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 Front Cover
 Rain, rain, go away
 Back Cover






Group Title: Father Tucks's "Play and Pleasure" series ; 1002
Title: Rain, rain, go away
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085593/00001
 Material Information
Title: Rain, rain, go away
Series Title: Artistic series
Physical Description: 8 p. : ;
Language: English
Creator: Raphael Tuck & Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: Raphael Tuck & Sons
Place of Publication: London ;
New York
Publication Date: c1898
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry -- 1898
Bldn -- 1898
Genre: Children's poetry
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
England -- London
France -- Paris
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Imprint also notes publisher's location in Paris.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00085593
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001763285
oclc - 26820031
notis - AJH6448

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Rain, rain, go away
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Back Cover
        Page 12
Full Text















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RAIN, RAIN, GO AWAY.


Rain, rain,


Go


away,


Come again


April day.


Little Johnnie


Wants to play.


Rain, rain,


go to Spain,


never come


back again.


COPYRIOHTED 1898, Ye RAPHAEL TUCK & SONS CO., LTo., N. Y


The Baldwin Library
Uni city
n orida


And






What a pity I i

it w o u ld b e, Jlr

If there were '"

no rain.

All the pretty flowers

you see,

All the golden grain,

Everything, in fact, which grows,

From the cotton to the rose,

Grass and flowers and even trees,

Could not live at all. They'd cease.

Children, you should not complain;

What would we do without the rain?




Look at these little children three.
So early

iN the

-morning,


"W ThThey don't seem pleased,

e as you can see,

In spite of which they're charming.

If it had been a pleasant day,

They'd all have gone a-riding;

But now they're anything but gay,

Because the sun's in hiding.






Dottie and her dolly,


Going for a walk


In the rain,-and



Could the dollv


talk


It would


that is folly ;


say


to Dimpled



DB



" Better


stay


Dimpled





My Lady Wind, My Lady
Wind,
Went round about the house
to find
A chink to get her foot
in;
She tried the key-hole in
the door,
She tried the crevice in the
floor,
And drove the chimney
soot in.

/--- (1, <~2\K ,


And then one night when
it was dark,
She blew up such a tiny
spark,
That all the house was
pothered;
From it she raised up such
a flame
As flamed away to Belting
Lane,
And White Cross folk
were smothered.





And thus when once,

my little dears,

A whisper reaches

itching ears, .

The same will

come, you'll

find;

Take my advice, restrain your tongue,

Remember what old nurse has sung

Of busy Lady Wind.


Hark! Hark! The children shout,

Once more the sun comes out,

The black, black clouds have gone

away again;

Hark The birds all sing once more,

Children, oh, come out of door,

SLeap and dance and sing;

a good-bye to rain.































See, these sheaves of golden grain,
,, 0







See, these sheaves of golden grain,

Grain's been ripened by the rain;

If it had not rained, there'd been no sheaves.

So at rain do not complain,

Everything that grows needs rain.

Hear it patter, patter on the eaves l




Oh, what a day we'll have,-I'm glad we

didn't go
J Yesterday, for if we had, we wouldn't now;
So after all, rain's good, besides it makes
things grow,

Let's hurry and ask dear Mamma how.
Brother, Sister, hurry, scurry down pell-mell,

When breakfast is over, ho! for our ride.
I'm hungry as a bear,-there goes the breakfast
bell-

(luit dri\-ing
I'm to sit by
PaFpa'; sidc.






See the lovely butterfly,



Perch upon my finger.



He is not the least bit shy,



Or he wouldn't linger.


Stranger, stranger, fly away,


Though


I'd never harm you,


Come again another day,


Nothing will alarm you.


.7









Tell, oh, tell me where you live,

Pretty little stranger?

I will never, never give

You cause to fear danger.

I have learned one lesson well,

Not to harm a creature,

Which upon the earth doth dwell;

Mamma is my teacher.
J. W. s.

















































Published by
2-^ e pAPHACL TUCK SONS, CO., LZ-
No. 1002 Londor Paris New YorK
Designed at the Srudios ir ERqland.


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