Title: Agenda and minutes of meetings
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 Material Information
Title: Agenda and minutes of meetings
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Senate
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Publication Date: September 7, 1995
Copyright Date: 1995
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00085568
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01419955

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AGENDA

UNIVERSITY SENATE
Thursday, September 7, 1995
282 Reitz Union
3:30 p.m.
(Welcome reception at 3:00 p.m.)

I. APPROVE MINUTES of April 13, 1995, University Senate Meeting

II. NEW SENATOR ORIENTATION -- University Senate Steering Committee

III. ADMINISTRATORS' REPORTSS:

A. President's Report -- University of Florida Performance Based Budget Outline, 1996-97
(see attachment 1)
B. Provost's Report

IV. ACTION ITEM(S): None

V. INFORMATION ITEMSS:

A. Keith Legg, Chair, University Curriculum Committee

1. Proposal to Change the Name of the College of Health Related Professions to the
College of Health Professions (see attachment 2)

2. Proposal to Change the Name of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory
Medicine to the Department of Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine
(see attachment 3)

3. Proposed Revisions to the General Education Program (see attachment 4)

B. Elizabeth Bolton, Chair, University Senate Steering Committee
Resolution of the Advisory Council of Faculty Senates (see attachment 5)

VI. CONVERSATION WITH THE PRESIDENT/PROVOST: If time permits, there will be a
three-minute interactive dialogue between Senators and the President, Provost or other
administrators. Ask anything! Rules: One question, with follow-up. Dialogue limited to
one minute for the question and three minutes for the response.








1995-96 Senate Steering Committee Members


David Bloomquist

Kandace Brooks

Elizabeth Bolton

Joseph Delfino

John Newell

Zoran Pop-Stojanovic

Pierre Ramond


345 Weil Hall

307 Music Building

3041 McCarty Hall

217 Black Hall

1403 Norman Hall

201 Walker Hall

251 Williamson Hall


392-0914

392-6213

392-1987

392-0841

392-0724 x238

392-0288

392-5704


Fax: 392-3394

Fax: 392-0461

Fax: 392-8196

Fax: 392-3076

Fax: 392-7159

Fax: 392-8357

Fax: 392-8743


Barbara Talmadge

Vice Provost Gene Hemp

Provost Andrew Sorensen

President John Lombardi


Non-Voting Members

215 Criser Hall 392-0063

233 Tigert Hall 392-1301

235 Tigert Hall 392-2404

226 Tigert Hall 392-1311


Fax: 392-3987

Fax: 392-8735

Fax: 392-8735

Fax: 392-9506


1995-96 Meeting Dates


Steering Committee 2:45 p.m.

August 23 355 Tigert Hall
September 18 355 Tigert Hall
October 23 355 Tigert Hall
November 20 355 Tigert Hall
December 18 355 Tigert Hall
January 22 355 Tigert Hall
February 19 355 Tigert Hall
March 19 355 Tigert Hall


Senate 3:30 p.m.

* September 7 282 Reitz Union
October 19 282 Reitz Union
November 16 282 Reitz Union
December 7 282 Reitz Union
* January 11 282 Reitz Union
February 8 282 Reitz Union
March 7 282 Reitz Union
April 11 282 Reitz Union

* Welcome reception at 3:00p.m.








Meeting of the University Senate
April 13, 1995

The meeting was called to order at 3:00 p.m.

The minutes of the March 16, 1995 meeting were approved as submitted.

PRESIDENT'S REPORT: The President was unable to attend the meeting.

PROVOST'S REPORT: The Provost discussed budgetary issues and indicated that UF will
probably receive a modest increase from the state legislature. The increase, however, will be in
total number of dollars and will probably result in less disposable income. The Provost
anticipates that part of the increase will go for salaries, three percent on average, effective January
1, 1996. In combination with several other factors, this could result in a cut in disposable income
of around eight-million dollars. This is approximately two percent of an overall state budget of
400 million dollars.

The Provost discussed two methods to accomplish the cuts. The first would be on an across the
board basis. The alternative would be to target special areas and cut programs that are at high risk
for being cut by the legislature. The Provost feels this would be a preemptive strike and could
result in a reduction in the percent of across the board cuts. The Provost feels that the university
needs to begin developing long term plans for simultaneously decreasing expenditures and
increasing revenues. He discussed ways to increase revenues such as a computer-use fee for
students.

The Provost would like to have a great deal of debate and discussion on this topic so that faculty,
staff and students may have ample opportunity to express their opinions. To allow for discussion
of budgetary issues, the Provost will meet with the Academic Advisory Committee and the
University Senate Steering Committee over the summer. The Provost would also like to meet
with a group students over the summer.

ACTION ITEM(S): Jonathan Earle, chair of the Senate Nominating Committee, presented the
nominees for committee service for the academic year 1995-96. The ballots and accompanying
biographical information were distributed and collected by members of the University Senate
Steering Committee. No additional nominations were submitted from the floor. The votes will
be tabulated by members of the Steering Committee.

INFORMATION ITEM(S): Hal Rennert, chair of the University Senate Steering Committee,
reported on the recent meeting of the Advisory Council of Faculty Senates (ACFS). The ACFS is
composed of representatives from each of the SUS institutions who help direct input from the
faculty to the Chancellor of the Board of Regents (BOR). Dr. Rennert discussed a preliminary
proposal from the ACFS to allow an SUS faculty member to sit on the BOR. The members of the
Steering Committee will discuss this issue over the summer and present it as an information item
at the September Senate meeting.








Barbara Talmadge, University Registrar, discussed telephone registration and answered several
questions about new policies and procedures. Ms. Talmadge thanked the administration and
Student Government for their support of the system.

Keith Carodine, Associate Athletic Director, presented a report on the University Athletic
Association (UAA). Dr. Carodine discussed the academic progress and achievements of student
athletes and their participation in special community programs.

Paul Gibbs, the new director of UF's Office of International Studies and Programs and Peter
Hartman, director of International Programs for IFAS, discussed educational exchange programs
and program development in their respective offices.

EXECUTIVE SESSION: Jack Ohanian, chair of the Honorary Degree Committee, moved to
approve an honorary degree candidate. The motion was seconded and approved unanimously.

CONVERSATION WITH THE PRESIDENT/PROVOST: None.


The meeting adjourned at 4:40 p.m.




[DRAFT PROPOSAL August 21, 1995]


UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA



University of Florida Performance Based Budget Outline, 1996-97


University of Florida Performance Measures, 1996-97 Budget Outline


University of Florida Performance-Based Budget Adjustments, 1996-97


University of Florida Change Indicators Page

Student FTE --------------------------------- -------------------------- ------ 1
Degrees Awarded at All Levels--------------- ----------- .--------------------- 1
General Revenue and Lottery Expenditures------------- -------------------------------- 2
General Revenue and Lottery Expenditures per Student FTE All Levels-------------------- 2
Sponsored Research Expenditures -------------------- --------- ---- -- 3
Non-State Dollars Earned for Each State Dollar Spent -------------------------------- 3
Credit Hours Taught by Ranked Faculty and Other Instructors ------------------- 4
Percent Change in Credit Hours Taught by Ranked Faculty and Other Instructors --- - 4
State Funded Ranked Faculty Effort in Person-Years by Function------------- ----5
Percentage Change in Expenditures from State and Non-State Sources ------------ -------5




U111r Vi bIL' ot iot mua r et wtinaiice-Jgasea iuhIaet Outline. I99b-91


kc u u U&.M.una rauliers UU rui I UIITCOMEI
Continuation Budget Undergraduate, Graduate and Professional Increased educational level in
E&G $276,681,757 Degrees, Research, Service, Extension, state
HSC $148,928,010 Clinical Service Generate economic development
IFAS $124,188,482 1. Maintenance of existing priority programs Capture non-state dollars for
2. Enrollment growth of 392 upper level FTE Florida
and 61 graduate FTE Support enhancement of public
services
Reallocation and Tuition Adjustments for Academic Increased Instructional Effectiveness Increased efficiency of education
Programs 1. Reduced time to degree: student advising, Decreased cost of degree in non-
Reallocation in administrative costs $1.5 *- telephone/computer registration professional and other non-block
Reallocate effort on public service $3.5 4-- 2. Reduced cost of instruction: student programs
Reallocate TIP program to post-professor review $1.2 4 tracking/MAPPS system, increase faculty Increased access to medical care
Differential tuition program $1.0 productivity in state
Block tuition $2800 for in-state undergraduates 3. Reduced cost of degree: improve enrollment Increased access to higher
in Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, management education in state
Nursing, Pharmacy, $7600 out-of-state, for graduate 4. Reduction in limited access programs Increase financial aid to offset
students, $3610 in-state, $9700 out-of- state $0.9 5. Increased access to health professions, block tuition increase
* Increase tuition by $1000 per year in Law, 50 FTE undergraduate, 40 graduate FTE,
Veterinary Medicine, and Medicine $1.7 30 professional headcount

Tuition Adjustments for Financial Aid Improved Quality and Diversity of Student Increased access to higher
* Differential tuition $1.0 Body education in state
1. Increase in need-based and merit-based
student support
Tuition Adjustments for Quality Improved Quality of Instruction Increased level of education in
* Differential tuition $2.4 1. Increased access to computer technology: state
* Technology fee $50/semester $4.8 improved technology support Increased computer literacy in
* Laboratory fee increase to 1% of matriculation fee $0.3 2. Increased access to and depth of library state
resources
Restructure Student Fees to Level just under SUS Refinance Non-Academic Student Services Increased support for non-
Maximum 1. Shift Student Mental Health to fee basis academic student functions from
* New student support fee $4.50 per credit hour $4.5 2. Shift Student Placement to fee basis non-state resources, reallocation
* Reduce athletic fee by 30% to 3. Shift Financial Aid management to fee base of state dollars to teaching
$1.00 per credit hour ($0.5) 4. Shift part of Athletic Fee to other student,
non-academic, services
Result of Research Investment Increased Research Intensity Increased external funding in the
* External research funds increase $10.0 1. Increased external grants state
2. Decreased ratio of state funded research Increased economic development
effort to research effort funded by non-state Increased technology transfer
funds
3. Increased Ph.D. productivity


UNIVERSITY OF
WFLORIDA


Proposal


__~____


DRAFT




university ot lorHiia 'erlormance-lvieasures. 1990-97 Budget Outline
INPUT OUTPUT PERFORMANCE MEASURES (1993-94 baseline)
Continuation Undergraduate, Graduate and Professional Degrees, Research, Service, Teaching productivity: Number of degrees, degrees per
Budget Extension, Clinical Service faculty, SCH, SCH/faculty
1. Maintenance of existing priority programs Research productivity: Increased sponsored research
2. Enrollment growth of 392 upper level FTE and 61 graduate FTE money generated
Increased ratio of non-state/state money
Reallocation and Increased Instructional Effectiveness Decreased credit hours taken over those required for
Tuition 1. Reduced time to degree: student advising, telephone/computer registration degree, increased retention, increased graduation rate
Adjustments for 2. Reduced cost of instruction: student tracking/MAPPS system, increase Increased percentage of students on track to degree
Academic faculty productivity (post-professor incentive program) (measure progress towards degree for all students)
Programs 3. Reduced cost of degree: improve enrollment management Reduction in limited access programs (aim of zero)
4. Reduction in limited access programs Increased access in health related professions, 50 FTE
5. Increased access to health professions, 50 FTE undergraduate, 40 FTE undergraduate, 40 FTE graduate, 30 professional
graduate, 30 professional headcount headcount
Increase faculty productivity: research $ per professor,
SCH/professor; extension-clinical product/professor
Tuition Improved Quality and Diversity of Student Body Increased number of students receiving financial aid;
Adjustment for 1. Increase in need-based and merit-based student support increased average size of award
Financial Aid
Tuition Improved Quality of Instruction Increased public access terminals, Increased number of
Adjustments for 1. Increased access to computer technology: improved technology support departments computerized, Increased number of
Quality 2. Improved laboratories student/faculty sites wired; Increased number of off-
3. Increased access to and depth of library resources campus student/faculty sites wired, Increased number of
classrooms wired
Increase library hours/semester, Increased books,
Increased reference sources, Increased journals
List of laboratories upgraded, projects completed
Restructure Refinance Non-Academic Student Services Completion of shifting of funding of student services
Student Fees 1. Shift Student Mental Health to fee basis Verify that athletic program funding remains stable after
2. Shift Student Placement to fee basis shift in student support
3. Shift Financial Aid management to fee base
4. Shift part of Athletic Fee to other student, non-academic, services
Result of Increased Research Intensity Increased non-state expenditures, ratio of state to non-
Research 1. Increased external grants state expenditures
Investment 2. Decreased ratio of state funded research effort to research effort funded Increased economic development in number of start-ups
by non-state funds linked to university technology, research, and service
3. Increased Ph.D. productivity Increased technology transfer in number of patents,
licenses, royalty agreements, and income from these
Number of Ph.D. and ratio Ph.D./faculty


UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Performance Measures


DRAFT




Aft UNIVERSITY OF
WFLORIDA


[DRAFT]


Source of Adjustment (millions)


Internal Budget Reallocations

* From Administration $1.5
* From Public Service $3.5

Tuition and Fee Adjustments

* For increased access to health professions $1.6
* For quality enhancements $3.4
* For financial aid $1.0
* For student advising, registration $1.0
* For access to technology $4.8
* For laboratories $0.3

Shift Non-Academic Functions to
Non-State Money

* New Student Support Fee $4.5
* Reduce Current Athletic Fee ($0.5)

Continued and Increased Support of
Academic Functions from Non-State Money

Increase transfer from Foundation $2.0
Increase funded contracts and grants $10.0
New transfer from exclusive Coke Contract $0.25
SContinue transfer from UAA $2.0
SContinue transfer from Shands to Medicine $5.0


Amount of Adjustment


$5.0 million






$12.1 million







$4.0 million






$12.25 million


Purpose of Adjustment


Increased Support for
Non-Academic Functions from
Non-State Resources


Increased Instructional
Effectiveness
Improved Quality of
Instruction
Increased Research Intensity
from Non-State Money


University of Florida Performance-Based Budget Adjustments. 1996-97


Instruction


Increased Access

Increased Efficiency

Increased Quality of
Instruction






UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


University of Florida Change Indicators


Student FTE
(1990-1994)
27,000


26,500


26,000


25,500


25,000


24,500


24,000
1989-90 1990-91 1991-92 1992-93 1993-94



Degrees Awarded at All Levels
(1988-1994)
8,600 -

8,400 -

8,200-

8,000

7,800 -

7,600 -

7,400-

7,200-

7,000-

6,800-

6,600 I
187-88 1988-89 1989-90 190-91 991-92 1992-93 1993-94


Page 1


Student FTE

This chart illustrates the growth in full-
time-equivalent students over the fiscal
years 1990-1994. Overall, the
University of Florida on its campuses
throughout the state grew from 25,000
students in 1989-90 to just over 26,500
FTE students in 1992-94. The head
count numbers reached over 39,000 in
this last year. This is a growth of over
1,500 FTE students. For a mature
campus, a 5 to 6 percent growth in
students brings an increase in the
demand for services and academic
programs. The University of Florida
met this demand in spite of the financial
difficulties felt by every university from
the decline in state support per student


Degrees Awarded at All Levels

The University of Florida's principal
instructional product is degrees at all
levels (undergraduate, masters,
professional, doctoral, and Ph.D.). This
chart illustrates that in spite of all the
financial difficulties, the number of
degrees awarded by the university
increased dramatically during this
period. A 17 percent increase in degree
productivity during this time of
declining financial resources shows an
institutional commitment to enrolled
students to help them succeed
effectively and efficiently in the face of
sudden budget readjustments.


[DRAFT]







University of Florida Change Indicators


DRAFT]


General Revenue and Lottery Expenditures
(1990-1994)

$380,000,000
$375,000,000

$370,000,000
$365,000,000
$360,000,000
$355,000,000
$350,000,000
$345,000,000
$340,000,000
$335,000,000
$330,000,000
$325,000,000
1989-90 1990-91 1991-92 1992-93 1993-94




General Revenue and Lottery Expenditures
per Student FTE All Levels
(1990-1994)
$15,500

$15,000-

$14,500

$14,000


$13,500

$13,000


$12,500-

$12,000
1989-90 1990-91 1991-92 1992-93 1993-94


General Revenue and Lottery
Expenditures

This chart shows the dramatic decline
and partial recovery in general revenue
and lottery expenditures at the
University of Florida. Similar charts
reflect this phenomenon at the other
nine public universities reporting to the
Board of Regents. The dramatic
decline from fiscal 1990 to 1993 hit the
institutions most severely. The 1993-94
budget restored a significant portion of
the lost revenue. It did not recover to
the levels of fiscal 1990 or meet the
extra costs of a growing student
population. It also ignored the steady
inflation that raised all university costs
in this period. The universities met this
challenge through internal
readjustments for efficiency and
through a delay in the renovation of
teaching materials, equipment, and
other academic resources.



General Revenue and Lottery
Expenditures per Student FTE

The combination of a rising student
population and a declining state budget
produces this chart. Here the decline of
fiscal years 1990 to 1992 and the
marginal recovery of fiscal 1993 and
1994 show clearly. The dollars
recovered, thanks to a strong effort by
the legislature, nonetheless barely
restored a fraction of the reduced level
of support from the earlier years. While
this small per-student recovery came as
welcome support, it still left the
institutions below any reasonable level
of continuing support per student. The
dollars per student shown here permit
the continuation of programs but not the
maintenance of quality over time.


Page 2


UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA







UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


University of Florida Change Indicators


[DRAFT]


Non-State Dollars Earned for Each State
(1992-1994)


$2.24

$2.22--

$2.20--

$2.18--

$2.16-

$2.14-

$2.12

$2.10-

$2.08-

$2.06


1992-93


1991-92


1993-94


Page 3


Sponsored Research Expenditures
(1990-1994)

$195,000,000


$185,000,000

$175,000,000


$165,000,000


$155,000,000


$145,000,000

$135,000,000


$125,000,000
1989-90 1990-91 1991-92 1992-93 1993-94


Sponsored Research Expenditures

Although sponsored research
expenditures do not capture the total
research product of the University of
Florida, the number provides the best
and most reliable indicator of the
economic power of quality research.
This research brings dollars and
enterprise into the state far in excess of
any cost the state incurs in generating
the research. Sponsored research
expenditures is the only reliable
national indicator of research
accomplishment and is widely used to
rank total university research capability.
The University of Florida's growth in
sponsored research expenditures is not
only remarkable but especially so
considering the decreasing proportion
of faculty time spent on research.


Non-State Dollars Earned for Each
State Dollar Spent

Universities are generators of wealth
and prosperity for all who contribute to
their support. One measure of this is
the total non-state dollars earned by the
university compared to the dollars
invested by the state. First-rank
research universities often have about
one-third of their budget provided by
state funds and two-thirds provided
from earned income (grants, contracts,
endowment, gifts, tuition, fees,
auxiliaries, and other sources). At the
University of Florida we have increased
the percentage of our activities funded
from earned dollars as the chart at the
left shows At 2.24 dollars earned for
every state dollar spent we are at almost
70% earned dollars.


Dollar Spent





UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


TTnivprsitv nf Finrirn Chnnod


Tnflpatnrce


[DRAFT]


Page 4


Credit Hours Taught by Ranked Faculty and Other
Instructors
(1992-1994)
1,000,000

900,000

800,000-

700,000-

600,000-
0 Ranked Faculty
500,000

400,000

300,000

200,000

100,000- 3 Others

0
1991-92 1992-3 1993-94


Credit Hours Taught by Ranked
Faculty and Other Instructors

The increased emphasis on teaching
appears in the growth in student
numbers, the implementation of a
program to identify and reward high
quality and high productivity teachers,
and the concerted effort to enhance
research productivity. The university
shifted faculty effort into teaching. As
more faculty teach more courses and
more students, the number of credit
hours delivered by the ranked faculty
increases and the number delivered by
others (primarily teaching assistants)
declines. This shift in relative
responsibility for teaching appears
clearly in this chart.


Percent Change in Credit Hours Taught by Ranked
Faculty and Other Instructiors (1992-1994)





Ranked Faculty









Others





-15% -10% -5% 0% 5% 10% 15%


Percent Change in Credit Hours
Taught by Ranked Faculty

This chart shows the same data as the
previous one but in clear percent change
terms. As these two charts illustrate,
the ranked faculty teach more credit
hours and they teach a higher
percentage of the total credit hours, and
the percentage and number of credit
hours taught by the ranked faculty have
increased over the last three years.


----








University of Florida Change Indicators


State Funded Ranked Faculty Effort in Person-Years
by Function (1992-1994)


1,200 -


1,000 --


- Instruction/
Advising



-A- Research




--e Administration




-4- RPblic Service/
Extension


1991 -92 1993-94 1992-93


Percentage Change in Expenditures from State and
Non-State Sources
T (1991-93 to 1993-94)


Trust Funds,
Federal & County

Local and DSO


Clinical Fees


Private & MG&G

Tuition and Fees

Sponsored
Research

Auxiliaries
General
Revenue and
Lottery


Page 5


UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


DRAFT]


800


600


400


200


State Funded Ranked Faculty Effort
in Person-Years by Function

This chart illustrates the shifts in effort,
the proportion of time spent by faculty
members on a given task. The unit,
person years, is an artifact that allows
the university to determine, in the
aggregate, how faculty spend their time
on the various functions of the
university. This chart illustrates that the
faculty spend more of their effort on
teaching and advising and less on
research. Even with the reduction in
effort on research, however, the faculty
of the University of Florida increased
their research productivity. The
university will work to reduce the effort
on administration and service in the
coming budget years.


Percentage Change in Expenditures
from State and Non-State Sources

This chart shows the importance of
clinical fees in the support of the
academic medical center which could
not function without the transfer of
health care provider earnings into
education and research. Private funds
come mostly from gifts and various
other small grants not related to
research. Tuition has grown with the
increase in the number of students and
small increases in tuition.. Sponsored
research has grown as has the revenue
from auxiliaries such as residence halls.
The general revenue and lottery
increases represent the state's effort to
cover enrollment growth. Trust funds,
Federal and County Extension dollars
and Local and DSO funds declined in
response to changes in federal programs
and reductions from sales of agricultural
products produced by the university.


% 3 2% 7% 12% 17
3% -3% 2% 7% 12% 17%


I


"'


1991-92


1992-93


1993-94







ATTACHMENT 2


UNIVERSITY OF
^FLORIDA

College of Health Related Professions Health Science Center
Office of the Dean PO Box 100185
Gainesville FL 32610-0185
April 6, 1995 TEL: 904/392-2631
FAX: 904/392-6529


Keith Legg, Ph.D.
Director, Honors Program
Chairman, University Curriculum Committee
352 Little Hall
Campus

Dear Dr. Legg:

I understand a petition to change the name of a college must first be approved by our
Committee. I am writing to request that your Committee approve changing the name of
the College of Health Related Professions. The changes in the health delivery system
during the last decade have been dramatic. Changes in the delivery of health care
have significant implications for the education of health professionals. Although the
broad swatch of change makes it difficult to single out any particular sector, the growth
and changes in scope of the health workforce have been particularly noticeable. The
tremendous growth in the health sector has created many occupations and expanded
the scope of practice of existing health professions.

The University of Florida was the first university to establish a unique college to
address the diverse educational needs of health professions. In 1958 the University of
Florida established the College of Health Related Professions. Many other universities
quickly followed the lead of the University of Florida establishing similar programs. The
name of the College reflected the belief that the professions included in the College
were related to the dominant health profession-medicine.

Over the last 36 years, the roles and scope of practice of the professions included in
the College of Health Related Professions have grown. The professions included in
the College are now autonomous professions, no longer dependent on medicine. As
new colleges including the professions in our program have been established, the
independence of the professions has been recognized. A more appropriate name,
Health Professions, has often been used. Indeed, this name has been used in the
Florida University System.

Pending appropriate University approval, we plan to change the name of our College to
the College of Health Professions. This change has the support of the faculty,
students, and department chairs within the College. The Health Center Council



Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution








Dr. Keith Legg
April 6, 1995
Page Two


unanimously approved the change. Dr. Challoner and Dr. Sorensen have expressed
support as well. I also spoke with Dean Bird, because of the common use of the term
health. He supports this change. We have discussed the name change with Mrs.
Darrel Mase, widow of the founding dean of the College and she concurs with this
change. In addition, we discussed the change with Dean Emeritus, Richard Gutekunst,
who also concurred.

The faculty and students of our College are excited about the opportunities for our
professions. Adaption of a more contemporary name for the College is appropriate to
the challenges ahead.

I look forward to hearing this request has been approved.

Sincerely,



Robert G. Frank, Ph.D.
Dean and Professor
Director, Rehabilitation and Behavioral Health Systems
UF Health Systems

RGF/dll

cc: Dr. David Challoner
Dr. Gene Hemp
Dr. Andrew Sorensen
Chairs, College of Health Related Professions






UNIVERSITY OF

FLORIDA


College of Health Related Professions
Office of the Dean


Health Science Center
PO Box 100185
Gainesville FL 32610-0185
TEL: 904/392-2631
FAX: 904/392-6529


June 9, 1995



Dr. Keith Legg, Chair
Curriculum Committee
PO Box 118150

Dear Keith,

Attached are copies of letters of support from Dean Patrick Bird, Dean Frank Catalanotto, Dean
Kathy Long, and Dean Allen Neims. Each letter attests to their support for changing the name
of the College of Health Related Professions to the College of Health Professions.

I look forward to working with you when this proposal is presented to the Curriculum
Committee.

Sincerely,


Robert G. Frank, Ph.D., Dean
Director, Rehabilitation and Behavioral Health Systems
UF Health Systems

RGF/sjv

attachments


Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution






,UNIVERSITY OF
Y FLORIDA


College of Health and Human Performance
Office of the Dean


201 FLG
P.O. Box 118200
Gainesville, Florida 32611-8200
Phone: (904) 392-0578
Fax: (904) 392-3186


April 27, 1995


Dr. Robert G. Frank
Dean
College of Health Related Professions
P. O. Box 100185 JHMHC
Campus

Dear Bob:

On behalf of the College of Health
support changing the name of your college


and Human Performance, I wish to
to the College of Health Professions.


Cor i lly,
C ly,

/ Patrick J.
Dean


Bird, Ph.D.


PJB/jm


04-28-95P03:04 RCVD


Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences Department of Health Science Education Department of Recreation, Parks, and Tourism
Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Institution






UNIVERSITY OF

FLORIDA


May 12, 1995



Dr. Robert G. Frank, Dean
College of Health Related Professions
PO Box 100185
Health Science Center

Dear Bob:

I wanted to express to you my enthusiastic endorsement for changing
the name of the "College of Health Related Professions" to the "College of
Health Professions". I think that this name title is an important recognition
of the primary care patient responsibilities and activities of the faculty and
students within your programs and is therefore most appropriate.


Sincerely,



Frank A. Catalanotto, D.M.D.
Dean


FAC/co


75- A


Equal Opportunity Affirmative Action Institution


College of Dentistry
Office of the Dean


PO Box 100405
Gainesville, FL 32610-0405
Telephone: (904) 392-2946
Fax: (904) 392-3070






UNIVERSITY OF

.TFLORIDA


College of Nursing
Dean's Office


May 19, 1995


Robert G. Frank, Ph.D.
Dean, College of Health Related Professions
PO Box 100185
Campus

Dear Dr. Frank:

As you know, we discussed the name change for your college at a recent Health Center Council
meeting. Given the issues you raised, and the alternatives available, I concurred with all other Health
Center deans that the proposed change to "College of Health Professions" was appropriate..

Nursing, of course, is a health profession, and some of our faculty have raised questions about possible
confusion with any single college having a name as global as "health professions." However, after
discussion, I believe the College of Nursing faculty can (and do) accept the proposed name change.
Clearly, we have no better alternative to put forward.

Thus, I support your proposed change to the College of Health Professions. Best wishes as you
proceed with the name change process.


Sincerely,


,-~ 429


Kathleen Ann Long, PhD, RNCS, FAAN
Dean and Professor

KAL/pr


05-23-95P02:43 RCV\


Equal Opportunity/Affimative Action Institution


Health Science Center
PO Box 100197
Gainesville FL 32610-0197
Area Code 904-392-3752






UNIVERSITY OF

IFLORIDA


College of Medicine
Dean and Associate Vice President '
Health Science Center


PO Box 100215
Gainesville, FL 32610-0215
Tele: (904) 392-5397
Fax: (904) 392-6482


June 5, 1995




Dr. Keith Legg
Director, Academic Affairs
University of Florida
P. O. Box 118150
Campus

Dear Keith:

I am in support of Dean Frank's proposal to change the name of the College of Health
Related Professions to the College of Health Professions.

Sincerely,

Allen H. Neims, M.D., Ph.D.
Alien H. Neims, M.D., Ph.D.


AHN:dh

cc: Robert G. Frank, Ph.D.


J6-O 7 6095A: :5:y !% D


Equai Opportunity'Affirmative Action Institution






UNIVERSITY OF

H FLORIDA


College of Veterinary Medicine
Office of the Dean
Richard E. Dierks, Dean
Ronald R. Gronwall, Executive Associate Dean


PO Box 100125
Gainesville FL 32610-0125
Telephone: 904/392-4700
Fax: 904/392-8351


July 31, 1995



Dr. Keith Legg
Director, Academic Affairs
University of Florida
PO BOX 118150
CAMPUS

Dear Dr. Legg:

I am in support of the proposal to change the name of the College of Health Related Professions to the College
of Health Professions.

Sincerely,



RE. Dierks
Dean and Professor

RED/ad

cc: Dr. Robert G. Frank


Health Science Center Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution




ATTACHMENT 3

UNIVERSITY OF

FLORIDA


College of Medicine
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
March 13, 1995


P.O. Box 100275
Gainesville, Florida 32610-0275
Tel: (904) 392-3741
Fax: (904) 392-6249


Dr. Keith Legg
Chairman of UF Curriculum Committee
352 Little Hall
Campus

Dear Dr. Legg:

Enclosed is a copy of a letter which was sent to Dean Allen H. Neims on
November 8, 1994. However, it apparently did not proceed on through the appropriate
channels to achieve our goal. We are therefore requesting your assistance in achieving
a name change for our Department.

As you know, the title of "Immunology" was dropped from the "old" Department of
Immunology and Medical Microbiology. That department's name has officially been
changed to "Molecular Genetics and Microbiology." Inasmuch as the immunology
program of the College has moved to Pathology, we request that our Department's name
be changed to Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine. We
understand this request must first go to the UF Curriculum Committee, and after their
approval, the request will be sent on to the UF Senate for their final approval.

Please note, at the November 7, 1994, monthly Faculty Meeting, Pathology's faculty
voted unanimously to approve this name change.

If there is any further input required from our office in accomplishing this name
change, please let us know. We are anxious to obtain this official change in order to
properly advertise the Department's curriculum choices. Thank you.

Kind regards,



Noel K. Maclaren, M.D.
NKM:fj Professor and Chairman
enclosure
cc: Richard Moyer, Ph.D. APPROVED:
Richard Smith, M.D.
Edward Wilkinson, M.D.
Robert Watson, M.D. /
Mohan Raizada, Ph.D. Allen H. Neims, M.D., Ph.D. Date
Sigurd Normann, M.D., Ph.D.
Raymond Hackett, M.D.


Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution








ATTACHMENT 4


PROPOSED GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS


EFFECTIVE SUMMER B, 1996



1. General Education requirements will consist of 36 hours. These hours
must be distributed across four categories or knowledge areas.

A. University Foundations (9 hours)
3 hours composition
6 hours mathematics

B. Humanities (9 hours)
Includes current categories of Historical and Philosophical and
Literature and the Arts

C. Social and Behavioral Sciences (9 hours)

D. Physical and Biological Sciences (9 hours)

E. In addition,

1. At least six (6) of the specified 36 hours of general
education must also have an international or diversity
focus.

2. A student may elect to vary the hours in categories B, C, D
(Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Physical and
Biological Sciences) within the constraints of no less than
six (6) and no more than twelve (12) hours in each
category and a constant total of twenty-seven (27) hours
across the three categories.

3. The student must meet a writing requirement of 12 hours.
Credit for the University Foundation/Composition course
will constitute 3 hours and the remaining requirement
can be met by any courses that meet the Gordon Rule
writing requirement.








4. Foreign Languages at the 2000 level and above will meet
the international and diversity requirement and will be
countable toward the General Education requirements if
they also qualify under one of the other areas, i.e.,
Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Physical and
Biological Sciences.

5. The General Education Requirements may be exempted
with course credit through AP credits, IB courses, or dual
enrollment courses. Additional exemption possibilities
will be considered such as scores on SATII exams and will
be proposed when deemed appropriate by relevant faculty.

F. Colleges and departments are urged to identify existing courses
with international and diversity content and to develop new
courses in the various disciplines that could satisfy the
international and diversity requirement.





ATTACHMENT 5


Resolution of the Advisory Council of Faculty Senates (ACFS)
February 24, 1995
Tallahassee, Florida
The faculty of the State University System (SUS) of Florida
desire representation on the Board of Regents (BOR) as a member
with voice and vote. Until that is achieved, the faculty of the
SUS of Florida request that a representative of the ACFS be
included on each BOR agenda.

Rationale:

Faculty should participate in policy discussion, debate and
decisions that affect higher education in Florida. Participation
of faculty is important in matters and issues such as (1) tenure
and promotion, (2) evaluation, (3) awards for excellence, (4)
curriculum policy and curricular structure, (5) requirements for
degrees and granting of degrees, (6) policies for recruitment,
admission and retention of students, (7) the development,
curtailment, discontinuance, or reorganization of academic
programs, (8) grading policies, and (9) other matters of academic
concern.

Although faculty are a significant part of the educational
system, they have no direct input to BOR policy formulation.
Faculty are profoundly affected by BOR policies, since these relate
to the performance of their jobs and the evaluation of that
performance. At present, students hold a seat on the BOR.
Further, each geographic area of the state is represented and
university administration has a recognized presence. While the
faculty may attend BOR meetings by virtue of the Sunshine Law, they
are not represented by a faculty member on the BOR.

"While the UFF, as the elected bargaining agent, retains the
exclusive right to negotiate and reach agreement on terms and
conditions of employment for members of the bargaining unit, and
the BOR retains its rights, under law, to manage and direct the
SUS,...[i]t is desirable that ... [faculty] will have a mechanism
and procedure, independent of the collective bargaining process,
for making recommendations... ." (Preamble UFF/BOR Collective
Bargaining Agreement, 1991-1994, page 1.) It is within the spirit
of this language that the above resolution is proposed.








Query: FLSTAT:193sec240.2071


240.207 Board of Regents; appointment of members;
qualifications and terms of office.d&

(1) The Board of Regents shall consist of the Commissioner of
Education and 12 citizens of this state who shall be selected
from the state at large, representative of the geographical areas
of the state; who shall have been residents and citizens thereof
for a period of at least 10 years prior to their appointment (one
of whom shall be a member registered as a full-time student in
the State University System and who shall have been a resident of
this state for at least 5 years prior to appointment in lieu of
the 10 years required of other members); and who shall be
appointed by the Governor, approved by three members of the
Cabinet, and confirmed by the Senate. However, no appointee
shall take office until after his appointment has been approved
by three members of the Cabinet. The State Board of Education
shall develop rules and procedures for review and approval of the
appointees. Except for the Commissioner of Education and except
for the full-time student member, who shall serve for 1 year, the
terms of office for the members of the Board of Regents shall be
6 years and until their successors are appointed and qualified,
except in case of an appointment to fill a vacancy, in which case
the appointment shall be for the unexpired term, and except as in
this section otherwise provided. No member shall be selected
from any county to serve with any other member from the same
county, except that not more than two members may be selected
from a county which has a population in excess of 900,000, and
with the exceptions of the student member, who shall be selected
at large, and the Commissioner of Education. The Governor shall
fill all vacancies, subject to the above approval and
confirmation, that may at any time occur on the board.
(2) Members may be removed for cause at any time upon the
concurrence of a majority of the members of the State Board of
Education.
(3) To create an orderly succession of Regents and the
appointment of two Regents each year, one additional Regent shall
be appointed in 1991 to serve a 69year term, and one additional
Regent shall be appointed in 1992 to serve a 64year term. For
the four seats with terms ending in 1993, the Governor shall make
one appointment for a 3ayear term and two appointments for
regular 69year terms. For 1 year, from January 1992 to January
1993, there shall be a total of 15 Regents. All the members of
the Board of Regents serving on May 3, 1991, shall complete their
regular terms, as prescribed by the Secretary of State.
History.!
s. 2, ch. 636204; ss. 15, 35, ch. 69.106; s. 71, ch. 776104;
s. 1, ch. 776442; s. 10, ch. 786416; s. 1, ch. 796128; s. 6, ch.
796222; s. 1, ch. 81&139; s. 9, ch. 91&55.
Note. 6
Former s. 240.011.




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