• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Preface
 Frontispiece
 Maine
 New Hampshire
 Vermont
 Massachusetts
 Rhode Island
 Connecticut
 New York
 New Jersey
 Pennsylvania
 Delaware
 Maryland
 Virginia - West Virginia
 North Carolina
 South Carolina
 Georgia
 Florida
 Alabama
 Mississippi
 Kentucky
 Tennessee
 Ohio
 Indiana
 Michigan
 Illinois
 Wisconsin
 Minnesota
 Iowa
 Missouri
 Arkansas
 Louisiana
 Texas
 New Mexico
 Arizona
 Indian territory - Oklahoma
 Nebraska
 Kansas
 Wyoming
 Colorado
 Utah
 Nevada
 California
 Oregon
 Washington
 Idaho
 Montana
 North Dakota - South Dakota
 Alaska
 Rank of states and territories
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Rhymes of the states
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085529/00001
 Material Information
Title: Rhymes of the states
Physical Description: 96 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Newkirk, Garrett, 1847-1921
Fenn, Harry, 1838-1911 ( Illustrator )
Century Company ( Publisher )
De Vinne Press ( Printer )
Publisher: Century Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1896
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Territories and possessions -- Juvenile literature -- United States   ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- United States   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1896   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre: Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Summary: Geographic, demographic and historical facts about each state admited by date of publication (45), with an accompanying map and a poem. Also includes information on the Indian Territory, the Oklahoma Territory and the territory of Alaska.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
Statement of Responsibility: by Garrett Newkirk ; With drawings by Harry Fenn after sketches by the author.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00085529
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224297
notis - ALG4558
oclc - 00550499
lccn - 16003079

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Half Title
        Half Title
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Dedication
        Dedication
    Preface
        Preface
    Frontispiece
        Page 1
    Maine
        Page 2
        Page 3
    New Hampshire
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Vermont
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Massachusetts
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Rhode Island
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Connecticut
        Page 12
        Page 13
    New York
        Page 14
        Page 15
    New Jersey
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Pennsylvania
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Delaware
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Maryland
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Virginia - West Virginia
        Page 24
        Page 25
    North Carolina
        Page 26
        Page 27
    South Carolina
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Georgia
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Florida
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Alabama
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Mississippi
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Kentucky
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Tennessee
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Ohio
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Indiana
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Michigan
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Illinois
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Wisconsin
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Minnesota
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Iowa
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Missouri
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Arkansas
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Louisiana
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Texas
        Page 62
        Page 63
    New Mexico
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Arizona
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Indian territory - Oklahoma
        Page 68
        Page 69
    Nebraska
        Page 70
        Page 71
    Kansas
        Page 72
        Page 73
    Wyoming
        Page 74
        Page 75
    Colorado
        Page 76
        Page 77
    Utah
        Page 78
        Page 79
    Nevada
        Page 80
        Page 81
    California
        Page 82
        Page 83
    Oregon
        Page 84
        Page 85
    Washington
        Page 86
        Page 87
    Idaho
        Page 88
        Page 89
    Montana
        Page 90
        Page 91
    North Dakota - South Dakota
        Page 92
        Page 93
    Alaska
        Page 94
        Page 95
    Rank of states and territories
        Page 96
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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-




















































































The Baldwin Library
Univcrity


MU M1 i i i iIi l


ana~n~naasllRaaarae~Illllaass~~ Illbra~l~a~aa~ll


















RHYMES OF THE STATES






RHYMES OF THE STATES





BY

GARRETT NEWKIRK


WITH DRAWINGS
AFTER SKETCHES


BY HARRY FENN
BY THE AUTHOR


NEW YORK
THE CENTURY CO.
1896



































Copyright, 1894, 1895, 1896,
by GARRETT NEWKIRK


All rights reserved


THE DEVINNE PRESS.























DEDICATION

TO THE BOYS AND GIRLS OF
ALL THE STATES, WITH THE WISH THAT
EACH ONE MAY BE A GOOD AND FAITHFUL CITIZEN OF
THE STATE, AND OF THE UNITED STATES, THIS
BOOK IS AFFECTIONATELY INSCRIBED
BY THE AUTHOR









PREFACE


"Thirty days hath September,
April, June, and November,
All the rest have thirty-one,
Excepting February alone:
To this we twenty-eight assign,
Till leap-year gives it twenty-nine."

This well-known rhyme a familiar aid to every boy and girl in
memorizing the number of days in the twelve months -suggested
to the author of this little book a similar series of rhymes, which
should assist children in studying the history and geography of the
United States. It is no easy task to fix in the mind the location,
outlines, physical features, and historical record of all the States of
our American Union.
The author has tried to reduce all these distinctive facts into the
form of simple rhymes, easily impressed upon the memory, and ac-
companied by pictures which illustrate the ideas contained in the
verses. In the pictures, moreover, each State has been shown on
a single page; and, in addition to an outline map of the State,
there is given a caricature sketch of some object or animal ivhich
the State might be said to resemble in form. These, the author
believes, will prove very useful in fixing in the child's mind the
shapes and the main physical features of the different States.
The Rhymes have been carefully and artistically illustrated by
Mr. Harry Fenn, and the entire series of verses and pictures has
been published in the pages of St. Nicholas within the last two
years.
The silhouettes of the States, small as they are, are accurately
drawn to scale by Mr. H. L. Bridwell. They make an interesting
and instructive page which not only shows the form but gives the
comparative size of each State.





RHYMES OF THE STATES.


7815
S, 'I AP
fj 12*1 M9 4990 _
831s







If;
^ 2SMMO" ~ ~ ~ ,q21 SM*~ L Ia ^ i ~~








ut
* mmml .&^^9 *a>^

840
CI x^ njH- if ifWAW *~
V .AKT sH^^^R^^^ NE~lBRASKA^H





*F
*f
*O
^ALL THE STATEES^ SHN UPON THE SAME SCALE.
ALL THE S 376 SHOWN UPON THE SAME SCALE.





RHYMES OF THE STATES


ctI e MAINE.

Square miles, 33,040.
Population (1890), 66I,o86.
(. Akg' t In rank according to popula-
tion, the 3oth State.
Counties, 16.
O ,,A AoR. Representatives in Congress, 4.
I Presidential Electoral votes, 6.

J, First settlements-about 1623
-at Monhegan and Saco.









For nearly 200 years Maine was under Massa-
chusetts.
First called Province of Mayne," by charter of
Charles I., 1639.
Admitted into the Union, 1820.
The poet Longfellow was born in Portland, February
27, 1807.
From 12,000 to 15,000 men are engaged directly in
the fisheries.
Yearly value of fisheries products, about $3,000,000. rur or.
Yearly value of lumber products, about $ i 2,000,000.
Gold and silver (1880), about $8,000.
Principal quarries, limestone.
Popular name: The Pine Tree State."






RHYMES OF THE STATES


Hurrah lor the UnteStates I
And each link in theL chain:
And kIr our stories here begi n
,'lth the northeast State ofa.lia) w.\




Mlain-has the very finest tree
Of cedar, spruce, and pine; '-
And ships ,re built along her coast
For sailing on the brine





Some thousands of her eple go
-fishing in &th sea.
They catch enough to seat oe,
k-some ofor you and oie,





S easant isle has she
er quiet bays,
ere people come from other States
To spend the.summer days. -'





RHYMES OF THE STATES


NEW HAMPSHIRE.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

Square miles, 9,305.
Population (1890), 376,530.
In rank according to population, 33d.
Counties, io.
Representatives in Congress, 2.
Electoral votes, 4.

First settlements at Dover and Portsmouth, 1623.
Annexed to Massachusetts, 1641.
Became again a separate province, 1741.

Value of manufactured boots and shoes, 1890,
nearly $12,000,000. (
Value of manufactured cot-
ton goods, nearly $22,-
000,000. o
Value of gold and silver '
product (1880), about
$30,000. M
Popular name: "The Granite Tom &wk.
State."






RHYMES OF THE STATES


V


hWAM


r- .


~; -K
-it.


hti.. .~s


NEW: HAM PSH IRE.

"Th'- (;ranite St.t:." shirp point: north,
Has no-iritin.s alld thei \\hit-.
B,:cau-r. th: :n:ii' up.n their top's
S... :tn iii m kl;:e. th-m I bright

This i- a pile~ira St -it' ,.I.er':in
Thr' .ummrr-r-t;nm, to:i d,, ll:
T he air it .,:.-:t, the r nights ::r, o:o:l.
T h,. I.pi, treat ,ou': ll.

Six th:.i-s and I,-et lI:l unt \\'a.i-in;gt,:n
Stand I higlhr than thli: ,ea,
A nd IXr,,m the: t.,p \...ndri u. \i,\'.
Is lih.-d o:n-_ JI, in thrie:.

A li-rg.e ainit nt if *.r:iaite stone.
Of color Llu,: .:r gri\,
Is tal.:rn Irr:n thli quirri : hI-r
To cities, i:r :awa\'.

\l M .:h d vl : diTV a I:.: 11:r -*if..-. r.-.: [I -h-, .::. :. I h- M ...ui-l :r.


_ ----~1111~-1~11~8--


m I


.'L -


Ji


: .
i.1.





RHYMES OF THE STATES


5 0| oiTPELIER.
P_


o VERMONT.

SSquare miles, 9,565.
j Population (1890), 332,422.
S" In rank according to population, 36th.
,J Counties, 14.
*o Representatives in Congress, 2.
SElectoral votes, 4.

SFirst State admitted into the Union after
the formation of the Government;
S .. date of admission, March 4, 1791.

Number of pounds of maple-sugar ( 890), 14,123,921.
Gallons of syrup, 218,252.
Value of paper manufactured (1890), $2,289,000.
Value of products of marble and stone works, $3,249,000.
Principal quarries: marble, slate, and
limestone.
Vermont wais settled largely from New
Hampshire and Massachusetts.
Claimed for a long time by both
New Hampshire and New York.
Popular name: "The Green Mountain
State."






RHYMES OF THE STATES 7












Ver-mont we call this pleasant State
Because the hills are green-
b-eautiful and rich are they,
-For ~.es between.







The cattle in theM es graze,
SOr rest beneathhe trees; !
Sweetf'golden but er here is made,
And ~Very famous cheese.
4 2k -~----











And wholesome bread, and milk, and cream,
And maple-sugar sweet, -
How happy must the children be Z
With such good things to eat. -







- Green Mountain'Boys," the troops were called -
Who followed GeeralStar ..
And,.Ethan Allen, when' bra P ...
Was captured in the dark.i -'-
'-,. :---z- -_----





RHYMES OF THE STATES


16-0 /,Ies .


coD


MASSACHUSETTS.


ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.


Square miles, 8,315.
Population (1890), 2,238,943.
In rank according to population, 6th.
Counties, 14.
Representatives in Congress, 13.
Electoral votes, 15.

First settlements at Plymouth in 1620; at Salem, .
1628; at Boston, 1630.

Value of boots and shoes, factory product (1890), $I 16,387,900.
Value of cotton goods (1890), $100,202,882.
Massachusetts has been the home of several of America's most
famous poets, Bryant (in early life), Emerson, Longfellow,
Holmes, Whittier, Lowell, Aldrich, and others.
Popularly called "The Old Bay State."





RHYMES OF THE STATES


E -J,. _5; L l- J -- ^- -
... (To Massachusetts next we come,
// "' With Boston, by the sea,
.Where brave men went aboard the ships
\And cast out British tea.



And here it was, at Bunker Hill,
'.Thaht our forefathers true, '
' A\ gallatbattle bravely fought
.- 'For freedom and for you.


SHere Plymouth, too, and Lexington,
Each has its tale to tell,
Of men who suffered, men who fought.
And did their dut\ -well. ,_' "


- ~-,----

1


And Massahsetts has an arm,
A narrow strip of land
Extending out into the sea,
An elbow % and a hand.






- -- ------- ., ..: '-mi 11 i iiz.!'


~ tk


4-


A st





RHYMES OF THE STATES


RHODE ISLAND.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

NAMED FOR AN ISLAND IN NARRAGANSETT BAY. THIS ISLAND IS
BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN THE "VINLAND" VISITED
BY THE NORTHMEN ABOUT A. D. I000.

Square miles, 1,250.
Population (1890), 345,506.
In rank according to population, 35th.
Counties, 5.
Representatives in Congress, 2.
Electoral votes, 4.

Two capitals, Providence and Newport.
Value of manufactured cotton goods (1890), $27,000,000.
Woolen and worsted goods, about $32,000,000.
Manufactured jewelry, $8,000,000.
General Nathanael Greene and Commodore Oliver H. Perry were
natives of this State.
First settlement, by Roger Williams, at Providence, 1636.
It is popularly called Little Rhody."





RHYMES OF THE STATES


S Good Rog e illiams was a man
Wh loved his neighbors well;
SBut for his faith they made him, seek
S Another place to dwell.



Among the Indians, in the woods,
To live in peace he went,
; And down by Narragansett Bay
He made a settlement.



f>.' Although Rhode Island State is small,
SIts census-roll is full,
Its mighty factories turn to cloth-
Our cotton and our wool. '


-- --- -- ---




RIIODE ISLAND.

PROVIDENCE





RHYMES OF THE STATES


CONNECTICUT.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

Square miles, 4990.
Population (1890), 746,258.
In rank according to population, 29th.
Counties, 8.
Representatives in Congress, 4.
Electoral votes, 6.

First settlement, by the Dutch, at Hartford, 1633; but they soon sold
out to the English. Other settlements followed at New Ha-
ven, Windsor, and Weathersfield, by people from Massachusetts.

Value of manufactured brass and copper, and all kinds of brass and
copper ware (1890), about $25,000,000.
Value of manufactured hats and caps, and materials for (1890),
nearly $9,000,000.
Leads in the manufacture of firearms and ammunition.
Principal quarries, red sandstone.
Popular name: "The Nutmeg State."





RHYMES OF THE STATES


_ -_ The. State of Connecticut
'-". You may know on the map,
Because it resembles
A little boy's cap. -. .
l ,: aJ1 ,. -
l /t -J


-.._ ,- -- -,-
cits capital, Hartford,
Is. worthy of pride
JIs. famedi" far-nd. wide. l
s. nd, wide:
0 AN


SNow"these six noble States
..-New--England we name,-
-Because their first settlrs'
- Fro~i~old England came.


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RHYMES OF THE STATES


NEW YORK.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

NAMED IN HONOR OF THE DUKE OF YORK.

Square miles, 49,170.
Population (1890), 5,997,853.
In rank according to population, Ist.
Counties, 60.
Representatives in Congress, 34.
Electoral votes, 36.

Printing and publishing, value of products (1890), $69,000,000.
Flouring and grist-mill products (1890), $52,000,000.
Foundry-and machine-shop products (1890), $72,000,000.
Pounds of butter (1890), nearly 1oo,ooo,odo, greatest product of
any State.
Hudson River discovered by Henry Hudson, 1609.
First settlement of New York, on Manhattan Island, by the Dutch,
1613-14.
The island was bought from the Indians in 1626 for $24 and a
copper kettle.
There are many beautiful lakes in New York State, and two ranges
of mountains, the Catskills and Adirondacks.
Popular name: "The Empire State."


14






RHYMES OF THE STATES


----'- '.
-.--C ---: -



.. ^' -_--- 7-- -: -:--_ .. -


New York is called the "Empire State
And rightly bears the name;
As first in people, wealth, and trrdl:.
No State contests her claim.


Into her ports great vessels throrn-
To make her rich and great,
.nd New York City, like a que..n.
Sits proudly at her gate.


he grand old Hudson in
.By many a city flows;
An westward roll iagars
s every traveler lnows

Lon Island 's like wimr
But qtT 00 ig to fry
A "Sandy Hook' s ar
SAnd Brooklyn mar


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32-1 r-6leds


NEW N

YORK.


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RHYMES OF THE STATES


NEW JERSEY.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

NAMED FOR THE ISLE OF JERSEY, ENGLAND, AND IN HONOR OF SIR
GEORGE CARTERET, BECAUSE HE WAS A NATIVE OF THE ISLE.

Square miles, 7,815.
Population, 1,444,933.
In rank according to population, I8th.
Counties, 21.
Representatives in Congress, 8.
Electoral votes, io.

Value of manufactured silk and silk-goods (1890), $30,760,371.
Foundry and machine-shop products, iron and steel (1890), nearly
$30,000,000.
Leads in the manufacture of pottery and glass.
Value of patent and enameled leather product (1890), $5,430,000.
Number of bushels of potatoes grown (1890), white, 4,055,851.
Number of bushels of potatoes grown (1890), sweet, 2,254,344.
The first settlements of New Jersey were by the Dutch, 1617 to
1623, at Bergen and Fort Nassau.
Popular name: "The Blue State."





RHYMES OF THE STATES


-,For factories and .thriving farms
New Jersey is renowned;
'The storied Catskills northward rise,
SWhile southward plains abound.
For fine sea-bathing thousands come
From cities far and near,
':To Atlantic City, Asbury Park,
SAnd Long Branch, every year.
'.If like this State a boy were washed,
I He surely would go frantic -
His face in the river Delaware,
His back by the 'Atlantic! '"


, Across the frozen Delaware,
SYour books will tell you when,
V Washington went to Trenton town
And captured a thousand men.


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19


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RHYMES OF THE STATES


PENNSYLVANIA.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

Square miles, 45,215.
Population (1890), 5,258,014.
In rank according to population, 2d.
Counties, 67.
Representatives in Congress, 30.
Electoral votes, 32.

Value of glass manufactured (1890), over $17,000,000.
Value of foundry and machine-shop products, iron and steel, nails
and iron work (1890), $362,965,647.
Tons of coal produced (1889), 81,719,059.
Dozens of eggs (1890), over 50,000,000.

Philadelphia means The City of Brotherly Love." It was founded
by the Quakers, and Philadelphia has ever been one of the
most peaceable and law-abiding of cities.
The First Continental Congress met here September 5, 1774; and,
with the exception of short periods, Philadelphia was the seat
of government till 18oo.
A popular name for Pennsylvania is "The Keystone State," be-
cause if the original thirteen from New Hampshire to Georgia
were placed in the form of an arch, Pennsylvania would occupy
the middle position, being seventh from either base.






RHYMES OF THE STATES


The map of Pennsylvania
Represents a flag afloat;
And in its southeast corner
Philadelphia we note.

This State was settled by the Friends
(Or "Quakers") led by Penn;
Who bought the land from Indians,
And treated them like men.


Petroleum, coal, and iron
Are found within her hills;
Fine farms in every valley,
And many rolling-mills.
And once in Philadelphia
Pealed out that famous bell
That rung in Independence Day
The day you love so well.


( 1


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RHYMES OF THE STATES


DELAWARE.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

Square miles, 2,050.
Population (1890), 168,493.
In rank according to population, 42d.
Counties, 3.
Representatives in Congress, I.
Electoral votes, 3.

Railroad and street cars, making and repairing (1890), $3,291,293.
Ship-building (1890), $2,044,313.
Leather, morocco (1890), $4,015,694.
The Delaware River was discovered by the Dutch navigator Hud-
son, in 1609.
First settlement made by thirty Hollanders under De Vries, near
Lewes, 161o, and destroyed by the Indians three years later.
Next settlement by Swedes and Finns, in 1638, who called the
country Nya Sveriga, or New Sweden. Their forts-were at-
tacked and captured by the Dutch, in 1655. The land came
into English possession, 1664. It was governed as part of
Pennsylvania from 1683 to 1703. Declared itself independent
of Great Britain, 1776. Furnished a valiant regiment for the
Revolutionary War, and was the first State to ratify the Con-
stitution, December 7, 1787.
Popular name: The Blue Hen State."





RHYMES OF THE STATES


Well, I declare!-here's Delaware, 'e
Shaped like an upturned' shoe;
Its capital marks just the place
To put the button, too. r

And Wilmington is near the toe' -'
Along the Bay it lies;
For steamships, carriages, and cars
This city takes the prize.

Whoever seeks to buy fine fruit
Should go to Delaware;
Her orchards are about as good ,",
As you '11 find anywhere. "

i By wagon-loads and car-loads, too,
e She ships the very best;
\ In boxes, baskets, crates, and cans P%111
It travels east and west, /





RHYMES OF THE STATES


MARYLAND.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

NAMED IN HONOR OF HENRIETTA MARIA, WIFE OF CHARLES I. OF
ENGLAND.

Square miles, 12,210.
Population (1890), 1,042,390.
In rank according to population, 27th.
Counties, 23.
Representatives in Congress, 6.
Electoral votes, 8.

Tons of coal produced (1889), nearly 3,000,000.
Ounces of gold (1889), 501 (worth about $20 an ounce-a little
over $io,ooo).
Value of canned and preserved foods, oysters, fish, fruits, and vege-
tables, $10,030,500.
Value of oysters (1890), $4,467,325.

Two hundred people sent from England by Lord Baltimore, in
1633, to make the settlement of Maryland, were brought over
in two vessels named the "Ark" and the "Dove."
There was for a long time a dispute between Maryland and Penn-
sylvania over their boundary line. This was settled in 1760
by what was called, from the names of the surveyors who lo-
cated it, "Mason and Dixon's line."
Area of the District-of Columbia, 70 square miles.
Population (1890), 230,392.
Popular name: "The Monumental State."





RHYMES OF THE STATES


The "Land of Mary," England's queen,
Named by Lord Baltimore,
Upon the Bay of Chesapeake
Owns oyster-beds "galore!'"
(g stelan ,ies "
East of the Bay lie farming-lands,
Where corn and wheat are grown;
The western hills for scenery
And minerals are known. ,.

Along the west and southern sides
Potomac River flows;
The District of Columbia
This State's rich lands inclose.' '-

The Nation's Capital is there
With all its weighty cares.
Where Congress and the President
Attend to our affairs. .








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RHYMES OF THE STATES


VIRGINIA.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

NAMED FOR "THE VIRGIN QUEEN" ELIZABETH.

Square miles (since the separation of West Virginia),
42,450.
Population (1890), 1,665,980.
In rank according to population, 15th.
Counties, 118.
Representatives in Congress, Io.
Electoral votes, 12.

Value of flour and grist-mill products .(1890), $12,000,000.
Value of tobacco grown, and its products, about $22,000,000.
Value of gold produced (1889), about $2,500.
Value of silver (by U. S. Government Report), $12.
First settlement of Virginia was at Jamestown, 1607.
First negro slaves were brought here from Africa, 1619.
Popular names: The Old Dominion," and Mother of Presidents."






WEST VIRGINIA.

Square miles, 23,000.
Population, 762,794.
In rank according to population, 28th.
Counties, 54.
Representatives in Congress, 4.
Electoral votes, 6.

Value of steel and iron products (1890), $I I,ooo,ooo.
Salt produced per year in the Kanawha and Ohio Valleys, about
100,000 barrels.





RHYMES OF THE STATES


"A l thi-" "- ne irg- -- -"'
'_8f e'(F L- -- .



,"V














r had an earlier seitlm nt
Than any other State:
h,,

















And none can boast a prouder list
Of sons both good and great;f
The cradles of Virginia
Rocked seven little boys,
Who, seven future Presidents,
SEELN GTWere playing with their toys.
S h' l a Here Washington and Jefferson,
SJames Madison and Monroe,
o And nn ne HarrisonTaylor and Tyler, j
ere born long yeais ago.

** ;M^ In West Virginia there 's salt
ARL Ando coal ad iron -ore.
S; But Virginia's old plantationof
-,. A H e re near the eastern shr.on
.A 0





RHYMES OF THE STATES


NORTH CAROLINA.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

Square miles, 52,250.
Population, 1,617,947.
In rank according to population, I6th.
Counties, 94.
Representatives in Congress, 9.
Electoral votes, I I.

Value of products (1890), cotton goods, $9,563,000; tobacco and
snuff, $4,783,000; tar and turpentine, $1,705,000; gold (1889),
$161,291 ; silver (1889), $3,200. (Tar and turpentine prod-
ucts in 1870 were valued at about $3,300,000.)
Bushels of sweet potatoes (1890), 5,665,391.
Carolina was at first considered a part of Virginia. Settlements
were attempted before 1600, but all were prevented or de-
stroyed by Indians.
Charter of the Province of Carolina (named for Queen Caroline)
was given by Charles II., 1663.
This charter covered a strip of territory from the Atlantic to the
Pacific Ocean. Nobody knew then how far apart the oceans
were, and people made maps largely by guess. Afterward, for
a time, the State's western boundary was the Mississippi River.
Carolina was divided into North and South, 1729.
Popular name: "The Old North State."






RHYMES OF THE STATES


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"ll' tOiLIihed tb \ Atlin tic 0 ears
r- ~jihd the t.-.0t l 0 lc l

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An ~d ic) th.c? ,. Io a mir.-l
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W~ho-c pitch i-,c-~rt~
For making tLurlj.:ritinL





RHYMES OF THE STATES


SOUTH CAROLINA.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

Square miles, 30,570.
Population (1890), I,151,149.
In rank according to population, 23d.
Counties, 32.
Representatives in Congress, 7.
Electoral votes, 9.

Acres planted in cotton (1890), 1,987,469.
Number of cotton-bales produced, 747,140.
Acres in rice (1890), 42,238.
Pounds of rice produced, 30,338,951.
Value of fertilizers from phosphate-beds (1890), $4,417,000.
Gold (1889), about $45,000.
Silver (1889), $200.
In 1850 the State produced about 16o,ooo,ooo pounds of rice.
The State is famous for a fine cotton known as Sea Island Cotton."
On April 12, 1861, the attack was made on Fort Sumter in Charles-
ton Harbor. This was the beginning, "the first gun," of our
terrible Civil War.
Popular name: "The Palmetto State."






RHYMES OF THE STATES


i I


1
.ith Car ,na ,



A. rn:l a l rce ilI.aurit i jl ric : '-'
But t is -IJ:om that hi-r chiiIlrLn
Can .*., T ,li.:n] :n th l ic]':



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TI:i,-. Marin.mn and hi l, band,
\\ h. .i..,nt l.r rind -.-.ndJence
A nd I .. e.Il the -ir n.ti .e lIand:.



,l Th.:ri, t i. ['lea aint harbor
\\ith '..rts ii Chailct.on Bay,
SAn il here i:rn April mornlrig
LBrou-,ht in a fatal day.


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.:'--i.Li-.^ |

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RHYMES OF THE STATES


GEORGIA.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

Square miles, 59,475.
Population (1890), 1,837,353.
In rank according to population, 12th.
Counties, 136.
Representatives in Congress, I I.
Electoral votes, 13.

Acres planted in cotton (1890), 3,345,104.
Number of bales produced, 1,191,846.
Bushels of wheat (1880), 3,159,771.
Bushels of corn (1890), 29,000,000.
Value of cotton goods manufactured (1890), $12,075,629.
Gold product (1889), $119,000.
Silver product (1889), about $400.
Since 1829 the mines of Georgia have produced between eight and
ten million dollars' worth of gold.
The first settlement of Georgia was at Savannah, in the spring of
1733.
Atlanta is sometimes called "The Chicago of the South," because
of its rapid growth since the Civil War.
Popular name: "The Empire State of the South."







RHYMES OF THE STATES


General Oglethorpe from England
A colony did bring;
And named the thirteenth of the States
For the second George, his King.

Now Georgia's called by many
"The Empire State of the South";
Its largest port, Savannah,
Is near the Savannah's mouth.

All grains are grown in Georgia,
And cotton,-many bales;
It is as large as England,
Including also Wales.

The capital, Atlanta,
A city far renowned,
In beauty has arisen,
From her ashes on the ground.

50 Miles .-





RHYMES OF THE STATES


FLORIDA.

FOURTEENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1845.

Square miles, 58,680.
Population (1890), 391,422.
In rank according to population, 32d.
Counties, 39.
Representatives in Congress, 2.
Electoral votes, 4.

Oranges produced in 1885, 900,000 boxes; in 1894, 4,800,000.
Value of lumber products (1890), about $5,500,000.
Value of sponge fisheries product (1890), $281,754.
The first European visitors were Ponce de Leon and his followers,
who landed in 1513 at or near the site of St. Augustine. A
fort was built there in I565. Land again explored by De Soto
in 1539. Pensacola was settled by Spaniards in 1696.
Florida was ceded to Great Britain by Spain in exchange for Cuba,
1763. Ceded again to Spain by United States, Treaty of 1783.
Restored to the United States by Treaty of 1819. Possession
taken, 1821.
Florida was the home of the Seminole Indians till 1842, when, after
a seven years' war, most of them were sent to the Indian Ter-
ritory.
Popular name: "The Everglade State," or "The Flowery State."





RHYMES OF THE STATES 33







FLO RRI IX






The gulf and ocean, near together,
t Make this a land of pleasant weather.
You all like oranges, I know,
And here in Florida they grow.
A subject of the Spanish King
Of yore came here to seek a spring:
He hoped its waters would restore
Lost youth and health to him once more.
He found great reptiles with long jaws;
Scales hard like flint, and teeth like saws.
And he was young enough that day
To turn about and run away.
And in this tropic clime is seen
Our oldest town-St. Augustine.

% -





RHYMES OF THE STATES


ALABAMA.

Once a part of the territory of Georgia, except a strip along the
coast which was held by Spain as part of Florida. This ter-
ritory was made a part of territory of Mississippi, 1798. Sep-
arated from Mississippi in 1817, and admitted to the Union
in 1819.

Square miles, 52,250.
Population, 1,513,017.
In rank according to population, 17th.
Counties, 65.
Representatives in Congress, 9.
Electoral votes, 1o.

Acres of cotton-fields (1890), 2, 761,165.
Number of cotton-bales produced, 915,210.
Bushels of Indian corn, 30,000,000.
Gallons of molasses and sorghum, 3,576,120.
Tons of coal (1890), 3,572,903.
Foundry and machine-shop products: iron and steel (1890), nearly
$15,000,000; gold (1889), $1500; silver, $85.
First settlement in Alabama was by the French in 1702.
Popular name: "The Cotton State."






RHYMES OF THE STATES 35


i -

S,, Long, long ago some Indians,
By other tribes oppressed,
S' Found here a home and named it
"Alabama"-"l Here we rest."
And now in Alabama
No warriors red remain,
But white and colored people
Raise cotton, corn, and cane.
There's Birmingham to northward--:
A growing, busy hive, ..
With mines of coal and iron,
Where manufactures thrive.
lt South, are the bay and harbor,
And city called Mobile;
V_. But in Montgomery city
Is Alabamna's seal.
,' .






RHYMES OF THE STATES


MISSISSIPPI.

SEVENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION UNDER THE CON-
STITUTION, 18I 7.

Square miles, 46,310.
Population, 1,289,600.
In rank according to population, 21st.
Counties, 76.
Representatives in Congress, 7.
Electoral votes, 9.

Bushels of corn (1890), 26,000,000.
Acres of cotton-fields, 2,883,000.
Bales of cotton, 1,154,125.
Value of cotton-seed oil and cake, $2,406,628.
Value of cotton goods manufactured, $1,333,000.
Value of lumber products (1890), $5,670,000.
The southern part of Mississippi was once held by Spain as part
of Florida. The rest was claimed and settled by French
(Natchez founded in 1716). Part of the territory was con-
veyed by Napoleon to the United States by the Louisiana
purchase," 1803.
Popular name: "The Eagle State."






RHYMES OF THE STATES


Algonquins pointing to the stream
Spake to their sons and daughters:
"The Mississippi 't is," they said;
Which means the "Father of Waters."
To where Missouri has its source,
Among Montana's fountains;
The Mississippi should have had
One name,-from Gulf to. mountains.
This State in shape is like a coat: .
This will not be forgotten
If you remember that its soil I
Ranks high for growing cotton.
And as a name for the capital, j
Her people have selected
That of a very valiant man-
A President, twice elected.





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I
..........





RHYMES OF THE STATES


KENTUCKY.

EXPLORED BY DANIEL BOONE, 1769. FIRST TOWNS, HARRODS-
BURG AND BOONESBOROUGH, I774-75. MADE A COUNTY
OF VIRGINIA, I776. THE SECOND STATE
ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1792.

Square miles, 40,400.
Population (1890), 1,858,635.
In rank according to population, I th.
Counties, I19.
Representatives in Congress, I.
Electoral votes, 13.

Number of live-stock on hand (I890), 70,000,000; of which horses
were 401,000; mules were 151,000; and swine were 2,036,000.
Pounds of tobacco, 221,880,303.
Value of flour and grist-mill products, $9,681,000.
Value of cooperage, cordage, and twine, $2,574,000.
Popular name: "The Blue-Grass State."






RHYMES OF THE STATES 39






A mighty hunter-Daniel Boone-
There never was one bolder--
Went to Kentucky, all alone,
With his rifle on his shoulder.

Then he returned and brought his friends
To help him take possession:
Strong, hardy people, too, they were,
Of courage- and discretion.-

The blue-grass region" of the State
Saw many a bloody battle:
'T is famous for tobacco farms,
Fine horses, sheep, and cattle.

Kentucky has the Mammoth Cave,-
A palace under ground,-
And there the Echo River flows,
Where eyeless fish are found.


L ~ 41





RHYMES OF THE STATES


TENNESSEE.

THIRD STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, I794.

Square miles, 42,050.
Population (1890), 1,767,518.
In rank according to population, I3th.
Counties, 96.
Representatives in Congress, lo.
Electoral votes, 12.

Value of lumber and log products, (1890), over $12,000,000.
Value of flour and grist-mill products (1890), $12,474,000.
Value of marble and stone work, nearly $i,ooo,ooo.
Value of gold (1880), 97 ounces, worth nearly $2000.
Gallons of milk (1890), 107,000,000.
Pounds of butter (1890), 28,314,000.
Horses owned, 300,000; mules, 200,000; chickens, 12,000,000.
As told in the Rhyme of North Carolina, Tennessee was at first
part of that State. First permanent settlement made near
Knoxville, in 1756.
During the Civil War, more important battles were fought in Ten-
nessee than in any other State except Virginia.
Popular name: "The Volunteer State."






RHYMES OF THE STATES


',l. .-.A "' ." "--- -- -









And across, at either end.

This State mines coal and iron
And marble, pink or green;
It has a healthy climate,
And many a lovely scene.

Knoxville, Nashville, Memphis,
Are handsome cities three,-
And Chattanooga also
Is worth a trip to see.

The heights of Lookout Mountain
Above the mist and cloud,
Once knew the tread of armies,
And roar of battle loud.


'I


TENNESSEE. -


C~ ___


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RHYMES OF THE STATES


OHIO.

FOURTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1802.

Square miles, 41,o60.
Population (1890), 3,672,316.
In rank according to population, 4th.
Counties, 88.
Representatives in Congress, 21.
Electoral votes, 23.

Value of flouring and grist-mill products (1890), $39,468,409.
Value of agricultural machinery manufactured, $14,338,258.
Coal (1889), about 1o,ooo,ooo tons.
Bushels of apples (1890), 13,789,278.
Number of sheep, 4,060,729.
Pounds of wool, 20,987,574.
Pounds of butter, 74,990,307.
Ohio was part of the Northwest Territory (set apart 1787, and
slavery prohibited therein).
The Ohio River was discovered by La Salle about 1669. Country
was later claimed by both French and English. Ceded by
France to Great Britain, treaty of 1763. First permanent
settlement, at Marietta, in 1788.
President Wm. Henry Harrison was elected while a resident of
Ohio, though born in Virginia.
President Benjamin Harrison was born in Ohio, but elected while
a resident of Indiana.
The Presidents Grant, Garfield, and Hayes were natives of Ohio.
Popular name, The Buckeye State."






RHYMES OF THE STATES


Ohio is proud of cities three,-
The name of each begins with C

She 's also given Presidents three,
Their names beginning with H or G.

'T is a land of farms, and homes, and schools,
A land where law and order rules.

Remember her capital's name, to know
Who found America, long ago.

Now tell the name -or pay a fine--
Of th' river along her southern line.

By looking sharp, you will not fail
In Erie Lake to find a whale.


Mich


''al-l-r






RHYMES OF THE STATES


INDIANA.

SIXTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1816.

Square miles, 36,350.
Population (1890), 2,192,404.
In rank according to population, 6th.
Counties, 92.
Representatives in Congress, 13.
Electoral votes, 15.

Value of flour and grist-mill products (1890), $31,239,000.
Value of furniture and cabinet-making, $7, 114,000.
Value of carriage and wagon materials, $2,282,000.
Bushels of apples, 8,784,000.
Bushels of cherries, 199,000.
Acres in meadow, 2,330,504.
First settlement of Indiana, by French at Vincennes, about the
year 1700.
Battle of Tippecanoe, November 7, 1812.
Indianapolis, the capital, is known as "The Railroad City."
As drawn on the map, the city, with the roads entering it, is often
compared to a spider's web.
The State has large fields producing natural gas and coal.
Popular name, "The Hoosier State."





RHYMES OF THE STATES


Indiana was named for the Indians,
Because, when the country was new,
sS 1*. They were there by hundreds and thousands-
And exceedingly troublesome, too,
S' Till General Harrison whipped them
In the battle of Tippecanoe.

'- T is now a rich country for farming,
'" '''' Where children arise with the sun,
S.', ,,!' And race all about in the orchards
And meadows, with frolic and fun,
Never caring how many great railroads
To Indianapolis run.
Some of her thriving cities
As frontier outposts began;
I '' J Fort Wayne was named for a general
Who at Stony Point charged in the van,
,* --- 'And afterward conquered the Indians,-
o0 /-,l / A gallant and soldierly man.





RHYMES OF THE STATES


MICHIGAN.

THIRTEENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1837.

Square miles, 58,915.
Population (1890), 2,093,884.
In rank according to population, 9th.
Counties, 85.
Representatives in Congress, 12.
Electoral votes, 14.

Value of lumber products, logs, etc. (1890), $73,484,306.
Value of planing-mill products, sash, doors, and blinds, $10,007,603.
Value of wooden packing-boxes, $ I, 243,791.
Value of other timber products, $9,637,663.
Value of flour and grist-mill products, about $23,000,000.
Value of products of ship-building (1890), $4,710,000.
Value of salt, $2,046,000oo.
Bushels of apples (1889), 13,154,000.
Copper produced (1895), 129,573,876 pounds, average price o1
cents per pound, or $12,957,387. (The copper of Michigan
is "native pure copper. There is no copper ore to pay for
working.)
Leaving out coal, this State leads all in the value of her mineral
productions in 1889, $70,000,000.
Gold (1889), 4,210 oz., about $97,000.
Silver, 14,607 oz., about $8,700.
Iron ore (1889), 5,856,169 tons.
Michigan was part of the Northwest Territory, and formed part of
Indiana from 1787 to 1805.
First settlement, French mission, founded by Father Marquette
and others, at Sault (pronounced soo) Ste. Marie.
The city of Detroit was founded by French, under Cadillac, 1701.
Mackinac (final c silent), The Picturesque Isle."
Popular name, "Wolverine State."





RHYMES OF THE STATES


l Fair Michigan's Peninsulas
Il Great lakes almost surround;
A, A woodman's heavy mitt and cap
Are in the outlines found.

SThe northern part is widely known
For copper- and iron-mines;
The southern part for grain and fruit,
And groves of noble pines.
Within the Straits of Mackinac
Behold an island fair-
S The loveliest place among the lakes
To breathe the summer air.

The fine old city of Detroit,
Is on historic ground; ,
The University of the State
Is at Ann Arbor found. f


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RHYMES OF THE STATES


ILLINOIS.

EIGHTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1818.

Square miles, 56,650.
Population (1890), 3,826,351.
In rank according to population, 3d.
Counties, 102.
Representatives in Congress, 22.
Electoral votes, 24.

Bushels of corn (1890), 289,000,000.
Value of manufactured products: agricultural implements, $24,-
609,660; steel, iron, and iron work, $42,611,431.
Bituminous coal (1889), 12,104,272 tons.
Value of men's clothing, $47,191,242.
Slaughtering and meat-packing, wholesale, $212,539,000.
Soap and candles, about $10,000,000.
Watches, $3,048,966.
The principal factories are at Elgin, Rockford, and Springfield.
The Illinois region was explored by the Frenchmen La Salle and
Marquette about 1670.
"Fort St. Louis" was built on what is now known as "Starved
Rock," on the Illinois River.
Population of Chicago (1880), 503,185; 1890, I,o99,850.
Great fire of Chicago, October 8-10, 1871.
World's Columbian Exposition, May i to October 31, 1893.
Popular name, "The Sucker State."





RHYMES OF THE STATES


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The Illinois, an Indian tribe
Once numerous and great,
Were all destroyed, but left their name
To a river and a State.

'T is sometimes called the "Prairie Sta
The soil is rich and fine;
Her pastures green are dotted o'er
With horses, cows, and swine.

Chicago, Queen of Illinois,
Each rival has surpassed;
Her clothes are never big enough
Because she grows so fast.

A great World's Fair Chicago held
Not very long ago;
Beside the lake grand palaces
By magic seemed to grow.


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RHYMES OF THE STATES


WISCONSIN.

SEVENTEENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1848.

Square miles, 56,040.
Population (1890), 1,686,88o.
In rank according to population, 14th.
Counties, 70.
Representatives in Congress, Io.
Electoral votes, 12.

Bushels of oats (1890), 60,739,052.
Barley (1890), 15,225,872.
Buckwheat ( 890), 1,o64,178.
Value of flour and gristmill products, $24,252,297.
Value of timber and lumber products, all kinds, $67,262,254.
Value of manufactured leather, $11,161,850.
Wisconsin was part of the Northwest Territory, and was at first
under the government of Michigan. Named for its principal
river-" Ouisconsin" (Indian) -meaning "wild, rushing river."
The State contains many hundreds of small lakes.
The Wisconsin and Fox Rivers come so near each other at Portage
that they are connected by a canal a mile and a half long.
The city was so named because this was the place of portage,
where the Indians carried their canoes and luggage from one
river to the other as they came and went often between the
Mississippi River and Lake Michigan. The first white settle-
ment was by the French, and named for the prairie dogs,
Prairie du Chien.
Popular name, "The Badger State."






RHYMES OF THE STATES


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'WISCONSIN
Oh, wonderful river Wisconsin!
S How lovely are your dells;
Oh, beautiful State of Wisconsin!
How good are your springs and wells.

How lovely the breezes that fan you
SThe glorious summer through,
From woods sweet-scented with balsam,
That shadow your lakes so blue.

Of cities you have Milwaukee,
Along Lake Michigan shore,
And Madison, named in honor
Of president number four.
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RHYMES OF THE STATES


MINNESOTA.

NINETEENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION,1858.

Square miles, 83,365.
Population (1890), 1,301,826,
In rank, according to population, 20th.
Counties, 80.
Representatives in Congress, 7.
Electoral votes, 9.

Bushels of wheat (1890), 52,300,247.
Acres in wheat (1890), 3,372,627.
Bushels of oats (1890), 49,958,791.
Bushels of barley (1890), 9,100,683.
Acres in flax (1890), 303,635.
Bushels of flaxseed (1890), 2,721,937.
Value of flour and gristmill products (1890), $60,158,088.
Value of all timber and lumber products, $30,018,583.
Value of fur goods, manufactured products, $I, 152,369.
Minnesota was explored by the French, under Hennepin and La
Salle, about the year 1780. It was claimed as part of Louisiana
Territory. Organized as a separate territory in 1849.
The Indian war in Minnesota and massacre of settlers by the Sioux
occurred in 1862-3.
The greatest flouring mills in the world are at Minneapolis.
Popular name, "The Gopher State."





RHYMES OF THE STATES


m __


The nver brought the Indians
From prairies of Dakota;
So cloudy seemed the water,
They called it "Minnesota."
) Now together are the cities
Minneapolis and-St. Paul,
By the .River and the Rapids
S And the "Laughing Waterfall."

. The mills in Minnesota
.'. Are running every hour,
Sawing and planing lumber,
And grinding wheat to flour.

The air of Minnesota
Is fairly cool and dry;
Though wide awake the State is, f
It has a Sleepy Eye.




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RHYMES OF THE STATES


IOWA.

SIXTEENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1846.

Square miles, 56,025.
Population (1890), 1,911,896.
In rank according to population, ioth.
Counties, .99.
Representatives in Congress, I I.
Electoral votes, 13.

Bushels of Indian corn (1890), 313,130,782.
Bushels of oats, 146,679,289.
Bushels of barley, 13,406,122.
Bushels of flaxseed, 2,282,359.
Number of swine (first in United States), 8,200,779.
Number of cattle, 4,892,183.
Tons of hay (for which the State ranks first), 7,264,700.
Pounds of butter (for which the State ranks third, New York rank-
ing first and Pennsylvania second), 72,893,079.
Iowa was included in Louisiana Territory, claimed by France, and
sold to the United States in 1803.
The first settlement was made by a Frenchman, Francis Dubuque,
1788-89, who opened lead mine nearwhere the city of Dubuque
now stands.
There are many beautiful small lakes in the northern part of the State.
The name Iowa is Indian, said to mean "The beautiful land."
Popular name, "The Hawkeye State."






RHYMES OF THE STATES


_0

/ C iT-he State of Iowa lies between
," i Two rivers, broad and long;
E -ach hastening to their meeting-place
With currents deep and strong.

From north to south, from east to west,
This State has fertile land;
Here health, and wealth, and honest work
Go always hand in hand.

S" a; :-1: The people of the "Hawkeye" State
-Seek to be wise and good,
And so the school and church are found
In every neighborhood.

This State has wealth of yellow maize
To bring her golden, coin;
The capital's in the central part-
A city called Des Moines.

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RHYMES OF THE STATES


MISSOURI.

ELEVENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, I821.

Square miles, 69,415.
Population (1890), 2,679,184.
In rank according to population, 5th.
Counties, I 15.
Representatives in Congress, 15.
Electoral votes, 17.
Value of products (1890), flour and gristmill, $34,486,795.
Foundry and machine shop, steel and iron work, $18,568,217.
Timber and lumber, $13,289,179.
Confectionery, $3,584,958.
Tons of coal (1889), 2,557,823.
Bushels of wheat (1890), 30,113,821.
Bushels of corn (1890), 196,999,016.
Bushels of apples, 8,698,170.
Bushels of peaches, 1,667,789.
Number of cattle (1890), 2,969,736.
St. Louis was founded by the French in 1764.
Great fire in St. Louis, 1849.
Severe cholera epidemic, same year.
St. Louis ranked in size as the fifth city in the United States, 1890,
having a population of 451,770.
Popular name, "The Iron State."





RHYMES OF THE STATES









How many States have borrowed names
From rivers by or through them ?
How many of these have taken names
From Indians who knew them? ?/

Missouri River through the State
Sweeps on with lordly motion,
Then to the Mississippi joins
And with it seeks the ocean.

The State possesses many things
To make the people wealthy:
Rich prairie pastures, timber, coal -
Withal, a climate healthy.

St. Louis on the east we see,
And westward Kansas City;
The capital, half-way between,
'Mid hills and valleys pretty.


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RHYMES OF THE STATES


ARKANSAS.

PART OF LOUISIANA PURCHASE, 1803. ORGANIZED AS A SEPARATE
TERRITORY, 1819.

TWELFTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1836.

Square miles, 53,850.
Population (1890), I,128,179.
In rank, according to population, 24th.
Counties, 75.
Representatives in Congress, 6.
Electoral votes, 8.

Timber and lumber products (1890), 10,561,949.
Acres in cotton 1,700,578.
Bales of cotton grown, 691,494.
Value of cotton-seed oil and cake, $1,881,668.
Number of cattle, all kinds, 938,264.
Tons of coal (1889), 279,584.
First settlement by the French, 1685.
Many thousands of people visit the Hot Springs every year and take
the baths.
Popular name, The Bear State."






RHYMES OF THE STATES


This State's legislature
Has made it a law
That, in speaking her name,
We must say "Ar-kan-saw."

Not far from the center
The Hot Springs are found,
Where scalding hot water
Boils up from the ground.

Her rivers are many,
Her forests spread wide,
Her mountains- the Ozarks,
Are Arkansas' pride.

The State sells much timber,
And ore, and li\e stock; U
Her capital city
Is called Little Rock.


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RHYMES OF THE STATES


LOUISIANA.

FIFTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1812.

Square miles, 48,720.
Population (1890), I,118,587.
In rank according to population, 25th.
Counties (or Parishes), 59.
Representatives in Congress, 6.
Electoral votes, 8.

Pounds of sugar produced (1890), 202,124,050.
Gallons of molasses (1890), 14,439,772.
Rice, acres cultivated, 84,377; pounds produced, 75,645,433.
Cotton, acres cultivated, 1,270, 154; bales produced, 659,180.
Value of total lumber products, $6,965,320.
Louisiana was explored by De Soto, 1541; Marquette, 1673; La
Salle, 1682. Settlement at Biloxi, 1699.
The battle of New Orleans, the last of the war of 1812-14, was fought
January 8th, 1815, more than two weeks after the treaty of peace
had been signed. If there had been an electric telegraph then,
under the sea and over the land, many hundreds of lives would
have been saved.
Popular name, "The Pelican State."





RHYMES OF THE STATES


This State %%as settled by the French,
And for King Louis named:
But fifteen million dollars bought
For us the land they claimed.
She has a warm and sunny clime,
Unvexed by frosts or snows,
And through a delta, like the Nile,
The lississippi flows,
On this our greatest, central stream,
S And very near its mouth,
The famous "Crescent City" stands,
Queen city of the South.
The greatest sugar-making State!-
New Orleans is its port;
SAnd here, behind his cotton-bales,
"Old Hickory" held the fort!


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RHYMES OF THE STATES


TEXAS.

FIFTEENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1845.

Square miles, 265,780.
Population (1890), 2,235,523-
In rank according to population, 7th.
Counties, 261.
Representatives in Congress, 13.
Electoral votes, 15.

Number of horses (1890), 1,026,777.
Number of cattle of all grades, 6,201,522.
Number of sheep, 3,454,858.
Pounds of wool, 14,917,068.
Bushels of peaches, 5, 106,332.
Bushels of plums, 160,256.
Lumber products of all kinds, $14,643,507.
Value of gold, $6,600.
Ounces of gold, 330.
Ounces of silver, 323,438.
Texas was originally part of Mexico, but declared its independence,
March 2, 1836. The massacre of the Alamo took place March
6th, 1836. Texas was an independent republic from 1836 to
1845. Its annexation to the United States, in 1845,was the cause
of the war between the United States and Mexico, 1846-47.
Popular name, "The Lone Star State."






RHYMES OF THE STATES 63










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Te'.:a3 is the largest State
In our united band,
From Louisiana reaching west.
Unto a river grand.

ii,^- Some day the story you will learn
S Of fatal "Alamo"
And how the Lone Star" State was won
In war with Mexico.

A harbor fine has Galveston,
Near Trinity River's mouth;
And many rivers you can see,
All flowing east and south.

Fine growth of cotton, timber, grain,
This fertile State adorns;
^- Great herds of cattle throng her plains,
With wide, extended horns.





RHYMES OF THE STATES


NEW MEXICO.

ORGANIZED AS A TERRITORY, 1850.

Square miles, 122,580.
Population (1890), 153,593.
In rank according to population, 43d.

Produced tons of coal (1889), 486,943.
Ounces of gold, 39,457, about $900,000.
Ounces of silver, 1,251,124, value about, $1,455,855.
Number of sheep (1890), 1,248,970.
Pounds of wool, 4,074,503.
New Mexico belonged to old Mexico till 1846. It was visited by the
Spaniards as early as 1540. They found the Pueblo Indians
living in villages and cultivating the soil in the valleys. Their
largest village became (about 1640) the town of Santa Fe, and
has been the capital of New Mexico ever since.
Santa F6 is a famous health resort. Very many of its people are
Mexicans, and many live in adobe houses, that is, houses built
of clay.





RHYMES OF THE STATES 65
















This territory forms a square,
With a little piece, below, to spare.
The waters of a river wide .... ..'.,
From north to south the land divide.


The land is mountainous and high;
The air is healthful, pure, and dry.
To the Pacific, loaded trains
Go every day across her plains.


The plains are deserts, wild and free,
With little grass and scarce a tree. ', -
Few cities of our land to-day '
Can boast the age of Santa F6.





RHYMES OF THE STATES


ARIZONA.

ORGANIZED AS A TERRITORY, 1863.

Square miles, 113,020.
Population (1890), 59,620.
In rank according to population, 48th.

Ounces of gold (1889), 44,029, about $1,012,500.
Ounces of silver, 1,812,961.
Total mineral products (1889), $7,248,717.
Arizona was part of New Mexico till 1863.
The cation of the Colorado river in Arizona is in some places 7,000
feet deep.
There is a mountain not far from the river, near Callville, which con-
sists largely of pure salt.
There are also found in Arizona wonderful forests of petrified wood.
Trees several feet thick have become great masses of agate.
High up on the mountains are found the homes of a race of people,
the wonderful Cliff-Dwellers.





RHYMES OF THE STATES


S- A wealthy miser is this State,
As many a miner s found;
He keeps his silver and his gold
-_ Safe buried in the ground.

And here we find the grandest sight
That man has ever seen,
Where Colorado's rapids flow,
Deep in their vast ravine.

Along the western boundary
SThe waters southward go,
And join the Californian gulf
By way of Mexico.

The summer days are very long,
The deserts hot and dry;
And there great cactus plants abound
Full twenty-five feet high.
Z._ t-//





RHYMES OF THE STATES


INDIAN TERRITORY.

ORIGINALLY A PART OF THE LOUISIANA PURCHASE.

Square miles, 31,400.
Population, Indian (1890), 51,279.

The wealth of the Indians, aside from their land, is largely in cattle,
but their number cannot be accurately stated.
The average wealth among the Cherokees, however, is said to be
greater than that of any other people. The Indians who are
civilized have good schools and colleges.
There is coal in the territory, of which 752,832 tons were mined in
1889.



OKLAHOMA.

Square miles, 39,030.
Population (1890), 61,834, of which 13,177 were Indians.

The population has greatly increased since the opening of the ter-
ritory to white settlers in 1891.





RHYMES OF THE STATES


Here are the Apaches,
And there the Kiowas;
Here are bold Comanches,
And there the Chickasaws.

Also Sacs and Foxes,
Creeks and Cherokees,
Seminoles and Choctaws,
And Pottawottomies.

This country was intended
For the Indians' very own,
And white men are expected
To leave these lands alone.

The part called Oklahoma
Is occupied by whites;
But first we gave the Indians
Protection in their rights.


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RHYMES OF THE STATES


NEBRASKA.

TWENTY-FOURTH STATE ADMITTED, 1867. ORIGINALLY PART OF
LOUISIANA PURCHASE AND MISSOURI TERRITORY.
NAMED FROM THE NEBRASKA RIVER.

Square miles, 77,510.
Population (1890), 1,058,910.
In rank, according to population, 26th.
Counties, 90.
Representatives in Congress, 6.
Electoral votes, 8.
First settlement, at Bellevue, 1847.
Organized as a separate territory, 1854.

Tons of hay (1890), 3,115,398.
Bushels of Indian corn, 215,895,996.
Bushels of oats, 43,843,640.
Bushels of wheat, 10,571,050.
Bushels of barley, 1,822, 11 I.
Bushels of flax seed, 1,401,184.
Bushels of rye, I,085,o83.
Bushels of buckwheat, 120,000.
Number of swine, 3,815,647.
Sugar-refining, value (1890), $323,912.
The beet-sugar industry has grown largely since the last census.
Popular name, Blackwater State."





RHYMES OF THE STATES


lFrom Kansas, going north, we come
Upon Nebraska State,
Where people start from Omaha,
En route for the Golden Gate."

Sometimes along the river Platte
Five hundred miles they ride;
Sometimes upon the higher ground
Through prairies rolling wide.

Nebraska's fertile prairie lands
Are good for corn and wheat;
And many tons are made each year
Of sugar from the beet.

Oh, mighty prairies of the West,
So boundless and so free!
How glorious roll your waves of green,
Like billows of the sea!
1 *





RHYMES OF THE STATES


KANSAS.

TWENTY-FIRST STATE ADMITTED, JANUARY 29, 1861. ORIGINALLY
PART OF LOUISIANA PURCHASE. "KANSAS" WAS
THE NAME OF A TRIBE OF INDIANS.

Square miles, 82,080.
Population (1890), 1,427,096.
In rank, according to population, i9th.
Counties, 106.
Representatives in Congress, 8.
Electoral votes, 1o.

Bushels of corn, 1890, 259,574,568.
Bushels of wheat, 30,399,871.
Bushels of peaches, 1,798,781.
Number of cattle, 3,187,033.
Number of swine, 4,023,933.
Tons of coal, 2,221,043.
Value of meat product, wholesale, $44,696,077.
Salt (1890), $697,802. (The product has since greatly increased.)
There was a conflict in Kansas, before the great Civil War, 1854 to
1860, fought mostly with ballots, but sometimes with bullets,
about whether the territory should be made a free or a slave
state. The territory at that time was often referred to as
Bleeding Kansas." The story of the territory during those
years is very interesting.
Popular name, the Sunflower State."





RHYMES OF THE STATES


Eighteen hundred and sixty-one
Can ne'er forgotten be;
'T was then that "Bleeding Kansas"
And joined our family.

In infancy this thriving child
Through many troubles passed,
But ever since she 's run alone
Few States have grown so fast.

A lovely prairie land is this,
With many a happy home;
And herds of cattle, flocks of sheep,
Where bison used to roam.

-The Kansas River, flowing east,
To the broad Missouri goes,
While south and east the Arkansas
To the Mississippi flows.
N ri-.3






RHYMES OF THE STATES


WYOMING.

THIRTY-FIRST STATE ADMITTED, 1890. THE TERRITORY WAS
LARGELY INCLUDED IN THE LOUISIANA PURCHASE.

Square miles, 97,890.
Population (1890), 60,705.
In rank, according to population, 47th.
Counties, 12.
Representative in Congress, I.
Electoral votes, 3.

Tons of coal mined (1889), 1,388,947.
Ounces of Gold, 71 .
Number of cattle (estimated, 1895), 1,000,000.
Number of sheep (1890), 712,520.
Number of pounds of wool, 4,146,773.
The greater part of the National Yellowstone Park was taken from
Wyoming.





RHYMES OF THE STATES


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,Wyoming to the south and east
SHas famous pasture ground:
Just on the corner, north and west,
The National Park is found

With mountains high and valleys deep,
With springs, both hot and cold;
And marble walls and agate woods,
All made by fires of old.

The grandest things in all the world
This region has in store;
And Uncle Sam declared the land
A park forevermore.

The people favor equal rights-
Both men and women vote:
'Wyoming State upon the map
Is nearly square, you note.


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RHYMES OF THE STATES


COLORADO.

TWENTY-FIFTH STATE ADMITTED, 1876. NAMED FOR THE COLORADO
RIVER. TERRITORY ACQUIRED IN PART BY LOUISIANA
PURCHASE AND IN PART FROM MEXICO. OR-
GANIZED AS A TERRITORY, 1861.

Square miles, 103,925.
Population (1890), 412,198.
In rank, according to population, 3ist.
Counties, 55.
Representatives in Congress, 2.
Electoral votes, 4.

Tons of coal produced (1889), 2,597,181.
Ounces of gold, 187,881.
Ounces of silver, 18,375,551.
Total value of all mineral products, $41,126,610.
Number of sheep, (1890), 717,990.
Pounds of wool, 3,334,234.
The City of Denver grew from 35,629 in 1880, to 106,713 in 1890.
Pike's Peak is 14,147 feet above sea level.
Popular name, Centennial State."





RHYMES OF THE STATES


This State has plains along the east,
And westward mountains high,
Where Pike's Peak lifts his snowy head,
Aloft to greet the sky.

Now all of these west mountain States
Have gold- and silver-mines;
Where great machines break up the ore,
And.furnace fire refines.

And Colorado's mines are rich:
Her scenery, too, is grand;-
To make the valley farms produce,
They irrigate the land.

The Arkansas and Platte are fed
By little streams, that flow
From showers upon the mountain-sides, ,-
And melted mountain snow.


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RHYMES OF THE STATES


UTAH.


FORTY-FIFTH STATE ADMITTED, 1894.
ACQUIRED FROM MEXICO,


PART OF TERRITORY
1848.


Square miles, 84,970.
Population (1890), 207,905.
In rank, according to population, 40th.
Counties, 26.
Representative in Congress, i.
Electoral votes, 3.


The State produced (1889), tons of coal, 236,651.
ounces of gold, 23,591.
ounces of silver, 7,005,193.
salt valued at $144,300.
bushels of wheat, 1,515,465.
bushels of peaches, 69,910.
bushels of apricots, 4,178.
The territory was-settled in 1847, by Mormon emigrants, whose
leader was Brigham Young.
The State is becoming famous for mining and fruit growing.
Popular name, "Mormon State."





RHYMES OF THE STATES


::--2 T- _--- .---5- =- .--




"Denver and Rio Grande"* road
To Utah we may take;
S/ Then travel through the northern part,
Around the Great Salt Lake.

/ At forty miles an hour, or more,
We speed upon our way;
Where "prairie schooners" crawled alon
Scarce twenty miles a day.
First came the Mormons to this land,
With notions rather queer;
SFrom trouble in the Eastern States
They moved, and settled here.

The thriving city of Salt Lake
Affords a' pleasing sight;
The Lake is of the deepest blue,
With shores of gray and white.
S Pronounced Rio Grand'y.


COL.






RHYMES OF THE STATES


NEVADA.

TWENTY-THIRD STATE ADMITTED, 1864. ORGANIZED AS A TERRI-
TORY, 1861. PART OF THE TERRITORY ACQUIRED FROM
MEXICO, 1848. NAMED FOR "THE SNOWY RANGE,"
SIERRA NEVADA MOUNTAINS, OF SPAIN.

Square miles, 110,700.
Population (1890), 45,761.
In rank, according to population, 49th.1
Counties, 14.
Representative in Congress, I.
Electoral votes, 3.

Silver discovered, 1859.
Ounces of gold produced, 1880, 206,469.
S c 1889, 169,617.
S silver 1880, 9,614,561.
if 1889, 4,696,605.
Number of cattle, 210,9oo.
Number of sheep, 273,469.
Value of salt, estimated (1880), $92,640.
Popular name, Silver State."
1 In giving rank, the District of Columbia is counted separately as if it were a State, which accounts
for the apparent discrepancy of 49 numbers for 48 States and Territories.





RHYMES OF THE STATES


To Utah now we '11 say good-bye,
And toward the "Golden Gate,"
We '11 cross Nevada's boundary line
Near a corner of the State.

Nevada has a climate dry,
With very little rain;
But while her gold and silver last
Her people won't complain.

From this State's many famous mines
Much silver has come out;
And Carson, capital of the State,
Was named for Kit," the scout.

Nevada has the queerest stream-
A stream that ends on land;
The Humboldt River it is called,
Which sinks in desert sand.
O r-- ... ... _.j


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RHYMES OF THE STATES


CALIFORNIA.

EIGHTEENTH STATE ADMITTED, 1850. NAMED BY SPANIARDS FOR
AN ISLAND TOLD OF IN A SPANISH ROMANCE, RICH IN GOLD
AND PRECIOUS STONES. COAST EXPLORED BY SIR FRANCIS
DRAKE, 1578-79. FIRST SETTLEMENTS, SPANISH MISSIONS :
SAN DIEGO, 1768; SAN FRANCISCO, 1776. TERRITORY ACQUIRED
FROM MEXICO, 1848. GOLD DISCOVERED, FEBRUARY, 1848.

Square miles, 158,36o.
Population (1890), 1,208, 13o.
In rank, according to population, 22d.
Counties, 52.
Representatives in Congress, 7.
Electoral votes, 9.

Productions (1890) :
Pounds of wool, 16,358,547.
Pounds of cheese, 3,871,575.
Bushels of wheat, 40,869,337.
Bushels of barley, 17,548,386.
Bushels of peaches, I,691,oi9.
Bushels of pears 577,444.
Bushels of oranges (estimate for 1895), 1,000,000 boxes.
Ounces of gold (1889), 829,677.
Ounces of silver, I,062,578.
Value of quicksilver (estimated), $1,700,000.
Popular name, Golden State."






RHYMES OF THE STATES


C .LFsORM RI7S


Hurrah! we've reached the "Golden Gate,"
California's joy and pride;
Where all the ships of all the world
At once might safely ride.
Here San Francisco on her hills "
Sits proudly by the sea; -
While ships from China and Japan
Cast anchor at her quay.
This is a land of fruit and flowers, -
A land of golden grain; r
Where winters often are as kind
As summers are in Maine.
The warm Pacific waters lave
A thousand miles of shore, I
And California every year
Still prospers more and more.
Yosemite, the valley grand,
Is found within this State;
Those who may see it stand in awe
To view the wonder great!





RHYMES OF THE STATES


OREGON.

PART OF TERRITORY POSSESSION OF.WHICH WAS SECURED BY TREATY
WITH GREAT BRITAIN, AUGUST 6, 1846. NAME, SPANISH,
MEANING "WILD MARJORAM." TWENTIETH
STATE ADMITTED, 1859.

Square miles, 96,030.
Population (1890), 313,767.
In rank, according to population, 38th.
Counties, 31.
Representatives in Congress, 2.
Electoral votes, 4.

Bushels of wheat (1890), 9,296,734.
Bushels of oats, 5,948,894.
Bushels of prunes and plums, 199,700.
Bushels of pears, 106,383.
Value of canned fish, oysters, fruits, and vegetables, $1,643,324.
Total fishery products (1880), $2,781,024.
Total fishery products (1889), $1,186,188.
Tons of iron ore (1889), 26,283.
Ounces of gold, 46,648.
Ounces of silver, 17,851.
The Willamette River, running northward to the Columbia, has a
very beautiful and rich valley, about 40 miles wide and 140
miles long.
The height of Mt. Hood is 11,225 feet.
Popular name, Beaver State."





RHYMES OF THE STATES


Great Britain once claimed many a league,
Along the ocean strand;
We had disputes for forty years
About the western land

Till we at last agreed to take
A part of what we'd claimed;
From which three States were later made,
As here you have them named.

Washington is to the north,
And Oregon below;
Adjoining them upon the east
Is Sister Idaho.


Three hundred miles has Oregon
Along the ocean tide;
A saddle-back upon the north
Where Washington doth ride.


D 'J


C.d t Sdt~tb s.






RHYMES OF THE STATES


WASHINGTON.

TWENTY-SIXTH STATE ADMITTED, 1889.

Square miles, 69,180.
Population, 349,390.
In rank, according to population, 34th.
Counties, 34.
Representatives in Congress, 2.
Electoral votes, 4.

Bushels of wheat (1890), 6,345,426.
Bushels of oats, 2,273,182.
Bushels of barley, 1,269, 140.
Bushels of cherries, 11,692.
Value of timber products (1890), $19,480,580.
Fishery products (1880, $181,372.
(4 (1889), $1,107,847.
Ounces of gold (1889), 9,oo5.
Ounces of silver (1889), 28,464.
Popular name, Chinook State."
There are twenty-eight counties in the United States named for
Washington.





RHYMES OF THE STATES 87









~-=~--} __


great northwest State! remember well
\\The honored name you own,
And may your children ever be
For truth and valor known.---

Here wide extend the deep, dark woods,
With their gigantic trees:
Some other States have forests fine,
But nfione so great as these.
The harbors found in Puget Sound,
Are good as one could wish:
Columbia River; near its mouth,
Is noted for its fish.
'The lovely orchards in this state
Have many a cherry-tree,
The map is somewhat bottle-shaped-
Mouth toward the open 'sea.


:..Z.





RHYMES OF THE STATES


IDAHO.

AN INDIAN NAME, MEANING "GEM OF THE MOUNTAINS."
THIRTIETH STATE ADMITTED, I-890.--FIRST SETTLEMENT, CCEUR
D'ALENE, 1840.

Square miles, 84,800.
Population (1890), 84,385.
In rank, according to population, 45th.
Counties, 18.
Representative in Congress, I.
Electoral votes, 3.

Number of sheep (1890), 357,712.
Pounds of wool produced, 2, 19,242.
Ounces of gold (1889), 95,983.
Ounces of silver (1880), 359,309.
.". (1889), 3,137,508.
Tons of iron, 24,072.
Total value of mineral products (1889), $8,385,233.
The climate of southern and western Idaho is favorable to fruit
growing as well as stock raising.
Popular name, "Gem of the Mountains."






RHYMES OF THE STATES.


Y- ~Cr


Ho, Idaho! Ho, Idaho!
I pray you, tell me why
You sit so very straight and prim,
And hold your head so high ?


"Because my mountains are so firm--
They will not bend at all;
And people's heads are always high,
When they are very tall.


"I have a thousarid flocks of sheep
Which in my valleys feed:
Of gold and silver I 've enough
To buy all things I need.


"My capital-you ask the name?
'T is Bois6, if you please:
The National Park ?- Oh, yes, indeed,
It rests against my knees."





RHYMES OF THE STATES


MONTANA.

A PART OF THE LOUISIANA PURCHASE. ORGANIZED AS A TERRI-
TORY, 1864. TWENTY-SEVENTH STATE ADMITTED, 1889.

Square miles, 146,080.
Population (1890), 132,159.
In rank, according to population, 44th.
Counties, 16.
Representative in Congress, i.
Electoral votes, 3.

Number of cattle (1890), 881,898.
Number of sheep, 1,859,016.
Pounds of wool, 9,335,551.
Gold discovered, 1861; ounces produced (1880), 87,354.
C (1889), 151,861.
Ounces of silver (1880), 2,246,938.
(1889), 13,511,455.
Tons of coal (1889), 363,301.
Value of all mineral products (1889), $33,737,775.
The Missouri River, from its source in Montana to the Gulf of
Mexico, is 4,200 miles long, the longest in the world.
Popular name, Stub-toe State."





RHYMES OF THE STATES


"A land of mountains," this word mean .; -.S^S '
The Rocky Mountain chain '
Extends so far, with all the hills 1
There's left but little plain, 1 "I-I
The Indian hunter's paradise" i
Was here, not long ago; -" '
Where roamed the grizzly bear, the elk.
And herds of buffalo.


Missouri River from the west
Comes down with many a leap,
To meet the Yellowstone that flows
Through gorges wild and deep.


'T was in this State that Custer brave
And many gallant men
Rode forth against the savage foe;
But none rode back again. ,


6oo M~es


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RHYMES OF THE STATES


NORTH DAKOTA.

TWENTY-EIGHTH STATE ADMITTED, 1889.

Square miles, 70,795:
Population, 182,719.
In rank, according to population, 41st.
Counties, 39.
Representative in Congress, I.
Electoral votes, 3.


Products, 1890:
Bushels of wheat, 26,503,365.
Bushels of oats, 5,773,129.
Bushels of barley, 1,570,717.
Flax, bushels of seed, 164,314.


Tons of hay, 531,472.
Flour and grist-mill products, value,
$2,624,198.
Tons of coal, 28,907.
Popular name, Flickertail State."


SOUTH DAKOTA.

TWENTY-NINTH STATE ADMITTED, 1889.

Square miles, 77,650.
Population, 328,808.
In rank, according to population, 37th.
Counties, 51.
Representatives in Congress, 2.
Electoral votes, 4.


Bushels of wheat (1890), 16,541,138.
Bushels of oats, 7,460,846.
Bushels of barley, 902,005.
Flax, bushels of seed, 1,541,524.
Value of flour and grist-mill products,
$2,793,701.


Tons of hay, 1,541,524.
Ounces of gold (1889), 149,533.
Ounces of silver, 104,672.
(From the Black Hill mines.)
Popular name, "Swinge Cat," or
"Singed Cat" State.





RHYMES OF THE STATES


N ORThi;: BS OJUT




Our stories end: this page we give
To North and South Dakota-
Two wide and mostly level States
Just west of Minnesota.
Here farms are many-some are large,
And fields of wheat are grand:
The flour we buy is often marked
Dakota Four X brand." "
-2
Red River, on their eastern line, ,
Flows north, tow'rd Hudson's Bay;
Our only stream with current wide /r
Whose waters run that way.

And here we have the great Black Hills, .
Southwest along the line; /
A region very rough and wild, P_
With many a wealthy mine.

54 U/.jil









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