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 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Foreword
 Aesop's fables
 Advertising
 Back Cover














Group Title: Books for the bairns ; 1
Title: Æsop's Fables
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085520/00001
 Material Information
Title: Æsop's Fables
Series Title: Books for the bairns
Physical Description: 62, ii p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Aesop
Stead, W. T ( William Thomas ), 1849-1912 ( Editor )
"Review of Reviews" Office ( Publisher )
Publisher: "Review of Reviews" Office
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: 1896
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1896   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1896   ( rbgenr )
Fables -- 1896   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre: Children's stories
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Fables   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: edited by W. T. Stead.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements on end papers.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00085520
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002220596
notis - ALG0792
oclc - 234194637

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Foreword
        Page 2
    Aesop's fables
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Advertising
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text










































iTh e. =dBlin L~ihrary
filt Univmit








BOCG. FOR THE BAIRNS-I ,

EDIrED s& \\. T. STEAD.


- .;


* S- OP'S




CONT
PAGE
rh' Am 3IL, L;:, n.".i .... 3
I th Fr 1'l: -.. .. .. 4
T he Lik H r '.,. nes
Tre L... L.E ., ar,J V1 Fox .. .. 6
Thi ,- I, .: .. .. 8


'IT Etl- ..1 I R : ., .. 12


The Ass -'..: C.::i -j i .. 916
T .'I- r J d i *1 ... .. .. .. 1
Ti., C.:.( andtheJewel 8.. .." 18
Ti.- .' ." ,-..: i r theTown Mouse.. 18
Ih H ... -,-i .. ,l 'r.e W olf .. .. 20
Th I', aI'I j 11; Shadow .. .. .. 21
Th- r i:ri, rt. Crow .. .. .. .. 22
The I..: 1.. foraKing., ... .. 23
iT.- I' .r I. Pigeons .. ... 24
The Wolves and the Sheep 25
The T? ee and'h A- .. .. 26
H-r r: r al.. L. '. 27
M:r i. ri. v -.... .. 28
T .- .ua 1..1 : RI. p er.. .. .. 29
ih- H i,,- i.Ji the Tortoise .. .. .. 30
I t1 ''LI.. i t. the Sun.. .. .. 31
1Tr. ''1. "rod the Reed.. .. ... 32


FABLES.


'ENTS.

The H' r. L i
The ?h.r.:Eh'.i b ,, d \l- i'..-.i .. ;.
The H, iL.,-'iil a,,i 'I..: -;il:l .. '
The M .:i. .ln .. D.:.r
Venus and the Cat


I L
T f.e C : .., r, ,-. ,, L. '. -
Tlc t ., -., ll,. ; .. .. .. 3:
IhL 1.: a i 1 l. l.- .h. 1 ,. .-4
iLI.' L.:, 'L: :. '... .. 1 -
The Man and the Lion.. .. :

I ri t I. : .. I'
i T .L- rug r 4'


Ti1, C,.. o., ,: 1 .. ..
"T F .i ..- -, i h:.rog 1 4




ThaC u-r .t:1 i [,i
Th' : i, ..1 L- n .-
The Mountain in Labour
The Horse and the Groom .
The Old Hound..
The Horse and the Loaded A,. .. *


LONDON:

"REVIEW 6F REVIEWS" OFFICE.


[ENTEi El. AT ST.'TIOr:'ER' HALL.]


Is


VOL. I.


I -" I










A WORD TO THE BAIRNS.


THIS little book is full of clever stories, so clever that men have
kept telling them over and over again for two thousand years.
Old stories are the best. For bad stories die soon. Only the best
live long, and the longer they last the more they are proved to
be good.
IEsop, who wrote these fables, lived six hunarea years before
Jesus was born. lEsop was a poor man. He did not even belong
to himself. He was a slave, and was owned by another man, as if
he were a horse or a cow. But he was so wise and clever, people
praised him, and at last he was helped by the rich King of Lydia,
called Crcesus, who was so rich that often to-day a very rich man is
called Crcesus. But the King's help caused his death, for he sent
him to Delphi to do some work for him there, but jEsop was killed
by the people, who threw him down a high rock, saying he was a
bad man who did not serve the gods. The Jews killed Jesus on
the cross on the same excuse. The best men God sends into the
world are often killed by the worst, who say that the very men sent
by God do not serve Him, because they do not agree with them.
So poor IEsop was killed. But after his death the bad men were
plagued with pestilence for many years, until they repented and
paid much money as a fine for their crime.
His fables teach truths by a story. To make the truth stand
out more clearly he puts his words into the mouths of birds and
beasts. And to make his birds and beasts more easy for you to see,
I have had pictures of them drawn to help you to see them in your
own mind. These pictures are only lines. You must try to see
the scene as it really would be with all its colour and life. When
you have read a fable, shut your eyes and try to see the birds and
the beasts as if they were alive now, and you had just been hearing
them talk. And when you have read them do not forget them, but
tell them over to your friends, and always ask questions about
anything you cannot understand.
Parents and teachers who read these fables aloud to their
children will find it useful after reading several stories to double
the page over, so that only the pictures are seen, and ask their
hearers to describe the story with the aid of the picture.


cT







THE FABLES OF AESOP.


THE ASS IN THE
LION'S SKIN;

OR, PRETENDERS ARE SURE TO
BE FOUND OUT.

AN Ass having put on a
Lion's skin roamed about,
frightening all the silly
beasts he met with, and,
seeing a Fox, he tried to
alarm him also. But Rey-
nard, having heard his voice,
said, Well, to be sure and
I should have been fright-
ened too, if I had not heard
you bray."


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THE FROG AND THE
OX;

OR, THE RISK OF PUFFING
YOURSELF UP TOO MUCH.

AN Ox, grazing in a bog,
chanced to set his foot among
some young Frogs, and crushed
one of the brood to death.
One that escaped ran off to his
mother with the dreadful news;
" And, 0 mother! said he,
"it was a beast-such a big
fourfooted beast !-that did it."
"Big ?" quoth the old Frog,
"how big? was it as big "-
and she puffed herself out to a
great degree-"as big as this? "
"Oh said the little one, "a
great deal bigger than that."
"Well, was it so big?" and
she swelled herself out yet
more. "Indeed, mother, but
it was; and if you were to
burst yourself, you would
never reach half its size."
Vexed at this doubting of
her powers, the old Frog
made ore more trial, and
burst herself indeed.






THE LARK AND HER YOUNG ONES.


THE LARK AND HER
S YOUNG ONES;
SOR, IF YOU WANT A THING
DONE DO IT YOURSELF.
THI:EI was a brood of young
Larks in a field of corn, which
wi just ripe, and the mother,
I::'king every day for the
l'-'i'[r.-, left word whenever
she went out that her young
ones should report to her all
the news they heard. One
day the master came. It is
full time," said he, to call in
all my neighbours and get my
corn reaped." When the old
Lark heard this she told her
young ones, "If he trusts to
his neighbours he will have to
wait awhile yet for his har-
vest." Next day the owner
came again, and, finding no-
thing done, he said to his son,
Go call your uncles and
cousins, and -see that they
begin to-morrow." But the
Lark told her young ones not
to be frightened, for the rela-
tions had got harvest work of
their own. She went abroad
the next day, and the owner,
coming as before, called to his
son, "We will set to work
ourselves to-morrow." When
the young ones told their
mother this Then," said
she, it is time to be off, in-
Sdeed."


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.ESOP'S FABLES.


'I THE LION, THE BEAR,
AND THE FOX;
OR, FIGHTERS OFTEN LOSE
".U WWHAT THEY FIGHT FOR.
A LION and a Bear found
( the carcase of a fawn, and
/ / had a long fight for it. The
contest was so hard and even,
that, at last, both of them,
half-blinded and half-dead,
lay panting on the ground,
without strength to touch the
prize that was stretched
between them. A Fox com-
ing by at the time, and
seeing their helpless con-
dition, stepped in between
S them and carried off the
booty. "Poor creatures that
we are," cried they, "who
have been wasting all our
strength and hurting each
other, merely to give a rogue
a dinner "







THE LION AND THE BULLS.


:THE LION AND THE
BULLS;

OR, WHEN FRIENDS QUARREL
FOES PROFIT.

THREE Bulls fed in a field
together in the greatest peace
and friendship. A Lion
had long watched them in
,the hope of making prize
of them, but found that
there was little chance for
him so long as they kept
all together. He therefore
began secretly to spread evil
and false reports of one
against the other, till he
had got up a jealousy and
distrust amongst them. No
sooner did the Lion see that
they avoided one another,
and fed each by himself
apart, than he fell upon
them singly, and so made
an easy prey of them all.


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ESOP'S FABLES.


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THE ASS'S SHADOW;

OR, QUARRELLERS LOSERS.

A YouTH, one hot sumru.:'s
day, hired an Ass to (:'iny
him from Athens to Megara.
At mid-day the heat of the
sun was so scorching, that
he got off, and would have
sat down to rest himself
under the shadow of the
Ass. But the driver of the
Ass disputed the place with
him, declaring that he had
an equal right to it with the
other. What! said the
Youth, did I not hire the
Ass for the whole journey ?"
"Yes," said the other, "you
hired the Ass, but not the
Ass's shadow." While they
were thus wrangling and
fighting for the place, the
Ass took to his heels and
ran away.






THE FIGHTING-COCKS AND THE EAGLE.


THE FIGHTING COCKS
AND THE EAGLE;
OR, CROW TOO MUCH AND LOSE
ALL.
Two young Cooks were fight-
ing as fiercely as if they had
been men. At last the one
that was beaten crept into a
corner of the hen-house
covered with wounds. But
the conqueror, flying up to
the top of the house, began
clapping his wings and crow-
ing, to announce his victory.
At this moment an Eagle,
sailing by, seized him in his
talons and bore him away;
while the defeated rival came
out from his hiding-place, and
took possession of the dung-
hill for which they had fought.


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2ESOP S FP


....... ......
'-'i'~"~"


iBLES.




THE BUNDLE OF
STICKS;

OR, UNION IS STRENGTH.

A MAN who had a quarrelsome
family, after having tried in
vain to get them to agree by
words, thought he might more
readily prevail by an example.
So he called his sons and bade
them bring him some sticks.
Then having tied them into a
bundle, he told the lads, one
after the other, to take it up
and break it. They all tried,
but tried in vain. Then un-
tying the bundle, he gave
them the sticks to break one
by one. This they did with
the greatest ease. Then said
the father, "Thus you, my
sons, as long as you remain
united, are a match for all
your enemies; but differ and
separate, and you are undone."







THE HORSE AND THE STAG.


THE HORSE AND THE
STAG;

OR, YOU CAN BUY REVENGE
TOO DEAR.

A HORSE had the whole
range of a meadow to him-
self; but a Stag coming and
damaging the pasture, the
Horse, anxious to have his
revenge, asked a Man if he
could not assist him in
punishing the Stag. Yes,"
said the Man, "only let me
put a bit in your mouth, and
get upon your back, and I
will find the weapons." The
Horse agreed, and the Man
"mounted accordingly ; but
instead of getting his revenge,
the Horse has been from that
time forward the slave of man.


C3
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4q_~;._-1-~-- ~






JESOP'S FABLES.
THE BELLY AND THE
MEMBERS;
OR, SOME THINGS ARE MORE
USEFUL THAN THEY SEEM.
IN former days, when all a
man's limbs did not work
together as friendly as they
do now, but each had a will
and way of its own, the
Members generally began to
find fault with the Belly
for spending an idle life,
while they were wholly
occupied in labouring for its
support, and ministering to
its wants and pleasures; so
they entered into a plot to
cut off its supplies for the
future. The Hands were no
longer to carry food to the
Mouth, nor the Mouth to
receive the food, nor the
', Teeth to chew it. They had
not long persisted in this
S course of starving the Belly
into subjection, ere they all
S began, one by one, to fail
and flag, and the whole body
S to pine away. Then the
Members were .convinced that
the Belly also, idle and uso-
S less as it seemed, had its own
useful work to do; that they
i could no more do without it
than it could do without
them; and that if they
would have the body healthy,
they must work together,
each in his proper sphere,
for the common good of all





THE LION AND THE MOUSE.


THE LION AND THE
MOUSE;

OR, ONE GOOD TURN DESERVES --
ANOTHER.

A LION was sleeping in his
lair, when a Mouse, not
knowing where he was going,,
ran over the mighty beast's
nose and awakened him.
The Lion clapped his paw
upon the timid little creature,
and was about to make an
end of him in a moment, .
when the Mouse begged him
to spare one who had not
intended to offend, and not
stain his paws with so mean -
a prey. The Lion, smiling
at the little Mouse's fright,"
kindly let him go. Now it
happened no long time after,
that the Lion, while ranging
the woods for his prey, fell .i
into the strong net of the
hunters; and finding himself
caught without hope of escape,
set up a roar that filled the
whole forest with its echo.
The Mouse, recognizing the -
voice of his former preserver, -'. r
ran to the spot, and without ... .
more ado set to work to
nibble the knot in the cord
that bound the Lion, and in
a short time set the noble
beast at liberty.






JESOP'S FABLES.


THE ANT AND THE
DOVE;
OR, DO GOOD TO THOSE WHO
DO GOOD TO YOU.
AN Ant went to a fountain
to quench his thirst, and
tumbling in, was almost
drowned. But a Dove that
happened to be sitting on a
neighboring tree saw the
Ant's danger, and plucking
off a leaf, let it drop into
the water before him, and
the Ant mounting upon it,
was presently wafted safe
ashore. Just at that time a
Fowler was spreading his net,
and was in the act of en-
snaring the Dove, when the
Ant, perceiving his object,
bit his heel. The start which
the man gave made him drop
his net, and the Dove,
aroused to a sense of her
danger, flew safe away.


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THE DOG, THE COCK, AND THE FOX.


TI-E DOG, THE COCK,
AND THE FOX;

on, DIAMOND CUT DIAMOND.

A DOG and a Cock having
made friends went out on
their travels together. Night
found them in a forest; so
the Cock flying up on a tree,
perched among the branches,
while the Dog dozed below
at the foot. As the night
passed away and the day
dawned, the Cock, according
to his custom, set up a shrill
crowing. A Fox hearing
him, and thinking to make a
meal of him, came and stood
under the tree, and thus
addressed him:-" Thou art
a good little bird, and most
useful to thy fellow-creatures.
Come down, then, that we
may sing our morning hymns
and rejoice together." The
Cock replied, Go, my good
friend, to the foot of the
tree, and call the priest to
toll the bell." But as the
Fox went to call him, the
Dog jumped out in a
moment, and seized the Fox
and made -an end of him.


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ASOP'S FABLES.


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THE ASS, THE COC;,
AND THE LION;

OR, THE- DANGER OF CONCEIT.

AN Ass and a Cook lived in
a farm-yard together. One
day a hungry Lion passing;
by and seeing the Ass to be
nice and fat, resolved to make
a meal of him. Now, they
say that there is nothing a
Lion hates so much as the
crowing of a Cock; and at
that moment the Cock hap-
pening to crow, the Lion at
once made off with all haste
from the spot. The Ass,
mightily amused to think that
a Lion should be frightened
at a bird, plucked up courage
and galloped after him, de-
lighted with the notion of
driving the king of beasts
before him. He had, how-
ever, gone no great distance,
when the Lion turned sharply
round upon him, and made an
end of him in a trice.





THE VAIN JACKDAW.


THE VAIN JACKDAW;
OR, THE RISK OF BORROWED
PLUMES.
A JACKDAW, as vain and con-
ceited as Jackdaw could be,
picked up the feathers which
some Peacocks had shed, stuck
them amongst his own, and
despising his old friends, tried
to pass himself off as a Pea-
cock among the Peacocks.
They, instantly detecting the
fraud, stripped him of his
borrowed plumes, and falling
upon him with their beaks,
sent him about his business.
The unlucky Jackdaw, sorely
punished and deeply sorrow-
ing, betook himself to his
former friends, and would
have flocked with them again
as if nothing had happened.
But they, recollecting what
airs he had given himself,
drummed him out of their
society, while one of those
whom he had so lately de-
spised, read him this lecture:
-" Had you been contented
with what nature made you,
you would have escaped both
the chastisement of your
betters and the contempt of
your equals."


/ 4


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2ESOP'S FABLES.

THE COCK AND
JEWEL;


THE


OR, WE VALUE ONLY WHAT '.
WE CAN USE.
As a Cock was scratching
up the straw in a farm-yard,
in search of food for the
hens, he hit upon a Jewel
that by some chance had
found its way there. Oh! "
said he, "you are a very fine
thing, no doubt, to those
who prize you; but give me
a barley-corn before all the
pearls in the world."


THE COUNTRY MOUSE
AND THE TOWN
MOUSE;
OR, BETTER A CRUST IN PEACE
THAN A FEAST IN FEAR.
ONCE upon a time a Country
Mouse who had a friend in
town invited him to pay
him a visit in the country.
The Country Mouse gave his
old friend the best he had,
peas and barley, cheese-
parings and nuts. The Town
Mouse, picking a bit here
and a bit there, while the
host sat nibbling a blade of
barley-straw, at length ex-
claimed, How is it, my
good friend, that you can
endure the dulness of this


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THE COUNTRY MOUSE AND THE TOWN MOUSE.


lii ? You are living like
a toad in a hole. Come with
i-, :n:ld I'll show you life
and th- town." The Country
M,:',ie assented; and they
:,it o:it together on their
j.'iTi.i.- to town. It was
raLiluni-htl ere they reached
ti.- *iat house where the
Town Mouse took up his
qu ii t... On the table were
tLh- 1-imains of a splendid
L...il,:. The Town Mouse
1.!,.,--1 dish upon dish and
dainty upon dainty on the
Country Mouse. In the
ril-t. of his enjoyment, the
dI. ,r flies open, and a party
of revellers bursts into the
r. The Mice jump from
fL. table and hide them-
-I,.- in the first corner
the- can reach. No sooner
,I., they venture to creep out
.,-.,in than the barking of
,1.,.s drives them back in
4till greater terror than
,i-,.r-. At length, when
Ihi,-; seemed quiet, the
'..'iitry Mouse stole out
~t'iom hiz hiding place, and
1.i.lh!2: his friend good-bye,
xnlii..-r-,l in his ear, "Oh,
ni- :,..i. sir, this fine mode
.t living may do for those
\h:, likli- it; but give me
my b.irley bread in peace
and se.-curity before the
',d:.titi-I feast where Fear
and Care are in waiting."






S2SOP'S FABLES.

THE HOUSE-DOG ANTI
THE WOLF;
OR, BETTER BE FREE ANDt
HUNGRY THAN BE A WELI -
-_-. FED SLAVE.
A LEAN, hungry Wolf ch .i..l'
one moonshiny night to fall
in with a plump, well-fed
House-Dog. "How is it, myr
friend," said the Wolf, fth
-- you look so sleek? How
well your food agrees within
S you! and here am I strivingI
1. for my living night and day,
and can hardly save myself
from starving." "Well,"
said the Dog, "if you would
fare like me, you have only
to do as I do." "Indeed!"
said he, "and what is that?"
Why," replied the Dog,
just to guard the master's
house and keep off the thieves
at night." "With all my
heart," said the Wolf. "Fol-
low me," said the Dog. Now
as they were jogging on
S together, the Wolf spied a
mark in the Dog's neck.
"What does that mean?"
"Pooh nothing at all," said
'' the Dog. "Nay, but pray-"
S said the Wolf. "Oh! a
mere trifle, perhaps the collar






THE DOG AND THE SHADOW.


to which my chain is--"
" Chain! cried the Wolf in
surprise; "you don't mean
to say that you cannot rove
when and where you please ? "
"Why, not exactly perhaps;
you see they sometimes tie
me up in the day-time-but,
hullo where are you going?"
SOh, good night to you," said
Sthe Wolf; "you are welcome
* to your dainties; but for me, a
Sdry crust with liberty against
a king's luxury with a chain."


THE DOG AND THE
SHADOW;
OR, GRAB SHADOW AND LOSE
SUBSTANCE.

A DOG had stolen a piece of
meat out of a butcher's shop,-
and was crossing a river on
his way home, when he saw
his own Shadow reflected in
the stream below. Thinking
that it was another dog, with
another piece of meat, he
resolved to make himself
master of that also; but in
snapping at- the supposed
treasure, he dropped the bit
he was crying, and so lost
all.


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2ESOP'S FABLES.


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THE FOX AND THE
CROW;
OR, BEWARE OF FLATTERERS.

A CRow had snatched a fine
piece of cheese out of a
window, and flew with it
into a high tree, intent on
enjoying her prize. A Fox
spied this, and, wanting the
cheese for himself, said, "0
Crow, how beautiful are thy
wings how bright thine eye I
how graceful thy neck! thy
breast is the breast of an
eagle.! thy claws I beg
pardon, thy talons are a
match for all the beasts of
the field! Oh, that such a
bird should be dumb, and
want only a voice!" The
Crow, pleased with the
flattery, and chuckling to
think how she would surprise
the Fox with her caw, opened
her mouth down dropped
the cheese! which the Fox
snapping up, observed, as he
walked away, That whatever
he had remarked of her
beauty, he had said nothing
yet of her brains."






THE FROGS ASKING FOR A KING.


THE FROGS ASKING
FOR A KING;

OR, BE CONTENT, LEST YOU GO
FARTHER AND FARE WORSE.

IN the days of old, the Frogs,
grown weary of following
every one his own way, asked
Jupiter to let them have a
King to keep them-in better
order. Jupiter, knowing better
the vanity of their hearts,
threw down a Log into the
Lake, which, by the splash
it made, sent them all into
the greatest terror. They
rushed under the water and
into the mud, and dared not
come out. At length one
Frog dared to come out, and,
seeing the Log lie stock-still,
he and others swam up to it
and leaped upon it, treating
it with the greatest contempt.
Dissatisfied with so tame a
ruler, they asked Jupiter for
a more active King. Upon
which he sent them a Stork,
who no sooner arrived among
them than he began laying
hold of them and eating them
as fast as he could, and it
was in vain that they tried
to escape him. Then they
sent a private message to
Jupiter, asking him to take
pity on them; but Jupiter
replied, "No; it serves you
right "


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THE KITE AND THE
PIGEONS;
OR, SUSPECT THE PROMISES OP
THE CRAFTY.
SOME Pigeons had long lived
in fear of a Kite, but by being
always on the alert, and keep-
ing near their dove-cote,- they
had hitherto escaped the
attacks of the enemy. Find-
ing himself unsuccessful, the
Kite tried craft. Why,"
said he, "do you prefer this
life of continual anxiety,
when, if you would only
make me your king, I would
secure you from every attack
that could be made upon
you ?" The Pigeons, trust-
ing to his word, called him
to the throne; but no sooner
was he made king than he
abused his authority by
devouring a pigeon a-day.
Whereupon one that yet
awaited his turn, said no
more than, "It serves us
right."






THE WOLVES AND THE SHEEP.


THE WOLVES AND THE
SHEEP;

gOR, NEVER SACRIFICE FRIENDS
SAT THE ADVICE OF FOES.

ONCE on a time, the Wolves
sent a message to the Sheep,
desiring that there might be
peace between them for the
time to come. Why," said
they, should we be for ever
Swaging this deadly strife?
Those wicked Dogs are the
cause of all; they are always
barking at us and provoking
us. Send them away, and
there will be no longer any
obstacle to our eternal friend-
ship and peace." The silly
Sheep listened, the Dogs
wi'i- sent away, and the
' l::.,. thus having lost their
Slt protectors, became an
l.aty prey to their bad
enemy.


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THE TREES AND THE
AXE;

OR, TO SACRIFICE THE POOR
ENDANGERS THE STATE.

A WOODMAN came into a
forest to ask the Trees to
give him a handle for his
Axe. It seemed so modest a
request that the principal
Trees at once agreed to it,
and it was settled among
them that the plain, homely
Ash should give what was
wanted. No sooner had the
Woodman fitted the staff to
his purpose, than he began
laying about him on all sides,
felling the noblest Trees in
the wood. The Oak now
seeing the whole matter too
late, whispered to the Cedar,
The first concession has lost
all; if we had not sacrificed
our humble neighbour, we
might have yet stood for
ages ourselves."





HERCULES AND THE WAGGONER.


HERCULES AND THE
WAGGONER;

OR, GOD HELPS THOSE WHO
HELP THEMSELVES.
As a Countryman was driving
his waggon along a miry lane,
his wheels stuck so deep in
the clay that the horse came
to a standstill. Upon this
the man, without making the
least effort of his own, began
to call upon Hercules to come
and help him out of his
trouble. But Hercules bade
Shim lay his shoulder to the
wheel, assuring him that
SHeaven only aided those who
tried- t.: help themselves.






EsOP'S Fi


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A.BLES.

MERCURY AND THE
WOODMAN;
OR, HONESTY IS THE BEST
POLICY.
A WOODMAN was felling a
tree on the bank of a river,
and by chance let slip his axe
into the water, which sunk to
the bottom. Being in great
distress, he sat down by the
side of the stream and la-
mented his loss bitterly. But
Mercury, whose river it was,
taking pity on him, came to
him; and hearing the cause
of his sorrow, dived to the
bottom of the river, and bring-
ing up a golden axe, asked
the Woodman if that were his.
Upon the man's denying it,
Mercury dived a second time,
and brought up one of silver.
Again the man said it was
not his. So diving a third
time, he produced the very
axe which the man had lost.
"That is mine!" said the
Woodman, delighted to have
recovered his own; and so
pleased was Mercury with the
fellow's truth and honesty,
that he made him a present
of the other two.
The man went to his com-
panions, and told them what
had happened; one of them
determined to try whether he
might not have the like good






THE ANT AND THE GRASSH'OPPER,


i' ,:, .-. -So going to the same
p, .. -. is if for the purpose of
,,iit ,,_: wood, he let slip his
I-:,- ,11 purpose into the river,
nl. then sat down on the
'i: -uL. and made a great show
c.,- we .ling. Mercury appear-
e.i ,i before, and dived into
L-b '..tam; and bringing up
:,li'en axe, asked if that
t, rie axe he had lost.
.v-, surely," said the man
iZ, ll' ; and he was about to
-'' the treasure, when Mer-
Sv. to punish his impudence
ii I ing, not only refused to
-.-r- him. that, but would not
:. i-ih as restore him his
.. L axe again.

STHE ANT AND THE
GRASSHOPPER;
OR, SAVE UP FOR A RAINY DAY.
ON a cold, frosty day an Ant
as dragging out some of the
corn which he had laid up in
summer time, to dry it. A
Grasshopper, half dead with
hunger, asked the Ant to give
yUbm a morsel of it to preserve
is life. What were you do-
ng," said the Ant, "this last
summer? Oh said the
rasshopper, I was not idle;
kept singing all the summer
ong." Said the Ant, laugh-
ng and shutting up his
granary, "Since you could
ing all summer, you may
ance all winter."


--

(II -






JESOP'S FABLES.



THE HARE AND THE
TORTOISE;

OR, SLOW AND STEADY WINS
THE RACE.
A HARE laughed at a Tortoise
for the slowness of his pace.
But he said that he would
S run against her and beat her
any day she should name.
Come on," said the Hare,
"you shall soon see what my
K -\ feet are made of." So it was
agreed that they should start
at once. The Tortoise went
off jogging along, without a
moment's stopping, at his
usual steady pace. The Hare,
treating the whole matter
very lightly, said she would
\ first take a little nap, and
that she should soon overtake
the Tortoise. Meanwhile the
Tortoise plodded on, and the
Hare oversleeping herself,
arrived at the goal, only to
see that the Tortoise had got
S in before her.






THE WIND AND THE SUN.


THE WIND AND
SUN;


OR, IT IS BETTER TO PERSUADE
THAN TO BULLY.
A DISPUTE once arose between
the Wind and the Sun, which
was the stronger of the two,
and they agreed that which-
ever soonest made a traveller
take off his cloak should be
said to be the stronger. The
Wind began, and blew with
all his might and main a
blast, cold and fierce as a
Thracian storm; but the
stronger he blew the closer
the traveller wrapped his cloak
around him, and the tighter
he grasped it with his hands.
Then broke out the Sun:
with his welcome beams he
sent away the vapour and
the cold; the traveller felt
the warmth, and as the Sun
shone brighter and brighter,
he sat down, overcome with
the heat, and cast his cloak
on the ground.


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THE OAK AND THE
REED;

OR, IN YIELDING IS STRENGTH.

AN Oak that had been rooted
up by the winds was borne
down the stream of a river,
on the banks of which many
Reeds were growing. The
Oak wondered to see that
things so slight and frail had
stood the storm, when so great
and strong a tree as himself
had been rooted up. Cease
to wonder," said the Reed,
"you were blown down by
fighting against the storm,
while we are saved by yield-
ing and bending to the least
breath that blows."







THE SHEPHERD-BOY AND THE WOLF.


THE SHEPHERD-BOY
AND THE WOLF;

OR, MEN NEVER BELIEVE A
LIAR, EVEN WHEN HE SPEAKS
THE TRUTH.

A SHEPHERD-BOY, who tended
his flock not far from a
village, used to amuse him-
self at times in crying out
"Wolf! Wolf!" Twice or
thrice his trick succeeded.
The whole village came
running out to his assis-
tance; when all the return
they got was to be laughed
at for their pains. At last,
one day the Wolf came in-
deed. The Boy cried out in
earnest. But his neighbours,
supposing him to be at his
old sport, paid no heed to his
cries, and the Wolf devoured
the sheep.


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JESOP'S FABLES.


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THE HUSBANDMAN
AND THE STORK;

OR, YOU ARE KNOWN BY THE
COMPANY YOU KEEP.

A HUSBANDMAN fixed a net
in his field to catch the
Cranes that came to feed on
his new-sown corn. When
he went to examine the net,
and see what Cranes he had
taken, a Stork was found
among the number. "Spare
me," cried the Stork, "and
let me go! I am no Crane.
I have eaten none of your
corn. I am a poor Stork, as
you may see-the most pious
and dutiful of birds. I take
care of my father and mother.
I--" But the Husband-
man cut him short. "All
this may be true enough, I
dare say; but this I know,
that I have caught you with
those who were eating my
crops, and you must suffer
with the company in which
you are taken."






THE FOX AND THE GRAPES.


THE FOX AND THE
GRAPES;

OR, MAKE THE BEST OF WHAT
YOU CAN T HELP.

A Fox, just at the time
when the grapes are gathered,
stole into a vineyard where
the ripe, sunny Grapes were
hanging up on high in most
tempting show. He made
many a spring and a jump
after the juicy prize; but,
failing in all his attempts,
he muttered as he retreated,
"Well! what does it matter?
The grapes are sour!"


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JESOP'S FABLES.


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THE MISCHIEVOUS
DOG;

OR, DON'T PRIDE YOURSELF
ON YOUR DISGRACE.

THERE was a Dog so wild
and mischievous that his
master was obliged to fasten
a heavy bell about his neck,
to prevent him biting and
harming his neighbours. The
Dog, priding himself upon
his badge, walked about the
market place, shaking his
bell to attract notice. But
a sly friend said to him,
"The less noise you make
the better; the bell you carry
is no reward of goodness, but
a sign of disgrace!" I






VENUS AND THE CAT.


VENUS AND THE CAT;

OR, WHAT'S BRED IN THE BONE
COMES OUT IN THE FLESH.

A CAT, having fallen in love
with a young man, besought
Venus to change her into a
girl, in the hope of gaining
his affections. The Goddess,
taking compassion on her
weakness, changed her into a
fair damsel; and the young
man led her home as his bride.
As they were sitting in their
chamber, Venus, wishing to
know whether, in changing
her form, she had also changed
her nature, set down a Mouse
before her. The Girl, forget-
ful of her new condition,
started from her seat, and
pounced upon the Mouse as
if she would have eaten it on
the spot; whereupon the God-
dess, provoked at her frivolity,
straightway turned her into a
Cat again.


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ESOP'S FABLES.


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THE COUNTRYMAN
AND THE SNAKE;
OR, INGRATITUDE AND ITS
PUNISHMENT.
A COUNTRYMAN, returning
home one winter's day, found
a Snake by the hedge-side,
half dead with cold. Taking
pity on the creature, he laid
it in his bosom, and brought
it home to his fireside to
revive it. No sooner had
the warmth restored it, than
it began to attack the children
of the cottage. Upon this
the Countryman, whose pity
had saved its life, took up a
hoe and laid the Snake dead
at his feet.





THE FOX AND THE GOAT.


THE FOX AND THE
GOAT;

OR, LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP.

A Fox had fallen into a well,
and had been thinking for a
long time how he should get
out again; when at length a
Goat came to the place, and
wanting to drink, asked Rey-
nard whether the water was
good, and if there was plenty
of it. The Fox replied, Come
down, my friend; the water is
so good that I cannot drink
enough of it, and there is so
much of it that it cannot be
dried up." Upon this the
Goat, without any more ado,
leaped in; when the Fox, tak-
ing advantage of his friend's
horns, as nimbly leaped out;
and coolly remarked to the
poor Goat, "If you had half
as much brains as you have
beard, you would have looked
before you leaped."


. I 1






ESOP S FABLES.


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THE VIPER AND THE
FILE.

A VIPER, entering into a
smith's shop, began looking
about for something to eat.
At length, seeing a File, he
went up to it, and began
biting at it; but the File bade
him leave him alone, saying,
"You are likely to get little
from me, who am used to bite
others."







THE WOLF AND THE LAMB.


THE WOLF AND THE
LAMB;
OB, ANY PRETENCE WILL SERVE
A TYRANT.
As a Wolf was drinking at
the head of a running brook,
he spied a stray Lamb pad-
dling at some distance down
the stream. Having made
up his mind to seize her, he
thought to himself how he
might show cause for doing
it. "Villain! said he,
running up to her, "how
dare you dirty the water that
I am drinking Indeed,"
said the Lamb humbly, "I
do not see how I can disturb
the water, since it runs from
you to me, not from me to
you." "Be that as it may,"
replied the Wolf, "it is but
a year ago that you called
me many ill names." Oh,
Sir! said the Lamb, tremb-
ling, "a year ago I was not
born." Well," replied the
Wolf, if it was not you,
it was your father, and that
is all the same; but it is no
use trying to talk me out
of my supper; "-and without
another word he fell upon
the poor helpless Lamb and
tore her to pieces.


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AESOP'S FABLES.


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THE LION IN LOVE;

OR, NEVER PART WITH YOUR
ARMS.

IT happened in days of old
that a Lion fell in love with
a Woodman's daughter, and
had the folly to ask her of
her father in marriage. The
Woodman was not much
pleased with the offer, and
declined the honour. But
upon the Lion threatening
him, the poor man, seeing
that he was not to be denied,
hit at length upon this way
of escape: "I feel greatly
flattered," said he, with
your offer; but, noble sir,
what great teeth you have
got! and what great claws
you have got! where is the
damsel that would not be
afraid of such weapons as
these? You must have your
teeth drawn and your claws
out before you can be a
suitable husband for my
daughter." The Lion agreed
(for what will not a body do
for love ?), and then called
upon the father to accept him
as a son-in-law. But the
Woodman, no longer afraid
of the tamed and disarmed
bully, seized a stout stick,
and drove the poor suitor
from his door.







THE MAN AND THE LION.


THE MAN AND THE
LION;

OR, WHO IS IT TELLS THE
TALE ?

ONCE upon a time a Man and
a Lion were journeying to-
gether, and came at length to
high words as to which was the
braver and stronger creature
of the two. As the dispute
waxed warmer they happened
to pass by, on the road-side,
the statue of a man strangling
a lion. See there," said the
man; what more proof can
you have of our superiority
than that?" That," said
the Lion, "is your version of
the story ; let us be the sculp-
tors, and for one lion under
the feet of a man you shall
have twenty men under the
paw of a lion."


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THE DOG IN THE
MANGER;
OR, DON'T GRUDGE OTHERS
WHAT YOU CANNOT USE YOUR-
SELF.
A DOG made his bed in a
Manger, and lay snarling and
growling to keep the oxen
from their provender. "See,"
said one of them, "what a
miserable our! who neither
can eat hay himself, nor will
allow those to eat it who can."


44


___~ N


AESOP S FABLES

i i-
t-t, __






THE WOLF AND THE CRANE.


THE WOLF AND THE
CRANE;

OR, GET YOUR FEE BEFORE
YOU MAKE YOUR CURE.

A WOLF had got a bone stuck
in his throat, and in the
greatest agony ran up and
down, begging every one he
met to relieve him, at the
same time hinting at a very
rich fee. A Crane, moved by
his entreaties and promises,
put her long neck down the
Wolf's throat, and drew out
the bone. She then modestly
asked for the promised fee.
To which the Wolf, grinning
and showing his teeth, replied,
with -seeming indignation,
"Ungrateful wretch! to ask
for any other reward than
that you have put your head
into a Wolf's jaws, and
brought it safe out again!"


- (







ESOP'S FABLES.


THE FOX AND THE
STORK;

OR, TTT FOR TAT.

A Fox one day invited a Stork
to dinner, and, wishing to play
a practical joke, he provided
nothing but some thin soup in
a shallow dish. This the Fox
lapped up very readily, while
the Stork, unable to gain a
mouthful with her long narrow
bill, was as hungry at the end
of dinner as when she began.
The Fox meanwhile professed
his regret at seeing her eat so
sparingly, and feared that the
dish was not seasoned to her
mind. The Stork said little,
but begged that the Fox would
do her the honour of returning
the visit. He agreed to dine
with her on the following day.
He arrived true to his appoint-
ment, and the dinner was or-
dered forthwith; but when it
was served up, he found to his
dismay that it was contained in
a narrow-necked vessel, down
which the Stork readily thrust
her long neck and bill, while
he was obliged to content him-
self with licking the neck of
the jar,






THE CROW AND THE JUG.


THE CROW AND THE
JUG;
OR, NECESSITY IS THE MOTHER
OF INVENTION.

A CRow, ready to die with
thirst, flew with joy to a Jug,
which he saw at a distance.
But when he came up to it
he found the water so low
that with all his stooping and
straining he was unable to
reach it. Thereupon he tried
to break the Jug; then to
uveiturn it; but his strength
was not sufficient to do either.
At last, seeing some small
pebbles at hand, he dropped a
great many of them, one by
one, into the Jug, and so
raised the water to the brim,
and quenched his thirst.






mESOP'S FABLES.


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THE EAGLE AND THE
FOX;

OR, WHERE THERE'S A WILL
THERE'S A WAY.

AN EAGLE and a Fox had
long lived together. One day,
while the Fox was abroad, the
Eagle made a swoop at the
Fox's cub, and carried it off to
her nest, thinking that the
tree was so high it would
secure her from the Fox's
revenge. The Fox, on her
return home, begged to have
her young one again; but
finding that her entreaties
were of no avail, she snatched
a torch from an altar, and set-
ting the whole tree in flames,
soon made the Eagle restore,
through fear for herself and
her own young ones, the cub
which she had just now denied
to her most earnest prayers.






THE MAN AND THE SATYR.


THE MAN AND THE
SATYR;
OR, CIRCUMSTANCES ALTER
CASES. 'I
A MAN and a Satyr, having
struck up an acquaintance, sat
down together to eat. The
day being wintry and cold,
the Man put his fingers to
his mouth and blew upon
them. "What's that for, my
friend?" asked the Satyr.
"My hands are so cold," said
the Man; "I do it to warm
them." In a little while some
hot food was placed before
them, and the Man, raising
the dish to his mouth, blew
upon it. "And what's the
meaning of that now?" said
the Satyr. Oh," replied the
Man, my porridge is so hot,
I do it to cool it." "Nay
then," said the Satyr, "from
this moment I renounce your
friendship, for I will have
nothing to do with one who
blows hot and cold with the
same mouth."






ZSOP S FABLES.


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THE MOUSE AND THE
FROG;

OR, TREACHERY AVENGED.

A MOUSE, in an evil day,
made friends with a Frog, and
they set off on their travels
together. The Frog, on pre-
tence of great affection, and of
keeping his companion out of
harm's way, tied the Mouse's
fore-foot to his own hind-
leg, and thus they proceeded
for some distance by land.
Presently they came to some
water, and the Frog, bidding
the Mouse have good courage,
began to swim across. They
had scarcely, however, ar-s
rived mid-way, when the
Frog took a sudden plunge
to the bottom, dragging the
unfortunate Mouse after him.
But the struggling and floun-
dering of the Mouse made so
great commotion in the water
that it attracted the attention
of a Kite, who, pouncing
down, and bearing off the
Mouse, carried away the Frog
at the same time in his train.






THE CAT AND THE MICE.


THE CAT AND THE
MICE;
OR, A WISE CAUTION IS THE
BEST PROTECTION.
A CAT, grown feeble with
age, and no longer able to
hunt the Mice as she was
wont to do, bethought her-
self how she might entice
them within reach of her
paw. Thinking that she
might pass herself off for a
bag, or for a dead Cat at
least, she suspended herself
by the hind-legs from a peg,
in the hope that the Mice
would no longer be afraid to
come near her. An old
Mouse, who was wise enough
to keep his distance, whispered
to a friend, "Many a bag
have I seen in my day, but
never one with a Cat's head."
"Hang there, good Madam,"
said the other, "as long as
you please, but I would not
trust myself within reach of
you though ypo were stuffed
with straw.'







2ESOP'S FABLES.


K,11


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THE MICE IN COUNCIL;

OR, WHO WILL BELL THE CAT?

ONCE upon a time, the Mice,
being sadly distressed by the
Cat, resolved to call a meeting,
to decide upon the best means
of getting rid of her. Many
plans were discussed and re-
jected. At last a young Mouse
got up and proposed that a
Bell should be hung round the
Cat's neck, that they might
for the future always have
notice of her coming, and so
be able to escape. This pro-
position was hailed with the
greatest applause, and was
agreed to at once. Upon
which an old Mouse, who had
sat silent all the while, got up
and said that he considered
the plan very clever, and that
it would, no doubt, be quite
successful; but he had only
one short question to put,
namely, which of them it was
who would Bell the Cat ?






TIE FOX AND THE LION.


THE FOX AND THE
LION;

OR, FAMILIARITY BREEDS
CONTEMPT.

A Fox who had never seen a
Lion, when by chance he met
him for the first time was so
terrified that he almost died of
fright. When he met him the
second time he was still afraid,
but managed to disguise his
fear. When he saw him the
third time he was so bold that
he went up to him and asked
him how he did.






JESOP'S FABLES.

THE LION, THE ASS,
AND THE FOX, HUNT.
ING;

OR, LAWLESS MIGHT BREEDS
CRAFTY SLAVES.

THE Lion, the Ass, and the
Fox formed a party to go
out hunting. They took a
large booty, and when the
sport was ended bethought
themselves of having a
hearty meal. The Lion
bade the Ass allot the spoil.
So, dividing it into three
.-'I equal parts, the Ass begged
his friends to make their
choice; at which the Lion,
in great anger, fell upon
the Ass and tore him to
pieces. He then bade the
'-i.'- Fox make a division; who,
S gathering the whole in one
great heap, reserved but the
smallest mite for himself.
Ah friend," said the Lion,
"who taught you to make
so just a division?" "I
wanted no other lesson,"
replied the Fox, "than the
S" Ass's fate."






THE SICK LION.


THE SICK LION;
OR, DON'T VENTURE WHERE
MANY GO IN BUT NONE COME
OUT.
A LION, no longer able, from
weakness and old age, to hunt
for his prey, laid himself up
in his den, and, speaking with
a low voice, gave out that he
was very ill indeed. The re-
port soon spread among the
beasts, and there was a great
lamentation for the sick Lion.
One after the other came to
see him; but, catching them
thus alone, and in his own
den, the Lion made an easy
prey of them, and grew fat
upon his diet. The Fox, sus-
pecting the truth of the
matter, came at length to
make his visit of inquiry, and,
standing at some distance,
asked his Majesty how he did.
"Ah, my dearest friend,"
said the Lion, is it you?
Why do you stand so far
from me? Come, sweet friend,
and pour a word of consolation
in the poor Lion's ear, who
has but a short time to live."
"Bless you!" said the Fox;
" but excuse me if I cannot
stay; for, to tell the truth, I
feel quite uneasy at the mark
of the footsteps that I see
here, all pointing towards
your den, and none returning
outwards.


C-
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2ESOP'S FABLES.


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THE COUNTRY MAID
AND HER MILK-CAN;
OR, DON'T COUNT YOUR
CHICKENS BEFORE THEY ARE
HATCHED.
A COUNTRY MAID was walking
along with a can of milk upon
her head, when she fell a-
thinking. "The money for
which I shall sell this milk
will enable me to increase my
stock of eggs to three hundred.
These eggs will produce at
least two hundred and fifty
chickens. The chickens will
be fit to carry to market just
at the time when poultry is
always dear; so that by the
new year I cannot fail of
having money enough to pur-
chase a new gown. In this
dress I will go to the fair,
where all the young fellows
will strive to have me for a
partner; but no-I shall re-
fuse every one of them with a
toss of my head." Delighted
with this idea, she could not
forbear acting with her head
the thought that thus passed
in her mind; when, down
came the can of milk; and all
her imaginary happiness van-
ished in a moment.






THE WIDOW AND THE HEN.


THE WIDOW AND THE
HEN;

OR, LOGIC MISLED BY
IGNORANCE.

A WIDOW woman kept a Hen
that laid an egg every morn-
ing. Thought the woman to
herself, "If I double my
Hen's allowance of barley, she
will lay twice a day." So she
tried her plan, and the Hen
became so fat and sleek that
she left off laying at all.





]ESOP'S FABLES.


II I






JII i. r S I,. ~ yI: I





: \




; 1\'jI


THE GOOSE WITH THE
GOLDEN EGGS;

OR, MUCH WANTS MORE AND
LOSES ALL.

A CERTAIN man had the good
fortune to possess a Goose
that laid him a Golden Egg
every day. But dissatisfied
with so slow an income, and
thinking to seize the whole
treasure at once, he killed the
Goose, and, cutting her open,
found her-just what any
other goose would be!






THE MOUNTAIN IN LABOUR.


THE MOUNTAIN IN
LABOUR;

OR, THOSE WHO PROMISE MOST
PERFORM LEAST.

IN days of yore, a mighty
rumbling was heard in a
Mountain. It was said to be
in labour, and multitudes
flocked together, from far
and near, to see what it
would produce. After long
expectation and many wise
conjectures from the by-
standers out popped a
Mouse!





SOP'S FABLES.


THE HORSE AND THE
GROOM;

OR, HORSE SENSE.

A GRooM who used to steal
and sell a Horse's corn, was
yet very busy in grooming
and whisping him all the day
long. "If you really wish
me," said the Horse, "to look
well, give me less of your
currying and more of your
corn."






THE OLD HOUND,


THE OLD HOUND;

OR, THE REWARD OF LONG
AND FAITHFUL SERVICE.

A HOUND, who had been an
excellent one in his time, and
had done good service to his
master in the field, at length
became worn out with the
weight of years and trouble.
One day, when hunting the
wild boar, he seized the crea-
ture by the ear, but, his teeth
giving way, he was forced to
let go his hold, and the boar
escaped. Upon this the hunts-
man, coming up, severely
scolded him. But the feeble
Dog replied, "Spare your old
servant It was the power,
not the will, that failed me.
Remember rather what I was,
than abuse me for what I
am."


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- ---


JESOP'S FABLES.


THE HORSE AND THE
LOADED ASS;
OR, THOSE WHO SHIRK THEIR
FAIR SHARE CARRY DOUBLE.


*~~ ;- ',-





I --


.' ,-


'". A MAN who kept a Horse and
an Ass was wont in his jour-
neys to spare the Horse and
put all the burden upon the
F' Ass's back. The Ass, who
M .. had been some while ailing,
besought the Horse one day to
.relieve him of part of his load;
l For if," said he, "you would
Stake a fair portion, I shall soon
get well again; but if you re-
fuse to help me, this weight
will kill me." The Horse,
however, bade the Ass get on,
: and not trouble him with his
complaints. The Ass jogged
,'"" / on in silence, but presently,
overcome with the weight of
his burden, dropped -down
') dead, as he had foretold.
S Upon this the master, coming
up, unloosed the load from the
dead Ass, and putting it upon
the Horse's back, made him
carry the Ass's carcase in
addition. "Alas, for my ill-
S nature!" said the Horse ;
//r'!, ( "by refusing to bear my just
portion of the load I have now
to carry the whole of it, with
". a dead weight into the bar-
S gain."


-.:~ *~ :~







ADVERTISEMENTS. 1


THE MASTERPIECE L1IBARY.


SERIES I.-THE
No. 1.-Macaulay's "Lays of Ancient
Rome," and other Poems.
No. 2.-Scott's ". "iru,;.:u "
No. 3.-Byron's C'rii-. Harold,"
Cantos. I. and II., and other Poems.
No. 4.-Lowell's Poems. Selections.
No. 5.-BTrns's Poems. Selections.
No. 6.-Shakespeare's "Romeo and
Juliet."
No. 7.-Longfellow's Evangeline,"
&o.
No. 8.-Selections from Mrs. Elizabeth
Barrett Browning's Poems.
No. 9.-Selections from Campbell.
No. 10.-Milton's Paradise Lost" Pt. 1.
No. 11.-Stories from "The Earthly
Paradise," by Wm. Morris.
No. 12.-Byron's Childe Harold." Pt. 2.
No. 13.-Whittier's Poems of Liberty,
Progress and Labour.
No. 14.-Tales from Chaucer in Prose
and Verse.
No. 15.-Milton's "Paradise Lost." Pt. 2.
No. 16.-Tom Moore's Poems.
No. 17.-Selections from Win. Cullen
Bryant's Poems.


PENNY POETS.
No. 18.-The Story of St. George and
the Dragon.
No. 19.-Poems of John Keats.
No. 20.-Scott's Lady of the Lake."
No. 21.-Whittier's Poems. Part 2.
No. 22.-Shakespeare's "Julius Casar."
No. 23.-Pope's "Essay on Man," &c.
No. 24.-Poems of Tom Hood.
No. 25.-Coleridge's "Ancient Mariner."
No. 26.-Poems of Matthew Arnold.
No. 27.-Poems of Walt Whitman.
No. 28.-Poems of Shelley.
No. 29.-Clough's "Love-Story of a
Young Man."
No. 30.-Some Ingoldsby Legends.
No. 31.-" Lay of the Last Minstrel."
No. 32.-Poems of Wordsworth. Pait 1.
No. 33.-Poems of Cowper.
No. 34.-Poems ofDryden.
No. 35.-Poems of Southey.
No. 36.-Legends and Ballads.
No. 37.-Wordsworth's Poems. Part 2.
No. 38 -Poems of Mrs. Hemans and
Eliza Cook.
No. 39.-Milton's "Paradise Regainfed,"
and other Poems.


SERIES II.-PENNY POPULAR NOVELS

( ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION, 8s. 60. POST FREE.
No. 1.-" She." By Rider Haggard. (With the Author's Permission.)
No. 2.-" Monte Cristo's Millions." Dumas.
No. 3.-" The True History of Joshua Davidson." By Mrs. Lynn Linton.
r No. 4.-" The Vengeance of Monte Cristo."
No. 5.-" The Scarlet Letter." Hawthorne.
No. 6.-" Little Em'ly." (From "David Copperfield.")
No. 7.-" Ben Hur." By Gen. Lew Wallace.
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