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Title: Puerto Ricans in New York City, April 1, 1953
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085470/00001
 Material Information
Title: Puerto Ricans in New York City, April 1, 1953
Series Title: Puerto Ricans in New York City, April 1, 1953.
Physical Description: 4 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Community Council of Greater New York
Publisher: Welfare and Health Council of New York City
Place of Publication: New York New York
Publication Date: 1953
 Subjects
Subject: Puerto Ricans -- New York (State) -- New York   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00085470
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 213097052

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Back Cover
        Page 11
        Page 12
Full Text















PUERTO RICANS IN NEW YORK CITY


APRIL 1, 1953






























Welfare and Health Council of New York City

44 East 23rd Street, New York 10, N. Y.

April 1, 1953











Welfare and Health Council of New York City

44 East 23rd Street, New York 10, N. Y.

ALgonquin 4-5500




Board of Directors

Coverly Fischer, President Hon. George Sylvester, Vice-President
Carl M. Loeb, Jr., Vice-President Thomas Keogh, Secretary
Francis L. Whitmarsh, Treasurer


.


Mrs. Richard J. Bernhard
Milton J. Bluestein
Mrs. Charles S. Brown
Edmond Borgia Butler
Laurence L. Cassidy
Harold C. Dean
Dr. Louis I. Dublin
Rt. Rev. Msgr. James J. Lynch


Clarence G. Michalis
Walter A. Miller
Mrs. Grayson M-P Murphy, Jr.
Hermann G. Place
T, J. Ross
John H. Schmid
Mrs. Adrian Van Sinderen
Raymond M. Hilliard, Executive Director


Hon, John J. Bennett
Mrs. Richard J. Bernhard
Mrs. Leonard H. Bernheim
Andre Blumenthal
Marguerite T. Boylan
Lt.Col. Chester R. Brown
Frank A. Calderone, M.D.
Rev. J Henry Carpenter
Hon. Philip J. Cruise
J. Clarence Davies, Jr.
Stanley P. Davies
Mrs. Robert De Vecchi
R. L. Dickinson
Virginia Dunbar
Mary L. Gibbons
Archibald Glover


Central Planning Board

Louis C. Haggerty
Mrs.Harold D.Harvey
Robert L. Hoguet
Rev.George P.Jacoby
Dr. William Jansen
Hon. Peter Kasius
Thomas Keogh
Hon.Marcus D.Kogel,M.D.
Arthur M. Loeb
Carl M. Loeb, Jr.
Hon.Henry L.McCarthy
Hon.John F.Mahoney,M.D.
Leonard W. Mayo
Philip Michaels
Walter A. Miller
Mrs.Irvin C.Mollison


Hon.George P.Monaghan
Hon. Robert Moses
Rev.Francis J.Mugavero
Hon. Samuel habin
Mrs. Robert C. Rome
Mrs.Samuel L.Rosenberry
Mrs. Arthur D. Schulte
Arnold V. Schwartz
G. Howland Shaw
David Sher.
Louis H. Sobel
Ordway Tead
George M.Wheatley, M.D.
Ralph L. Whelan
Joseph Willen
Hon. Albert Williams


I *







Puerto Ricans in New York City
April 1, 1953


The Welfare and Health Council of New York City has long maintained an
especial interest in our Puerto hican citizens. So many myths, misunderstand-
ings and misconceptions are prevalent concerning this newest of our "minority
groups" that factual information is of major importance. This publication
concerns itself primarily with the numbers of those of Puerto Rican birth or
parentage currently (April 1, 1953) in New York City. Although primarily a
population estimate, a brief general statement is also necessary.

Among prior publications of the Council on this subject are "Puerto
Ricans in New York City" (1948); "Population of Puerto Rican Birth or Parentage,
New York City: 1950"; and "Estimated Net In-Migration to Continental United
States from Puerto Rico," September 1952./

Growing largely out of the work of the Welfare Council's Committee, the
Mayor's Committee on Puerto Rican Affairs in New York City was established in
1949. Included on that Committee are representatives of eleven public agencies
(including officials of five Puerto Rican governmental departments), eighteen
private agencies, and civic leaders, including leaders of the Puerto Rican
"community" here. The closest cooperation exists between the Mayor's Committee
and the welfare and Health Council; the Chairman of the Mayor's Committee is
the Executive Director of the Council.

There are certain demonstrable truths which have been established beyond
any question of doubt:--first and foremost is the fact that the vast majority
of this group of our citizens differ in no essential way from each of the other
large groups who came in the past--even with respect to the opprobrious, unjust
"name-calling" which was applied to each new group. Like the former newcomers,
they perform services essential to our economic life, and through their earnings
they are nearly all self-supporting, self-respecting citizens. It cannot be too
strongly emphasized that when we talk of "Puerto hicans," we are talking about
American citizens; moreover, they are good patriotic Americans, as evidenced
most recently in the lists of wounded veterans in the prisoner-of-war exchanges
in Korea.

The second incontrovertible fact is that they add to the sum total of our
culture, bringing in the colorful Puerto Rican and Spanish motifs. This prom-
ises, on a long-range program, to serve for better communication with the mil-
lions of our Central and South American neighbors.

Reference has been made previously to the discrimination and miscon-
ceptions concerning each new group cf arrivals to this city, and to the fact
that the same situation prevails, unfortunately, concerning our Puerto Rican
citizenry. There is one serious situation in this city today which intensifies
the difficulties concerning our Puerto Rican citizens:--this refers to the
virtual nonexistence of family living accommodations at rentals that new arriv-
als can afford.

This situation has been clearly portrayed in a report prepared by the
Council's special Committee on Housing entitled "The Present Housing Emergency


l/ Only the publication "Population of Puerto Rican Birth or Parentage, New
York City: 1950" is now available. Price 43.00.







2 -
-2-

in New York City," (January 1953). After pointing out that "New York is in a
period of 'slum making'," the report continues, "primarily slum-dwellers are
the victims, not the makers of slums." At other points in the report, it is
demonstrated that the Puerto hicans, being the newest arrivals and largely
holding the lowest-paid jobs, are particularly affected by the prevailing
adverse housing conditions,--adverse conditions which will continue for many
years because of the cost of new housing construction.

The impact of the adverse housing conditions is felt particularly in
neighborhood tensions, with which local community cooperation can deal effec-
tively. The Mayor's Committee on Puerto Rican Affairs in New York City has
made a notable contribution to the cause of better relationships and "improve-
ment of the climate" for mutual understanding and appreciation.

However, where conditions unfavorable for family living prevail,--such
as an entire family living in one room, with several other families also living
in the same apartment or house, all sharing one toilet and one kitchen, and all
devoid of many other normal facilities for family living, the impact is so ser-
ious, that remedial,--even better, preventive--measures are essenti"lQ (Space
does not permit further discussion of this situation here; the matter is treated
in detail in the Council's publication on "Housing.")

The Government of Puerto Rico itself, in cooperation with the United
States Employment Service and the New York State Employment Service, has under-
taken a vigorous campaign to divert Puerto Ricans seeking employment away from
New York, to other centers throughout the continental United States. Where
previously, almost all migrants from Puerto Rico settled in New York, today
there are many additional 'magnets", to attract Puerto Rican citizens leaving
the Commonwealth to points where employment possibilities are favorable, and
more particularly, where conditions for new families--particularly for families
with many children--are not so difficult as currently prevail in New York.
These efforts have already reduced the percentages of those who leave Puerto
Rico and settle in New York City to approximately 80%, or less, of the total,
and it is hoped that the continuing and intensified efforts, including publi-
cizing in the Commonwealth itself of the fact that there is no available low-
rent housing in New York, will result in very material easing of the situation.

The distribution of our Puerto Rican citizens throughout the city is
shown in the Velfare and Health Council's publication previously referred to,
"Population of Puerto hican Birth or Parentage, New York City: 1950," based
on the Health Areas of the city and the enumeration of the 1950 Census. In
1951 the Mayor's Committee, in its report on "Puerto Rican Pupils in New York
City Schools," dealt with this same problem of distribution. Since then, there
have been rapid changes into new areas and further research is necessary to make
even a fairly accurate, current portrayal of this distribution.

A As to the number of Puerto Rican citizens in New York City, the best es-
timate is of a current (April 1, 1953) total of 400,000, of whom 314,000 were
born in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico; 86,000 born here-i The bases for such
estimate are shown in Tables 1, 2 and 3, which follow. These Tables, inciden-
tally, show the close correlation which exists between the years of high employ-
ment rates here and the numbers who leave the Commonwealth.




27 This publication, "The Present Housing Emergency in New York City," is
available; price $ 1.00






Estimated Net Migration
Estimated Net Mieration


Year


1939 .

1940 .

1941 .

1942 .

1943 .

1944

1945 .


. 9 .


* C *

* S S


Table 1

from Puerto Rico to Continental United States: 1939-1952


Net Total


3,035


-425

643


1,679

3,204

11,201

13,573


Year


1946 .

1947 .

1948 .

1949 .

1950 .

1951 .

1952 .


1953 (January, February & March)


* .


. 17,335


Net Total


39,911

24,551

32,775

25,698

34,703

52,899

59,103


Table 2


Numbers in New York City of Puerto Rican Birth or Parentage


Born in
Puerto Rico


1930 (April U.S.Census)

1940 (April U.S.Census)

1940 (April U.S.Census)
2/
1953 (April Estimated)


44,908

61,463

187,586

314,000


Born Here


Total


4J/


A/

58,720

86,000


246,306

400,000


/ The figures represent the number of persons departing from Puerto Rico for
the Continental U.S. or elsewhere, minus the number of arrivals in Puerto
Rico; transient passengers and tourists are excluded; departures for and
arrivals from places other than the mainland are a relatively small pro-
portion of these totals. The minus sign is used here to indicate a net-
outflow from the mainland. Source: San Juan Office, Immigration and
Naturalization Service, United States Department of Justice, September
1952.

2/ See Table 3 for monthly totals; the total in-migration for the three years
from April 1, 1950 (the latest U.S. Census figure) to April 1, 1953 is
158,029.

2/ The Welfare and Health Council makes this present estimate, assuming that
* 80% of migrants from Puerto Rico settle in New York City. (This agrees with
the estimate of the Chief of the Migration Division, Department of Labor,
Government of Puerto Rico.) To this is added "natural increase" (excess of
births over deaths) here, since the U.S. Census figure for April 1, 1950.
(This figure for "natural increase" is based on the best available data.


4/ Data not available.


_ __ __


___CI_


* .


Ir



r





Table 3
Net In-mgrton to Continental
Net In-migration to Continental


United States


Monthly data: 1939 1953 (First


from Puerto Rico:
3 Months)


Month 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946


January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
Total





January
February
March
April
May
June
July
S August
September
October
November
December
Total


-305
-42
-70
922
218
719
262
-682
1,329
-246
338
592
3,035


1947


-1,070
25
84
116
25
235
376
-466
1,426
-368
442
-1,250
-425


1948


-186
-860
-1,301
2,164
775
-252
-81
109
474
69
10
-278
643


1949


-,18
156
530
-346
226
177
121
176
207
109
155
286
1,679


1950


259
241
409
216
279
143
442
748
428
105
656
-722
3,204


1951


480
1,029
228
2,041
1,809
844
731,
872
393
477
980
1,317
11,201


1952


4- 4-. -- -4 + 1


1,060
1,404
2,467
2,926
4,174
1,444
1,287
4,497
4,650
2,126
713
-2,197
24,551


1,183
925
2,171
4,549
4,473
3,640
4,680
5,831
5,850
1,230
1,044
-2,801
32,775


1,826
694
2,091
4,954
4,818
2,815
2,513
3,843
4,406
836
424
-3,522
25,698


1,990
1,321
2,700
4,830
5,455
9,359
2,359
3,225
5,839
817
-41
-3,151
34,703


1,922
1,925
4,050
8,348
7,366
9,260
8,002
9,975
6,766
655
-1,193
-4,177
52,899


3,681
3,050
4,715
9,870
10,673
9,596
8,397
11,764
6,146
-849
-391
-7,549
59,103


460
1,470
1,198
1,442
1,035
628
723
1,660
2,237
1,169
739
812
13,573


1953


6,910
3,441
6,984


1,171
1,097
1,636
3,197
4,775
5,405
6,028
7,634
6,273
3,156
1,422
-1,883
39,911


1954


The figures represent the number of persons departing from Puerto Rico for the
Continental U. S. or elsewhere, minus the number of arrivals in Puerto Fico;
transient passengers and tourists are excluded; departures for and arrivals
from places other than the mainland are a relatively small proportion of these
totals. The minus sign is used here to indicate a net-outflow from the mainland.
irce: San Juan Office, Immigration and Naturalization Service, United States
Department of Justice. *April 1, 1950, date of U.S. Census.


#6743
April 1953


Estimated


Sou

































The Welfare and Health Council of New York City is a

voluntary organization which serves as a coordinating

and planning center for public and voluntary welfare

and health services in the five boroughs of the

City of New York.






















WELFARE AND HEALTH COUNCIL OF NE,: YORK CITY
44 East 23rd Street New York 10, NY.




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