• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Our animal friends in picture and...
 Back Cover






Group Title: Our animal friends in picture and story : containing over two hundred illustrations
Title: Our animal friends in picture and story
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085536/00001
 Material Information
Title: Our animal friends in picture and story containing over two hundred illustrations
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Berkeley, Stanley ( Illustrator )
Cranston, W. A ( Illustrator )
Reller, Frank ( Illustrator )
Grand Union Tea Company ( Publisher )
Estes & Lauriat ( Copyright holder )
Grand Union Press ( Printer )
Publisher: Grand Union Tea Company
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: Grand Union Press
Publication Date: c1896
 Subjects
Subject: Animals -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1896   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- New York -- New York -- Brooklyn
 Notes
General Note: Copyright issued to Estes and Lauriat.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements follow text. "Musa Fisher".
Statement of Responsibility: by Harrison Weir, Stanley Berkeley, W.A. Cranston, Frank Reller, and other well-known artists.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00085536
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224402
notis - ALG4666
oclc - 235942724

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Our animal friends in picture and story
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
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    Back Cover
        Page 205
        Page 206
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AL



IN


PICTURE AND STORY




CONTAINING OVER TWO HUNDRED ILLUSTRATIONS

. BY .

HARRISON WEIR, STANLEY BERKELEY, W. A. CRANSTON,
FRANK RELLER AND OTHER WELL-KNOWN ARTISTS




NEW YORK
GRAND UNION TEA COMPANY
- PUBLISHERS

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PRESSWORK ',
GRAiD UNION PRESS
BROOKLYrl BOHIucGi-NEV, YOR.. U S. A,


CTRAODS jLIOCOUNCILr S4
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ELEPH ANTS.
-\? What queer, ungainly beasts elephants ;ire! Their
long, fbpping e;uis, when stuck out, louk like wiii gs,
M LIIl their trunks are inorek like tails thzil niiytliin elso
Yet. n elei1aiit's. trunk is vilrY us1efiil to IJ-ii. W ith itI
S -he pick n t s See s s.iall as ; pin.
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STHE JAGUAR AND HER YOUNG.
.i I WAS out hunting- one evening in South America,
when I saw a female leopard, busily covering something
1 upi with her paws. Two cubs .were watching the opera-
tion. A shot of my gun rolled the animal over. When
S -I went to secure the two little ones, I found that the poor -"
Smother animal had been burying' her dead cub._
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(CHARGED


BY A RHINOCEROS.


This terrible beast is a rhinoceros. It
attacked by the hunters, aind in trying to
knocked one of them over. It has not hurt. him
the rhinoceros has not timn. lo turn on himi andn
with its wicked-looking' horn .,( li, will escape.


has bee
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E-SCAPE.


r'12c"Adle downi .-Ill .1(-abl.ed the


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40"' byv thel tail. The doog hias howlved So 1011(1 that his mlas-
ter Ihas 1eiarnl.;i tdIlw I 0 his assistance. He., apiro1tchles
-l itv jIeaIr U1am shoti)s the monkey. The ionke dros
tfhL it N V wII is terril dv fli"Ilt-kiied lbuut inot hurt.


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TIHE EAGLE.
MANY of you have seen il ;a menagerie an eagle
sulking in its cag'e, dull, lifeless, and stupid. If so,
you have a very poor notion of what the ear'le is in
his natural home, among, the rocks and nmollutains, 'where
le may well -be called the King of Bi rds. Thi picture
.rill show you how he looks when free.








































A FINE DOG.
This is a fine-looking dlog. In the picture he -
looks at you as if he knew what. a handsome fellow
he is. His master must be very proud of him,-- I am -
sure I would be if I owned him, and I would be very
kind to him too.

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POLAR BEARS.
These rle iola;r 1 e;irs. They live in tle fair Nortli
.a1rnid ice inl sriow. They ;are very larg-e iul otf ia ellodwi.sh
white. They live mostly on se;ls i1nid fish, illi(1d ii;y hIe
seen1 in lartge llrl11 ilers together it ce It;lil Setiso l 5 of thlie
year. r They re very ierce and strong.











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A CLEVER DEER.


The deer wanted to get the berries on the tree, but
they could not reach up) to them. So one of them is
jumlpilng up and knocking' the berries down with his
horus. It is v-ry cl .ver of him t o do this, and he deserves
t.o get a gCood meal for his trouble.


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TIiIl, K(ANGARtOO.


The Kang'aroo is being chased by the (ogs, and
will soon be overtaken alnd killed. Kanigaroos have
very short front legs, and they go about on their hind
legs, gett-ing' over the ground by jIumps. When they
rest, they plrop themLselves with their ibig' thick tails.










































-.--- ---- --- -= -------- -- -------
-. --

TWO WILD I-lORSES.
tre are artwo wild horses that have just been en]p-
tured. atid put in a pen. T"liev ha m imninediately I:egurn
to fight, ;and are citing' fiercely at each other. If tlhe
man8 who captured them does not come soon, they may
hurt each other, and one may even kill the other.


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A MONK.KEY AND1 HiS ll 1AR.
Someboly Ins thrown a eirni into til iii)-eys cagre.
and Jack has seizl upon it. : d is cheiwiig it with great
gusto. It will soon inak_' hiii sick. andi tilen .he v ill be
sorry that he i-w it. It is a dsstig habit to chew
tobacco, and ntoIldy shoui! do it.




































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AN INTRUDER.


What a larg-e bear! Aind what is lie doing?.
that he is eating iupl the school-childrel's lunlches.
they come for tlleir pails they willilind tlenm
and they will have to be hungry. The 1ear is
a fine time. He will probably eat everythingg.


............................


I think
When
empty,
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ting' fearlessly by, engaged in eating nuts, while the
tiger is looking on with great interest. They all seem
to be great friends.



















































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THE SHRIKE, OR BUTCHER-BIRD.

THIs bird is also called "Nine Killer," as it is gener-
ally supposed to abstain from eating until it has killed
that number. This idea, perhaps, arose from the fact that
the bird kills many more insects than it can possibly eat.
The colourilng of the bird is very rich and bold, the head
especially so.


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WARREN HASTINGS ON A DONKEY.


WVARREN HASTINGS, one day, saw some of his young
friends striving to ride an ass. Let me try!" exclaimed
le, mounting' the donkey. The beast began to kick up
his heels, and lower his head; but this trick would not
ilinswer, for, sitting firmly. the rider made the donkey
f1I"Ve wheresoever he chose.







































THE CONVICT'S LITTLE FRIEND.
This man has done something' wrong', and' has been
put in prison. A little bird comes every day to eat the
crumbs the man gives it. It has become very tame, and
the man has become very fond of it. I hope he will be
a better man when he gets out of prison.
- -. -








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A TIPSY BEAR.


This man used to make money by going around the
country and wrestling with a tame bear. One day the
bear got hold of a bottle of brandy. This made him ugly,
and when the time came for the wrestling he attacked his
master fiercely. The man easily threw the tipsy brute.










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A SHAM FIGHT.
I ONC'E saw a, woiderifully trailld 1hore. One per-
lorniance was a sort of lhamn fight between him and
SmainnI. which is shown in the picture. In this fight
their horse is rearing up to attack the nmn. who holds
; little shield in one hand and in the other he nas a
cudgel.



































A DEVOTED MOTHER.
A GENTLEMAN, after it had snowed for several days.
came upon a wild duck lying' beside a tuft of rushes, he.
looked more closely, and saw that she was dead. Hier
neck was stretched out, her mouth open and full of snow.
her wings extended over her nest. She had died in trying
to save her eggs from the effect of the snowstorm.









































A TAME NIGHTINGALE.
A YOUNG nightingale was once given to me. It
soon became very tame, and was kept in a cage; and,
finally, it was allowed to go- out of its cage, which was
hung up open at the door. At first it returned regularly
in the evening to its cage, but one night it did not come
back.
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AIATCH'E1M.

MY brother anli I have a smI;tlll dow which we call
Match'emi. Ie is a very cunningiii little fellow full of life
a;l( spirits. \Ve llhave succeeded ill teachliilg him quite
a number of tricks, and 1ie really seems to enjoy doing
them. He is always ready and anxious to show visitors
what a well educated little doegie he is.


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This little do. i. very a ,'ryv beanvse the erows ha ve
to i i sun of i.s finnter. Tihe crows are flyilig away
with tlie tfid in their beaks. TI e dog has scared t hen
aw:-v. anid hais )put his paw on, the plate to guard it. I
hope the crows will not coie btack.


1










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I'LLEI'TING THE COWS.

This dog' is oIillctiii.nt th' r'ows. .-, thit iiis nm s'er
friayN drive them homei. Onil: to tlie nw\vs hi;s started
T Oi' il ; 1 111). i11d lir e h{ it. lilvill,' ,nli e i 1oill brinrgimn her back lint lby and -tl y I'n will s. ced in
- hingmg Ix her t.o where the others are \vai ii,.














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GIVING BREAD TO THE HORSE.
The little boy is ofriing the horse a piece of bread.
Thee iorse is ver'vy glad to get it. as lie is ver-y hungry.
It is a kind action to feed the poor horse. Some horses
are very well treated, but cart-horses lead a hard life,
and receive little kindness.









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8Y MP II Y.
SI PS i.t 11) w"in r IIAv vlIe1 ;a 114" Id of sheep. k
,a 'ssed1 by. Oinv of the poor th ii-gs ';s so Wi; 1. i t
it. ly dowii t o0 re-3t,. Soo)i ;iiiotieif'. tflb ock x hPP liA ;n h:
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THE BLUE JAY.
THIS beautiful bird is always regarded with great
Silterest, not only on account of his brilliant plunagi.e
but also for his pert appearance, aind for his chatter aind
his faculty of eprloducing the notes or cries of other birds.
'The blue jay is a native of North America, and is not
known in any other country.
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4


A CLEVER MONKEY.


The little girl approached too near to the monkey,
and the mischievous little fellow knocked her hat off. See
how surprised the little girl looks, and how amused the
imonikey appears. He has a broad grin on his face, and he
seems to think that he has done something very clever.
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THi TAME BE AR.

luh.. t boear;! is hungry, rand his nli ster is feeding
Ii. t his uii.-. i; zzle. The mal is not ..'rid of the
0i V, 'i- iould gf rni:r- he v~~. ie ~~ad te-' the man
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THE RED FIRE-FISH.


THE Ceylonese fishermen regard this weird-looking
fish with a sort of superstitious dread; they imagine that
it can inflict with the sharp spines with which it is armed
a deadly wound; but there is no foundation for such a
belief, for although the hand may be lacerated, yet there
is nothing poisonous about it.

































































































































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PUSS IN A FIX.
Puss has climbed up to the top of a high tower, and
does not know how to get down. She is mewing, pitifully,
as if begging some one to come and take her down. It is
strange that cats can climb to places from which they do
not know how to descend.


''


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THE CAPTAIN'S DOG.


This clog is owned by the captain of the ship. The
dog loves the water, and is never happy on land. The
vessel is just starting on a long voyage, and the dog is
watching the hoisting of the sails. He is a great pet of
S all. the sailors, but he loves the captain the most.




































































































































































































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THE DRAGON-FLY.
SONE cannot look at these beautiful insects without
admiring the wonderful lightness with which they main-
tain themselves in the air over a flower or other object.
They stand there so perfectly steady for a moment. or two,
then in an instant they dart away with such rapidity, that
the eye can scarcely follow.


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HOW A SOLDIER ESCAPED.
A GERMAN cavalry soldier and his horse were cap-
tured by the French. The prisoner was seated near
the window of threroli where he was confined, when
he saw his horse led by; with one bound he had leaped
from the window, sprung upon his lhor.s and escaped
before the astonished soldiers had time to fire.




































THE CAT AND THE MII OR~.


Pussy is looking at herself in the glass, and is very
much astollished. She thinks it is another cat. and tries
to touch her, but only hits the hard glass. This sur-
prises her more than ever, and she looks behind the
glass to see if the other cat is hidden there.











































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THE BEAR AND THE BEES.
Bears are very fond of honey, and whenever they
can find a wild bee's nest, they do not rest until they
have gotten at its sweet contents. This bear has found
a large nest, and is enjoying himself very much, in
spite of the attempts of the bees to drive him away.


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OUR DOG BEVIS
We hive a dog- named Ievis. When she wants to
get into the house she rises oil her hind legs and presses
down the latch with her paiws. Is not she a very clever
dog to be able to op'en a door -all by herself? We are
very proud of her.
























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A DONKEY BRAYING.
Have you ever heard a donkey bray ? It makes a ter-
rilble noise. Probably the goose in the picture has come to
se~ what can he the matter with its companion, but the
(dokey pays no attention to her, but continues to bray as
if it. heart. was set on making. a noise.









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SHOOTING BIRDS OF PARADISE.
THE Birds of Paradise are very beautiful. 'Th
natives shoot the male birds with how and arrows when
they are displaying themselves at, the nesting- season.
In order to reach their game, the natives construct, a
kind of shield of foliage, under cover of which they
are able to kill the lovely creatures at their leisure.







































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KED DEER IN THE SNOW.
IN the snowstorms of last winter, a railway train
in the far north of Scotland stuck fast in the drift.
The engine fire was not put out, and several red deer.
starved with the extreme cold, and perhaps also moved
by curiosity, came round the locomotive and seemed to
like the warmth.




































SHEEP.
PERHAPS the most gentle and timid of all anirnals
are tlhe sheep. They look at you with their soft eyes. ;?s
if asking you not to hurt them. The young lambs ;i(r
very Cunlniing. They are full of life and spirits, andl arc
selloim still until, worn out. they seek their mothers a nd
lie downN blesidle then to .rest.






























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THIE HOI NED TRUNK FISH.
Tnis extraordiiiiry lookillng cratire is a native of the
tropical seas. The lihad is furin islied witli two short horn s;
the body is (ovired with a solid coat of mail. formed of
scales; apertures n1r formed in the IarmIIour. through which
protrude the month, the fins, and the tail, presenting alto-
gether a rather tbformidable aspect.
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PLAYING WITH A BEAR.
These little children have found a bear in the woods.
They are not att all afraid of him, but are playing with
him. One is giving him an apple, while the other ias
climlnd on his back. Their parents are very muchl
frightened, but the bear does not hurt the children.





























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THE TIGER.
A TI(ER. When full grown. but still Vyoung preys
upon d1er. ntellopes. ;n(l other fleet-t-fltc ed rei1tres.
After \warls, however. when rowil g old. ih tpproances
Jmonre nearly to tle dwellings of man, finding it easier
to overtake a fat heavy bullock, or some other domestic
animal, than the bounding antelopes.




































THE DOG AND THE MONKEYS.
Some monkeys were once walkiig- along- when they
came across a dog, chained to his kennel. He lay so
still that the monkeys did not think he was alive, and
so they came close up to him. Suddenly the dog
sprang' and seized olne before he could get away.
























































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W' OLNYES.


THE eolnmon wolf ill'nhabits all the nlorthel'rn part's
of the world, from, the Arctic region to Southern Elurope,
thougll it. differs g-reattly il coloulr ;ind size. Wolves are
most lively at night.. They a;re swift of foot. alld cat-lh
their p1rey 1)y r11nlinglil it. down\. During the winter they
usually hunt ill large packs.




































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TIHNE "'I iD)A-'T)I,.
PEURAPs the strail-i-st t i-ve'r eixistedl \as
the pter od;(;tyl, or Iwilg-tilg-ired rletil." It ouildl fly
in th 1 air o- walk ni thie oullind. cli1iuh tre.s ;illi rocks
by meIn alis (of its stroii,, r1w.s, ln l i t likIst ikel 11t c illi
swim ini tlh \VIt'r. T I ,Ie 1tr1di(Ct \I h1;is .ti(cri jInssed
away witdh t lit ;aie ill which it lived.









--- ; -- -- -
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This pigeon h' lius In wounded hy Inti dr, ;iii its
f'ielns l mivi. tflo\n to its ;idl. They lun v ta-kiln it willing
in t licir 1.;iaks. ;iil ;ire trying to fiy Af' \\w lh it. 1 ]iojpe
they will su.c l '. ;ts ti'he deserve to dLi -,o. ;nil it would
he -I pity it tril y l 'ihil< .


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BE'I'I AYEI) BY A PJ .1

I~i111,111 lIms St(,l-Ilh a pio. -:1I141 h~idden' it 11jjEIl.hisJj4

tile Jpig2s m~villel ha~s 1011111 ouit. tha~t thle inlllis aS thief,
and tilt! 111(1.1 will be pun~ishedl. IN I ou ver comluluits a sill
is sre to be futild out sooner 01 latell.









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Mother Puss is iestiing,
life an l spirits. Ir, will
Make his llmother pltv with
nose: ibut. slhe is too tired,
he will have to play alone.


Ihut her little ston is full of
lt kieepj iet. ;anl tries to
liimll. IIe h ts her 1 on the
1iadl waits to go to sleep, so







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AN DIPIUS )NE) 1W\VL.
Th:es'- birds ane inlart'ijn. lTtl- <- ,.j \ ; t o .,



r.
for lhavi gi' (;lkeiin poss,.ssiI .,ft their bIox. Sn Il'\ 1 -e
walling up thle ojeniii'n t' tlu ibox. 'I'liey -re an.in
to punish thl. owl for stealilni' tl-irj li-in'. t11 ] wi'i
the owl 1 w iiltl fl ti\aw;y ielotre it is too !;ite.











































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A -NARRO)WK ESCAPE.'

'k lxrru., bk!Wi lUis 1Jail'Y l 1)01tt ib Il.eck of a sliip,
vdiein hIe sliIppedl aIndl felul ovoer1 ir(i. I bravc smi
~pluIloge( ill ;itteI him'i, Ilze im miid swan ti; IN.e
Ve-%sills slile wholrhe a. frw, fipe id He iil~ev d I Vlil


app~jarell. Buit forti tlilt e I. *ju.'t tb 1g) lato.








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A CHOP IN DANGER.


k CHOP IN DAM, ER

Naughty Pussy! Nobody is in the room, and she has
climbed upon the table and is eating the chop cooked for
her master's breakfast. When he comes downstairs lihe
will find 1no breakfast.. Hark! he is coining! Run away
Pssy. or e will be sure to piun ish you
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A ROBIN'S NEST IN A KETTLE.
YESTERDAY I took a walk in the fields, and found a
robin's nest in a. very queer place. The birds had found an
old kettle lying on its side, and had at once appropriated
it.. It made a. very dry, comfortable house, with nothing
to fear from wind or rain. It was very well concealed,
and I found it only by chance.



































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THE S'CAHABJEI H EBTES.
THIS singular-looking cr.eature, the ma11 S<.IurnWiaILs
Hercules, is furnished with \ luorny 1enk. slighrly cnvtd
downward; its under-jaw is to othd i nd v"vy .wviul;
its body is larg-e a;nd ullwieldy. T'lie h l ,t th1 z tI
is small in proportions to her 1,,ody: the fr. 1, sh.rt
land different in form t.o that of the mulhe.








































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SPEED AND SNAP.


Speed and Snap !were not good friends. ti- Snip
was jealous of the other. Snap wa ia pug io lbad
been in our fa.iily for many yeaus. :-., ehic we e._ only v
had Speed for a few 1 tontlhs. We lh;o(! < qiiclJi ,' 'cojn,:
very lod of Sped. ;.d tis m;id Sip jo






































A WICKED GANDER.
The geese have been driven into the fields 1b the
old man. The man is now going home, and an old
Sganlder i, looking nt him. As soon as the man is out.
Sof sight the gOander will lead the geese into the woods.
The Ie man will have trouble in finding them.
' -..




































THE IBEX.
THE ibex, or wild goat, is larger than the Comhmon
t;ale goat. It has wonderful horns, which arch com-
pletely over to the back of the neck, and weigh- as much
as fifteen or sixteen pounds. Its forelecgs are shorter
than its hind ones, which makes it easier, for the alnial
to ascend than to descend the mountains.









































MfY DOG__j~S.


This is the picture of my two dogs. Aaiggie and
Flossie. Every dlay when I go for a. walk. the dogs
in,-ist on .g_.oing'" with) me. Sometimes they walk along(
quietly Iy my side. I-bt more often they run races a eross
the fields, coniinlg backt to me every few minnuts.


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LEILA.
Le ii a wa s sit tff i htkil 6' ut when(U tile eatt. pil
-W ith one jnpLeila i lmded on the uttCs I i; i
-: t Cl J u m p( )v C 1 t II II h o f ll l
A111. kept her 1) h t e e t hore 1' 7g
-,it did not. f _- i t, it Cv she mtbt eu4 'i t 114-,
onk~ ofr ~e was~ foi-:Ed to give~ herl~ A yijde.




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THE CORYPHENE.

THE coryplhele is a most voracious creature, feeding
S chiefly uponl the finny inhabl:itants of the water, and is

S especially noted for its attacks upon the flying'-islh.
These b eautifil and lunfllortuate little flying-fisli, between
i the lhungiry corphlene below and the voracious albatross
. above, lead a risky life.

__ .-- .









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A PATIENT DONKEY.
What. a merry time these boys are having on their
donkey! All four have clambered on his back, lad are
trying' to stay on !by holding on I to -each other. One of
them, however,. seems to 1-)e sli)pp:ilgi off. The donkey is
-very patient, and does not mind hi lloaId.





































A KING'S G-R EY II ND.
i Chitrles I., kilng of Eln esp-eciai;lly of greyhounds. He l;nl one tIivourite, aliled
lBevis, -of wlicl lihe never tied. he doThg n't(s ;hlw vs
inl the king's rInn, and tlie ki. -.I :te` stroked limi l ,.
She talked to his mijnisters or gI.uV tlieni lhis orders.
















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A MITUATTL SURPRISE.


THE royal Bengal Tiger is fouled ill the jullgles
of India. This ferocious beast,. n cat as lirge as an ox,
is the fiercest of all an.imuls. alnd is particularly feared
b- the natives. Thought they o not always attack meni
unlless provoked. whenll they halve once tasted hluni
flesh they will eat no ot.her.







































THIE 0(4 OF MARATHON.
AT the great battle of Maratholn, fought between the
: Athenians andl the Persians. one of the Athenians was
:I COipalnied into battle !)y a. M1olossiiln doo.: .andI so
. greatly did the (dog distilng-ish himself. that his effigy
SwaIs sc(1llpture1d beside that of his master on a. monumentalI
tablet that was set, up to their memory.

--, .. .....- _









































THE COCK AND THEE CHICKENS.
Who would think in looking at the little chickens
that they will some day be as large as the great cock
that is with them! The cock scratches up the dirt in
order that the chickens may find worms to eat. I hope
that they will find all they want.


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A HUNTING PONY.
This man is shooting at some birds. He is on a
pony, but the pony does not seem to miind the noise of
the gun. Most ponies would run away if they heard
a gun g'o offI. but this one has been carefully trained,
and he is not at all afraid.




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