• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Prelude
 The alphabet
 Nursery rhymes from olden...
 Back Cover






Group Title: Nursery rhymes from olden times : together with an alphabet especially adapted to the needs of our baby boys and girls, and choice selections from the leading juvenile writers of to-day
Title: Nursery rhymes from olden times
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085537/00001
 Material Information
Title: Nursery rhymes from olden times together with an alphabet especially adapted to the needs of our baby boys and girls, and choice selections from the leading juvenile writers of to-day ; beautifully and appropriately illustrated with rare wood engravings, pen and ink drawings, sketches, and lithograph frontispiece
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.), music ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Hunter, Dorothy ( Editor )
Elwes, Alfred Thomas ( Illustrator )
Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 ( Illustrator )
Imperial Publishing Co. (Chicago, Ill.) ( Publisher )
Publisher: Imperial Publishing Co.
Place of Publication: Chicago, IL
Philadelphia, PA
Publication Date: c1896
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1896   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1896   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1896   ( rbgenr )
Alphabet rhymes -- 1896   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre: Children's poetry
Children's stories
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Alphabet rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
 Notes
General Note: Frontispiece printed in colors, and text printed in red and blue.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
General Note: Illustrations signed by A. T. Elwes, F. Opper and others.
Statement of Responsibility: edited and arranged by Dorothy Hunter.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00085537
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224385
notis - ALG4649
oclc - 234236938

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
    Title Page
        Page 4
    Prelude
        Page 5
    The alphabet
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Nursery rhymes from olden times
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
    Back Cover
        Page 100
        Page 101
Full Text















71





















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IN LINCOLN PARK, CHICAGO.


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NURSERY


RHYMES


FROM OLDEN TIMES

TOGrTHER 'WITH

An Alphabet especially adapted to the needs of our Baby Boys
and Girls, and choice selections from the leading
Juvenile Writers of today.


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vt .^^^::1^ '-I,;
t' .. ; / .,- e ** '
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Beautifully and Appropriately Illustrated with Rare Wood Engravings, Pen
and Ink Draw\ings, Sketches, and Lithograph Frontispiece.


ElIITED irJl V.Inf,,4..r.EIl r:Y
DOROTHY HUNTER

Coiyrllght, IV ",6 All Rights Reserved.

PUBLISHED BY
HIJI ERIAL I'UBLISHIiNG CO.
HI R.*L.*, 1 1 PA.. l'IlL \ l. i ] 11.1, P .














0, co0m1, annl see ourI
Douk!
C)ur Jin-le Boliok! Ou

0 litt,-_ i i>:1 l1 f r- and
Do at it.s l ', cs look.


Jingle You'll laugh and laugh,
I know v\ou wNill.


r Jingle


near,


And laughter does all sorrow
kill;
So hasten, children, never fear,


But vuu will
h 1"0.


flu (.1 ann~uscnient


was written just


xN -LI,
-And x,_,, ha\vc nothing, else to do


But re1ad and laugh,
an11 read,


And all thI tun -,tou'll ever


andl lau g


ii'iti'l


You'll 11nd
Bouck,


within the Jingle


The Jingle Book!
Book!


The Jingle


When once V\IAu coime and take
a look,.


Come, children,
look!


at its


pages


The Book


3~ .;


.- .." Q
*,1 .*aS144wiste-I."-i';-A


~D~6`3 TIOM~~





THE ALPHABET.


Anna.

A stands for Anna,
Sweet, big, and tall;
Who loves me right dearly,
And won't let me fall.


* ., ... --.






THE ALPHABET.


Ball.


Stands for Ball
Which Bessie will throw;
Three to make ready,
And "four" it will go!


,* ,-* ,, ..,
... . .. _... ,, .. : t j,





THE ALPHABET.


Children.

C stands for Children,
Light hearted and gay,
Knowing not care
Throughout the long day.





THE ALPHABET.


Dick.


D stands for Dick,
Who with puzzled look,
Is spelling his name
From a picture book.






THE ALPHB-AET.


Effie.


E stands for Effie,
Who holds the dog up,
So that he can drink
From out the tin cup.


. -{i "~~*.ti






THE ALPHABET.


Freddy.


F is in Freddy,
In Fanny and fun;

All come home gaily,

When school work is done.


:'.' . ,!
^t 'ii. e 'ffii~c. -^' ... .. .. *. -' .... -


~~i~~~su~





THE ALPHABET.


Girl.

G is in Girl,
So cunning and sweet,
Asking why dollie
Will not talk and eat.


77~---w~U~----





THE ALPHABET.


Hetty.

H stands for Hetty,
Who, happy and gay,
Wants to be artist
Throughout the long day.





THE ALPHABET.


In a.


Ilia.

I is in Ina;
Happy girl is she,
Teasing her rag baby
To take a little tea.


gp~sraasr%~~aa~b~8~~----~~ ~





THE ALPHABET.


Jennie.

J stands for Jennie,
Whose hair is like silk,
She plays she is kitty
And laps up the milk.


' I




* ~.


THE ALPHABET.


Kitty.


K stands for Kitty,
With coat sleek and warm
Sleeping so cozily
Away from all harm.






THE ALPHABET.


Laura.



L stands for Laura,
Happy all day long;
To this little maiden
Life is one glad song.


p ., ",' '-'_


caan~





THE ALPHABET.


Mamma. A

Mf stands for Mamma,
Good, kind and true hearted;
Helping dear old Santa Claus
To trim the tree for you.




~~~~,rt a~~.4 7 il~s'r ?'".t4 *~,i. A h.i.4'vi


THE ALPHABET


Nathan.


Stands for Nathan,
Who had the tree in mind,
Until he dreamed it covered
With toys of every kind.




w^^s'a%^a^^^^aa^?ii^%-e%in ^." Urm U WEWswnEW mr


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/ A Fl '~r "-Jt~. '%ir


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--7


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- -w--- -


THE ALPHABET.


Porridge.


-w


is in porridge,
In dog and in John,
Whkn John is through eating,
The dog shall have some.





THE ALPHABET.


Picnic.

p is in Picnic,
In party, and pay.
Children -first at the table.
And then off to play.





THE ALPHABET.


Question.

Q is in Question.
Sister wants to know,
What she shall do,
When children act so?

La:.


.-r;rr24--_1----?-~:





THE ALPHABET.


Robert.

IR is in Robert,
So happy and gay,
Who calls out,"Shine? Shine?"
"Five cents," do you say?





THE ALPHABET.


Susie.

is in Susie,
So merry and gay,
Who loves her sweet doggie,
And what he does say.





THE ALPHABET.


Gertie.

T is in Gertie,
With bright yellow locks,
Who is selling her matches
For five cents a box.






THE ALPHABET.


is in music,
In us, and in June,
Aand now if you'll listen
We'll sing you a tune.





TUE ALPHABEIiT.


Verses.


V is in verses,
Which Carrie will send,
By the swift-winged dove,
To all her dear friends.






THE ALPHABET.


TVT stands for Will,
Who feeds his chickens all;
If one of them gets ill,
The mother for him calls.


~Van -8





THE ALPHABET.


Xmas.

X stands for Xmas,
The glad day which brings
Old Santa Claus laden
With many nice things.

i- .




------n *-r_~_ ^ U Y .w w -


THE ALPHABET.


You.

r stands for you, dear,
Whom mamma loves to tell
That you must ever careful be,
And do your errands welL





THE ALPHABET.


Zoe.

Z stands for Zoe,
A dear little girl,
Who loves her kitty,
That she named PearL





TWENTY FROGS AT SCHOOL.


Twenty froggies grew up fast;
Bull-frogs they became at last;
Not one dunce among the lot,
Not one lesson they forgot.
Polished in a high degree,
As each froggie ought to be,
Now they sit on other logs,
Teaching other little frogs.


HOP AND SKIP LXA, CNJG IT SWII.


sick


~IiiUiII









THE THREE KITTENS.


"MEW-MEW !" said two
lit-tie wee black kit-tens.
Grace stooped down, and
picked one of them up-
SMew!" it said, and then
tried to play with the
neck-lace she had on,
The oth-er kit-ten did not
like this at all. She
pulled at Grace's dress
with her small black paw.
SSo then she was tak-en
up too, and both soon
snug-gled down in Grace's
lap, and went fast a-sleep. But where was the
mam-ma cat all this time ? She had gone back
to the barn, where all her kit-tens were born, to
bring an-oth-er one to the house, to show her
mis-tress what a fine fam-i-ly she had She
had hard work to get in; for John, the man.









THE THREE KITTENS.

had closed the doors. She
walked a-round the barn, and at
the back she found a win-dow
o-pen. Ned, the don-key, had IF
his head out of it; but she
scram-bled in be-side him, and
took up an-oth-er kit-ten in her
mouth, and ran back to the
house a-gain.
When she reached it, she found that Jane
had closed the front-door. She mewed as
I II loud as she could;
'_ I ii' dI but it was some
... time be-fore an-y
Sione heard her, and
o-pened it. But at
last she reached her
'" i mis-tress safe-ly
,with her third child.
She her-self was
S white, and so was
one of the kit-tens.
The other two were as black as coals.


V r i i






.~, llary had a little lamb,

Its fleece was white as snow,
And every place that Mary went

The lamb was sure to go.






It followed her to school one day,

Which was against the rule; .

It made the children laugh and play

To see a lamb at school, ., ,

,', .'o. .




'-" And so the teacher turned him out

But still he lingered near,

A .S A patind patiently did wait about,

Till MIary did appear.


* .2




































































I'9 -


TAKE YOUR PENCIL AND PAPER, AND ASK MAMMA HOW
TO DRAW A PICTURE OF THIS CALF AND COW.





To market, to market,
To buy a fat pig;
Home again, home again, jig-i-ty jig.

A. man of \words and not of deeds
Is like a garden full of weeds;
For when the weeds begin to grow
Then doth the garden overflow.


As I was goingto St. Ive
I met a man with seven
wives;
Every wife had seven sack
Every sack had seven cat:
Kits, cats, sacks, wives,
How many were going 1
St. Ives?


A cat came fiddling out of a barn,
With a pair of bagpipes under her arm;
She could sing nothing but fiddle cum fee
The mouse has married the bumble-bee.
Pipe, cat-dance, mouse,
We'll have a wedding at our good house





How many days has my baby to play,
Saturday, Sunday, Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday,
Saturday, Sunday, Monday.


VI


VII


VIII


IX


x


There was an old woman, and what do you think?
She lived upon nothing but victuals and drink;
Victuals and drink were the chief of her diet;
This tiresome old woman could never be quiet.





Tom, Tom, the piper's son,
Stole a pig, and away he run;
The pig was eat,
And Tom was beat,
And Tom ran crying
dIow'.n ti


street.


A-"


Cross Patcl


Draw the latcl


Sit by the fire and spin


Take a cup,


Little Jack Horner


Sat in a corner,
Eating a Christmas pie;
He put in his thumb,
And he took out a pliuml,
And said, "\What a good boy


am I!"


And drink it up,
And call the neighbors il

The North Wind dotl
blow,
And we shall have snow
And 'what will poor Robil
do then ?


F-


rrs


. .. ,. ., _,'


^W








































































































DOLLY'S DREAM THE NIGHT AFTER THE CIRCUL


. J





Wash the dishes,
Wipe the dishes,
Ring the bell for tea;

Three good wishes,
Three good kisses,
I will give to thee.


Speak when you're spoken to, Up
Hold up your head, As
Turn out your toes,
And go smiling to bed.

Up

Jack and Jill went up the hill
To fetch a pail of water;
Jack fell down and broke his crown,
And Jill came tumbling after.

Up Jack got, and home did trot,
As fast as he could caper',
Dame Jill had the job to plaster his knob
With vinegar and brown paper.


on my word and honor
I went to Bonner,
I met a pig
Without a wig,
on my word and honor


.4


c3--~c`
..~~;L E---




















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IIL Il.i
j.
a
~-;i--
--~----


"ALL 3/ITVE/"
LITTLE MIis- Efi ,'comes out from the store. O yes. out frum the store I
Laden with ,rels..:nt, a dozen or more, 0 yes, a dozen or more !
Little Miss Effie, I pray you turn, and cheer up the two little hearts that yearn
For a share of the blessings you daily spurn.
Do not be selfish, but try each day,
To help somebody's sorrow and trouble aw:ay,
For Christmas should always be kindly and -ay.


DISAPPOINTING

NEEDDIE caught
A lot of fish.
And home he \went i
The bottom of
The pail fell o
C, dear me !


S ~ How can I
iOf Neddie:

Neddie didn't know it, though,
And so his heart was glad;
He hoped to eat fried fish for tea-
Wasn't it sad !


tell the mot
and his old


NT. -
---


n lee.

)Ut,
-- .. *J ,

urnful tale
tin paIil.

But when at last he found it out,
A tear stood in hin i eve,
He looked withinn his empty pail,
And heaved a sigh.


And thus must end the doleful tale,
Of Neddic and his old tin pail.


-=f?^_


^.,- i _
_- / .' 't'--



U--- -






THE LITTLE MAY-QUEEN.

O, THE merry sunbeams! 0, the merry sight!
Little lads and lassies neathh the sunshine bright !
On the throne of daisies, bloSsois in her hair,
Laughing 'mid her blushes, sits the Alay-queen fair.
O'er the sunny meadow, clover-blossoms grow,
Thro' the nodding grasses, spring-time zephyrs blow;



-,. .
."* .-- :. ,5..- '
j -- ,' : ".-.' '--". .... "--





... tter s and dais ift their pretty h -






With its skiesso tender, and its dainty floer
i ,,, ,, | . .-
V' '




Dance away, my child round your lie un,










May's bright birth-ay lintr rit a dancupon the green.
0, the little \,a--queen ,


SAll too shy to say
With its skienjos so tenehonor ofi ainty h Qe r o ay
Dance: away, my children, round your little queen,
M ay's bright birth-day honor with a dance upon the green,
0, thle little lMlay-queen '
All too shy to say
How she enjoys the honor of being Qurei-n of May 1"





'ip-i-ty, hop,
To the barber shop,
To buy a stick of candy;
Ine for you, one for me,
And one for sister Annie.


Tent to bed with his stock-
ings on,
ne shoe off, and one
shoe on,
eedle, deedle, dar-


Hark! Hark! The dogs do
bark;
The beggars have come to
town;
Some in rags, and some in
tags,
And some in vel-
vet gowns. .


We are all


1 in the dumps,
For diamonds are trumps,
The kittens are gone to St. Paul's;
The babies are bit, the moon's in a fit,-
And the houses are built without walls.


~-~5~i~T igF7 gif









THE CAT AND THE FIDDLE. .'










_-_______ ___ _
------------ -_ --1 _. -- --- 1 -












THE CAT AND THE FIDDLE.
f Lively.




1. Hey diddle diddle I The cat and the fiddle! He played such a nice mer-ry tune,
2. Hey diddle diddle I played cat on the fiddle, 'Twas hey diddle diddle de de.
3. Back a-gain soon camethe manin the moon Fr'im t? h' famous old cit y of RTye.
4. Hey diddle diddle, the cat and the fiddle,They madesuch ater-ri ble noise,
.. P .9. -- -- "- -
-. ,.."






--T o r 4--9-- _
,__ ,4___ -____ a__-- ..----- .-------- -------- _



*-- -* if ~ --*- -

That the cow went mad with the pleasure she had, And j .lu nltld right ov er the
P-,: -, i. join'd the sport till his cough cut him short, Bow, wow! hey did die, oh
And he took the dish, and -aid "'Just what I wish, To hold my nice ap-ple
That the cow with friilht ran a way out uf -ight, And then ran af- ter the

,--------- -9.---- -...------- .--; -- -_-|-











THE CATANDT..THE FIDDLE-Concluded.


e- -e_ ic^- -- -. .T-
I '-y; -- -^-a '--9.-----s--- .-. --- *;--,
moon. But then don't you see bc-fore this coulll be, The moou had come down and
me! And lack came the cow with her iuer ry low, Man in the moon she hum-
pie! He scoll-ed the cur for iiak-ing a row, The cat bolt- ed like a
boys; The dog wagg'd his tail, the fid-dle to hail, The man says "Coinfall a -









1----U-Z-- -______ f-___________ __________
list-eu'd, Tllih lit tle dof g Ivark'd with d, -li-.ht as lie bark'd, "Ohl?
bled; Thlie di-i was de-light. e, the spoon was ex cit ed, As
rock -et; The mani took tliho lid die anI daiinc,:'i. d.lw'n thle mid-die, Then
round me, No more in tlhe soith shall I e'.r buri my mouth, Since
__ __-- ^ ---- ----- IP--- --g_ -----
^^ l^^f ^^ |z1


this, there is'ut!" no tliug'like this, there is'nt!"
they stum bled, o ver the cat they stumbled.
his pock et, put. the spoon in his pocket.
spoon I've fouud me,dish and a spoon I've found me.




IS THE HOUSE THAT


0


A


8 LURBH


OPQR TIUVWXY


Z


WITH STICKS.


THIS


JACK BUILT


WHAT BABY


CAN 1M\AKE


KVMN










SUPPOSE.


Suppose, my little lady,
Your doll should break her
head,
Could you make it whole by
crying
Till your eyes and nose were
red ?

And wouldn't it be pleasanter
To treat it as a joke,
8 And say you're glad 'twas
SDolly's,
And not yours, that broke ?

Suppose your task, my
little man,
Is very hard to get, .
Will it make it any
easier
For you to sit and
fret ?

And isn't it, my boy or Iil
girl, I
The wisest, bravest -
plan,
Whatever comes, or doesn't come,
To do the best you can!








Ti-s is Harry's little

dog,

On an errar,d

going;

See his eyes, how

wise he looks !

As tho' all thin.-

worth knowing

Were stored away

In his small brain,

With knowledge quite

o'erflowing.


HARRY'S DOGS.


-- -


. ,.., ,
,- ..4 '











,, a s~i~i%~B'R /(., ','


Such a giddy dog

he,

He's always on th

run,

And never knows

happy day

Unless engaged i

fun.

And yet 'tis only fai

to say


His crraids


well done.


THIS is Harry's other
dog.
He's on the watch,
you see.
A splendid dog,a noble
dog,
A trusty dog, is he.
He never runs the
streets about,
With other do.-s to
play,
But watches at his MIas-
ter's gate
When he has gone
away.
;.


-- -- He thinks, no doubt
.-- -" Since Mlaster ha:
S A ;.sL bestowed oi
"me,
It is my duty now tt
'----: try
I H' How faithful I car
be."
So, little boys, whotc'i
L.you are,
:.,,, This lesson try .
learn,
". '*: s And from your duties
great or small,
Do not unkindly turn
Be faithful in the very least
The Master bids you do.
An.d when to manhood you are grown,
All men shall find you true.





























7 $

~- i,,
A3


*

zEO~ 'Nt~
d~P.'A


We're happy, happy, all day long; each busy as a bee,

With study, exercise, and song, as any one can see.


- .- J


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~t~
)~;"C~F"
_cZ


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BOB'S GAME OF FOOT-BALL.


One day Papa took little Bob to the park, and while
they were there Bob saw the big boys play a game that
Papa said was foot-ball. Little Bob's big brother John
was in the game, and Bob thought it was such fun to
see John kick the 'ball so far. So when he got home
he told baby Bess about it, and he got John's ball to
show the little sister.
"Now, Bess," said Bob, "You must look close, for
they do it as quick as wink. Before you know it the

ball will be away across the room. Now, I have tc






BOB'S GAME OF POOT-BALL.


draw back my foot so, and then kick the ball with all
my might. John says so, and he ought to know, for
he just does kick so 'booful.'"









Bob kicked the ball with all his might, and baby
Bess' screams brought Mamma, who picked up the
darling and rocked and sang to -,
2J "-I v "' '









Bob had to think nearly a whole fl
hour before he could tell why /L J
they both sat on the floor when -,
he kicked so hard. and sang to





^ ( A3Y


-Y x :.z .', & ., ..... .







"CATCH IT IF YOU CANI

CATCH it if yOU Can now,
Jump, and jump so high;
Surely you and pussy
Will catch it by and by.

Baby at the window,
Puss and dog below,
'' One of them enjoys it,
S Playing ball, I know.


SBo\w-wow-wov," says doggie,
*' Meow, meow," says the cat.
IDa-da-da,"--laughs baby.
And-that's the end of that.


1


"WHERE'S MOTHER!"

" WHERE'S mother ? asks the birdies,

We are afraid ofyou /

Go off, for with our nest

You have nothing, miss, to do."






1 .. .\ -. i
I, N" \ K\ \

,. \ "

5 1! 1 7

I 'hd a little pn ,
I i -
S I I I
A iI,> /1












I lent him to 'a ady
I ald otlend my pon n
called hi
5 I .i 10


They called him da apple gray;
I lent him to a lady
To ride a mile away.

She whipped him, she slashed him,
She rode him through the mire;
I would not lend my pony now
For all the lady's hire,





Come when you're called,
Do what you're bid,
Shut the door after you,
Never be chid.

A diller, a dollar,
A ten o'clock scholar,
What makes you come so
soon ?
You used to come at
ten o'clock,
But now VouL
come at
noon.


Rain, rain, go away;
Come again another day;
Little Johnnie wants to play

Black within and red without
Four corners round
about. A
(A chimney.)


J --" -' Hush-a-bye, baby,
i On the tree top,
When the wind blows,
The cradle will rock;
When the bough breaks,
The cradle will fall;
hush-a-bye,
all.


.


*,5'caB -4


,;..





"PLENTY OF THEM!"


L.L- -- --
KEEP quiet, little puppies, do!
I'll give a lovely bath to you.
I'll make your faces nice and clean
As ever puppy's face w.as ecn ;
But I will do my best to try
And not g-.'t soap, dears, in your eve.
For when nurse does that thing to me,
It mak,=s the tears come, don't you see ?

THE DANCING
j ACK,
SEE him go,
It's a ig,. you know.
He always likes
To dance just so.
W\'here do you think
I got him., pray ?
S(Out of a grab-bag
/Yesterday.
4 XWe went to a fair in
the v ila-ge, you see,
And this w\as- the
nicest "'grab" for me.
My dancing Jack, my
jumping Jack,
Of attitudes graceful
he has no lack&


ep


PLENTY of them-nice and sweet.
Apples falling at my feet.
How can a little girl like me
So many, many apples eat ?


.L,
... -.

" DON'T be frightened, little miss,
I only want a nice, sweet kiss."
"0 naughty wasp, go 'way from me,
Your face I do not like to see.
The other way please turn your wings,
And with you carry all your adagU"


TTHE PUPPIES' BATH.









PLAYING AT SOLDIER.

"SHOUL-DER arms!" said Dick. "Forw.ard,
march!" If you had been in the room next
to the hall where the chil-dren were play-ing
that rain-y day, you would have thought that an
ar-my was march-ing back and forth, they made
such a noise. Then, all at once, the noise
stopped. "The ar-my will lie down, and go
to sleep for the night," said Dick. The ar-my








PLAYING AT SOLDIER.


lay cown to play sleep, and in a twin-kling it
fell in-to a real sleep. Ev-er-y man was in the
land of Nod. Jane, who had been out to the
barn for a bas-ket of ap-ples, was so sur-prised
at the sight, that three great red ones fell out
on the floor be-fore she could catch them.
Just at that mo-ment the boys' eyes o-pened.
and they had the ap-ples in less than no time.



















- S.-


DON'T BE IN A HURRY!
WHAT is your hurry, little folks pray ?
What in the world is your hurry to-day?
Your wagon is broken, your apples are out
Enjoying their freedom, and rolling about.
If you don't stop a minute to mend up your wheel,
And pick up your apples, how foolish you'll feel !






THE HOLE IN THE BAG.

S ONCE a little girl and boy
Went out to buy a pig, sir!
They started home with piggy
In a bag so fine and big, sir,
But oh dear me a little hole
S- Allowed their prize to roam,
And pigSgy turned his back to them,
And calmly trotted home.
SBut all the grunting heard that
yosdv dday
g '~Was* deam by Nwed ^and he M ay


41 ~





















"HOW MEAN!"


LITTLE TULIP'S RIDE.

One day when little Tulip was out in the yard, she
saw something new-a small board hanging between two
ropes. She trotted up to it. She gave it a push. To-
fro, to-fro, it went. Little Tulip had never heard of a
swing, but up she sat herself on the board, and then
she went too; to-fro! to-fro! "Isn't it nice, mammy!"
she called to her mother in the door, with a spring to
go higher and faster. Oh! oh!-a shriek. Out rushed
mammy. The board had tipped, and the little rider in
the air was slipping out. "Isn't it mean, mammy?
sobbed little Tulip.-BABYLAND.


"P 1n\0 NiL. E !"









TAD AND THE LOBSTER


THERE was a lit-
tle lad
Whose name was
Tad,
Down by the sea.
"A-ha! a-ha!"
cried he:
"A play-fel-
low I see,
Com-ing to play
with me."


>/'


.
- I __--


But soon he
changed his cry:
The tears came
in his eye.
"Let go!" he
cried; let go !
You don't play
fair, you know.
0 m a my,
quick! Boo-hoo
He'll bite my
finger through"












till
'.11 1'1 ~ IIij~ 1.`: 1. il Al
I-MI






,,.,,I '




II:
lift i



1911- 1 -








A1I
Orllo v l.i



,j,


I'i~r '~ --


















'IgII


Johns i


KITTY'S SUPPER.








7z
,.. ., ., - --

,:.- - ,- '- -- --/-


-,, 1 '_ J 1 -- _. _








And we'll buy. some candy then, my dear."


SSTHE SNOWBALL AND TOMMY.
"Wi my ship T snowball and Tornmm
One winter's day,
S /, ... .- Went up on the hill
S/ For a merry play.




1
The was Come on" said the Snowballsnowball grew




tired of play, and of Toin im, too, '\
I 1d it sLudde lfl turnr ld, aid J i n the hill
Xushcd poor little romimy ith ri .ht ooJ will.
Come on cri, T o- Follow me e "
"Ii said th .. I wills! laughed T iy,
j ": Chuck full of glee.




The hil, was ,-tecp, and the snowball grew \ /. "
i3, tired of play, and of omlnmv, too, "i-'^

Fushcd poor little Toln my \\itli ri)ht :ood ill. "--\ \. ,*'.'".' ";;'..
'"Come on !" cried T ornn-,y '* r,-illo,, me I .. ....., -,f, e
"1 will 1" said the r s ,no aL. ;, iCily. "- i "., "?'ll...







"OBBIE DOBBIE."


"Obbie Dobbie" was a baby-
Funny name, I think, don't you?
That is what her papa called her,
And she had another, too.


One day little "Ohbic Dobbi, "
Laughed and laughed with all
her might
Looking up into her dress-s.lee\c,
Eyes and nose all hid from sight.
Mamma sak1, "Why, what's the
matter?
Is it real, or make-believe,
All this fun ?" The baby answered,
"I am 'aughin' 'in my s'eeve,'"


Funny name and funny baoy,
With a cunning little face;
And the other name they called her
Wa-, the prettier one of "Grace."


In a iiiurn:tnt I rerem mbcred
I had said those words one
day,
Little thinking h,.by prattle
Would repeat them o'er in play
With such literal translation,
(What an impress light words
leave )
Papa's little "Obbie Dobbie,"
Laughing in her baby sleeve







FIVE LITTLE PIGS.


FOR \'E-RY LIT-ILE FOLKS.

Five lit-tle fin-gers, and five lit-tie pigs!
Of each I've a story to tell.
Look at their faces and fun-ny curl-ed tails,
And hear what to each one be-fell.

Ring-tail, that stead-y and good lit-tie pig,
To mar-ket set off at a trot;
And brought home his bas-ket quite full of nice things
Con-tent-ed and pleas-ed with his lot.

Young Smi-ler, the next, was a stay-at-home pig,
Liked his pipe, and to sit at his ease;
He fell fast a-sleep, burned his nose with his pipe,
And a-woke with a ve-ry loud sneeze.
Num-ber three was young Long-snout, who ate up the beef
He was both greedy and fat,
He made him-self ill by eat-ing too much,
And then he was sor-ry for that.

And poor lit-tle Grunt-er-you know he had none-
A piggy so hun-gry and sad;
He si-lent-ly wiped the salt tears from his eyes,
I think it was really too bad.

Young Squeak-er cried "Wee, wee, wee!" all the way home;
A pig-gy so fret-ful was he.
He had a good whip-ping, was sent off to bed;
S And de-served it, I think you must see,

E
* 5 ri ", ;i. & ...* .. ..... .... ".' .., :.. .. ,.- ...-





































































nIgV LITTLE PIG&


_ -----~--LII








THE BAD LITTLE PUPPIES.

T,-- "h Three puppies, one
1 :da' y,
_,,_ __ __ To their Ma did
say,
*i'I'L'" Do, please, give us
-4. leave
To run out and play."
"The day is so fine,"
Said their Ma, "You may.
But, my children dear,
You must not go near
The pool in the field,
So deep and so clear."
Then off went the three,
As gay as could be, -
And came to the pool
So glassy and cool.
And when they looked
in,


PAP U77dE1_/'7r5 PVPPIES.~S






THE BAD L1 Ji Z'LE P PPIES.


What, think you, saw
'V.. 4 they?
'.. -.. Three other puppies!
Let s jo n them at
___ play.
They jumped from the brink,
And in they all fell.
But drowned they were not,
I'm happy to tell.
And when they got home,
All dripping and cold,
Oh! did n't their mother
Both grumble and scold


; ,. .1.. "q
-A-



I'll tell you a story I'll tell you another
About Mary 1IIorey, About her brother,
And now my story's begun. And now my story's done.








THREE MERRY CHILDREN
Three little children,
All sunny hearted,
Loving each other.
Seldom were parted:-
Katie, the sunbeam.
And black-haired Nancy,
And W\ilie the pet
Of both, I fancy.
Morning by morning
To school they wended,
And home at evening,
WXhen school was ended.
But little heeding
Of wind or weather.
Laughing and sningi
Gaily together.
Love is the sunlight
That glows about them,
Laughs in their faces,
I And shines from out them.



0 i ,

-j






i r 7YURE LESSO..


PICTURE LESSON.


WE
A' /'


Onc.
T iwo.
Letters in Lu ;


Three,

.,, Letters in Door;
Five,
Six,
Letters in Bricks;


AIIDSHIPAy,
D HI s p,wv,
-f W 11


Eight,
In Playmate,


Nine,
Ten,
In M midshipmen.


~~~~~D"au;s~oi~iu~l;aa-~i~sa~*~a~









HAPPY HOMES.


TWO COWARDS.





ILEXA.NDER ADOLPHUS WHITE.
Hel. i m:r :n .,Id wolf lon night.
And. the w,,l}f looked s. grim.
So fit t, eat /'i ,
That his hair stool in tend in his fright.


But the wolf 1had no, teeth left to bite,
And A l.d.il'lhi]s was s uch a strange sight,
S'c.ated there on the ground,
That th.- -I i.wolf turn,:.d round,
And ran off hiins:l1f, full of fright!







" STAN D UP, SIR!"


STAND up and beg for it, doggie, do !
Or not a drop will I give to you.
I mind my mamma, and always say
"Please, mamma, give me some food to-day."
You're such a proud old doggie I see,
You're far too proud to be begging of me.








___ :
N '.


-;----~
--- --*r
L1;--
----,-
;--c~r- _------ --i~i'~
~-
cc~c-_-


Goosey, goosey gander,

Whither shall I wander?

Up stairs and down stairs,

-And in my lady's chamber.


Kitty cat, now catch the rat;

Be sure you don't let go.


First on the plant, then on the n

Away for the door it goes.


-.:1 'j:i!l :-~l,rt~u~-.ra~P~Z~l~-~:~r I;il .IILh~_rr~.t:!.....nl I.~~~L~i~~d~i~k~:h~







"THERE' PA.\P -'"


THiEREr' papa I see him standing '-1- tiherr-
Look. mamma, he's buying som,-- can. l, [ declare;
Candy for his darling-," that is /. .,u kr,
Is it at any wonderr I h.xe niy I t,' P ,) '


I was tired of waiting : I tl'iog- l t l ,.1 :,-I* ici-nr-,
But now he's buyinm L.andr,..,l' cini t. :.i \ ;e i
some ;
I'll wait for him foreve-r, and .c-r', [.tII t 1
For somerthing'- coming quickly' .. itlin [.1', '.L nit


AT HOME.
ONtY. a worn nut shoe,
But then I -ruess it will do.

I. .
^..-


We'll build our nest and "at home will be,
Till the neighbors have called upon you and
.me.


MAMM.\ bothL 'it [ fr imi,
'To trundle o'er the ground.
I like my pretty ho.:ple,
It is so large and round.
I'm six years old
This very day.
Quite big enough to run and play.


"MY NEW IIn)PL' 1:1"





i lMAMM\lA'S LITTLE AS.iSF.TH i'S,


B, INT. IN, hom ie th I xrash,
To help i\amma to-dciay.

Tripping o'er the mr-adc.io
With little hearts o ga.

SThe lie ust i-n the c*a. 'i 1K t t
Un-iderncath the hill. t '

But they hlrp j\lmni in rni kirty, ( V\ A
itl earn -t r .nd lil. .. '

\\'e're Ma ina' A t It / '
They ijll a ay u \'.to -*

ni l.. ii at ti i .-
.._- i.n ,.. th ir t-1 t1 r-



Ll F TLE COMFO. TER."
D ir, till- 1Iorn'- t 1- ice hI er l:bro,-hD .- ?
So it did, th: n:iught thin.! -
A nd ii -Ir little lips, ..,: t-n._'-l /
\I-- r O h" ai" r.ll n :C1

t Did it hurt him vt-r-v l, .11 t. -
1 es, it l.1. ...ar ,I :-^-'r
SIsn't h- a lucky fl ,. I
To Fix- little iSt r nI n ?r 4

J 0, she's jui t a little cncoml 'rrt, -
.. X lAnd she's quick to uni.- r.tan:, ;.. .-
,4 T r r.There is nothing: quite, like l:iWes,. "'-.
Sw-eet, to h -al her brother la I-nd. -

So the naughty %iasp can't hint.ler, Arid i no rather b.l hii'. h.'1p -n,
Tlh twu '.hJ ldren (1urn1 thi-i- pla), All ltn.ughiuLit thi liip'py day.
















i 3 .... --- .,
S--T-




STHREE SINGERS.
ONE sang high, and one sang low, the other just between
They were i.. daintiest damsels one had ever seen.
But somehow, it was funny, they couldn't keep in tune,
And so they all r.-,-- weary of singing '.: l-, soon,
And no one dared i'i-.est that the maids should try *.,,in.
Because,. to tell the truth-their singing gave such pain.




NOT JACK A7 .D JILL.

NOT Jack and Jill of olden time, ,: .'
Whom '\ other Goose put into .r1i, h hy
But ;;.1; Sam, and simply Polly, / I' '
Two little cousins, sweet and jolly, ',
,,I .4. y.i'' .). d .
-VI,, ii for water one fine day, -..,
And tripping o'er their homeward way
Full merrily, without a care, --' -- '-,-
Fell suddenly into a snare ___ "--
That master Tommy set, and so
SLike Jack and Jill, fdel do(,wi, you know.








A QUARTETTE OF LITTLE ONES.

Mac and Janet, Ted and Nell;
What a merry, sweet quartette!
Which are fairer, can you tell,-
Eyes of blue, or eyes of jet ?

Six and five, and three and two,
Are the ages of the set:
Mac so bright, and Jan so true,
Laughing Ted, and Nell the pet.

Soft azure eyes and hair of floss
Are beautiful to me; but yet
So are brown curls with silken gloss,
And dark eyes in deep fringes set.

Mac, Nell; Ted, Jan: two dark, two fasR
Dear, dear! how puzzled one does gt?
To know which is the sweeter pair,
Those with the blue eyes, or the jet.

. .. .
























































































II~
d,
,I


__I
''



? + Bllt~






gP -7
~.\. /'
\
-, h,


PLAYING HORSEE"


C) wiurT fun nn a i.jn mi1er's day,
Three little folks .llu iv I doggie at play !
.lack, and Jennii-. an, I. aby Jim,
And littlil bob-tailed, :,-iaggy-haired Tim !

Down the lane, and awAiy they go !
lack i- the racing hir-..r, you know;
lennie's the w\va-.gon, .-i, ,ut and -.tron *,
And Jin's tlhe dri\'r with whip so lung.


Kind little sister with brothers two.
Ready always her share to do,
In the merry playtime, helping along
With love and sunshine the days so long.

Whoa now, horsie so fast you go,
You'll soon be running away, I know;
And O, if your wagon you should ups-rt,
What a terrible fright your driver will gei









SIT IS A GOOD OLD S/YINIG


THAT


LOvHTEN S

,vN --,-_---. ,.
__ I'


~T~
r.
~ r
"''''/ d
:(rl
~
~1
7;S-


We're lappy, happy all lday long;
Each busyv a a bee
With study, exercise and song,
Ai an.,' onle c-an sev.








?jZZLES ABOUTIrETTER AND A ITTY.


Ill 1111 V II I III Is I


i-te had been one
way a i whoke we ek.
Paly had helped him


to etnerP she.
u
6 h. o~' 0.

a

as she finished.
botl a
I"erre-s wCa


and had c
-tiouhf i"
but" now she
beyinnin t6o
t t'ed .9 be,
Ald not" move and h

her
Peal live plaIma, ln
6asd and hak him

and a


nd wrote a nice


redt* n .
was
row
np alone
erl

Were all

"I witl
t .o come


00


over hew eyes
itep himsfey !


. I I' --


0ld
writ&
back ,

a.nd
pu.

pat"


P I


C~-r ~I I __ --- 7 11-~-










W -

































Papa Bruin, Mnama Bruin and Baby Bruin go out for a
walk. Little Goldilocks goes into their house and falls asleep.
On their return she jumps out the window and runs home.





ON THE FENCE,
THREE little people
on the fence.
"Hi! Betty Ma,-
tin!
If you are going'
London town,
Its time you were
a starting !
See, Sammie at
The swallows
stares!
For London town
1e little cares.
So, Betty Martin, you
and I,
Will just slip off quite
i.n the sly,
-h, IBetty Martin ?"


Three little people on the fence.
Hi BEtt, Martin!
The owner 'II come and i pack you hence.
0--o-oh D;rtt Martin !
If you are .:oin t:i London town,
DO be a starting "


IT RAINS!


0, Dn.\n,. (, drar, what shall I do !
The rain rain fast, and, will w,:t me thro'!
And my iiuminbr-ll i.s niie and new !
Thv rain will surely spoil it, to" !
I wi-h the drops w,' e light and few.
O, myvn 1'rn in a regui-ir stew !
It', all very well for talks to say pooh!
The rain won't liht-m a snip like you."
But I feel. I kno-w, I'll be wet-boo-hoo I
It rain., it '.,:, .' what shall I do !
--',. .. 2 .-. { -". .. -


So off they went to London town,
W while Samrnic little knew it.
But they were sad
When he got mad,
And cried, How could you do it ?"


.... ..*-, ... :. a






I L



v
N


TAKING A RIDE.
D,::;'r go so fast, Sir Billy Goat.
My wife and child and I
Can hardly keep our balance here,
All mounted up so high.
Good doggie, bark at him no more,
He's rattled our bones, till tlh:y ar,_.. our,-.

THREE FRIENDS AND THEIR WOES.

-- THREE friends once met on the king's high-


--- A miserable set of friend; were they.

S.... i-t The cat was lame in her right hand paw,

SThe dog had ti-.othach1 in his j;-iw,

The, mule had ,ar-cl:l',. poor old soul !

I F '" And not on,: '-lf thl'i.,-, was lhornroughly whole.

They met, and o sadly -said "Good-day !"
.-.; Then parted again on the king's highway.






THE LITTLE STRANGERS.


,, There is a pretty little child
A Lives in behind our looking-glass;
Whene'er I walk across the floor
SThen she comes out to see me pass
I know she is a playful child,
For if I run, then so will she;
And she has playthings just like mine
SThey always dress her, too, like me.
SIf I go close, then she comes close,
Some day I think that we shall speak
And then I'll ask her to come through
MAKING R And stay with me a whole long week.

DAISY'S SUN-DAY-DAY.
"Mamma," called Dai-sy one Sun-day morn-ing, coming
up-stairs as fast as her short legs would bring
her; "the church clocks are hol-ler-in'for me
S to go to Sun-day-school; don't you hear?"
"Mamma, do let her go," said Margaret
"An' I'll wear my Ba-by Bunt-in
clothes, an' I won't never say one speck
inose," mid Dai-y, prancing about






So they put on the Baby
Bunt-ing suit, and she went
with Mar-ga-ret.
And this is what she
told when she came home:
"An', mamma," said she, i
"I saw a bad dirl, an' it was
Sun-day-day, an' I was a ..
dood dirl, an' I made a frown .
at her,'cause she was a-tak-in'
walks Sun-day-day, she an' o. r. WAY TO CHUR
her doll. An' I met some more bad dirl, aw;
SI made a frown at her too, 'cause I was
dood dirl, an' it was Sun-day-day, an' ..:
was a-sit-tin' on a door-step, an' a-smilin' oi
loud. An' I singed in church."
A HAD GIRL
"Yes, mam-ma,"said Margaret. "And I was so vexed
"'S'ould Mar-get be vexed on a Sun-day-day?" sam

Dai-sy. "An' now take off my Ba-by Buntin's." a~&"rsw










B ABIESS


/ ... P.ATiv oirl and baby chickeenq.
Out rif doors t,,tu ether,
T "P infg in the Lunshine of
I'_ 1','1"'-- "a "ant sum n'er
weathere;
|; All so fine and prI-tty in
dTheir dainty drcs and
feathers,
SBaby girl and baby chickens
Oit of doors together.





"Cluck, cluck, .lid ".
Says mamma hen;
"What a pretty girlie
Such brown eyes and royv lips, ----
And bonny hair so curly !" V
"Wee-wee-wee,"'the chickens saIy,
"Let is run and meet her,
And with just our sweetest songs,
Ilterrily we'll greet her."
Oh, oh, oh the Laby cries,
"Let us play togcthtr;
Little chickies, biri.!ie:,, hens, '
In the pleasant weather."









"No. Go!i


1 ,
i I
11111 L


" N, no, good sir, you can't pull me,

But try a gentle word, then see !

For kind persuasion every one knows,

With obsti nacy very far goes.

AnI a pa t on my back. I think, my friend,

May: possibly klad to some good end.

But your cross old face and your threats, I'm sure,

With me will leve'r effect a cure."




Whoa! my pretty dappled pony;


While I sing my little song,
You may rest a while, my pony,
For you have traveled all day long.

You are rested now, my pony,
And the sun is going down;
Do your best, my little pony,
Off again to Boston town.

Yes, said the dog, fun for you
But death to me.


c:







WORK WHILE YOU WORK.


Work while you work,
And play while you play,
That is the way
To be cheerful and gay.
All that you do
Do with your might;
Things done by halves
Are never done right.
One thing at once,
And that done well,
Is a very good rule, -
As many can tell.
Moments are useless,
Trifled away;
Work while you work,
And play while you play.




















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I I IIF












E-11 the I%













V. r l_













A r, I i; 1 1, E.. r 1. 1T me 1. j,. r od K U
















AMN% ALI U








"L'
.. .-J. #_ -, _J'U










Bye, baby, bunti

Daddy's gone a-huntin,

To get a rabbit-skin

To wrap his baby
B Unting n. i -

I *' ,. .Is,,p
-c
...I~ -






















Hupty-Dupt had a great fall;





oCannot put Humpty-Dumpty together again.
(An Egg.)
C Sao--- -n wa



1-iHumpty-Dumpty had a great fall;

i horses, all the king's men,
Cannot put Hurnpty-Dumpty together again.






For every evil under the sun

There is a remedy, or there is none;

If there be one, try and find it,

If there be none, never
mind it. -


Sing a song of sixpence,
A pocket full of rye;
Four-and-twenty blackbirds
Baked in a pie.


When the pie was opened
The birds began to sing
Was that not a dainty dish
To set before a king?


There was a little man, and he had a little gun,
And his bullets were made of lead, lead. lead;
He shot Johnny King through the middle of his wig,
-,, And knocked it right off hii
S"head, head, head.


iK jl"i'i I Fishie, fishie, in the brook

SPapa catch him with a
S---- hook;

",i i w Mamma fry him in a pan,

S ,,lj". I''' I. 1(i ; Brigie eat'm like a man.
11-11, V-1 B i(Tic eatI


----ru


n
---
.-





See, saw, Margery Daw,

Jennie shall have a new master;
She shall have but a penny a day,
", .: Because she c can't
work any faster.


'. Pussy-cat,
i -N- ,..- N- ,-",


.., been ?
I've been to London, to visit the Queen.
Pussy-cat, pussy-cat, what did you there?
I frightened a little mouse under her chai


1)ussy 5N'-cat,
havre you


Once I saw a little bird
Come hop, hop, hop;
So I cried, "little bird,

\Will you stop, stop, stop?"
knd was going to the window,
1o say how do you do;
Lut he shook his little tail,
And far away he flew!


*.





Willy boy, Willy boy, where are you- going?
I will go with you if I may.


I am going to the meadows, to see them mowing,
I am going to see them make the hay.


_- _-- -
- --- :--- .,__ -- ._


If I were you,
And you were I,


Then you'd be me,
And I'd be thee,


And we'd be each the other.


And we werc one -trotlier,




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