Title: Soil survey maps and interpretations
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085446/00001
 Material Information
Title: Soil survey maps and interpretations special report, Columbia County, Florida
Series Title: Soil survey maps and interpretations
Physical Description: 49, 52 p., maps. : ;
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Soil Conservation Service
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: The Service
Place of Publication: Washington ;
Fort Worth Tex
Publication Date: 1976
 Subjects
Subject: Soil surveys -- Florida -- Columbia County   ( lcsh )
Soil surveys -- Maps   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: prepared by Soil Conservation Service ... in cooperation with Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations.
General Note: For limited distribution.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00085446
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 03040566

Full Text
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SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.
IN COOPERATION WITH
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TABLE OF CONTENTS


HOW THIS SURVEY WAS MADE ..................

HOW TO USE THIS INTERIM REPORT . . . . . . . .

KINDS OF INTERPRETATIONS AND INFORMATION IN THIS REPORT...

PREPARING INTERPRETIVE MAPS FROM THE SOIL MAPS . . . .

USE AND EXPLANATION OF SOIL INTERPRETATION SHEETS . .

Estimated Soil Properties ...............
Rating Soils for:

Sanitary Facilities....... ..........
Community Development . . . . . . ..
Source Material ..................
Water Management .................
Recreation ....................

Capability and Predicted Yields . . . . . .
Woodland Suitability. . . . . . ... ..
Wildlife Suitability..................
Potential Native Plant Community .........

SOIL INTERPRETATION SHEETS . . . . . . . . .

MAPPING LEGEND .......................

INDEX OF SOIL SURVEY INTERPRETATION SHEET NAMES. . . .

CONVENTIONAL MAPPING SYMBOLS . . . . . . . .

INDEX TO MAP SHEETS.....................

MAP SHEETS .............. ...........







HOW THIS SURVEY WAS MADE


Soil scientists made this survey to learn what kinds of soils are
in the area, where they are located, and how they can be used. The soil
scientists went into the area knowing they likely would fine many soils
they had already seen and perhaps some they had not. As they traversed
the landscape, they observed the drainage and the kinds of native plants
or crops, the kinds of rock and many facts about the soils. They dug or
bored holes to a depth of about six and one-half feet or less to expose
soil profiles. A profile is the.sequence of natural layers, or horizons,
in a soil; it extends from the surface down into the parent material
that has not been changed much by leaching or by the action of plant
roots.

The soil scientists made comparisons among the profiles they studied,
and they compared these profiles with those in counties nearby and in
places more distant. They classified and named the soils according to
nationwide, uniform procedures. The soil series and the soil phase are
the categories of soil classification most used in a local survey.

Soils that have profiles almost alike make up a soil series.
Except for different texture in the surface layer, all the soils of one
series have major horizons that are similar in thickness, arrangement,
and other important characteristics. Each soil series is named for a
town or other geographic feature near the place where a soil of that
series was first observed and mapped. Alpin and Albany, for example,
are the names of two soil series. All the soils in the United States
having the same series name are essentially alike in those characteristics
that affect their behavior in the undisturbed landscape.

When soils are found that do not have the properties of a named
soil series, they are named temporarily in one of two ways. If the soil
is similar to a soil series except for varying in some property, such as
soil reaction, texture, thickness of a major horizon, etc., the soil is
called a variant of that series. An example of this is Lochloosa Variant.
When a soil is found that is not similar to a named soil series, it is
given an appropriate scientific name according to its soil taxonomic
classification. An example of this is Albaquultic Hapludalf. When
sufficient acreage of these new soils has been mapped to form a concept
and to establish a range of properties, they became a new soil series
and are named as explained in the preceding paragraph.

Soils of one series can differ in texture of the surface layer and in
slope, or some other characteristic that affects use of the soils by man. On
the basis of such differences, a soil series is divided into phases.
The name of a soil phase indicates a feature that affects management.
For example, Ocilla fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes is.a phase of the
Ocilla series.


After a guide for classifying and naming the soils had been worked
out, the Soil Scientists drew the boundaries of the individual soils on
aerial photographs. These photographs show woodlands, buildings, field
borders, trees, canals, ditches, roads, and other details that help in
drawing boundaries accurately. The soil map at the back of this interim
report was prepared from the aerial photographs.

The areas shown on a soil map are called mapping units. On most
maps detailed enough to be useful in planning the management of farms
and fields, a mapping unit is nearly equivalent to a soil phase. It is
not exactly equivalent, because it is not practical to show on such a
map all the small, scattered bits of soil of some kind that have been
seen within an area that is dominantly of a recognized soil phase.

Same mapping units are made up of soils of different series, or of
different phases within one series. One kind of such mapping unit is
called an undifferentiated group.

While a soil survey is in progress, Soil Scientists take soil
samples needed for laboratory measurements and for engineering tests.
Laboratory data from the same kind of soil in other places are also
assembled. Data on yields of crops under defined practices are as-
sembled from farm records and from field or plot experiments on the same
kind of soil. Yields under defined management are estimated for the
soils suitable for a crop.

Soil Scientists observe how soils behave when used as a growing
place for native and cultivated plants, and as material for structures,
foundations for structures, or covering for structures. They relate
this behavior to properties of the soils. For example, they observe
that filter fields for on-site disposal of sewage fail on a given kind
of soil, and they relate this to the slow permeability of the soil or
its high water table. They see that streets, road pavements, and
foundations for houses are cracked on a named kind of soil and they re-
late this failure to the high shrink-swell potential of the soil material.
Thus, they use observation and knowledge of soil properties, together
with available research data, to predict limitations or suitability of
soils for present and potential uses.

After data have been collected and tested for the key soils in a
survey.area, the Soil Scientists set up trial groups of soils. They
test these groups by further study and by consultation with farmers,
agronomists, engineers, and others. They then adjust the groups ac-
cording to the results of their studies and consultation. Thus, the
groups that are finally evolved reflect up-to-date knowledge of the
soils and their behavior under current methods of use and management.








HOW TO USE THIS INTERIM REPORT


THIS INTERIM REPORT contains information that can be applied in
managing farms, ranches, and woodlands; help in selecting sites for
roads, ponds, buildings, and other structures; and in judging the
suitability of tracts of land for farming, industry, and recreation.


Locating Soils

All the soils of this area are shown on the detailed map(s) at the
back of this special report. This map may consist of many sheets made
from aerial photographs. Each. sheet is numbered to correspond with a
number on the Index to Map Sheets. To locate the soil map sheet that
includes the specific area in which you are interested, refer to the
Index to Map Sheets.

On each sheet of the detailed map, soil areas are outlined and are
identified by symbols. All areas marked with the same symbol in this'
survey area are the same kind of soil. The soil symbol is inside the
area if there is enough room; otherwise, it is outside and a pointer
shows where the symbol belongs.


Using the Soil Legend to Find Soil Interpretations and Information

The "Soil Legend" can be used to find the soil interpretation sheet
for a specific kind of soil. The "Soil Legend" lists in numerical order
all of the symbols that appear on the soil map. The following is an
example of how to go from the soil map to the soil interpretation sheets.
Say that you are interested in an area of land that is mapped with the
symbol 2B. The first step is to go from the soil map to the "Soil Legend"
and find the name of the soil that is shown by the symbol 2B. In this
example, the soil might be Blanton. The second step is to turn to the
soil interpretation sheets that are arranged alphabetically and find the
interpretation sheet for the Blanton Series. If a series has more than
one phase, there is an interpretation sheet for each phase.


KINDS OF INTERPRETATIONS AND INFORMATION IN THIS REPORT

Before using the information listed on the soil interpretation
sheets,. read and become familiar with the explanations of the interpre-
tation sheets given in the section, "USE AND EXPLANATION OF SOIL INTER-
PRETATION SHEETS."

The interpretation sheets are the key source of information in this
special report. Each of the interpretation sheets gives a brief description
of the soil. This is followed by a section on the estimated


physical and chemical properties of the soil. The soils are rated as to
their suitability as resource material, as to their degree of limitations
for several selected uses, such as dwellings, septic tank filter fields,
etc., and for recreation. The major features affecting the soil for
these uses are also shown. Other information and interpretations given
are the capability, soil loss factors, and potential yields for the
soil, wildlife suitability, woodland suitability, and range.

PREPARING INTERPRETIVE MAPS FROM THE SOIL MAPS

Individual maps showing the relative limitations of soils for many
specific purposes can be developed by using the soil map and the inter-
pretations. Ratings can be shown visually by coloring soil maps or
transparent overlays according to the traffic-light color connotations
to point up the limitations for a particular use. A map or overlay can
be made in this manner for septic tank filter fields, dwellings, or for
any of the uses for which the soils are rated. For example, soil areas
that have a slight limitations for a given use can be colored green,
those with a moderate limitation can be colored yellow, those with a
severe limitation colored red, and those with a very severe limitation
colored brown or purple to contrast with the traffic light colors. Once
the interpretive map is complete, the patterns of soil limitations are
readily apparent. The user can quickly select areas that have potential
for a particular type of development and at the same time identify the
areas of severe limitations.

USE AND EXPLANATION OF SOIL INTERPRETATION SHEETS

INTRODUCTION

The interpretation sheets should be used only with soil surveys of
medium or detailed intensity, that have been prepared according to
standard procedures of the National Cooperative Soil Survey. It is not
intended that they be used with "Land-Type Surveys", low intensity
surveys, or general soil maps. The interpretations are for soils in
their natural state and not for disturbed areas that are altered by cut
or fill operations, or by drainage.

The Soil interpretations will not eliminate the need for on-site
sampling, testing, and study of specific sites for design and construc-
tion of engineering works and various uses. The interpretation sheets
should be used primarily to plan more detailed field investigations to
determine the conditions of the soil at the proposed site for the in-
tended use.

When the interpretation sheets are used in connection with delineated
soil areas on soil maps, the information pertains to the dominant soil
for which the soil area is named. Other soils, too small an area to map
out, may occur within the soil map area. The interpretations ordinarily
do not apply to the included soils. More detailed studies are required
if small, specific sites are to be developed or used within a given soil
area. For example, a soil map bearing the name Chipley





ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES


physical and chemical properties of the soil. The soils are rated as to
their suitability as resource material, as to their degree of limitations
for several selected uses, such as dwellings, septic tank filter fields,
etc., and for recreation. The major features affecting the soil for
these uses are also shown. Other information and interpretations given
are the capability, soil loss factors, and potential yields for the
soil, wildlife suitability, woodland suitability, and range.

PREPARING INTERPRETIVE MAPS FROM THE SOIL MAPS

Individual maps showing the relative limitations of soils for many
specific purposes can be developed by using the soil map and the inter-
pretations. Ratings can be shown visually by coloring soil maps or
transparent overlays according to the traffic-light color connotations
to point up the limitations for a particular use. A map or overlay can
be made in this manner for septic tank filter fields, dwellings, or for
any of the uses for which the soils are rated. For example, soil areas
that have a slight limitations for a given use can be colored green,
those with a moderate limitation can be colored yellow, those with a
severe limitation colored red, and those with a very severe limitation
colored brown or purple to contrast with the traffic light colors. Once
the interpretive map is complete, the patterns of soil limitations are
readily apparent. The user can quickly select areas that have potential
for a particular type of development and at the same time identify the
areas of severe limitations.

USE AND EXPLANATION OF SOIL INTERPRETATION SHEETS


INTRODUCTION

The interpretation sheet shows the name of the series to which the
interpretations are applicable. Below this is a brief description of
the soil. This description is designed to give the user a mental
picture of the soil. Following this, the estimated soil properties for
the soil series are shown. Although the soils bearing the same name are
similar between counties and States, the physical and chemical properties
of these soils may vary somewhat from one county to another and one
State to another; however, the properties of the soil at any location
should fall within the range of the estimates given for the soil series
on the interpretation sheet. For some soils, some of the physical and
chemical properties are based on test data; in others, these are best
estimates based on test data on similar soils.


EXPLANATION OF ITEMS

Depth (In.) The depth in inches of the major soil horizons that have
similar properties are given in this column.

USDA Texture The USDA texture is based on the relative amounts of
sand, silt, and clay in a soil, giving rise to textural classes
such as sand, sandy loam, loam, clay loam, and clay. (USDA Hand
book No. 18, SOIL SURVEY MANUAL).


Modifier


INTRODUCTION


The interpretation sheets should be used only with soil surveys of
medium or detailed intensity, that have been prepared according to
standard procedures of the National Cooperative Soil Survey. It is not
intended that they be used with "Land-Type Surveys", low intensity
surveys, or general soil maps. The interpretations are for soils in
their natural state and not for disturbed areas that are altered by cut
or fill operations, or by drainage.

The Soil interpretations will not eliminate the need for on-site
sampling, testing, and study of specific sites for design and construc-
tion of engineering works and various uses. The interpretation sheets
should be used primarily to plan more detailed field investigations to
determine the conditions of the soil at the proposed site for the in-
tended use.

When the interpretation sheets are used in connection with delineated
soil areas on soil maps, the information pertains to the dominant soil
for which the soil area is named. Other soils, too small an area to map
out, may occur within the soil map area. The interpretations ordinarily
do not apply to the included soils. More detailed studies are required
if small, specific sites are to be developed or used within a given soil
area. For example, a soil map bearing the name Chipley also can include
small, unmappable areas of other soils such as Foxworth and Albany
Soils. The interpretations apply only to the part of the delineated
soil area, and not to the entire soil area.


BY
BYV
BYX
CB
CBA
CBV
CN
CNV
CR
CRC
CRV
FL
FG
GR
GRC
GRP
GRV
MK
PT
SH
SHV
SR
ST
STV
STX
SY
SYV


Texture or terms used in lieu of texture:


Bouldery
Very bouldery
Extremely bouldery
Cobbly
Angular cobbly
Very cobbly
Channery
Very channery
Cherty
Coarse cherry
Very cherty
Flaggy
Very flaggy
Gravelly
Coarse gravelly
Fine gravelly
Very gravelly
Mucky
Peaty
Shaly
Very shaly
Stratified
Stony
Very stony
Extremely stony
Slaty
Very Slaty


COS Coarse sand
S Sand
FS Fine sand
VFS Very fine sand
LCOS Loamy coarse sand
LS Loamy sand
LFS Loamy fine sand
LVFS Loamy very fine sand
COSL Coarse sandy loam
SL Sandy loam
FSL Fine sandy loam
VFSL Very fine sandy loam
L Loam
SIL Silt loam
SI Silt
SCL Sandy clay loam
CL Clay loam
SICL Silty clay loam
SC Sandy clay
SIC Silty clay
C Clay


CE
CEM
DE
FB
FRAG
G
GYP
HM
ICE
IND
MARL
MPT
MUCK
PEAT
SG
SP
UWB
VAR
WB.
CIND


Coprogenous earth
Cemented
Diatomaceous earth
Fibric material
Fragmental material
Gravel
Gypsiferous material
Hemic material
Ice or frozen soil
Indurated
Marl
Mucky-peat
Muck
Peat
Sand and gravel
Sapric material
Unweathered bedrock
Variable
Weathered bedrock
Cinders








Moist Bulk Density The mass (weight) of a unit volume of moist soil.
This volume includes both soil and pores. Soils that are loose
and porus will have low bulk densities and those that are more
compact will have high values. A range is listed because of the
variability for a given soil.

Permeability (In./Hr.) That quality of a soil that enables it to
transmit water or air. Values listed are estimates of the range
in rate and time it takes for downward movement of water in the
major soil layers when saturated, but allowed to drain freely.
The estimates are based on soil texture, soil structure, available
data on permeability and infiltration tests, and drainage observa
tions of the water movement through soils. On a given soil, per
colation through the surface layer varies according to land use
and management as well as with initial moisture content. The
permeability is shown in inches per hour. For example, in a soil
that has a permeability rate of 6.0 inches per hour in 3 hours
free water would move downward a distance of (3x6") 18 inches.

Available Water Capacity (In./In.) The ability of soils to hold water
for use by most plants. The available water capacity is given in
inches per inch of soil for the major horizons. The water retention
by soil is related to the particle size, organic matter content,
and to the arrangement and size of soil pores. Fine-textured
soils tend to have higher water retention due to small pores
than do sandy soils with large pores. Estimates of the available
water capacity for soils with normally high water tables may appear
meaningless until one considers the possibility of artificial
drainage or the natural lowering of the water table during dry
seasons, or late summer or fall. Soils of the same series vary
from place to place. Therefore, values can deviate considerably
from those listed. It is commonly defined as the difference
between field capacity (1/3 atmosphere for loamy and clayey
materials or 1/10 atmosphere for sand) and the wilting percentage
(15 atmospheres) times bulk density times the thickness in inches
of the soil. The formula for AWC is:

AWC (in/in) = 1/3 (or 1/10) bar% 15 bar% X bulk density, moist
100

For example, in a soil that has an available water capacity of
0.10 in/in of soil, there would be 0.1 inch of water available
for plant growth for each inch of soil, and in 24 inches of
soil (0.1 x 24") 2.4 inches available.

Soil Reaction Is the degree of acidity or alkalinity of a soil. It
is expressed in pH the logarithm of the reciprocal of the
H-ion concentration. A soil that tests to pH 7.0 is precisely
neutral in reaction because it is neither acid nor alkaline. In
words, the degrees of acidity or alkalinity are expressed thus:


Extrememly acid
Very strongly acid
Strongly acid
Medium acid
Slightly acid
Neutral
Mildly alkaline
Moderately alkaline
Strongly alkaline
Very strongly
alkaline


pH
Below 4.5
4.5 to 5.0
5.1 to 5.5
5.6 to 6.0
6.1 to 6.5
6.6 to 7.3
7.4 to 7.8
7.9 to 8.4
8.5 to 9.0
9.1 and
higher


Salinity (mnhos/cm) The salinity is expressed in terms of the electri-
cal conductivity of a saturation extract in millimhos per centimeter
at 25 centigrade. The following shows the response of plants
associated with different ranges of electrical conductivity of
saturation extracts of soils.


Electrical conductivity of
saturation extract
mmho./cm at 25 C


0-2
2-4

4-8

8-16

16


Plant response


Salinity effects usually negligible.
Yield of very salt-sensitive crops
may be restricted.
Yield of salt sensitive crops
restricted.
Only salt-tolerant crops yield
satisfactory.
Only a few very salt-tolerant crops
yield satisfactorily.


If salinity is zero or no problem for growing crops, a dash is
shown on the interpretation sheet. Except for areas of tidal
marsh or tidal swamp along the Coasts, salinity is of no
importance in Florida soils.

Shrink-swell Potential Is the relative change in volume to be
expected of soil material with changes in moisture content; that
is, the extent to which the soil shrinks as it dries out or swells
when it gets wet. Extent of shrinking and swelling is influenced
by the amount and kind of clay in the soil. Shrinking and swelling
of soils cause much damage to building foundations, roads, and
other structures. A high shrink-swell potential indicates a hazard to
maintenance of structures built in, on, or with material having
this rating.


.. .-;f-ua&*i>&.








Unified Classification In the Unified System, soils are classified
according to particle size distribution, plasticity, liquid limit,
and organic matter. Soils are grouped in 15 classes. There are
eight classes of coarse-grained soils, identified as GW, GP, GM,
GC, SW, SP, SM, and SC; six classes of fine-grained soils, identi-
fied as ML, CL, OL, MH, CH, and OH; and one class of highly organic
soils, identified as Pt. Soils on the borderline between two
classes are designated by symbols for both classes; for example,
SP-SM.

AASHO Classification The AASHO system is used to classify soils
according to those properties that affect use in highway con-
struction and maintenance. In this system, a soil is placed in
one of seven basic groups ranging from A-1 through A-7 on the
basis of grain-size distribution, liquid limit, and plasticity
index. In group A-1 are gravelly soils of high bearing strength,
or the best soils for subgrade (foundation). At the other extreme,
in group A-7, are clay soils that have low strength when wet and
that are the poorest soils for subgrade. The A-1, A-2, and A-7
groups can be further divided as follows: A-l-a, A-l-b, A-2-4,
A-2-5, A-2-6, A-2-7, A-7-5 and A-7-6.

Fraction Greater than 3 Inches (Pct.) Most soils in Florida do not
have material this coarse. Soils that have a high content of shell
may have a small percentage of shells larger than 3 inches. Soils
in Florida that contain pebbles larger than 3 inches are rare.

Percentage of Material Less than 3 Inches Passing Sieve No. The
measured or estimated percentages of materials passing the numbers
4, 10, 40, and 200 sieves are given for each major horizon. The
percent passing the 200 sieve approximates the amount of silt and
clay, but does include some very fine sand. A range is listed
because of the variability for a given soil.

Liquid Limit and Plasticity Index These indicate the effect of water
on the strength and consistence of soil material. As the moisture
content of a clayey soil is increased from a dry state, the material
changes from a semisolid to a plastic state. If the moisture con-
tent is further increased, the material changes from a plastic to
a liquid state. The plastic limit is the moisture content at which
the soil material changes from the semisolid to plastic state; and
the liquid limit from a plastic to a liquid state. The plasticity
index is the numerical difference between the liquid limit and the
plastic limit. It indicates the range of moisture content within
which a soil material is plastic.

Clay (Pct.) The measured or estimated percentages of a mineral soil
separate consisting of particles less than 0.002 millimeter in
diameter. A range is given because of the variability for a given
soil.


Corrosivity Steel This refers to the potential for corrosion of
uncoated steel pipe buried in the soil. The soils are rated
as follows: LOW (slightly corrosive), MODERATE (moderately
corrosive), and HIGH (severely corrosive). Corrosion of uncoated
steel pipe is a physical-biochemical process converting iron into
its ions. Soil moisture is needed to form solutions with soluble
salts before the process can operate. The corrosivity is
estimated by electrical resistivity or resistance to flow of
current, total acidity, soil drainage, and soil texture.

Corrosivity Concrete This refers to the potential for deterioration
of concrete placed in soil materials. Deterioration is caused by
a chemical reaction between the concrete (a base) and the soil
solution (potential weak acid). Special cements and methods of
manufacturing may be used to reduce rate of deterioration in soils
of high corrosivity. Some of the soil properties that affect the
rate of deterioration are soil texture and acidity, the amount of
sodium or magnesium present in the soil singly or in combination,
and amount of sodium chloride in the soil. The presence of sodium
chloride in the soil indicates the presence of sea water. Sea
water contains sulphates which is one of the principal corrosive
agents.

Erosion Factors (K and T) A soil erodibility factor (K) and the soil-
loss tolerance (T) are used in an equation that predicts the
amount of soil loss resulting from rainfall erosion of cropland.
The soil erodibility factor "K" is measure of the rate at which
a soil will erode. Values are expressed as tons of soil loss per
acre per unit of R (rainfall factor) from continuous fallow
(three years or more) on a 9 percent slope, 73 feet long. Thus,
the K factor reflects the rate that soil erodes when other factors
affecting erosion are constant. Soil properties that influence
erodibility by water are: those that affect infiltration rate,
movement of water through the soil, and water storage capacity;
and those that resist dispersion, splashing, abrasion, and
transporting forces from rainfall and runoff. Some of the soil
properties that are most important are texture and organic matter
of the surface layer, size and stability of structural aggregates
in the surface layer, permeability of the subsoil and depth to
slowly permeable layers.

The soil-loss tolerance "T" sometimes called permissible soil loss,
is the maximum rate of soil erosion that will permit a high level
of crop productivity to be.sustained economically and indefinitely.
These rates are expressed in tons of soil loss per acre per year.
Rates of 1 through 5 tons are used in the south, depending upon
soil depth, and prior erosion.








Occasional Less often than once in 2 years on the average. Most pedons
show evidence of past deposition or scouring. The probability of
floods is not great enough to interfere seriously with farming
operations although some crop damage is likely.

Frequent More often than once in 2 years on the average. The pedon
shows evidence of yearly deposition or scouring. In addition,
debris or other recent flood water marks are easily observable on
the ground, on trees, fences, or bridges. The probability of floods
is great enough to restrict the choice of crops, cause severe crop
damage, or prevent the production of crops.

Duration refers to the length of time that the soils are flooded. Only
duration classes for canyon frequency classes are given. These classes
are as follows:

Very brief Less than 2 days. Soils have sufficient surface drainage
so that flood waters run off and damage, if any, to crops results
mainly from scouring or sedimentation.

Brief 2 to 7 days. Relatively permeable soils on level or depressional
landscapes or soils with restricted permeability on nearly level
landscapes. Most cultivated crops are severely affected by flooding;
most pasture plants and trees species are slightly or moderately
affected.

Long 7 days to 1 month. Soils on nearly level or depressional land-
scapes with restricted surface drainage or restricted permeability,
or both. Only water tolerant plants survive.

Very long More than 1 month. Soils on nearly level or depressional
landscapes with highly restricted surface drainage and restricted
permeability. Only water tolerant plants survive.

The time of year that flooding normally occurs is expressed in months,
for example, December-May.

The economic and social consequences of improper land use of flood prone
areas are serious. Problems begin when structures are located in flood
prone areas. The initial development encourages additional construction
and the installation of streets and utilities. The capacity of the
floodway may be reduced by these kinds of development increasing the
flood hazard. When flooding occurs, losses are not borne only by the
property owner but by the community as well. The public is usually
called upon to bear the cost of flood fighting, rehabilitation, and
flood protection.

Dwellings, commercial buildings, and other high cost developments that
are easily damaged by floods should not be located on flood prone soils.
Sanitary facilities such as septic tank filter fields, sewage lagoons,
and sanitary landfills built on flood prone soils present a health hazard.


Wind Erodibility Groups Soils that are subject to wind erosion ai;e
grouped into 8 groups according to their susceptibility t6'soil
blowing. Sandy soils are most susceptible to soil blowing,
especially during dry periods and when wind velocities are high.
Organic soils are normally wet, but they are also subject to soil
blowing when drained and cultivated if the soil surface is left
bare during extreme dry periods and wind velocities are high.

Organic Matter (Pct.) The measurement of estimated percentage of the
organic fraction of the soil that includes plant and animal residues
at various stages of decomposition, cell and tissues of soil
organisms, and substances synthesized by the soil population. It
is commonly determined as the amount of organic material contained
in a soil sample passed through a 2-millimeter sieve. Estimates
of organic matter are given only for the surface layer.

Flooding Flooding is defined as temporary covering of soil surface by
water from any source, such as streams overflowing their banks,
runoff from adjacent or surrounding slopes, inflow from high tides,
or combinations of these. Shallow water standing during or shortly
following a rain is excluded from the definition of flooding.
Marshes and swamps are excluded from the definition of flooding
because water is more than a temporary covering.

Flooding hazard may be expressed by one of three general flood
frequency classes -- none, rare, or common. Duration and time of
year that the flooding occurs is given for those soils with common
flood hazards. Not considered here, but nevertheless important,
are velocity and depth of flood waters. The classes of flooding
are defined as follows:

None No reasonable possibility of flooding.

Rare -- Flooding unlikely but possible under unusual weather conditions.
No evidence of recent water deposited sediments on surface or within
the pedon. Pedogenic horizons have developed within most soils.
Flooding probability is so low that it imposes no more than slight
or moderate soil limitation ratings for soil uses except those with
high per-acre investments, such as residential developments.

Common Flooding is likely under usual weather conditions. Most pedons
show evidence or recent water deposited sediments or scouring. The
probability of recurring floods is great enough to impose severe
limitations on many uses of soils, such as sanitary facilities and
community development. Restrictions on farming may be slight to
severe depending on duration and season of flooding.

Where a finer breakdown of common flooding is made, the following classes
under common flooding are used.








Roads and streets built on flood prone soils are likely to be
closed during floods and may require extensive maintenance or
restoration after floods.

In agricultural areas the consequences of flooding are much less
expensive, but nevertheless may present a hazard to the production
of crops. The frequency, duration, and time of year that flooding
occurs influences whether trees, pasture, or crops can be grown.

Trees and pastures can withstand more flooding than crops. Certain
short season crops, however, can be grown successfully if the grow-
ing season is relatively flood free.

High Water Table A high water table is defined as a zone of saturation
at the highest average depth during the wettest season. It persists
in the soil for more than a few days and occurs within 80 inches
of the soil surface.

Most water tables occur within the soil and are measured from the
surface of the soil down to the free-water level. In swamps and
marshes, however, the water table is above the surface of the soil
much of the time and water table is measured from the surface of
the water down to the soil surface.

Soils that have seasonal high water tables are classified according
to depth to the water table, kind of water table, and time of year
that the water table is highest.

The depth of the high water table from the soil surface is given in
feet or half feet. The range in depth reflects the year-to-year
variation in average highest depth. Depth to water table within the
soil is recorded with the small number first, e.g., 2-3. Water
table above the soil surface is recorded with a +, e.g., +2 if the
water table varies such that the average highest depth can be
above or below the surface, it is recorded as follows: +1-0.5,
with the first number indicating 1 foot above the soil surface,
and the second number foot below the soil surface. Where a
water table is below 6 feet or exists for less than one month,
6 is shown under depth.

Three kinds of seasonal high water table are recognized within the
soil: apparent, perched, and artesian.

Apparent water table is the level at which water stands in a
dug unlined borehole. It is influenced by the hydrostatic
pressure of soil water and by pressure at greater depths
penetrated by the borehole, water relations across impermeable
layers, and other factors, in the absence of evidence that
would permit greater specificity, therefore, the term apparent
water table is used for the level at which water stands in an
uncased borehold after adequate time for adjustment in the
surrounding soil.


Perched water table is one that exists in the soil above an un-
saturated zone. A water table may be inferred to be perched
on the basis of general knowledge of the water levels of an
area, the landscape position, the permeability of soil layers,
and from other evidence. To prove that a water table is perched,
it is necessary to observe the water levels in cased wells
placed above, in, and below the less permeable layer. If the
water in the well above the less permeable layer is consis-
tently higher than the other two, the water table is perched.

Artesian water table is one that exists under hydrostatic head
beneath an impermeable layer; when the impermeable layer has
been penetrated by a cased borehold, the water rises. The
final level of the water in the cased borehold may then be
characterized as an artesian water table.

Areas with water tables above the surface of the soil much of
the time are characterized as marsh or swamp -- marsh having
herbaceous vegetation, and swamps having woody vegetation.

The months that the water table normally persists at the average
highest depth range is shown, for example, January through April.

A seasonal high water table is an important criterion in a number
of engineering and biological uses of soils. Its depth and dura-
tion influences the use of soils for septic tank absorption fields,
shallow excavations, sanitary landfills, dwellings, and local roads
and streets, and ease of excavation for roadfill and topsoil.

The water table also influences the growth of crops -- a water
table that is near the surface during the growing season is detri-
mental to most plants. Growing plants, however, tend to lower the
water table through transpiration. A change in land use may dras-
tically change the wetness of an area. For example, a change from
trees to soybeans changes the transpiration rate and may cause a
wetter soil condition. Changing land use from cropland, pasture,
or forest to urban areas with streets and houses covering a much
larger area not only decreases the transpiration by vegetation
but also causes increased runoff. A wetter soil may result.

Cemented Pan This refers to a horizon or layer in the soil that is
strongly cemented through the natural processes of soil formation.
The depth to this -kind of layer is shown in inches. The hardness
of the pan is shown as thick or thin in the hardness column. "Thin"
cemented pan is thin enough (usually less than 3 inches if contin-
uously indurated, less than 18 inches if cemented) so that excava-
tion can be made with trenching machines, backhoes, or small rippers
and other equipment common to construction of pipelines, sewerlines,
cemeteries, dwellings or small buildings, and the like. "Thick"








cemented pan is sufficiently thick or massive to require blasting
or special equipment beyond which is considered normal in excavating
for this type of construction. If the soil does not have a
cemented pan, a dash is shown in the depth column. Few soils in
Florida have strongly cemented pans. Weakly cemented soil horizons
are in some Florida soils, and are within the definition of
"Cemented pan".

Bedrock This is solid rock beneath the soil. The depth to bedrock is
shown in inches for soils with bedrock within 60 inches of the
soil surface. All other soils are shown as 60. Most soils in
Florida are observed to depths of more than 60 inches. Refer to
the depth in inches adjacent to the USDA Texture to determine the
depth of observation. The hardness of the bedrock is shown as SOFT
or HARD. "SOFT" rock can be excavated using a single tooth
ripping attachment mounted on a 200-300 horsepower tractor, "HARD"
rock requires blasting or use of excavators larger than 200-300
horsepower.

Subsidence This refers to the lowering of the level of the soil surface.
When water is removed and the water table is lowered in organic soils
and some mineral soils with low strength in tidal marshes, the soil
will subside. Initially, or in the first few years, the subsidence
is most pronounced or greatest. After initial subsidence, organic
soils in Florida subside or oxidize at the rate of about 1 inch per
year. Total subsidence is estimated in inches.

Hydrologic Group Soils are grouped into four hydrologic soil groups,
A through D. These groups are used mostly in watershed planning
to estimate runoff from rainfall. Soil properties were considered
that influence the minimum rate of infiltration obtained for a
bare soil after prolonged wetting. These properties are: depth
to seasonally high water table, intake rate and permeability after
prolonged wetting, and depth to a layer or layers that slow or
impede water movement.

Dual hydrologic groups are given for wet soils rated D in their
natural condition that can be adequately drained. It is consid-
ered that drainage is feasible and practical and that drainage
improves the hydrologic group by at least two classes (from D to
A or B). The first letter applies to the drained condition.

Hydrologic group A (Low runoff potential). Soils that have
high infiltration rates even when thoroughly wetted and a
high rate of water transmission.

Hydrologic group B (Moderately low runoff potential). Soils
that have moderate infiltration rates when thoroughly wetted
and a moderate rate of water transmission.


Hydrologic group C (Moderately high runoff potential). Soils
that have slow infiltration rates when thoroughly wetted
and a slow rate of water transmission.

Hydrologic group D (High runoff potential). Soils having very
slow infiltration rates when thoroughly wetted and a very
slow rate of water transmission.

Potential Frost Action Frost action is not a problem in Florida, and
a dash is shown to indicate this.




RATINGS AND RESTRICTIVE FEATURES OF SOILS FOR SANITARY FACILITIES,
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT, SOURCE MATERIAL, *WATER MANAGEMENT, AND
RECREATION


*Part of the items under water management are rated and the remainder
show "Features Affecting" the particular item or use.

RATING SOILS FOR SELECTED USES

Soils are rated for the uses expected to be important or potentially
important to users of soil survey information. Ratings for proposed
uses are given in terms of limitations and restrictive features, suit-
ability and restrictive features, or only restrictive features. Only
the most restrictive features are listed, therefore, a soil rated severe
gives those soil features that cause the soil to be rated severe. There
may be other features that need to be treated to overcome soil limitations
for a specific purpose. The definition of the ratings are as follows:

Limitation Ratings

Soils are rated in their "natural" state, that is, no modification of the
soil site or material is made. Only the most restrictive features are
listed.

Slight is the rating given soils that have properties favorable for the
use. The degree of limitation is minor and can be overcome easily. Good
performance and low maintenance can be expected.

Moderate is the rating given soils that have properties moderately
favorable for the use. This degree of limitation can be overcome or
modified by special planning, design, or maintenance. During same part
of the year, the expected performance of the structure or other planned
use is somewhat less desirable than for soils rated slight. Some soils
rated moderate require treatment such as artificial drainage, control of
runoff to reduce erosion, extended septic tank absorption fields, extra
excavation, or sdme modification of certain features through manipulation
of the soil. For these soils, modification is needed for those








construction plans generally used for soils of slight limitation.
Modification may include specially designed foundations, extra rein-
forcement of structures, sump pumps, and the like.

Severe is the rating given soils that have one or more properties
unfavorable for the rated use, such as steep slopes, bedrock near
the surface, flooding, high shrink-swell potential, a seasonal high
water table, or low strength. This degree of limitation generally
requires major soil reclamation, special design, or intensive mainten-
ance. Some of these soils, however, can be improved by reducing or
removing the soil feature that limits use, but in most situations, it
is difficult and costly to alter the soil or to design a structure so
as to compensate for a severe degree of limitation.

THE INTERPRETATIONS WILL NOT ELIMINATE THE NEED FOR ON-SITE STUDY,
TESTING, AND PLANNING OF SPECIFIC SITES FOR THE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION
FOR SPECIFIC USES. The interpretations can be used as a guide to planning
more detailed investigations and for avoiding undesirable sites for an
intended use. By using the soil map and interpretations, it is possible
to select sites that have the least limitations for an intended use.

Many soils that have a high water table have severe limitations in their
natural condition. These same soils, when drained artificially, may
only have a slight limitation. Modern equipment and knowledge make it
possible to overcome most of the limitations of soils for many urban and
recreational uses. The degree of the limitation and the location of the
soil will determine the practicability of developing the soil for the
intended use. No consideration was given in these interpretations to
the size and shape of soil areas, nor to the pattern they form with other
soils on the landscape. For example, some very desirable soil areas are
too small in size or too irregular in shape, or their occurrence with
less desirable soils forms a pattern too complex to be utilized for the
intended use. Although not considered in the interpretations, these items
should influence the final selection of a site.

In rating soils for nonfarm uses, it is important to remember that
engineers and others can modify soil features or can design or adjust
the plans for a structure to compensate for most degrees of limitations.
Most of these practices, however, are costly. The owner-must be willing
to live with a few limitations, providing the use does not violate.
community codes or regulations. The final decision in selecting a site
for a particular use is a personal one and generally involves weighing
the costs for site preparation and malnteratee,

Suitability Ratings

Soils are rated in their "natural" state, that is, no modification of the
soil site or materials is made. A rating of good means the soils have
properties favorable for the use. Good performance and low maintenance
can be expected.


A rating of fair means the soil is moderately favorable for the use. One
or more soil properties make these soils less desirable than those rated
good.

A rating of poor means the soil has one or more properties unfavorable
for the use. Overcoming the unfavorable property requires special
design, extra maintenance, or costly alteration.


The limitations or
particular use are
of "Key Phrases".
definition follows:

KEY PHRASE


AREA RECLAIM


CEMENTED PAN
CUTBACKS CAVE
DEEP TO WATER
DEPTH TO ROCK

DROUGHT

DUSTY
ERODES EASILY
EXCESS FINES

EXCESS HUMUS
EXCESS LIME

EXCESS SALT

FAST INTAKE
1/FAVORABLE

FLOODS

FRAGILE
HARD TO PACK
LARGE STONES

LOW STRENGTH
NO WATER
PERCS SLOWLY

PIPING

PONDING


restrictive features and the features affecting a
shown on the interpretation sheet through the use
A list of the key phrases with explanation or


EXPLANATION

Borrow areas are difficult to reclaim, and revegeta-
tion and erosion control on these areas are extremely
difficult.
Cemented pan too close to surface.
Walls of cuts are not stable. The soil sloughs easily.
Deep to permanent water table during dry season.
Bedrock is so near the surface that it affects
specified use of the soil.
Soil holds too little water for plants during dry
periods.
Soil particles detach easily and cause dust.
Water erodes soil easily.
The soil contains too much silt and clay for use as
gravel or sand in construction.
Too much organic matter.
The amount of carbonates in the soil is so high that
it restricts the growth of some plants.
The amount of soluable salt in the soil is so high
that it restricts the growth of most plants.
Water infiltrates rapidly into the soil.
Features of the soil are favorable for the intended
use.
Soil flooded by moving water from stream overflow,
runoff, or high tides.
Soil easily damaged by use of disturbance.
Difficult to compact.
Rock fragments greater than 3 inches across affect
the specified use.
The soil has inadequate strength to support loads.
Too deep to ground water.
Water moves through the soil slowly, affecting the
specified use.
The soil is susceptible to the formation of tunnels
or pipelike cavities by moving water.
Soil in closed depressions innundated by standing
water that is removed only by percolation or
evapotranspiration.








KEY PHRASE

ROOTING DEPTH

SALTY WATER
SEEPAGE

SHRINK-SWELL


SLIPPAGE

SLOPE
SLOW INTAKE
SLOW REFILL

SMALL STONES

SOIL BLOWING
SUBSIDES

THIN LAYER

TOO ACID

TOO CLAYEY
TO SANDY
WETNESS


EXPLANATION

A layer that greatly restricts the downward
rooting of plants occurs at a shallow depth.
Water too salty for livestock consumption.
Water moves through the soil so quickly that it
affects the specified use.
The soil expands on wetting and shrinks on drying,
which.may. cause damage to roads, dams, building
foundations, or other structures.
Soil mass is susceptible to movement downslope
when loaded, excavated or wet.
Slope too great.
Water infiltrates slowly into the soil.
Ponds fill slowly because the permeability of
the soil is restricted.
Rock fragments that are 3 inches or less across
may affect the specified use.
Soil easily moved and deposited by wind.
Settlement of organic soils or of soils containing
semifluid layers.
Suitable soil material is not thick enough for use
as borrow material or topsoil.
The soil is so acid that growth of plants is
restricted.
Soil slippery and sticky when set and slow to dry.
Soil soft and loose; drought and low in fertility.
Soil wet during period of use.


1/ Used only under "features affecting" in Water Management where other
entries were not appropriate.

Sanitary Facilities

The nature of the soil is important in selecting sites for septic tank
absorption fields, sewage lagoons, and sanitary landfills, and in
identifying limiting soil properties and site features to be considered
in planning, design, and installation. Those soil properties that
determine the ease of excavation or installation of these facilities
will also affect the ratings.

Soil limitations ratings of slight, moderate, or severe are given for
septic tank absorption fields, sewage lagoons, and trench and area type
sanitary landfills. Soil suitability ratings of good, fair, and poor
are given for daily cover for landfill.

(a) Septic tank absorption fields are subsurface systems of tile
or perforated pipe that distribute effluent from a septic tank into
the natural soil. The centerline depth of the tile is assumed to be at
a depth of 24 inches. Only the soil between depths of 24 and 72 inches
is considered in making the ratings. The soil properties and site
features considered are those that affect the absorption of the
effluent, those that affect the construction of the system, and those
that may affect public health.


Properties and features that affect the absorption of the
effluent are permeability, depth to seasonal high water table, depth
to bedrock, cemented pan or ice, and susceptibility to flooding.
Stones, boulders, and a shallow depth to bedrock, ice, or cemented
pan'interfere with installations. Excessive slope may cause lateral
seepage and surfacing of the effluent in downslope areas. Also, soil
erosion and soil slippage are hazards where absorption fields are
installed in sloping soils.

Some soils are underlain by loose sand and gravel or fractured
bedrock at a depth less than 4 feet below the distribution lines. In
these soils the absorption field may not adequately filter the effluent,
and as a result ground water supplies in the area may be contaminated.

Percolation tests are used by some regulatory agencies to
evaluate the soil's suitability for septic tank absorption fields. These
tests should be performed during the season when the water table is
highest and the soil is at minimum absorptive capacity. The percolation
rates do not correspond to the permeability rates because they are
measured by different methods. Experience indicates that soils having
percolation rates (1) faster than 45 minutes per inch function
satisfactorily, (2) between 45 and 60 minutes per inch have moderate
limitations, and (3) slower than 60 minutes per inch have severe
limitations (USDHEW 1969).

In many of the soils that have moderate or severe limitations
for septic tank absorption fields, it may be possible to install special
systems that lower the seasonal water table or to increase the size of
the absorption fields so that satisfactory performance is achieved
(Bouma, 1974). However, such considerations are not considered in this
report.

(b) Sewage lagoons are shallow ponds constructed to hold sewage
while aerobic bacteria decompose the solid and liquid wastes. Lagoons
have a nearly level floor surrounded by cut slopes or embankments of
compacted, relatively impervious soil material. Aerobic lagoons
generally are designed so that depth of the sewage is 2 to 5 feet.
Relatively impervious soil for the lagoon floor and sides is desirable
to minimize seepage and contamination of local ground water.

Soil permeability is a critical property in evaluating a soil
-for sewage lagoons. Most porous soils will eventually seal when being
used as a sewage lagoon, however, until they do, the hazard of pollution
is great and it is difficult to maintain the constant water depth required
for proper operation. Soils with a permeability exceeding 2 inches
per hour are generally too porous for proper operation of sewage lagoons
and may cause contamination of shallow wells. Fractured bedrock within
40 inches may create a pollution hazard. Bedrock and cemented pans
create construction problems..







The slope limits are based on the specification that the
effluent be 2 to 5 feet deep. If shallower than this, weeds grow,
if deeper, it is more difficult to maintain an aerobic environment.
Slope must be gentle enough and the soil material thick enough over
bedrock or cemented pan to make smoothing for uniformity of lagoon
depth practical.

If floodwater overtops the lagoon, it interferes with the
functioning of the lagoon and carries away polluting sewage before
sufficient decomposition has taken place. Ordinarily, therefore, soils
susceptible to flooding have a severe limitation for sewage lagoons.
If, however, floodwaters are slow flooding are rarely if ever more
than 5 feet deep--not deep enough to overtop the lagoon enbankment--
the limitation rating is not severe because of susceptibility to flooding.

Soil containing large amounts of organic matter are unsuitable
for the floor of the lagoon. The organic matter promotes anaerobic
rather than aerobic environment and is detrimental to the proper
functioning of the lagoon.

Depth to water table is important if it influences the water
level in the lagoon. If it does, then a pollution hazard also exists.
Depth to water table is disregarded if the lagoon floor has slowly
permeable soil material at least 4 feet thick. Soils that contain rock
fragments are undesirable sites because the fragments interfere with the
manipulation and compaction needed to prepare the lagoon floor.

(c) Sanitary landfill (trench) is a method of disposing of solid
waste by placing refuse in successive layers in an excavated trench.
The waste is spread, compacted, and covered daily with a thin layer
of soil that is excavated from the trench. When the trench is full,
a final cover of soil material at least 2 feet thick is placed over
the landfill.

Ratings are based on properties to a depth normally observed
during soil mapping. However, because trenches may be as deep as 15
feet or more, geologic investigations are needed to determine the
potential for pollution of ground water as well as determine the design
needed. These investigations, generally arranged for by the landfill
developer, include examination of stratification, rock formations, and
geologic conditions that might lead to the conducting of leachates to
aquifers, wells, water courses, and other water sources. The presence
of hard nonripple bedrock, creviced bedrock, or highly premeable strata
in or immediately underlying the proposed trench bottom is undesirable
from the standpoints of excavation and potential pollution of underground
water.



Bouma, J., 1974, New Concepts in Soil Survey Interpretations for Onsite
Disposal of Septic Tank Effluent, Soil Sci. Soc. of Am. Proceedings,
Vol 38, No. 6, November-December, p941-950

U.S. Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service,
1969, Manual of Septic Tank Practice, PHS Publication, No. 526, p8.


Properties that influence risk of pollution, ease of excava-
tion, trafficability, and revegetation are major considerations. Soils
that flood or have a water table within the depth of excavation present
a potential pollution hazard and cause difficulty in excavating.

Soil slope is an important consideration because it affects
the work involved in road construction, the performance of the roads
and the control of surface water around the landfill. Soil slope may
also cause difficulty in construction of the trenches where the trench
bottoms must be kept level and oriented to follow the contour.

Soil slippage may be a problem on certain sloping soils.

The ease with which the trench is dug and with which a soil
can be used as daily and final cover is based largely on texture and
consistence of the soil. The texture and consistence of a soil determines
the degree of workability of the soil both when dry and when wet. Soils
that are plastic and sticky when wet are difficult to excavate, grade,
or compact and to place in a uniformly thick cover over a layer of refuse.

The uppermost part of the final cover should be soil material
that is favorable for the growth of plants. It should not contain
excess sodium or salt and should not be too acid. In comparison with
other horizons, the A horison in most soils has the best workability
and highest content of organic matter. Thus, for a trench-type landfill
operation it may be desirable to stockpile the surface layer for use in
final blanketing of the fill.

(d) Sanitary landfill (area) is a method of disposing of solid
waste by placing refuse in successive layers on the surface of the soil.
The waste is spread, compacted, and covered daily with a thin layer of
soil that is imported from a source away from the site. A final cover
of soil at least 2 feet thick is placed over the landfill when it is
completed. Properties that influence traffic-ability and risk of
pollution are the only considerations for area sanitary landfills.

Flooding is a serious problem because of the risk of washouts
and pollution downstream and the difficulty of moving trucks in and out
of flooded areas.

Permeability of the soil is an important consideration. If
permeability is too rapid, or if fractured bedrock or fractured cemented
pan are close to the surface, the risk of the leachate contaminating
water supplies is great. A high water table may also transmit pollutants
to water supplies and is likely to restrict truck movement during the wet
parts of the year.

Slope is a consideration because of the extra grading required
to maintain roads on sloping soils. Furthermore, leachate may flow along
the soil surface on sloping soils and cause difficult seepage problems in
completed fills.









Soil slippage may be a problem on certain sloping soils.

(e) Daily cover for landfill is the soil material that is applied
daily to compacted solid waste in an area type sanitary landfill. The
cover material is obtained offsite, transported, and spread on the area.
The required soil characteristics relative to both daily and final cover
material are nearly enough alike for one rating to serve.

Suitability of a soil for use as cover is based on properties
that reflect workability, ease of digging, and moving and spreading the
material over the refuse daily during both wet and dry periods. Soils
that are loamy or silty and free of stones are better than other soils.
Clayey soils may be sticky and difficult to spread; sandy soils may be
subject to soil blowing.

The soil must be thick enough over bedrock, cemented pan or
water table that so that material can be removed efficiently and yet
leave a borrow area that can be revegetated. Some damage to the borrow
area is expected, but if revegetation and erosion could be serious
problems, then the soil is rated severe.

Slope affects the ease of excavation and moving of the cover
material. Slope also may affect the final configuration of the borrow
area and hence runoff, erosion, and reclamation.

In addition to these features, the soils selected for daily
cover of landfill should be suitable for growing plants. They should
not contain significant amounts of substances toxic to plants such as
a high content of sodium or salts.

Building SIte Development

Soil properties influences development of building sites, including the
selection of the site, the design of the structure, construction, and
after construction, performance, and maintenance.

Soil limitation ratings of slight, moderate, and severe are given for
shallow excavations, dwellings with and without basements, small commercial
buildings, local roads and streets, lawns, landscaping, and golf fairways.

(a) Shallow excavations are trenches or holes dug in the soil to a
maximum depth of 5 or 6 feet. They are used for pipelines, sewerlines,
telephone and poweT transmission lines, basements, open ditches, grave
sites, and the like. The excavations are most commonly made by trenching
machines or backhoes.

The ratings are based on the soil properties that influence
ease of digging and the resistance to sloughing. Depth and hardness of
bedrock or cemented pan, the bulk density of the soil and the amount of


large stones influence the ease of digging, filling, and compacting.
Depth to the seasonal high water table and flooding may restrict the
time that the excavations can be made. Slope influences the ease of
using digging machines. Soil texture and depth to water table influence
the resistance to sloughing. Soil slippage may be a problem on certain
sloping soils.

(b) Dwellings without basements are single-family houses of three
stories or less without basements. The foundation is assumed to be
spread footings of reinforced concrete built on undisturbed soil at a
depth of 2 feet.

The ratings are based on properties affecting soil strength
and settlement under a load, and those that affect excavation and construction
costs. The properties affecting soil strength and settlement are presence
of a high water table and flooding, and the shrink-swell behavior and
compressibility of the soils. Compressibility is inferred from the
Unified classification. Properties influencing the ease and amount of
excavation are flooding, high water table, slope, depth to bedrock or
cemented pan, and the amount of coarse fragments. Soil slippage may be
a problem on certain sloping soils.

(c) Dwellings with basements are single-family houses of three
stories or less with basements. The foundation is assumed to be spread
footings of reinforced concrete built on undisturbed soil at a depth of
about 7 feet.

The ratings are based on properties affecting soil strength
and settlement under load and those that affect excavation and construc-
tion costs. The properties affecting soil strength and settlement are
the presence of a high water table and flooding, and the shrink-swell
behavior and compressibility of the soil. Compressibility is inferred
from the Unified classification. Properties influencing the ease and
amount of excavation are flooding, high water table, slope, depth to
bedrock or cemented pan, and the amount of coarse fragments. Soil
slippage may be a problem on certain sloping soils.


(d) Small Cmmercial Buildings. Limitation ratings are given
undisturbed soil on which small commercial buildings of less than
stories without basements are built. The foundation is assumed to
spread footings of reinforced concrete at a depth of 2 feet.


for
three
be


The ratings are based on properties affecting soil strength
and the settlement under a load and those that affect excavation and
construction costs. The properties affecting soil strength and settlement
are presence of a high water table and flooding, and the shrink-swell
behavior and compressibility of the soil. Compressibility is inferred
from the Unified classification. Properties influencing the ease and
amount of excavation are flooding, high water table, slope, depth to
bedrock or cemented pan, and the amount of rock fragments. Soil slippage
may be a problem on certain sloping soils.








(e) Local Roads and Streets. Limitation ratings are given for the
use of soils for construction of improved local roads and streets that
have all-weather surfacing--commonly of asphalt or concrete--and that are
expected to carry automobile traffic all year. The roads and streets
consist of (1) the underlying local soil material, whether cut or fill,
that is called "the subgrade", (2) the base material, lime-stabilized
soil, soil-cement stabilized soil, gravel or crushed rock, and (3) the
actual road surface or street pavement that is either flexible (asphalt),
rigid (concrete), or gravel with binder in it. These roads and streets
are graded to shed water and conventional drainage measures are provided.
With probable exception of the hard surface, the roads and streets are
built mainly from the soil at hand.

The properties that affect local roads and streets are those
that influence the ease of excavation and grading, and traffic supporting
capacity. The properties that affect the ease of excavation and grading
are depth to bedrock or cemented pan, depth to water table, flooding,
the amount of large stones, and slope. The properties that affect traffic
supporting capacity are soil strength as inferred from AASHTO group
index and the Unified classification, shrink-swell behavior, potential
frost action, and depth to high water table. Soil slippage may be a
problem on certain sloping soils.

(f) Lawns, Landscaping, and Golf Fairways. The soils are rated for
their use in establishing and maintain turf for lawns and golf fairways,
and ornamental trees and shrubs for residential type landscaping. The
ratings are based on the use of soil material at the location with some
land smoothing. Irrigation may or may not be needed and is not a
criteria for rating. Traps, trees, roughs, or greens are not considered
as part of the golf fairway.

The properties considered are those that affect plant growth
and trafficability after establishing vegetation. The properties that
affect plant growth are the content of salt, sodium and sulfidic materials,
soil reaction, depth to water table, depth to bedrock or cemented pan,
and the available water capacity of the upper 40 inches of soil. The
properties that affect trafficability after vegetation is established
are flooding, wetness, slope, stoniness, and the amount of clay, sand
or organic matter in the surface layer.

Construction Material

Suitability ratings of good, fair, or poor are given for soils used as a
source of roadfill and topsoil. Ratings of probable and improbable are
given for sand and gravel.

A rating of probable means that on the basis of the available evidence,
the source material is likely to occur in or below the soil. A rating
of improbable means that the source material is unlikely to occur within
or below the soil. This rating does not consider the quality of the
source material because quality depends on how the source material will
be used.


(a) Roadfill. Roadfill consists of soil material that is excavated
from its original position and used in road embankments elsewhere. The
evaluations for roadfill are for low embankments generally less than 6
feet and are less exacting in design that high embankments such as used
in superhighways. The rating is given for the whole soil, from the
surface to a depth of about 5 feet, based on the assumption that soil
horizons will be mixed in loading, dumping, and spreading. Soils are
rated as to the amount of material available for excavation, the ease of
excavation, and how well the material performs after it is in place.

Soil properties that affect the amount of material available
for excavation are thickness of suitable material above bedrock or other
material that is not as suitable. The percent of coarse fraction greater
than 3 inches, depth to high water table and slope are properties that
influence the ease of excavation. How well the soil performs in place
is indicated by the AASHTO classification and group index and the shrink-
swell potential. Some damages to the borrow area is expected, but if
revegetation and erosion control could become serious problems, then the
soil is rated severe.

(b) Sand. Sand as a construction material is usually defined as
the size of particles ranging from .074 mm (sieve #200) to 4.76 nm
(sieve #4) in diameter. Sand is used in greater quantities in many
kinds of construction. Specifications for each purpose vary widely.
The intent of this rating is to show only the probability of finding
material in suitable quantity. The suitability of the sand for specific
purposes is not evaluated.

The properties used to evaluate the soils as a probable source
for sand are the grain size as indicated by the Unified Soil Classification,
the thickness of the sand layer, and the amount of rock fragments in the
soil material.

If the lowest layer of the soil contains sand, the soil is
rated as a probable source regardless of thickness. The assumption is
that the sand layer below the depth of observation exceeds the minimum
thickness.

(c) Gravel. Gravel as a construction material is.defined as the
size of particles ranging from 4.76 mm (sieve #4) to 76 mm (3 inches)
in diameter. Gravel is used in great quantities in many kinds of
construction. Specifications for each purpose vary widely. The intent
of this rating is to show only the probability of finding material in
suitable quantity. The suitability of the gravel for specific purposes
is not evaluated. Most soils in Florida lack gravel. Some soils,
however, are underlain by limestone bedrock that is a good source of
material to crush for aggregate.









The properties used to evaluate the soil as a probable
source for gravel are grain size as indicated by the Unified Soil
Classification, the thickness of the gravel layer and the amount of
rock fragments in the soil material. If the lowest layer of the soil
contains gravel, the soil is rated as a probable source regardless of
thickness. The assumption is that the gravel layer below the depth
of observation exceeds the minimum thickness.

(d) Topsoil. The term "topsoil" has several meanings, but as
used here, the term describes soil material used to cover an area so
as to improve soil conditions for establishment and maintenance of
adapted vegetation.

Generally the organic rich upper part of the soil is most
desirable, however, material excavated from deeper layers is also used.
In this rating, the upper 40 inches of soil material is evaluated for
its use as topsoil. In the borrow area, the material below 40 inches
is evaluated for its suitability to grow-vegetation after the upper
40 inches is removed.

The soil properties that are used to rate the soil as
topsoil are those that influence plant growth, the ease of excavation,
loading and spreading and those which influence the reclamation of
the borrow area.

The physical and chemical soil properties that influence plant
growth are the presence of toxic substances, soil reaction, and those
properties which are inferred from the soil texture such as available
water capacity and fertility. The properties that influence the ease
of excavation, loading, and spreading are the amounts of rock fragments,
slope, depth to the water table, soil texture, and thickness of
suitable material. The properties that influence the reclamation of
the borrow area are slope, depth to water table, amount of rock fragments,
depth to rock, and the presence of toxic material.

Water Management

Interpretations of soils for water management are given as limitations
for pond reservoir areas, embankments, dikes and levees, and excavated
ponds (aquifer fed), and as restrictive features that affect drainage,
irrigation, terraces and diversions, and grassed waterways. If there
are no restrictive features the soil is shown as "favorable".

(a) Pond reservoir area is the area that holds water behind a dam
or embankment. Soils best suited to this use have a low seepage potential
which is determined by permeability and depth to fractured or permeable
bedrock, cemented pan, or other permeable material. The soil is rated
on its properties in the upper 60 inches as a natural barrier against
seepage into deeper layers without regard to cutoff trenches or other
features that may be installed under the pond embankment. Excessive
slopes will seriously reduce the storage capacity of the reservoir area.


(b) Embankments, dikes, and levees are raised structures of soil
material constructed to impound water or protect land against overflow.
They are generally less than 20 feet high, constructed of "homogeneous"
soil material (without a core zone) and compacted to medium density.
Embankments having zoned construction (core and shell) are not
considered.

Ratings are made for soil as a source of material for embankment
fills. The rating is given for the whole soil, from the surface to a
depth of about 5 feet, based on the assumption that soil horizons will
be mixed in loading, dumping, and spreading. The ratings do not indicate
the suitability of the natural soil for supporting the embankment.
Soil properties to depths greater than the embankment height will
have an effect on the embankment performance and safety. Generally,
deeper onsite geologic investigations must be made to determine these
important properties. Low density silts and clays in the supporting
foundation usually have excessive settlement and low strength.

Embankments, dikes and levees require soil material that is
resistant to seepage, piping, and erosion, and that has favorable
compaction characteristics. Organic soils are not suitable because of
high compression, low strength, and unpredictable permeability. When
compacting with tamping rollers (sheepsfoot) or pneumatic rollers, stones
over 6 inches in size must be removed, causing restrictions for stony
soils. If a water table is present, the depth of usable material and
the trafficability are affected.


The content of sodium and salts affects
growing vegetation on embankment surfaces. These
indicate dispersive soils that are highly erosive
piping.


the capability for
properties may also
and susceptible to


(c) Excavated Ponds (aquifer-fed). An aquifer-fed excavated pond
is a body of water created by excavating a pit or dugout into a ground-
water aquifer. Excluded are ponds that are fed by surface runoff and
embankment ponds that impound water 3 feet or more above the original
surface.

The soil properties that affect aquifer-fed ponds are depth
to a permanent water table, permeability of the aquifer, and quality of
water as determined by inference from the salinity of the soil. Large
stones are also considered because of their effect on ease of excavation.

(d) Drainage is the process of removing excess surface and sub-
surface water from agricultural land. How easily and effectively a soil
is drained depends on the depth of the water table or ponding, soil
permeability, depth to bedrock or cemented pan, flooding, subsidence of
organic layers, and slope. The productivity of the soil after drainage
is dependent on presence of toxic substances in the root zone, such as
salts, sodium, sulfur, or extreme acidity.








Properties that affect grading, excavation, and stability of
trench or ditch banks are depth to bedrock or cemented pan, large stones,
slope, and stability against caving.

Availability of drainage outlets is a feature that must be
considered in design, but is not considered in this report.

(e) Irrigation is the controlled application of water to supplement
rainfall for supporting plant growth. Soil features are listed that
affect design, layout, construction, management or performance of an
irrigation system. Those features important in design and management
of most irrigation systems are wetness or ponding and the need for
drainage, flooding, available water capacity, intake rate, permeability,
susceptibility to wind or water erosion, and slope. Soil features that
influence construction are large stones and depth to bedrock or
cemented pan. The features that affect performance of the system are
rooting depth, amount of salts or sodium, and soil acidity.

(f) Terraces and diversion are enbankments or a combination of an
embankment and channel constructed across a slope to control erosion by
diverting of storing runoff instead of permitting it to flow uninterrupted
down the slope. Soil features are listed that affect the construction of
terraces and diversions and that may cause problems after construction.
Soil features that influence construction are slope, large stones, depth
to bedrock or cemented pan, and wetness. Soil features that may cause
problems after construction are restricted rooting depth, high suscepti-
bility to wind or water erosion, and restricted permeability to water and
air.

(g) Grassed waterways are natural or constructed channels, usually
broad and shallow, covered with erosion-resistant grasses, used to
conduct surface water to outlets at a nonerosive velocity. Soil features
are listed that affect the construction of grassed waterways and the
growth and maintenance of grass after construction. Soil features that
influence the construction of grassed waterways are large stones, wetness,
slope, and depth to bedrock or cemented pan. The soil features affecting
the growth of grass after construction are susceptibility to wind or
water erosion, available water capacity, rooting depth, presence of
toxic substances such as salts or sodium and the permeability to water
and air.

Recreational Development

Soils are rated according to limitations that affect their suitability
for camp areas, picnic area, playgrounds, and paths and trials. Not
considered in this rating, but important in evaluating a site are
location accessibility of the area, size, and shape of the area and
its scenic quality, the ability of the soil to support vegetation,
access to water, potential water impoundment sites available, and
either access to public service lines or capacity of the soil to absorb
septic tank effluent. Soils subject to flooding are limited, in
varying degree, for recreational use by the duration of flooding and the
season when it occurs. Onsite assessment of duration and frequency of
flooding is essential in planning recreational facilities.


(a) Camp areas are tracts of land used intensively for tents,
trailers and campers, and the accompanying activities of outdoor living.
Camp areas require such site preparation as shaping and leveling, areas
for tent and parking areas, stabilizing roads and intensively used areas,
and installing sanitary facilities and utility lines. Camp areas are
subject to heavy foot traffic and some vehicular traffic. The soils are
rated on the basis of soil properties that influence the ease of developing
camping areas and the performance of the camping area after development.
Soil properties that influence trafficability and promote the growth of
vegetation after heavy use are important.

Slope, stoniness, and depth to bedrock or cemented pan are the
main concerns in developing camp areas. For good trafficability, the
surface of camp areas should absorb rainfall readily, remain firm to
heavy foot traffic, and not be dusty when dry. Soil properties that
influence trafficability are.texture of the surface layer, wetness,
permeability, and large stones. Slow permeability and clayey surface
texture are not as severe a limitation in dry regions of the country,
however, silty soils may be more of a problem because they are dusty.
Soil properties that influence the growth of plants are depth to bedrock
or cemented pan, permeability, and presence of toxic materials. Soils
that flood are particularly hazardous for camp areas because of the danger
to life and property.

(b) Picnic areas are natural or landscaped tracts used primarily
for preparing meals and eating outdoors. These areas are subject to
heavy foot traffic. Most vehicular traffic is confined to access roads
and parking lots. Soils are rated on the basis of properties that
influence development costs of shaping sites, trafficability, and growth
of vegetation after development.

Slope and stoniness are the main concerns in developing picnic
area. For good trafficability, the surface of picnic areas should absorb
rainfall readily, remain firm to heavy foot traffic, and not be dusty
when dry.. Soil properties that influence trafficability are texture of
the surface layer, wetness, permeability, and large stones. Slow
permeability and clayey surface texture are not as severe a limitation
in dry regions of the country, however, silty soils may be more of a
problem because they are dusty. Soil properties that influence the
growth of plants are depth to bedrock, permeability, and the presence
of toxic materials.

(c) Playgrounds are areas used intensively for games such as baseball,
football, and similar activities. Playgrounds require a nearly level soil
that is free of stones and that can withstand heavy foot traffic and still
maintain adequate vegetation. Soils are rated on the basis of properties
that influence cost of shaping, trafficability, and growth of vegetation.








(d) Paths and trails are used for walking, horseback riding, and
other uses and require little or no cutting or filling. The soils are
rated on the properties that influence trafficability and erodibility.
These are stoniness, wetness, texture or the surface layer, slope,
flooding, erodibility, and in dry regions, dustiness.


CAPABILITY AND PREDICTED YIELDS CROPS AND PASTURE
(HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)

INTRODUCTION

In this part of the interpretation sheet the different phases of the
soil series are rated into capability classes and subclasses, the
potential yields under high level management are estimated for important
crops that the soil is suited for.

EXPLANATION AND DISCUSSION OF ITEMS

Class determine phase Soil series are divided into phases on the
basis of difference in slope, texture of the surface layer, or
some other characteristic that affects use of the soils by man.

Capability In this column the different phases of the soil series
are grouped according to capability classes and subclasses.
Capability grouping shows, in a general way, the suitability of
soils for kinds of field crops. The groups are made according
to the limitations of the soils when used for field crops, the
risk of damage when they are used, and the way they respond to
treatment. The grouping does not take into account major and
generally expensive landforming that would change slope, depth,
or other characteristics of the soils; does not take into con-
sideration possible but unlikely major reclamation projects;
and does not apply to rice, cranberries, horticultural crops,
or other crops requiring special management.

Capability classes, the broadest groups, are designated by Roman
numerals I through VIII. The numerals indicate progressively
greater limitations and narrower choices for practical use,
defined as follows:

Class I soils have few limitations that restrict their
use.

Class II soils have moderate limitations that reduce the
choice of plants or that require moderate conservation
practices.

Class III soils have severe limitations that reduce the
choice of plants, require special conservation practices,
or both.

Class IV soils have very severe limitations that reduce
the choice of plants, require very careful management,
or both.


Class V soils are not likely to erode but have other
limitations, impractical to remove, that limit their
use largely to pasture, range, woodland, or wildlife.

Class VI soils have severe limitations that make them
generally unsuited to cultivation and limit their use
largely to pasture, range, woodland or wildlife.

Class VII soils have very severe limitations that make
them unsuited to cultivation and restrict their use
largely to pasture, range, woodland, or wildlife.

Class VIII soils and landforms have limitations that
preclude their use for commercial plants and restrict
their use to recreation, wildlife, water supply, or to
aesthetic purposes.

Capability subclasses are soil groups within one class; they are
designated by adding a small letter, e, w, or s to the class
numeral, for example, lie. The letter e shows that the
main limitation is risk or erosion unless close-growing
plant cover is maintained; w shows that water in or on the
soil surface interferes with plant growth or cultivation
(in some soils the wetness can be partly corrected by
artificial drainage); s shows that the soil is limited
mainly because it is shallow, drought, or stony.

In class I there are no subclasses, because the soils of
this class have few limitations. Class V can contain, at
the most, only the subclasses indicated by w and s because
the soils in class V are subject to little or no erosion,
though they have other limitations that restrict their use
largely to pasture, range, woodland, wildlife or recreation.

Potential yields predicted yields are for principal crops grown on
the soil. The predictions are based on estimates made by farmers,
county and on information taken from research data. The predicted
yields are average yields per acre that can be expected by good
commercial farmers at the level of management which tends to
produce the highest economic returns.


WOODLAND SUITABILITY


INTRODUCTION

On this part of the soil interpretation sheet the soils are evaluated
for their suitability for woodland. Each soil is given a woodland
ordination symbol. The soils are evaluated for woodland management
problems, and the potential productivity of important trees is estimated.
Trees to plant are also given.








EXPLANATION OF ITEMS


Ordination symbol The woodland ordination symbol serves to group
soils that are suited to about the same kinds of trees and that
have about the same potential productivity.

Each woodland ordination symbol is identified by a 2-part symbol.
The first part of the symbol indicates the relative productivity
of the soils: 1 = very high; 2 = high; 3 = moderately high;
4 = moderate; and 5 = low. The second part of the symbol, a
letter, indicates the important soil property that imposes a
moderate or severe hazard or limitation in managing the soils
for wood production. The letter x shows that the main limita-
tion is stoniness or rockiness; w shows that excessive water in
or on the soil is the chief limitation; t shows that toxic
substances in the soil are the chief limitation; d shows that
the rooting depth is restricted; c shows that clay in the upper
part of the soil is a limitation; s shows the soils are sandy;
f shows that the soils have large amounts of coarse fragments;
r shows the soils have slopes; and o shows the soils have no
significant restrictions or limitations for woodland use or
management.

Management problems evaluated are erosion hazard, equipment limitations,
seedling mortaility, withthrow hazard, and plant competition.

Erosion hazard measures the risk of soil losses in well-managed woodland.
Erosion hazard is slight if expected soil loss is small, moderate
if some measures to control erosion are needed in logging and con-
struction, and severe if intensive treatment or special equipment
and methods are needed to prevent excessive soil losses.

Equipment limitation ratings reflect the soil conditions that restrict
the use of equipment normally used in woodland management or har-
vesting. Slight ratings indicate equipment use is not limited to
kind or time of year. A rating of moderate indicates a seasonal
limitation or need for modification in methods of equipment.
Severe limitations indicate the need for specialized equipment
or operations.

Seedling mortality ratings indicate the degree of expected mortality of
planted seedlings when plant competition is not a limiting factor.
Normal rainfall, good planting stock and proper planting are
assumed. A slight rating indicates expected mortality is less
than 25 percent. Moderate rating indicates a 25 to 50 percent
loss; and severe indicates over 50 percent loss of seedling.


Windthrow hazard ratings reflect the danger of trees being blown over
by wind. A rating of slight indicates that normally there are no
trees blown down by the wind, a rating of moderate that some trees
are expected to blow down during periods of excessive soil wetness
and high wind, and a rating of severe that many trees are expected
to blow down during periods of soil wetness with moderate or high
winds.

Plant competition refers to the invasion or growth of undesirable
species on different kinds of soil when openings are made in the
canopy. A rating of slight indicates that competition will not
prevent adequate natural regeneration and early growth or inter-
fere with adequate development of planted seedlings, a rating of
moderate that competition will delay natural or artificial regen-
eration, both establishment and growth rate, but will not prevent
the eventual development of fully stocked normal stands, and a
rating of severe that competition will prevent adequate natural
or artificial regeneration without intensive site preparation and
maintenance treatments such as weeding.

Important trees This is a list of some of the commercially important
trees which are adopted to the soil. These are the trees which
woodland managers will generally favor in intermediate or improve-
ment cuttings.

Site index is the average height of dominant trees at age 50. For
South Florida Slash Pine site index given is for age 25 years.

Trees to plant This is a list of trees suitable to plant for commer-
cial wood production.


WIND BREAKS

In this part of the interpretation sheet, the important windbreak plant
species (mainly tree species) and their expected height at 20 years of
age for each class determining phase of the soil is given. If all
phases of the soil grow the same species to the same height, "ALL" is
shown in the "Class-Determining Phase" column. If soil blowing is not
a problem nor hazard for a soil, "NONE" is shown on the first line
under "Species".


WILDLIFE SUITABILITY

INTRODUCTION

Soils directly influence kinds and amounts of vegetation and amounts of
water available, and in this way indirectly influence the kinds of wild-
life that can live in an area. Soil properties that affect the growth
of wildlife habitat are: (1) thickness of soil useful to crops, (2)








surface texture, (3) available water capacity to a 40-inch depth, (4)
wetness, C5) surface stoniness or rockiness, (6) flood hazard, (7)
slope, and (8) permeability of the soil to air and water.

On the interpretation sheet, soils are rated for producing eight
elements of wildlife habitat and for three groups, or kinds, of
wildlife. The ratings indicate relative suitability for various
elements. A rating of good means the element of wildlife habitat and
habitats generally are easily created, improved, and maintained. Few
or no limitations affect management in this category and satisfactory
results are expected when the soil is used for the prescribed purpose.

A rating of fair means the element of wildlife habitat, and habitats
can be improved, maintained, or created in most places. Moderate
intensity of management and fairly frequent attention may be required
for satisfactory results, however.

A rating of poor means the element of wildlife and limitations for the
designated use are rather severe. Habitats can be improved, maintained,
or created in most places, but management is difficult and requires
intensive effort.

A rating of very poor means the elements of wildlife habitat are very
severe and that unsatisfactory results are to be expected. It is
either impossible or impractical to improve, maintain, or create
habitats on soils in this category.


EXPLANATION OF ITEMS

Potential for habitat elements Each soil is rated according to its
suitability for producing various kinds of plants and other ele-
ments that make up wildlife habitats. The ratings take into
account mainly 1he characteristics of the soils and closely
related natural factors of the environment. They do not take
into account climate, present use of soils, or present distribu-
tion of wildlife and people. For this reason, selection of a
site for development as a habitat for wildlife requires inspection
at the site.

Grain and seed These are annual grain-producing plants such as corn,
sorghum, millet, and soybeans.

Grass and legume Making up the group are domestic grasses and legumes
that are established by planting. They provide food and cover for
wildlife. Grasses include bahiagrass, ryegrass, and panicgrass;
legumes include annual lespedeza, shrub lespedeza, and other clovers.

Wild herbaceous This group consists of native or introduced perennial
grasses, forbs, and weeds that provide food and cover for upland
wildlife. Beggarweed, perennial lespedeza, wild bean, pokeweed,
and cheatgrass are typical examples. On rangeland. typical plants
are bluestem, grama, perennial forbs and legumes.


Hardwood trees These plants are nonconiferous trees, shrubs, and woody
vines that produce wildlife food in the form of fruits, nuts, buds,
catkins, or browse. Such plants commonly grow in their natural
environment, but they may be planted and developed through wildlife
management programs. Typical species in this category are oak,
beech, cherry, dogwood, maple, viburnum, grape, honeysuckle,
greenbrier, and silverberry.

Coniferous plants These plants are cone-bearing trees and shrubs that
provide cover and frequently furnish food in the form of browse,
seeds, or fruitlike cones. They commonly grow in their natural
environment, but they may be planted and managed. Typical plants
in this category are pines, cedars, and ornamental trees and shrubs.

Shrubs This column is not applicable to soils in Florida, and a dash
is used to indicate this.

Wetland plants In this group are annual and perennial herbaceous plants
that grow wild on moist and wet sites. They furnish food and cover
mostly for wetland wildlife. Typical examples of plants are smart-
weed, wild millet, spikerush and other rushes, sedges, burreed,
tearthumb, and aneilema. Submerged and floating aquatics are not
included in this category.

Shallow water This includes impoundments or excavations for controlling
water, generally not more than five feet deep, to create habitats
that are suitable for waterfowl. Some are designed to be drained,
planted, and then flooded; others are permanent impoundments that
grow submerged aquatics.

Potential as habitat for The soils are rated according to their suit-
ability as habitat for openland wildlife, woodland wildlife, and
wetland wildlife. These ratings are related to ratings made for
elements of habitat. For example, soils rated unsuited for shallow
water developments are rated unsuited for wetland wildlife.

Openland wildlife are birds and mammals that normally live in meadows,
pastures, and open areas where grasses, herbs, and shrubby plants
grow. Quail, doves, meadowlarks, field sparrows, cottontail rabbits,
and foxes are typical examples of openland wildlife.

Woodland wildlife are birds and mammals that normally live in wooded
areas of hardwood trees, coniferous trees, and shrubs. Thrushes,
wild turkeys, vireos, deer, squirrels, and raccoons are typical
examples of woodland wildlife.

Wetland wildlife are birds and mammals that normally live in wet areas,
marshes and swamps. Ducks, geese, rails, shore birds, and herons
are typical examples of wetland wildlife.







SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD
58 ALBANY FINE SAND. 0 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


Rangeland wildlife is not rated in Florida since woodland wildlife is
rated and is applicable to Florida conditions and soils.



POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY -
(RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)

INTRODUCTION


Soils in their native state have a vegetative cover or plant community
that has been grown and adapted to the conditions of the particular soil
on which it is found. Cultivation, burning, and over-grazing may result
in a different plant community than was originally on the soil in its
native state. Where data are available, a list of the common plants by
name, the plant symbol, the percentage composition by class determining
phase, and the potential production in favorable years, normal years, and
unfavorable years are shown on the interpretation sheet.



EXPLANATION OF ITEMS


Common plant name The common names of the major native plants that
grow under climax condition on the soil are listed in this column
for each class determining phase.


Phase symbol (NLSPN) A symbol derived from a combination of letters
from the scientific name of the plant as compiled in the National
List of Scientific Plant Names, USDA, SCS, 1971 is shown in this
column.


Percentage composition (dry weight) by class determining'phase The
percentage of the total composition that each named plant makes
up is shown in thesee columns for each class determining phase.
Where data are not available and acceptable estimates cannot be
made, the species are listed in order of their general productiv-
ity and the columns for percent composition are left blank.

Potential production The potential production of grazeable forage is
shown as pounds per acre on a dry weight basis for favorable years:
normal years, and unfavorable years. Favorable years are those
in which rainfall and climatic conditions are favorable for the
growth of plants. Normal years can be considered as years in which
rainfall and climatic conditions are average for the growth of plants.
Unfavorable years are those in which rainfall and climatic conditions
are unfavorable for the growth of plants.


THE ALBANY SERIES CONSISTS OF SOMEWHAT POORLY DRAINED SOILS OF THE COASTAL PLAIN. IN A REPRESENTATIVE PROFILE THE SUR-
FACE LAYER IS.DARK GRAY SAND 7 IN. THICK. THE SUBSURFACE LAYER IS 41 IN. THICK; IT IS LIGHT YELLOWISH BROWN SAND IN THE
UPPER PART AND BROWNISH YELLOW LOAMY SAND IN THE LOWER PART; BOTH ARE MOTTLED WITH SHADES OF YELLOW. GRAY AND BROWN. THE
SUBSOIL TO A DEPTH OF 88 INCHES IS SANDY LOAM AND SANDY CLAY LOAM. IT IS LIGHT YELLOWISH BROWN IN THE UPPER PART MOTTLED
WITH SHADES OF BROWN. -
I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES _____ I
IDEPTHI I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS ILIGUID IPLAS-
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE ] UNIFIED 1 AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I (PCT)I 4 1 10 1 40 I 200 I IINDEXJ
I0-551FS ISM IA-2 I 0 I 100 100 75-90 12-23 I I NP
155-651SL ISM IA-2 I 0 100 100 75-92 22-30 I NP
165-BI0SCL. SL. FSL ISC. SM. SM-SC IA-2. A-4. A-6 I 0 197-100 95-100 70-100 25-50 I <40 INP-17I
I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I 1 I I
I I I I I I I I
IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND JORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.1I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I I
1 I<2MMI} (G/CM3a I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
1 0-551 5-101 I 6.0-20 I 0.02-0.04 13.6-6.5 I LOW 1.171 5 I I 1-2 I HIGH I HIGH I
155-65110-201 1 2.0-6.0 1 0.08-0.10 14.5-6.0 I I LOW 1.201 I I I
65-80115-351620 0.-2.0 0.10-0.16 14.5-6.0 I I LOW 1.241 I I 1
I I I I I I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT*LI
I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I1 I IINl I I (IN) I IfINI I(IN) I I ACTION 1
I NONE-RARE I I 11.0-2.5APPARENTpDEC-MARI I >60 I I- CI -
SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
I SEVERE-WETNESS II FAIR-WETNESS
SEPTIC TANK I I
ABSORPTION I I ROADFILL
FIELDS II
I II
I SEVERE-SEEPAGE.WETNESS II IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE II
LAGOON II SAND
AREAS I II
I II I
SEVERE-WETNESS.TOO SANDY II IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SANITARY
LANDFILL I GRAVEL
(TRENCH) II
J II
SEVERE-SEEPAGE.WETNESS 1 POOR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY II
LANDFILL I TOPSOIL
(AREA) I I
SPOOR-TCO SANDY.WETNESS II
DAILY I II WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL II POND
I I_ II RESERVOIR
II AREA
-_-_ .BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT _____
ISEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE.WETNESS II SEVERE-SEEPAGE.PIPING.WETNESS
SHALLOW I IIEMBANKMENTS I
EXCAVATIONS 1 DIKES AND
LEVEES
SMODERATE-WETNESS II SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS 11 EXCAVATED
WITHOUT I PONDS
BASEMENTS AQUIFER FED
SSEVERE-WETNESS CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS I
WITH DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS
SSEVERE-WETNESS I WETNESS.DRCUGHTY.FAST INTAKE
SMALL I
COMMERCIAL IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I I
S1 II I .
MODERATE-WETNESS I WETNESS.TOO SANDY
LOCAL II TERRACES
ROADS AND AND
STREETS I DIVERSIONS
LAWNS. I SEVERE-DROUGHTY I WETNESSDROUGHTY
LANDSCAPING I II GRASSED I
AND GOLF II WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS I I

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS


USDA-SCS
12-78


I









5B ALBANY FINE SAND. O0 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
12-78


-------------------------------nB~nc.J..vnnw ugxskurmnen-------------------
SSEVERE-TOO SANDY II SEVERE-TOO SANDY

CAMP AREAS I IIPLAYGROUNDS
SII
I I II I I

SSEVERE-TOO SANDY ISEVERE-TOO SANDY
II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS I AND
1 TRAILS

CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
SCAPA- I CORN I SOYBEANS I TOBACCO I PEANUTS I IMPROVED IBAHIAGRASS I GRASS HAY
ABILITY I I I I IBERMUDAGR. I I I
I I (tu) I (BU) I (LBS) I (LBS) I (AUM) I (AUMI I (TONS) 1
I INIRRIIRR.INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR, INIRR IIRR. I
S3E 1 75 I 20 12100 11700 I 17.0 6.5 I I 4.5

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I


I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
11 I

I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I II I I I I I I I I
WOODLANDD SUITABILITY
ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
ISYM I EROSION EQUIP. SEEDLINGSI WINDTH.I PLANT I COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
I I HAZARD I LIMIT I MCRT'Y.I HAZARD COMPET.I IINDXI
12W I SLIGHT IMODERATEIMODERATEI SLIGHT IMODERATEILOBLOLLY PINE 195 ILOBLOLLY PINE
I I I I I LASH PINE l85 ISLASH PINE
I ILChGLEAF PINE I80 I
I .
I I I I I I I I I I I










WINCBREAKS
I I SPECIES IHT SPECIES HTI SPECIES IHTI SPECIES ITI
NONE I I I
I I I I I I I I





I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I










WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
I POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR:
GRAIN GRASSS El WILD JHARDWD ICONIFERISHRUBS IWETLANDISHALLOWIOPENLD IWOODLD 1WETLANDIRANGELOI
I SEED ILEGUMESI HERB. I TREES PLANTS I IPLANTSPI WATER IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF
FAIR 1 FAIR FAIR FAIR FAIR FAIR POR FAIR FAIR I POOR
S1 1 I I I I I I I I I
S I II I I I I I












POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY RANGELANDC OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
PLANT PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION DRY WEIGHT) _______
COMMON PLANT NAME SYMBOL
SI (NLSPNI I I I I
II I I I I I I I I I 1





















POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT): I A
FAVORABLE YEARS I
NORMAL YEARS I
UNFAVORABLE YEARS I
FOOTNOTES


SOIL I NTE RPRETAT IONS RECORD

78 ALPIN FINE SAND. 0 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
12-78


THE ALPIN SERIES CONSISTS OF EXCESSIVELY DRAINED NEARLY LEVEL TO STRONGLY SLOPING SOILS OF THE COASTAL PLAIN UPLANDS.
TYPICALLY. THEY HAVE A THIN DARK GRAY FINE SAND SURFACE LAYER AND THEN LAYERS OF LIGHT YELLOWISH- BROWN AND VERY PALE
BROWN FINE SAND TO A DEPTH OF 54 INCHES. BETWEEN DEPTHS OF 54 TO 142 INCHES IS LAYERS OF VERY PALE BROWN AND WHITE FINE
SAND THAT HAS LAMELLAE OF YELLOWISH-BROWN LOAMY FINE SAND. BELOW THIS TC DEPTHS OF 148 INCHES IS VERY PALE BROWN FINE
SANDY LOAM.
I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI I| I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS ILIQUID IPLAS--
(IN.) USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I I I(PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 I 200 i I INDEX I
S0-6 IFS ISP-SM. SM IA-3. A-2-4 I 0 195-100 90-100 60-100 5-20 I NP
S6-521FS, S ISP-SM IA-3. A-2-4 I 195-100 90-100 60-100 5-12 I NP
152-801FS. S ISP-SM. SM IA-2-4 1 0 195-100 90-100.60-100 11-20I I NP
IFSL. SL. SCL ISM. SM-SC IA-2-4 I0 195-100 90-100 75-100 20-35 1 <28 INP-7
I I I I 1 I I
I I I I I I
IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- ]EROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER 1I
I 1<2MM)i (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALI K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCPETE
S0-6 1 3-1211.35-1.55 I >20 0.05-0.10 14.5-6.0 IVERY LOW 1.101 5 2 I >.S I LOW I HIGH _
I 6-521 3-7 11.40-1.55 1 >20 I 0.03-0.07 14.S-6.0 I IVERY LOW 1.101 I
Is52-sl 5-8 11.45-1.60 I >20 I 0.06-0.09 14.5-6.0 I IVERY LOW 1.101 I I
110-3011.s5-1.65 I 2.0-6.0 I 0.10-0.15 14.5-6.0 I I LOW 1.201
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK SUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) I I (IN) I I(IN) IIN) I I ACTION I
I NONE -IJ I I >6.0 I I I 1>60 I I IAI I

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL.
SLIGHT II GOOD
SEPTIC TANK I
ABSORPTION I ROADFILL
S FIELDS II
1 II II I
I ISEVERE-SEEPAGE II PROBABLE
I SEWAGE II
S LAGOON II SAND I
I AREAS I I
I I II I
SEVERE-SEEPAGE.TOO SANDY I I IMPROBABLE-TOO SANDY
SANITARY I II
S LANDFILL II GRAVEL
S(TRENCH) I I
I I II I
SEVERE-SEEPAGE I POGOR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY II
LANDFILL II TOPSOIL
(AREA) I
I I II I
IPOOR-TOO SANDY.SEEPAGE
DAILY II WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR I IISEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL II POND
I I II RESERVOIR
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II I
SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE II SEVERE-SEEPAGE.PIPING
I SHALLOW IIEMBANKMENTSI
EXCAVATIONS II DIKES ANDI
II LEVEES
I I 1II1
SLIGHT II SEVERE-NO WATER
DWELLINGS II EXCAVATED
WITHOUT II PONDS I
BASEMENTS IIAOUIFER FED
I I1
SLIGHT I I DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS II
I WITH II DRAINAGE I
BASEMENTS 1 I

I I SLIGHT 1 1 DROUGHTY.SCIL BLOWING
I SMALL I II
COMMERCIAL I I IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I I
I I II 1 I
SSLIGHT II TOO SANDYSOIL BLOWING
LOCAL II TERRACES I
ROADS AND I II AND I
STREETS II DIVERSIONS
I I II I
I LAWNS, II DROUGHT
LANDSCAPING I I11 GRASSEDI
AND GOLF II WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS j ii
i I II I

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I I I
I I I






78 ALPIN FINE SAND. 0 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
12-78


RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
SI SEVERE-TOO SANDY I SEVERE-TOO SANDY
I I II I
I CAMP AREAS IIPLAYGROUNDS
I I II I
I I II I
SI SEVERE-TOO SANDY I I SEVERE-TOO SANDY
I I II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS II AND
I I TRAILS
I I II : I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CAPA- | TOBACCO PEANUTS WATER- IIMPRCVED IBAHIAGRASS I I
I ABILITY I I MELONS IBERMUAGR. I I
I I (LBS) I (LBS) I TONSI I (AU I (AUM) I I
I INIRRIIRRe.NIRR IIRR. NIRR RRRR RR R IRR. INIRR IIR. INIRR IIRRE INIRR IRR. INIRR IIRR.
A 4S (1500 12000 1 4.4 8I a 7 I 1
I I I I I I I I
II I I I I I I I i









ORD MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS __ POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I -------- ------
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I







SEROION EQUIP. SEEDLING I PLANT COMMON TREES ISITE I TREES TO PLANT
I I I I T 1 I I MORT I I Y. HAZARD C I I I I



3S SLIGHT I MODERN TEIMODERATE SLIGHT SLIGHT ILOBLLLY PINE 8 ISLASH PINE I
SLASH PINE 180 ILOBLOLLY PINE
SLONGLEAF PINE 170





*I



I I W I I I I I N I I I I I D I I

SPECI I IES I I I I ITI SPECIES I II I
SOUTHERN REDCEDAR 1501BAMBOO 1251SLASH PINE I401LOBLOLLY PINE 1351
SAND PINE 1301CAROLINA LAURELCHY 1301JAPANESE PRIVET 1301 1
I I I I I I 1












WODL AN TAT SUITABILITY Y
SRD IMANAGTE NTIAL FR HABITAT E NTS PITNTIAL PRO ACTIVITY IFR

3S RASLIGHT DERATEWILMODERATERDWD SLIG CONIFERSLIGHT LBLANDSHALLLY PINE SLASH PINE PANEL
LEGUME HERB. TREE I PLANTS LASH PINE 80I ILOBLDLLY PINE WI











POOR FAIR FAIR POOR FAIR PLOGLEAF P I FAIR FAIR POOR







P AP I I I AI T I I I I SPSOR FOREST UNDTST EATI 1 AhN
I I I IMPLANT IJ3 RL I I I INWEIGHT) I








COMMON PLAN NAME SYMBOL
II I I I I I I



























ICHALKY BLUESTEM ANCA4 20I I I
LOPSIDED INDIANGRASS SOSE 10
HAIRY PANIC I PARH 10








CREEPING BLUESTEM ANST 10
SLENDER BLUESTEM ANTE 5
IPANICUM PANIC 5


I OTHER ANNUAL FORBS AAFF 10
I TUREYI I I ULA I 0
OTHER SHRUBS I I I I I









1]AMERICAN BEAUTYBERRY CAAM2 1
OTHER TREES I TTTT I
PURPLE LOVEGRASS ERSP












NORMAL YEARS 2500
C(I IM NFNN M IHTI IPMBOLI ES I

I N I I I S N)




















---- UPOTENTINFAVARALE YEARSELEMT 500 1 PS ABITT F: I









FCGTNOT6S
S IF WATER SUPPIESIGRASS &MS ETC. RECEIVE SEEPAGE FROM ABSORPTION FIELDS A NONTAMINOPTION HAZARD MAY EXIST
NSEED LLEGUMT I HERBA I TREES PLANTS I IPL ANTS I WATER IWILDLF IWLDLF IWLDLF IWILDLF I
S D USPOOR I FAIR 5 FAIR I POOR I FAIR I V. POORy. POCR FAIR FAIR V. POOR I






I COMMON PLANU NAME SYMBOL






IFRINGELEAF PASPALUM PACI3 I 5
IPINELAND THREEAWN I ARSTS I 5
OTHER ANNUAL FORBS IAAFF 10
TURKEY OAK IQULA2 I 10
IoTHER SHRUBS ISSSS I 2
AMERICAN BEAUTYBERRY CAAM2 I I
DTHER TREES ITTTT I 1
PURPLE LOVEGRASS I ERSP 1

POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT):
FAVORABLE YEARS 3000 I l I I I
NORMAL YEARS 2500 I I I I I
UNFAVORABLE YEARS 1500 I I I
FCGTNOTES
1 IF WArER SUPPLIES. STREAMS, ETC. RECEIVE SEEPAGE FROM ABSORPTION FIELDS. A CONTAMINATION HAZARD MAY EXIST.


SOIL INTERPRETATI N S REC RD

70 ALPIN FINE SAND S5 TO 12 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
12-78


THE ALPIN SERIES CONSISTS OF EXCESSIVELY DRAINED NEARLY LEVEL TO STRONGLY SLOPING SOILS OF THE COASTAL PLAIN UPLANDS.
TYPICALLY. THEY HAVE A THIN DARK GRAY FINE SAND SURFACE LAYER AND THEN LAYERS OF LIGHT YELLOWISH- BROWN AND VERY PALE
BROWN FINE SAND TO A DEPTH OF 54 INCHES. BETWEEN DEPTHS'OF 54 TO 142 INCHES IS LAYERS OF VERY PALE BROWN AND WHITE FINE
SAND THAT HAS LAMELLAE OF YELLOWISH-BROWN LOAMY FINE SAND. BELOW THIS TO DEPTHS OF 148 INCHES IS VERY PALE BROWN FINE
SANDY LOAM.
I ______ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES '
IDEPTHI I I FRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS- I
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. j LIMIT ITICITYI
- I I I(PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 1 200 1 IINOEX I
S0-3 IFS I* SP-SM SM IA-3. A-2-4 I0 |95-100 90-100 60-100 5-20 -. | NP
S3-651FS, S ISP-SM 1A-3. A-2-4 I 0 95-100 90-100 60-100 5-12 I NP
165-80IFS. S ISP-SM, SM IA-2-4 I 0 195-100 90-100 60-100 11-20 I NP
I- IFSL. SL. SCL ISM. SM-SC IA-2-4 0 195-100 90-100 75-100 20-35 I <28 INP-7
I I I I I I I I
SI I I I
IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- 1 AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND ORGANICI CORROSIVITY
((IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSgEROD.IMATTER I ___
I 1<2MM)I (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT) 1 STEEL ICONCRETEI
1 0-3 I 3-121.35-1.55 >20 I 0.05--.10 14.5-6.0 I IVERY LOW 1.101) S 2 I >.5 I LOW I HIGH I
I 3-651 3-7 11.40-1.55 >20 I 0.03-0.07 14.5-6.0 I IVERY LOW 1.10o I I
165-801 5-8 11.45-1.60o >20 I 0.06-0.09 14.5-6.0 I IVERY LOW 1.101 I 1
I 110-30o1.55-1.65 I 2.0-6.0 .- 1 .-4.5-6.0 I I LOW 1.201
I I I I I I I I I I
I II I I I I I I I
I FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK SUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
I _I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARONESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I" (FT) 1 I 1(IN) I I (IN) I I(IN) IIIN) I I ACTION I
I NONE I >6.0L | I I II >60 I I I I A I -

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL_
MODERATE-SLOPE | GOOD
SEPTIC TANK ( II
ABSORPTION II ROADFILL
FIELDS
II II I
SEVERE-SEEPAGE.SLOPE II PROBABLE
SEWAGE I
LAGOON I SAND
AREAS II
I I II
SEVERE-SEEPAGE.TOO SANDY J1 IMPROBABLE-TOO SANDY
SANITARY I II
LANDFILL II GRAVEL
(TRENCH) I I
II II I
SEVERE-SEEPAGE II POCR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY I I
LANDFILL I I TOPSOIL
(AREA) I
I I I
POOR-TOC SANDY.SEEPAGE I
DAILY I I WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR I SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL POND
I II RESERVOIR
Ij AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT I
SSEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE II SEVERE-SEEPAGE.PIPING
SHALLOW I IIEMBANKMENTS
EXCAVATIONS I ] DIKES AND
II LEVEES
I I II _1
MODERATE-SLOPE II SEVERE-NO WATER
DWELLINGS II EXCAVATED
WITHOUT II PONDS
BASEMENTS IIAQUIFER FED
I-i II
SMODERATE-SLOPE II DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS II
WITH I1 DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I I
I t_ _ II
SEVERE-SLOPE II I DROUGHTY.SOIL BLOWING
SMALL II
COMMERCIAL I II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS II
I I II
MODERATE-SLOPE II SLOPE.TOO SANDYSOIL BLOWING
LOCAL I TERRACES
ROADS AND I I AND
STREETS I J DIVERSIONS

LAWNS I ISLOPE,DROUGHTY
LANDSCAPING II GRASSEDI
AND GOLF I WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS I J
_I IR__TII_ I

REGIONAL INT RPRETATIONS
I I I
I I I
I I
I LII


3









70 ALPIN FINE SAND. 5 TO 12 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
12-78


RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
SSEVERE-TOO SANDY II I SEVERE-TOO SANDY*SLOPE
I I II I
CAMP AREAS I IIPLAYGROUNDS- I
1 II I
I I II I : I
I SEVERE-TOO SANDY I I SEVERE-TOO SANDY
I I II PATHS I
PICNIC AREAS II AND I
I|I II TRAILS
I I II I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
I CAPA- I TOBACCO I PEANUTS I MATER- I IMPROVED IBAHIAGRASS I I
ABILITY I I I FELONS IBERMUDAGR. I I
SI (LB) I LBS) I (TONS) I T (AUMN I (AUM) I I I
I INIRRIIRR.INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IlRR. i
6S 4.4 7 I I I I I




I
'.
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I
WOODLAND SUITABILITY
SORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
I SYM I EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI MINDTH.( PLANT I COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
II I HAZARD I LIMIT I MORT'Y.I HAZARD I COMPET.I I INDXI I
13S SLIGHT MODERATEIMODERATE SLIGHT I SLIGHT LOBLOLLY PINE 185. SLASH PINE
SI SLASH PINE 180 LOBLOLLY PINE
S I LONGLEAF PINE (70 I

I I I I I I I I I









WINDBREAKS
SI SPACES IHT SPECIES I I SPECIES ITI SPECIES I
SOUTHERN REDCEDAR 1501BAMBOO I251SLASH PINE 40 I LOBLOLLY PINE 351
ISAND PINE I301CAROLNA LAURELCHY 1301JAPANESE PRIVET 130I I
I I I I I I I I I t I




I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I










I SEED ILEGUME HERB I TREES PLANTS I IMPLANTS I WATER IILLF I ILDLF I
SPOOR FAIR FAIR POOR I FAIR IV. POOR|V. POOR FAIR I FAIR IV. POOR -
ISAND PINE 130CAROLINA LAURELCHY ISOIJAPANESE PRIVET 1301 I I I
II I II I I .1








I I I 1 I I I I I
I I I III I
I I I I I I I I I
PTNTIAL NA POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR: ATION
PLANT SEED ILEGUM I HER. I TREES PLANTS IAGE COMPOSITION IPANTS I HATER IWILLF IWILDLF IWILLF IWILDLF I



COMMO P NME SPANCLANT



IPINEL COMMON PLANT NAME I ARSYMBOL I I
II (NLSPN) I I I
|CHALKY BLUESTEM ANCA4 I 20
LOPSIDED INDIANGRASS SOSE5 10
HAIRY PANICUM PARH 10
CREEPING BLUESTEM ANST 10
SLENDER BLUESTEM ANTE 5
|PANICUM PANIC 5
[FRINGELEAF PASPALUM PACI3 5
IPINELAND THREEAN I ARST5 5
|OTHER ANNUAL FORBS AAFF 10
TURKEY OAK QULA2 10
OTHER SHRUBS SSSS I 2
AMERICAN BEAUTYBERRY CAAM2 I 1
OTHER TREES TTTT 1
PURPLE LOVEGRASS ERSP

POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY MT): ___I_
FAVORABLE YEARS 1 3000 I I
NORMAL YEARS I 2500
UNFAVORABLE YEARS I 1500 I I I
FOOTNOTES
1 IF WATER SUPPLIES. STREAMS. ETC. RECEIVE SEEPAGE FROM ABSORPTION FIELDS, A CONTAMINATION HAZARD MAY EXIST.


SOIL INTERPRETATI ONS RECORD
56 PARENTS, SANITARY LANDFILL

AGENTS, SANITARY LANDFILL CONSISTS OF AREAS WHICH HAVE BEEN EXCAVATED AND BACKFILLED WITH ALTERNATING LAYERS OF REFUSE AND SOIL MATERIAL.
A REPRESENTATIVE AREA HAS A TOP COVERING OF MIXED LOAMY, SANDY AND CLAYEY SOIL MATERIAL ABOUT 3 FEET THICK. THE UNDERLYING MATERIAL
BETWEEN DEPTHS OF ABOUT 3 TO 16 FEET ARE LAYERS OF MIXED REFUSE MATERIAL THAT ARE ABOUT 4 FEET IN THICKNESS AND ALTERNATING LAYERS OF
MIXED SOIL MATERIAL THAT ARE ABOUT 6 INCHES IN THICKNESS.

I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES I
IDEPTHI I I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS- I
IIIN.)l USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED I AASHTO |>3 INI THAN PASSING SIEVE NO. LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I I I(PCT)I 4 I10 I o I40 1 200 I INDEX I
MATERIAL TOO VARIABLE TI ESTIMATE


I I I I I I I I I

IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE A SOI. I SALINITY 1 SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND JORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI)MMHOS/CM)I SMELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I
I 1<2MM)I (G/ )a I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT)I STEEL ICONCRETEI
S TOO VARIABLE TO ETIMATE I I '
I I I 1 1 I I II 1 J I 1 I
I I I I I I I I
II I I I
I 1 i I I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT-LI
__ I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY I DURATION I MONTHS I (FT) 1 I I(IN) I I (IN) I I(IN) IIIN) I I ACTION I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I' I I

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
I I I
SEPTIC TANK NOT APPLICABLE FOR SANITARY FACILITIES NOT APPLICABLE FOR SOURCE MATERIAL
ABSORPTION I jI ROADFILL
I FIELDS 1 II
I ] II I I
I I r11 I
SEWAGE I I|
LAGOON I SAND I
AREAS I II
II I
SANITARY I II
LANDFILL II GRAVEL
(TRENCH) II
I I II I
SANITARY II I
LANDFILL I TOPSOIL
(AREA) I II
I I II I
I I II
DAILY I I WATER MANAGENCNT
COVER FOR II P NOT APPLICABLE FOR WATER MANAGEMENT
LANDFILL I I POND
I tI I RESERVOIR
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II I
S NOT APPLICABLE FOR COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT I
SHALLOW I EMBANKMENTS I
IEXCAVAtIONS I DIKES AND I
I III LEVEES I
II
I I If I
I DWELLINGS I I EXCAVATED
I WITHOUT I PONDS
I BASEMENTS I JIAGUIFER FED I
I-I
II I
DWELLINGS I I
WITH I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I I
I I-
I I II
SMALL I I
COMMERCIAL I IRRIGATION
I BUILDINGS II

III I
LOCAL I I TERRACES
I ROADS AND 11 AND
STREETS I DIVERSIONS
I_ I-II _____
I LAWNS. I
LANDSCAPING II GRASSED
I AND GOLF I I WATERWAYS
I FAIRWAYS I I
I II I I

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I I I
I I I
I I I








56 PARENTS, SANITARY LANDFILL


FOOTNOTES


__ RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
IINOT APPLICABLE FOR RECREATION II
I I II I
I CAMP AREAS I PLAYGROUNDS I
SI 11 I iI
I I I I I
SI II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS f AND
I 111 TRAILS
i II __LI
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CLASS- CAPA- I I 1 I I
DETERMINING | ABILITY
PHASE I I I I I I I I
INIRRIIRRINIRR II NIRR. IRR INIAR IIRR. NI R INIR IRR.. INNIIR NIRR IIRR. INIRR I.RR,
NOT APPLICABLE FOR CROPS




SI R I I I I I I H 1 I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I 1 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I



WOODLAND SUITABILITY
CLASS- I ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY II
DETERMINING I SYM I EROSION EQUIP. LSEEDLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT I COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
I PHASE I i HAZARD I LIMIT H MORT*Y.I HAZARD I COMPET. I IIN IpIDx
ITOO VARIABLE TO PREDICT

I I I I I I I I I




I I I I I P ) I I I I I
I I I I M I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I
POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY












WIXNDBREAKS
CLAS-DETERMIN'G PHASE I SPECIES ITl SPECIES_ Il SPECIES IHTJ SPECIES IHT
ITOO VARIABLE FOR I I I I
PREDICTIONS
I I I I I I I I I
l I I I II I I
I I I I I I I I I

WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
CLASS- I POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR: I
DETERMINING GRAIN I|GRASS l| WILD JHARDWD ICONIFERISHRUBS JWETLANDI SHALLOWIOPENLD IUDOOLD IWETLANDIRANGELDI
I PHASE I SEED LEGUME I HERB. I TREES PLANTS I PLANTS I WATER IWILOLF IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF
TOO VARIABLE FOR ACCURATE l I I I I l I
PREDICTIONS I I I I I i I I J I 1 I
I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
PLANT I PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (ODRY WEIGHT) BY CLASS DETERMINING PHASE I
COMMON PLANT NAME I SYMBOL I I I
I (NLSPN) I I I I
I I I I I I I I


I I I I I I I
I I I I I


I I I I 1 I




I I I 1 I 1 I
POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT)): ___
FAVORABLE YEARS
NORMAL YEARS I
UI UNFAVORABLE YEARS I I I I I


S O IL IN T E R P R E T AT I O N S R E C O R D USDA-SCS
7-79
36 BAYBORO SANDY LOAM

THE BAYBORO SERIES CONSISTS OF VERY POORLY DRAINED SOILS ON NEARLY LEVEL PARTS OF THE LCWER COASTAL PLAIN. THEY HAVE
BLACK LOAM SURFACE LAYERS AND DARK GRAY AND GRAY VERY FIRM. SLOWLY PERMEABLE CLAY SUBSOILS.



I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI I I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS-
(IN.i| USDA TEXTURE UNIFIED AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
-I I I I-(PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 I 200 I INDEX I
O--181SL jSM-SC. SM, CL-ML. MLIA-4 I0 100 100 70-85 40-55 1 <30 INP--7
118-801CL. SC. C ICL. CH IA-7 I 0 1 100 100 85-100 55-95 I 40-70 120-40
I I I I I I

I I I
IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER |____ _
S 1I<2MM)I (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALI K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
I 0-s18 5-151l.45-1.65 I 2.0-6.0 I 0.11-0.15 14.5-5.5 LOW 1.15- I I 4-15I G I HIGH I HIGH
18-80135-6011.20-1.40 10.06-0.2 1 0.14-0.18 14.5-5.5 IMODERATE 1.321 I I
I I I i I lI I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
I- I DEPTH | KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I IfIN) I I (IN) I I(IN) I(IN) I I ACTION I
NONE I I I 0-1.OIAPPARENTIDEC-MAYI I I >60 I 1 0 I -

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL -
SEVERE-WETNESSPERCS SLOWLY II POOR-LOW STRENGTH.WETNESS
SEPTIC TANK I I
ABSORPTION I II ROADFILL
I FIELDS I II
I I II
I SLIGHT II IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
S SEWAGE I I
I LAGOON I II SAND I
AREAS I
I I II I
II SEVERE-WETNESS.TOO CLAYEY I IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SSANITARY I II
LANDFILL I II GRAVEL
(TRENCH) I I
I I II I
SSEVERE-WETNESS II I POOR-THIN LAYER.WETNESS
SANITARY III
LANDFILL I TOPSOIL
(AREA) II
I I II I
IPOOR-TOO CLAYEY.HARD TO PACK.WETNESS II
DAILY I II WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR II I SLIGHT
LANDFILL I I POND
I I II RESERVOIR
II AREA I
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT I I
ISEVERE-WETNESS II SEVERE-WETNESS
SHALLOW I EMBANKMENTS I
EXCAVATIONS I II DIKES AND I
I I II LEVEES I
I I II I
I SEVERE-WETNESS 1I I SEVERE-SLOW REFILL
DWELLINGS 1 J1 EXCAVATED I
WITHOUT II PONDS I
BASEMENTS IIIAQUIFER FED I

ISEVERE-WETNESS I I PERCS SLOWLY
DWELLINGS II
WITH III DRAINAGE I
BASEMENTS II 1
I I II I
SISEVERE-WETNESS I1 I WETNESS.PERCS SLOWLY
SMALL I II
COMMERCIAL I II IRRIGATION I
BUILDINGS I II
I I I I I
I SEVERE-LOW STRENGTHWETNESS Ij I WETNESS.PERCS SLOWLY
LOCAL I II TERRACES I
ROADS AND II AND
STREETS I DIVERSIONS
I II I
LAWNS. I SEVERE-WETNESS 11 WETNESS.PERCS SLOWLY
LANDSCAPING I II GRASSED I
SAND GOLF I II WATERWAYS I
FAIRWAYS I II I
II III

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I

II I


I


I W r_/YUKAO c I.-







36 BAYBORO SANDY LOAM USDA-S(
7-71
S____RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
SSEVERE-WETNESS I SEVERE-WETNESS
I I II
CAMP AREAS I I PLAYGROUNDS
I I
I I II
SSEVERE-WETNESS II SEVERE-WETNESS
I I PATHS
(PICNIC AREAS I AND
I I I TRAILS
I I_ __ I_
_ CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
I CAPA- I I 1 i
I ABILITY I I I I I I
I I I I I I I


:S

-I









I

I


I I I I II I













POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS/AC. DRY WT):
FAVORABLE YEARS
NORMAL YEARS
UNFAVORABLE YEARS I I I I
FOOTNOTES
1 TREES SHOULD BE PLANTED ONLY IN AREAS ADEQUATELY DRAINED.
*SITE INDEX IS A SUMMARY OF 5 OR MORE MEASUREMENTS ON THIS SOIL.


INRIRRRR.INIRR IIRR. NJIRR IRR. INIRR IR INRR IRR, INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIR IIRR.I


I 1 I





I I I I I1 I I I I I I


WOCDLAND SUITABILITY
ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS - |-_ POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
SYM IROSICNI EQUIP. SEEDLINGG WINDTH.1 PLANT COMMON TREES SITE TREES TO PLANT I
1-_ ____JHlAZARC LIMIT I MCRT'Y. HAZARD I COMPTI II I IINDX I I I
12w SLIGHT SEVERE SEVERE I ILCLCLLY PINE 195 SLASHH PINE 1/1
ISWEETGUM 194 *|LOBLOLLY PINE 1/1
I I I I ILASH PINE 95 ISWEETGUM
I IYELLOW-POPLAR I- |WATER TUPELO
I II |SOUTHERN RED OAK I-
I I I I1 WHITE OAK -


I I I I I I I I I I I




___ INDBREAKS
SPS_____ _S --SS I HTI_ SPEC IESa_ LHT SPECIES IHTI SPECIES IHT
NONE I|L L NI
IPN I I CP SLASH PINE 1I5 YSWEETGUM
















---I_ I I I I I I 1 1

IWILLIFF HABITAT SUITABILITY I
I_ POTENTIA FOR HABITAT ELEMENTSI POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FR: I
GRAIN GRASSS | WILD (HARDWD |CONIFERISHRUBS |WETLANDISHALLOW OPENLD |WOODLD 1WETLANDIRANGELD
SEED LEGUME HERBS I TREES PLANTS I PLANTS I WATER IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILLF
I I I I I I










I I I I I I I I I I

I PLANT PERCENTAGEG COMPCSIWTIOR (DRY WEIGHT) K
COMMON PLANT NAME I I I I I
S(NLSPN) I
I (NLSPN)


s


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD
052B BIGBEE FINE SAND, a TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


THESE SOILS CONSIST OF EXCESSIVELY DRAINED, DEEP SANDY SOILS ON LOW STREAM TERRACES. TYPICALLY, THEY HAVE DARK YELLOWISH BROWN SURFACE
LAYERS ABOUT 8 INCHES THICK AND YELLOWISH RED, YELLOWISH BROWN AND PALE SUBSURFACE LAYERS TO 80 INCHES OR MORE DEEP. THEY ARE FINE SAND
THROUGHOUT. SLOPES ARE 0 TO 5 PERCENT.


I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS ILIOUID IPLAS-I
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE UNIFIED AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3 PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I III I(PCT)I 4 I 10 1 40 1 200 I IINDEX I
S0-80 FS SP-SM A-3, A-2-4 0 100 100 80-95 5-20 1 NP
I I I II
I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I II
I I I I I I I1
IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IERDSIONIWIND ORGANICI CORROSIVITY
(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTERI i I
I I<2MMHl (G/CN31 I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I POTENTIAL XI T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
0-80 2-6 135-1.55 6.0-20 0.05-0.10 4.5-6.0 LOW I.171 5 2 1-5 I1Lw I MODERATE |
I I 1 i I I i I I 1 I 1 l
I I 1 I I i I I I
I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE 1HYDIPOTENT'LI
I_ I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) 1 i IIN) I I (IN) I I(IN) I(IN) 1. I ACTION I
COMMON I V. LONG I APR-SEP 1I 6.0 I I I I I >60 1 I I A I

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SEVERE-FLOODS GOOD
SEPTIC TANK I1
ABSORPTION I ROADFILL
FIELDS I II
I II I I
ISEVERE-SEEPAGE, FLOODS PROBABLE SOURCE
SEWAGE IlI I
I LAGOON 1 SAND
I AREAS I I
Il I
SSAN Y SEVERE-FLOODS, SEEPAGE, TOO SANDY IMPROBABLE SOURCE-TOO SANDY
SANITARY I
LANDFILL I GRAVEL
(TRENCH) I

SANITARY SEVERE-FLOODS, SEEPAGE POOR-TOO SANDY
SANI TARYO II
LANDFILL TOPSOIL
(AREA) I II

DAILY POOR-TOO SANDY, SEEPAGE WATER MANAGEMENT _
COVER FOR I II I
COVER FOR ISEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I II POND SEVERESEEPAGE
I_ I I RESERVOIR I
II AREA I
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II I
I Ii
SHALLOW SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE IEBANKNENTS ISEVERE-SEEPAGE
IEXCAVAIONS I I DIKES AND I
I! LEVEES
I I
SEVERE-FLOODS E SEVERE-NO WATER, CUTBANKS CAVE
I DWELLINGS V EXCAVATED
WITHOUT PONDS
I BASEMENTS I AQUIFER FED
I -I I1 I
I I II I
DWELLINGS SEVERE-FLOODS DEEP TO WATER
WITH I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I
II
SEVERE-FLOODS DROUGHT, FAST INTAKE, FLOODS, SOIL BLOWING
SMALL I
COMMERCIAL I IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I
I I II I I

LOCAL SEVERE-FLOODSTERRACES TOO SANDY, SOIL BLOWING
ROADS AND AND
STREETS DIVERSIONS
II I
LANDSCAPING MODERATE-FLOODS, DROUGHT GRASSED DROUGHT
AND GOLF II WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS II
__ II I

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I I I
I I I
I I I







052B BIGBEE FINE SAND, 0 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES

RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
SEVERE-FLOODS, TOO SANDY I SEVERE-TOO SANDY
II II I
CAMP AREAS IJPLAYGROUNDS
i I II I I

SEVERE-TOO SANDY II SEVERE-TOO SANDY
II PATHS I
PICNIC AREAS| AND
I I TRAILS
I I I __I
CCAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CLASS- ICAPA-- I BAHIAGRASS I I I I
DETERMINING I aBLITY I I I I I I i
PHASE (AUM) I I I I
I NIRRiIRRINIRR IIRR, INIRR JIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IRR. INRR IIRR. INIRR IIRRe.
IALL 3S 17.5 I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

I DET G S I I I I I IJT I I IC I T T

I I I I I I I. I I I I I I I I N I1
1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I 1 1 I I I I I
I I ssI IOIDI A MSI P I IV I I I I I







ALL 2S SLIGHT MODERATE MODERATE SLIGHT SLIGHT LOBLOLLY PINE 90 LOBLOLLY PINE
LS-1 I I I I I I 1E I I I I
I I I I I I I 1 1 i I




I I I I I I I I
WOODLAND SUIFE HABITABIIT Y -




S CLASS- I ORD MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS II POTENTIAL APRDUCTTVTY II
DETERMINING SYGIN EROSIONI EQUIP. SEEDLING WINDITH. PLANT I CANON TREES SITE TREES TO PLANT G
S PHASE 1 I HAZARD LIMIT MORTY. I HAZARD. I COMPE I IJNXI I
ALL 2S SLIGHT MODERATE MODERATE SLIGHT SLIGHT LOBLOLLY PINE









I 1 PHASE IE I S I I I S WATEI I ILOL ILD
I I I I I I I I I I i
I I I I I I I I I I I




I I I I 1 I I I I I
I P AII I l | I I
I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I









A L I I I I I I I I
S1 I I I I I I I
II I I I I I I I I
I I I I | I | I I I












POTCLASS- ENTI PLANT COMMUNITY RANGELA T. ENTS DESTROY POTENT AS HAtat FR
DETERMINING GRAIN &GRASS WILD HARDWD CONIFERSHRUCOMPOSITION ETLANDRY SHALLTMIOPEN BY CLASS DETERMINING PHASE








POTENTIAL PRODUCTION LS./AC. DRY WT)FAIR POOR POOR V.POOR V.POOR FAIR POOR V.POOR
I I I I I I I I I I

I NOR I I I I I
I I I I I I I I II
II II I I I I I I I


I N I I I I 1
I CLASS- I POTENTIAL FOR HABITATSELEDENTS I POTENTIALS HABITAT FOR i


























UNFAVORABLE YEARS
FOOTNOTES
I I I I 1 I I Y I I I I I I











TI EII I I

I II I





POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT'): I
FAVORABLE YEARS I I I .I II
I NORMAL "EARS I I I I I
I-- UNFAVORABLE YEARS "I i I I 5
FOOTNOTES


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD


USDA-SCS
12-78


12B BONNEAU-BLANTON COMPLEX. 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES
BLANTON PART
THE BLANTON SERIES CONSISTS OF MODERATELY WELL DRAINED NEARLY LEVEL TO STRONGLY SLOPING SOILS IN THE COASTAL PLAIN. IN A
REPRESENTATIVE PROFILE. THE SURFACE LAYER IS GRAY FINE SAND ABOUT 9 INCHES THICK. THE SUBSURFACE LAYER IS BETWEEN DEPTHS
OF 9 TO 58 INCHES AND 15 SUBDIVIDED INTO LAYERS OF LIGHT YELLOWISH-BROWN. VERY PALE BROWN AND WHITE SAND. THE SUBSOIL IS
BETWEEN DEPTHS OF 58 TO 85 INCHES OR MORE. IT IS PALE BROWN SANDY LOAM IN THE UPPER 4 INCHES; BELOW THIS IT IS PALE
BROWN AND LIGHT BROWNISH GRAY SANDY CLAY LOAM.
I _ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES "l
DEPTH I I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS (LIQUID PLAS- I
I(IN.)| USDA TEXTURE ( UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I (PCT) 4 I 10 I 40 I 200 1 IINDEX
0-521FS ISP-SM IA-3. A-2-4 I0 100 100 65-100 5-12 NP
52-801SCL. SL. FSL ISC, SM-SC. SM IA-4.A-2-4,A-2-6.A-6 0 100 100 69-95 25-50 12-37 3-20
I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I

IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I _
I 1<2MM)I (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT) STEEL CONCRETE
S0-521 2-7 11.35-1.60 j 6.0-20 I 0.03-0.07 14.5-6.0 I IVERY LOW 1.171 5 2 .5--1 1 HIGH I HIGH I
152-80112-3011.60-1.70 I 0.6-2.0 I 0.10-0.15 14.5-5.5 I LOW 1.321 I I
I I I l I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) I I (IN) I I(IN) ItIN) I I ACTION I
NONE I S1,0-6,0IPERCHEp IJAN-APRI -- I >60 I I -- L A -

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SSEVERE-POOR FILTER I I GOOD
SEPTIC TANK II
ABSORPTION I II ROADFILL
FIELDS J
I I I
SEVERE-SEEPAGE PROBABLE
S SEWAGE I
LAGOON I SAND
AREAS I
I I I. I I
SEVERE-TOO SANDY IMPROBABLE-TCO SANDY
SANITARY
LANDFILL GRAVEL
(TRENCH)

SEVERE-SEEPAGE POOR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY I
LANDFILL I TOPSOIL
AREA) I
SI I
POOR-TOO SANDYSEEPAGE I
DAILY WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL POND
_II RESERVOIR
I AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II
SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE SEVERE-SEEPAGE
SHALLOW I IIEMBANKMENTSI
EXCAVATIONS I DIKES AND
I I LEVEES
I I II
SSLIGHT II SEVERE-NO WATER
DWELLINGS I II EXCAVATED
WITHOUT II PONDS
BASEMENTS I IIAOUIFER FED
I -Ii I
SMODERATE-WETNESS II DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS I II
WITH I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS II
I I II I
SLIGHT I DROUGHTY.FAST INTAKE,SOIL BLCWING
SMALL II
COMMERCIAL II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I I
I I i I
SSLIGHT TOO SANDY.SOIL BLOWING
LOCAL I TERRACES
ROADS AND AND
STREETS DIVERSIONS
I I II I
LAWNS. I SEVERE-DROUGHTY II DROUGHT
LANDSCAPING I GRASSED I
AND GOLF I WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS II
I I II I

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I I I
I I I
I I I







21 BLANTON FINE SAND. 0 TL 5 PERCENT SLCPES


I I
CAMP AREAS I
I CAMP AREAS |
1 )


SmVERE-TCO SANCY


USDA-SCS
12-78


_________C_ f IQNALQ&VLLDPMENT __


II I SEVERE-TCO SANDY
I I
I PLAYGROUNDS I
1I
t l


SSVcRE-TCC SANDY ISEVERE-TOO SANDY
II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS I AND
I TRAILS
SI I
____ ___ __APABLITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE CF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CAPA- I CCRN SOYBEANS PEANUTS ] WATER- I TOBACCO IBAHIAGRASS I IMPROVED
ABILITY I MELONS I I IBERMUDAGR. I
I L (BU) ( BU) I (LBS) I (TONS) I (LBS) I (AUM) I (AUM) I
__ ____ J~NIRRIIRR. NIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. IIRR IIRR. (NIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIIRR IRR, NIRR IIRR. I
3S 1 60 I I 251 12200 1 1 12 1 12000 6.5 I I






O DNI 1 I I I I E I I I I T I I I




D POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I I I
SYM EROSION] EQUIP. SEEDLING| WINDTH. PLANT COMMON TREES SITEI TREIS TO PLANT
I HAZA I LIMIT I MCRTY. HaZAI I I CM INDEX I II
35 SLIGHT IMODEATEIMODERATE SLIGHT IMODERATE ISLASH PINE I80 ISLASH PINE
|LOBLOLLY PINE 180
I I I I I I I ILCNGLEAF PINE 170
I I I I I I I 1 1 I I I I I I






















S SPECIES I I I I I I ES I HI SPECIES I I

|JAPANESE PRIVET 1251
II I

























IHE I TRES IPAN I IPANTS I WAER IWIL ID IWID IWILDL
I I I I I I I I I
_____-____- PIENTIALNAL PLANT COMMUNITY (RAND SUITAB ITYRE UNDERSTORY
PI POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LjB_/AC DRY W)_ E L _CTIVIT
SSYM |EROSION EQUIP. ISEEOLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT T COMMON TREES SITEL TREES TO PLANT


J .IMT MRT AZAD COMPETE INXI

jP SLIGHT IMVEPATEIM O IRATE SLIGHT MOOERATEISLASH PINE 1O I SLASH PINE

























FAVORABLE YEARS
NORMAL YENAARS
SI I I P IS I S I I
























II I I ___ER NAVORBL I I I


















FOOTNOTES
I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I




I 1I1 1 I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
SI I I I II III I tII
I I 1 I I I I






I I I I I I I I I I I I I
FAI YEA S I I I I I I I I
IN M A SI I I I I I II


S OIL I N T E R P R E T A T IO N S R E C O R D USDA-SCS
12-78
12C BONNEAU-BLANTON COMPLEX, 5 TO 8 PERCENT SLOPES
BLANTON PART
THE BLANTON SERIES CONSISTS OF MODERATELY WELL DRAINED NEARLY LEVEL TO STRONGLY SLOPING SOILS IN THE COASTAL PLAIN. IN A
REPRESENTATIVE PROFILE. THE SURFACE LAYER IS GRAY FINE SAND ABOUT 9 INCHES THICK. THE SUBSURFACE LAYER IS BETWEEN DEPTHS
OF 9 TO 58 INCHES AND 15 SUBDIVIDED INTO LAYERS OF LIGHT YELLOWISH-BROWN. VERY PALE BROWN AND WHITE SAND. THE SUBSOIL IS
BETWEEN DEPTHS OF 58 TO 85 INCHES OR MORE. IT IS PALE BROWN SANDY LOAM IN THE UPPER .4 INCHES; BELOW THIS IT IS PALE
BROWN AND LIGHT BROWNISH GRAY SANDY CLAY LOAM,
I ___ ESTIMATED SJILE PROPERTIES I
DEPTH I I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS-I
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE 1 UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I I I(PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 I 200 I INDEX
I 0-49IFS ISP-SM IA-3. A-2-4 I 0 Itoo 100 65-100 5-12 I NP
I49-80oSCL. SL. FSL ISC. SM-SC. SM IA-4.A-2-4.A-2-6.A-6 0 I 100 100 69-95 25-50 12-37 3-20


S I I I I
IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULKI PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY | SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)J SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I_
_I <2MM)I (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCREITE
I 0-491 2-7 11.35-1.60 I 6.0-20 1 C.03-0.07 14.5-6.0 I IVERY LOW 1.171 5 I 2 1 .5-1 I HIGH I HIGH I
149-80112-3011.60-1.70 I 0.6-2.0 I 0.10-0.15 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.321 I I
I I I I 1 I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK SUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
S: I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) I (IN) I I(IN) )IIN I I 'I ACTION I
I NONE I I I5.0-6.OIPERCHED IJAN-APRI I I >60 I I IAI I

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SSEVERE-POOR FILTER II GOOD
SEPTIC TANK I II
ABSORPTION I I ROADFILL
FIELDS I
I I II I I
SEVERE-SEEPAGE PROBABLE
SEWAGE
LAGOON I SAND
AREAS
I II I
.SEVERE-TOO SANDY I I IMPROBABLE-TOO SANDY
SANITARY I
LANDFILL GRAVEL
(TRENCH)
I I' II I
SEVERE-SEEPAGE POOR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY
LANDFILL TOPSOIL
(AREA) II
i I II
POOR-TOO SANDY.SEEPAGE II
DAILY I II WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR I I SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL II POND
______ RESERVOIR
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II
SSEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE II SEVERE-SEEPAGE
SHALLOW I EMBANKMENTS
EXCAVATIONS II DIKES ANDI
I II LEVEES
I I II Ii
SLIGHT II SEVERE-NO WATER
DWELLINGS II EXCAVATED
WITHOUT I PONDS
BASEMENTS IIIAOUIFER FED

MODERATE-WETNESS II DEEP TO- WATER
DWELLINGS II
WITH I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS

SMODERATE-SLOPE I DROUGHTY.FAST INTAKE..SOIL BLOWING
S SMALL II
COMMERCIAL Ij IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I If
I I I 1
SI SLIGHT III TOO SANDY.SOIL BLOWING
LOCAL II TERRACES
ROADS AND I I AND
STREETS I DIVERSIONS I
i I II I
LAWNS I SEVERE-DROUGHTY II I DROUGHT
LANDSCAPING I II GRASSED I
AND GOLF I II WATERWAYS I
FAIRWAYS I II
IR III IIIN

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I I I

I I {






S O IL I N T E R P R E T A T I O N S R E C O RD USDA-SCS
12-78
20 BLANTON FINE SAND. 8 TO 12 PERCENT SLOPES


THE BLANTON SERIES CONSISTS OF MODERATELY WELL DRAINED NEARLY LEVEL TO STRONGLY SLOPING SCILS IN THE COASTAL PLAIN. IN A
REPRESENTATIVE PROFILE. THE SURFACE LAYER IS GRAY FINE SAND ABOUT 9 INCHES THICK. THE SUBSURFACE LAYEk IS BETWEEN DEPTHS
OF 9 TO 58 INCHES AND 15 SUBDIVIDED INTO LAYERS OF LIGHT YELLOWISH-BROWN. VERY PALE BROWN AND WHITE SAND. THE SUBSOIL IS
BETWEEN DEPTHS OF 58 TO 85 INCHES OR MORE. IT IS PALE BROWN SANDY LOAM IN THE UPPER 4 INCHES; BELOW THIS IT IS PALE
BROWN AND LIGHT BROWNISH GRAY SANDY CLAY LOAM,
I -ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI I I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS ILIOUID IPLAS-
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE 1 UNIFIED AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITY
S IJ_ I I I(PCT)l 4 I 10 I 40 I 200 I IINDEX I
0 -47IFS ISP-SM A-3. A-2-4 I O 100 100 65-100 5-12 NP
147-801SCL. SL, FSL ISC, SM-SC, SM IA-4,A-2-4.A-2-6.A-6 i0 100 100 69-95 25-50 12-37 3-20
I I I I
I I I I I I I I


IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA- | AVAILABLE I SCIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I
I 1<2MM)J (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALI K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
I 0-471 2-7 11.35-1.60 I 6.0-20 I 0.03-0.07 14.5-6.0 IVERY LOW 1.171 5 I 2 I .5-1 I HIGH I HIGH I
147-80112-301l.60-1.70 I 0.6-2.0 I 0.10-0.15 14.5-5.5 I LOW 1.321 I I I
I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I

I I I I 1 I I I I I
I I I

FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
S__I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I (IN) I I (IN) I (IN) I(IN) I I ACTION
NONE I I I5.0-6, 0PERCHED IJAN-APRI II >60 I I I I AI I

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SEVERE-POOR FILTER II GOOD
SEPTIC TANK I
ABSORPTION I ROADFILL
FIELDS I
II _I_ I
SEVERE-SEEPAGE.SLOPE PROBABLE
SEWAGE
LAGOON I SAND
AREAS
i I Ii
SEVERE-TOO SANDY I IMPROBABLE-TCO SANDY
SANITARY
LANDFILL GRAVEL
(TRENCH)
S I II
SEVERE-SEEPAGE II POR-TOO SANCY
SANITARY II
LANDFILL I TOPSOIL
(AREA) II
I II I
POOR-TOO SANDY.SEEPAGE
DAILY AFTER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR II SEVERE-SEEPAGE.SLOPE
LANDFILL I I POND
I ___II RESERVOIR
I AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT I
SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE II SEVERE-SEEPAGE
SHALLOW IIEMBANKMENTS
EXCAVATIONS II DIKES AND
II LEVEES

MODERATE-SLOPE II SEVERE-NO WATER
DWELLINGS II EXCAVATED
WITHOUT II PONDS
BASEMENTS IIAQUIFER FED I
I I II
MODERATE-SLOPE.WETNESS1 DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS II
WITH I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS II
I II II
SEVERE-SLOPE II DROUGHTY.FAST INTAKE.SOIL BLOWING
SMALL I1
COMMERCIAL II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I
I I II I
MODERATE-SLOPE II I SLOPE.TOO SANDY.SOIL BLOWING
LOCAL 11 TERRACES I
ROADS AND II AND I
STREETS I I DIVERSIONS
I I II I _
LAWNS. I SEVERE-DROUGHTY II I SLCPE.DRCUGHTY
LANDSCAPING I II GRASSED I
IAND GOLF I j WATERWAYS I
FAIRWAYS I II
I RI __ I I

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I I I
I I I
I I I


2C BLANTON FINE SAND, 5 TO 8 PERCENT SLOPES USDA-SCS
12-78
__RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
I SEVERE-TOO SANDY I SEVERE-SLOPE.TOO SANDY

CAMP AREAS PLAYGROUNDS
I I II I
_ II _
SEVERE-TOO SANDY ,I SEVERE-TCO SANDY
PATHS
PICNIC AREAS I AND
I TRAILS
I I_ II t
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE F CROPS ANC PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CAPA- CORN SOYBEANS PEANUTS I WATER- I TOBACCO IBAHIAGRASS I IMPROVED
ABILITY I MELONS I I IBERMUOAGR. I
I I (sLBU.- _- U LBS) I (TOS) I tLBS) AUM) I (AUM) _
I_ NIRRIIRR.INIRR II NI. j.RRJIRR. NIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR RIRR. INIRR J.RR..I
4S 50s 20 I 12000oo 10 11700 I 6.5 I I 7.5
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I


I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I


WCODLAND SUITABILITY
SORD ( MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
SYM I EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH. PLANT COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
I__ I HAZARD I LIMIT I MCRT'YI HAZARD I C IMPET.I INDX I I
3S SLIGHT MODERATEIMODERATE SLIGHT MODRATEISLASH PINE I80 SLASH PINE
LOBLOLLY PINE I80
ILONGLEAF PINE 170












____WINDBREAKS _
SI SPECIES IHTI SPECIE __ IHTI SPECIES I TI SPECIES IHTI
ISLASH PINE 1451LCBLOLLY PINE 145SSGUTHERN REDCEDAR 1401CAROLINA LAURELCHY I30o
IJAPANESE PRIVET 1251 I 1
I I I I I I
II I I I I I I


WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
I POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FCR:
GRAIN GRASSS &E WILD IHARDWD ICONIFERSHRUBS IWETLANDISHALLOW OPENLY IWOODLD WETLAND RANGELDI
I- .I _SEED ILEGUME ] HERB, I TREES PLANTS I PLANTS I WATER IWILDLF WILOLF WILLF ]WILDLFI
POOR FAIR FAIR POOR FAIR IV. POORIV. POCRI FAIR FAIR IV. POOR
I I I I I I I I I I
I I II I I




POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
PLANT I PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY EIGHT)
COMMON PLANT NAME SYMBOL I
SNLSPN) I I I I




I I I I I I I









POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT): I
FAVORABLE YEARS
NORMAL YEARS
UNFAVORABLE YEARS I I I
FOOTNOTES







2D BLANTON FINE SAND. 8 TO 12 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
12-78


---_-__---___ RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
SEVERE-TOO SANDY SEVERE-SLOPE.TOO SANDY

CAMP AREAS IIPLAYGROUNDS
II I
I SEVERE-TOO SANDY I SEVERE-TOO SANDY
I PATHS
PICNIC AREAS AND
TRAILS
CAPABILITY ANQ YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE -(HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
I CAPA- CORN SOYBEANS PEANUTS I WATER- I TOBACCO IBAHIAGRASS j IMPROVED
ABILITY I MELONS I I JBERMUDAGR.
SI (su) I (BU) I (LBS) I (TONS) I (LBS) I (AUM) I .(AUM I
-_ INIRRR R.INIRR IIRRL. NIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR.
4S I 150 I 1 20 12000 1 I10 1700 1 1 6.5 1 7.5

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 I I I 1 I I i i i I








~~~~W---- ---OODLAND SUITABILITY~_
ORD MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS POTNT L PROUTIVITY
SYM EROSION EQUIP. SEEDLING WINDTH. PLANT I COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
I HAZARD I LIMIT I MORT'Y. HAZARD I COMPETE. I INDEX I I
3S SLIGHT IMODERATEIMODERATE SLIGHT IMODERATEI SLASH PINE 180 SLASH PINE
LOBLOLLY PINE 180 I I
LONGLEAF PINE 170
I 4 I I 4 I I 4 4 I I 4



















W---------INDBREAKS
I __- FECES IHTLJ__ SPECIE S _HL I SPECIES IHTI SPECIES IHT
SLASH PINE 1451LOBLOLLY PINE 1451SOUTHERN REDCEDAR 140JCAROLINA LAURELCHY 1301
IJAPANESE PRIVET 125| |1
I I I I I II I I I
I II I I I I I I I I I I













-----WILDLIFE HABITATSUITABILITY
SMPOTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR:
GRAIN &IGRASS &I WILD tHARDWD ICONIFERISHRUBS IWETLANDISHALLOWIOPENLD IWOODLD IWETLANDIRANGELDI
I SEM o LEGUME I HERB. I TREES PLANTS I PLANTS I WATER IWILDLF WSITLLF IWILDLF IWILDLF I
SPOOR FAIR FAIR POOR I FAIR IV. POORYV. POOR FAIR FAIR IV. POOR -
L I I I MORT I HAZARD COETI IN I




POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND RI FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
PLANT I PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY-WEIGHT)}
COMMON PLANT NAME SYMBOL
S(NLSPN)I
4 4 4 I I I I I I I









































, POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT): ___
FAVORABLE YEARS I I
NORMAL YEARS
I UNFAVORABLE YEARS i I __
FOOTNOTES
I 4F 4 TNOT4 4


S O IL I N T E R P R E T A T I O N S R E C CRD


USDA-SCS
12-78


4B BLANTON-BONNEAU-SUSQUEHANNA COMPLEX, 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES
BLANTON PART
THE BLANTON SERIES CONSISTS OF MODERATELY WELL DRAINED NEARLY LEVEL TO STRONGLY SLOPING SCILS IN THE COASTAL PLAIN. IN A
REPRESENTATIVE PROFILE. THE SURFACE LAYER IS GRAY FINE SAND ABOUT 9 INCHES THICK. THE SUBSURFACE LAYER IS BETWEEN DEPTHS
OF 9 TO 58 INCHES AND 15 SUBDIVIDED INTO LAYERS OF LIGHT YELLOWISH-BROWN. VERY PALE BROWN AND WHITE SAND. THE SUBSOIL IS
BETWEEN DEPTHS OF 58 TO 85 INCHES OR MORE. IT IS PALE BROWN SANDY LOAM IN THE UPPER 4 INCHES; BELOW THIS IT IS PALE
BROWN AND LIGHT BROWNISH GRAY SANDY CLAY LOAM.
I _ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES I
IDEPTHI I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS- I
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEYE NG. LIMIT ITICITYI
I I II (I J(PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40o I200 I INDEX
0 -52 FS ISP-SM IA-3, A-2--4 0 1 100 100 65-100 5-12 I NP
152-801SCL, SL. FSL iSC. SM-SC, SM |A-4,A-2-4,A-2-6.A-6 0 1 100 100 69-95 25-50 12-37 1 3-20
I I I 4 I
I I I _II
IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT 1 DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I
I 1<2MM)I (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPGTENTIALI K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
I 0-521 2-7 11.35-1.60 1 6.0-20 I 0.03-0.07 14.5-6.0o IVERY LOW 1.171 5 I 2 .5-1 j HIGH I HIGH I
152-s8l12-3011.60-1.70 I 0.6-2.0 I 0.10-0.15 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.321 1 I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I 4
4 I 1 I I I I I I I

S I I I I I I I I I
I FLOODING HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK SUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
I_____I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
4 FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) I I (IN) I IIN)(I I(I I ACTION
NONE I I I5.0-6. PERCHED IJAN-APRI I I >60 I -1 A I

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SSEVERE-POOR FILTER I GOOD
SEPTIC TANK I
ABSORPTION 4 I ROADFILL
FIELDS I I
I I II I
I SEVERE-SEEPAGE I PROBABLE
S SEWAGE 4
S LAGOON I 4 SAND 4
S AREAS I
I II I
I SEVERE-TOO SANDY II IMPROBABLE-TCO SANDY
SANITARY I I
LANDFILL I II GRAVEL
(TRENCH) II
I I ____ I__
I SEVERE-SEEPAGE II POOR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY III
LANDFILL I I TOPSOIL
(AREA) I I
I I II I I
SPOOR-TOO SANDY.SEEPAGE II
DAILY I II WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR II SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I II POND I
I I t RESERVOIR I
II AREA I
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II I-_
I I SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE I SEVERE-SEEPAGE
S HALLOW IIEMBANKMENTS I
EXCAVATIONS I II DIKES AND I
I 1 II LEVEES I
II II I1
I SLIGHT II SEVERE-NO WATER
DWELLINGS I I EXCAVATED I
WITHOUT I II PONDS I
BASEMENTS I IIAQUIFER FED 4
I I I I I
I MODERATE-WETNESS 11 4 DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS I II
WITH Il DRAINAGE I
BASEMENTS I II
I I II I
SLIGHT II DROUGHTY.FAST INTAKE.SOIL BLOWING
SMALL II I
COMMERCIAL I II IRRIGATION I
BUILDINGS I II I.
I i III I--I
SSLIGHT II TOO SANDY.SOIL BLOWING
LOCAL II TERRACES
ROADS AND I II AND
STREETS II DIVERSIONS
I II I I
LAWNS. I SEVERE-DROUGHTY II DROUGHT
LANDSCAPING II GRASSED
SAND GOLF II WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS 1 II
I I I I

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I
I I I
I I I
I I I







48 BLANTON-8ONNEAU-SUSQUEHANNA COMPLEX, 2 TC 5 PERCENT SLOPES
BLANTON PART


USDA-SCS
12-78


____ ___ RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ____
SSEVERE-TCO SANDY I I SEVERE-TOO SANDY

CAMP AREAS I IIPLAYGROUNDS
SI
i IJ II I
SEVERE-TOO SANDY I SEVERE-TOO SANDY
II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS 11 AND
II TRAILS
I I II I ___
____ __CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE CF CROPS AND PASTURE (hIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
SCAPA- I CRN SOYBEANS PEANUTS I WATER- I TOBACCO ISAHIAGRASS I IMPROVED I
I ABILITY I MELONS I I IBERMUDAGR.
I I (BU) I (BU) | ( (LBS) I (TONS) I (LBS) I (JAM) ] (AUM),
I INIRRIIRR.INIRR IIRR. INIRR IRRI. NRR IRR INIRR INRR. INIRR RI.RR. NIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. I
s3 I I 60 25 12200 1 12 1 12000 I 6.5 8
I I I I I i I I I I I I I I I I I









WQCDLAND SU 1AP.LITY
ORD MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY

I SYM I EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
I I HAZARD I LIMIT I MORT-Y.1 HAZARD I CQMPET I iINDA
13S SLIGHT IMOOERATEIMODERATE1 SLIGHT IMODERATEISLASH PINE 18b SLASH PINE
I I I I I LOBLOLLY PINE 180
ILCNGLEAF PINE 170
I I I
























WINDBREAKS
I SPECIES IHTI SPEC I I I HTI SPECIES I HTI SPECIES IH I
ISLASH PINE I45LOLOLLY PINE 45IUTHERN REDCEDAR 1401CAROLINA LAURELCHY 130 I I I
IJAPANESE PRIVET 12 I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II











SI I I 1 _i I I I I
WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY -
IORD POTMAENTIA L FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR:VTY I

GRAIN IGHT IMODRAT WILD IRATE SIGHT FERMODERATES IETLASH PINE ALLOW PNLD SLASH PITLANDRANGLD
SEED ILEGUME HERB TREES IMPLANTS I IPLLLLANTS I WATER ILOLF F IWILF IL
POOR FAIR FAIR POR I FAIR PGLEAF PINERI FAIR 70FAIR IV R
I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I II











SI I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
























PLANT I PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DY WEIGHT) I
COMMON PLANT NAME SYMBOL
I I I NLSPN I I I














FAVORABLE YEARS I I I
INFORMAL YEARSBREAKS
I I ______SPECIES J|HT) SPECIES jNT__SPECIES HTl SPECIES LIHT
SLASH PINE 145|LOBLOLLY PINE |4SISOUTHERN REDCEDAR 40ICAROLINA LAURELCHY 130
|JAPANESE PRIVET 125 I
































SFAVRABLE YEARS I I I
S FOOTNOTES
WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY-
POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR: --
GRAIN GRASSS &| WILD IHARDWO 1CONIFERISHRUBS |WETLANDOSHALLOWIOPENLD IWOODLO |WETLANDIRANGELDI
I SEED ILEGUME I HERB. I TREES PLANTS I PLANTS I WATER IWILOL.F IWILOLF IMILDLF WILp.LF I
I POOR I FAIR I FAIR I POOR | FAIR IV. POORly. PCGRI FAIR I FAIR IV. POOR| |




--__ ___POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UJNOEpSTORY VEGETATION)-
PLANT I PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT) I
COMMON PLANT NAME SYMBOL I
I ( NLSPN) -













POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY IT):
FAVORABLE YEARS

UNFAVORABLE YEARS F OTNOT-I I
FOOTNOTES


USDA-SC
12-78


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD

48 BLANTON-BONNEAU-SUSOUEHANNA COMPLEX. 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES
BONNEAU PART


THE BONNEAU SERIES CONSISTS OF WELL DRAINED OR MODERATELY WELL DRAINED SOILS ON NEARLY LEVEL TO GENTLY SLOPING UPLANDS
OF THE COASTAL PLAIN. TYPICALLY. THESE SOILS HAVE THICK SANDY A HORIZONS OVER BROWNISH YELLOW AND YELLOWISH BROWN SANDY
LOAM AND SANDY CLAY LOAM BT HORIZONS.

1 ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
DEPTH I I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS- I
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE 1 UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. 1 LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I I I(PCT) 4 i 10 I 40 1 200 I INDEX I
0I-29IFS ISM IA-2 I 0 I 100 100 50-80 13-35 I NP
129-471SL. SCL ISC. SM-SC IA-2. A-6. A-4 I 0 I 100 100 60-90 30-50 21-37 I 4-14
147-80LSL, SCL. SC ICL. SC, SM-SC. CL-MLIA-4. A-6 I 0 I 100 100 60-95 36-60 20-40 4-18
I I I I I I I I

I i I I I I I I
.DEPTHICLAY MOIST SULKI PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL 1 SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I_
I 1<2MM)1 (G/CM3) 1 (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
I 0-291 2-1511.30-1.70I 6.0-20 I 0.05-0.11 14.5-6.0 I I LOW 1.15 5 I 2 I .5-2 I LOW I taiGHI
129-47118-35il.40-1.60 0.6-2.0 I 0.10-0.15 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.20 I I I
147-80115-4011.40-1.60 I 0.6-2.0 0.10-0.16 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.201 I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I

FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE_IHYDIPOTENT'LI
I__ DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) 1 I (IN) I I(IN) I(IN) I I ACTION
NONE I 13.S-S.OlIAPPARENTIDEC-MARI I I >60 I1 I A I -

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
MODERATE-WETNESS I I GOOD
SEPTIC TANK II
ABSORPTION I ii ROADFILL I
FIELDS I
SII I
SEVERE-SEEPAGE II IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE I I
LAGOON I SAND
AREAS 1|
I I II I
SEVERE-WETNESS IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SANITARY
LANDFILL I GRAVEL
(TRENCH)

MODERATE-WETNESS POOR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY
LANDFILL TOPSOIL
(AREA)
I I li I
GOOD I
DAILY I WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR II MODERATE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL II POND I
SI I_ RESERVOIR
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT -I
SMODERATE-WETNESS II I SLIGHT
SHALLOW 1 IIEMBANKMENTSI
EXCAVATIONS 1II DIKES ANDI
I1 LEVEES
II II I I
SLIGHT II SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS I I EXCAVATED
WITHOUT I PONDS
BASEMENTS I IIAQUIFER FEDI
I II I
MODERATE-WETNESS II I DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS II
WITH II DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS
i I II II
SLIGHT I I DROUGHTYFAST INTAKE.SLOPE
I SMALL I II I
COMMERCIAL I IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I II
I I II I I
SSLIGHT II I SOIL BLOWING
LOCAL II TERRACES
ROADS AND I AND
STREETS II DIVERSIONS

LAWNS MODERATE-DROUGHTY DROUGHT
LANDSCAPING I GRASSED
AND GOLF II WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS I I
I I E II IRP
REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I I I
I I I







4B BLANTON-BONNEAU-SUSQUEHANNA COMPLEX. 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES USDA-SCS
BONNEAU PART 12-78
RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
SEVERE-TOO SANDY SEVERE-TOO SANDY

CAMP AREAS IIPLAYGROUNDSI

I I II I I
SEVERE-TOO SANDY I SEVERE-TOO SANDY
II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS I AND
SI 11 TRAILS
I I II I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
SCAPA- I CORN I TOBACCO I COTTON I SOYBEANS *IBAHIAGRASS I IMPROVED
ABILITY I I LINT I 1 IBERMUDAGR.
SI (SBUL) (LB) (S) BS I (BU) I (AUN) I (AUM) I
I INIRRIIRR.INIRR IRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IRR. INIRR IRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. I
I2s 1 s 851 12600 1 1700 130 1 8 8.51










RD MANAGEME PROBLEMS POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I I I I
SYM EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI INOTH. PLANT COMMON TREES SITE I TREES TO PLANT
-I I HAZARD LIMIT I MORT'YI HAZ I I I I MPT INX
2S I SLIGHT I IIODERATEMOERAT SLIGHT I I ILOBLOLLY PINE 95 ILOBLGLLY PINE
I LONGLEAF PINE I 75 ILONGLAF PINE
II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I




















NONE
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I














WILDLIFE HABITATSUITABILITY
POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS I PTNPTIAL AS HABITATFBPY
GRAIN GRASSS &I WILD IHARDWD ICONIFERISHRUBS IWETLANDISHALLCWlOPENLD IWOODLD IWETLANDIRANGELDI
I SQI EROSION E UIHERB. TREES PLANTS I PLANTS_ W PATER IWILDLF IWILDLF IlLOLF IWTILLFT
GOOD GD I GOOD I GOOD GOOD POOR POOR GOOD I GOOD POOR



COMMON PLANT NAME SYMBOL
II I (N 1 I I I I I



LITTLE BLESTEM ANSCI I I I I
*IPANICUM PANIC 8
IPINELAND THREEAWN ARST5 8
ITOTAC I EGRSS CTA 17





I I I I I I M HLY MUHLE
1SWITCHGRASS PAVI 8
LARGE HOLLY ILCO 12
UNKNOWNS U IUU 13
I I I I I I I I I




















I NAVO I I I I I 95


















S_______________ FOOTNOTES ________________
N I I I I I I I I








LT_____TLE__U__T__NC2A_____UVA Y I T 9IJITABILIT

"S [LD UMAIC 8H TRFS PLANTS PLANT WATER WILDF WILLF WILF WILOF
N TOOD GNCOD |TGOOD I 8GOOD 1O00 | POOR IPOOR IGOOD 10000 IPOOR -
T I I I I I I I I I I I I


I I I I I I I I I I I I
POKNTIUAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
COMMON PLANT NAME B A SYMBOL R N I T I

LITTLE LUESTEM ANSC2 I 0 I I I
NPANICUM PANIC I 2 I I I I

NPANELAN DETHREEAW N ARST5 I 5 I I I I


S O I L INTERPRETATIONS RECORD

4B BLANTON-BONNEAU-SUSQUEHANNA VARIANT COMPLEX, 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES
SUSQUEHANNA VARIANT PART

THE SUSQUEHANNA VARIANT SERIES CONSISTS OF SOMEWHAT POORLY DRAINED, ACID, UPLAND SOILS. TYPICALLY, THESE SOILS HAVE GRAY FINE SAND
SURFACES 5 INCHES THICK AND LIGHT GRAY FINE SAND SUBSURFACES, AT A DEPTH OF 13 INCHES IS PALE BROWN CLAY WITH GRAY MOTTLES OVER
YELLOWISH RED CLAY UNDERLAIN BY LIMESTONE AT 55 INCHES,


I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES A)
IDEPTHI I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS- I
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
II I I IPCT)i I I I I 40 1200 I INDEX
0-13 FS SP-SM, SM A-3,A-2-4 0 100 100 65-85 15-30 NP
13-55 C MH A-7 0 100 100 100 50-80 40-50 14-20
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND ORGANIC CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)ICPCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITY REACTIONItMMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I__
IJ 1<2MMI IsG/C3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALI K l T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
S0-13 5-12 1.50-1.55 16.0-20.0 0.50-0.10 4.5-5.5 LOW 35 .5-2 HIH I HIGH
11355 50-80 1.25-1.50 <0.06 0.12-0.18 I 4.5-6.5 I MODERATE 321 I -
I l I I II I i I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I

FLOODING I HIGH ATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE 1HYDIPOTENT.LI
I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) 1 I I(IN) I I (IN) I-j(IN) IIN) I I ACTION I
NONE >6 1 I 55 IRIPPABLE I I I D I D

SANITARY FACILITIES (B) CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL (B)
I II I I
SEPTIC TANK I SEVERE-PERCS SLOWLY I I POOR-LOW STRENGTH, THIN LAYER
ABSORPTION I I ROADFILL I
FIELDS I I

I J IMPROBABLE SOURCE-THIN LAYER, EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE i MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK
LAGOON I II SAND
AREAS I II

I I IMPROBABLE SOURCE-EXCESS FINES, THIN LAYER
SANITARY I SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, TOO CLAYEY j
LANDFILL II GRAVEL
S(TRENCH) I

SII SEVERE-THIN LAYER
SANITARY I MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK II
LANDFILL I II TOPSOIL I
I (AREA) I II
I II I
I I II
DAILY I POOR-TOO CLAYEY, HARD TO ROCK | WATER MANAGEMENT (B) _
COVER FORL I P MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK
S LANDFILL I if POND I
I I RESERVOIR I
I AREA I
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT (B) II I
SMODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK, TOO CLAYEY IEMBANKNENTS SEVERE-HARD TO PACK :
I SHALLOW I IEMBANKW NTS I
IEXCAVAtIONS I I DIKES AND I
I II LEVEES I
i II I I
DWELLINGS MODERATE-SHRINK-SWELL I AV SEVEREDEEP TO WATER
I DWELLINGS I!I EXCAVATED I
WITHOUT | I PONDS
BASEMENTS I I(AGUIFER FED I I
I I II I I

DWELLINGS MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK, SHRINK-SWELL DEEP TO WATER
WITH I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I II
Il _ .-- II l j
I II I
SMALL MODERATE-SHRINK-SWELL j FAST INTAKE, PERCS SLOWLY
COMMERCIAL I IRRIGATION
I BUILDINGS II I
I I II II
LOCAL MODERATE-SHRINK-SWELL, LOW STRENGTH TERRACES PERCS SLOWLY
I ROADS AND | II AND I
STREETS II DIVERSIONS I

LAWNS. I GI I I
LANDSCAPING SLIGHT GRASSED PECS SLOWLY
IAND GOLF I II WATERWAYS I
FAIRWAYS I II
I-- I I I I
REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I I I
I II







4B BLANTON-BEJNNEAU-SUSQUEHANNA VARIANT COMPLEX, 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES
SUSQUEHANNA VARIANT PART

_____ RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (B)
SEVERE-PERCS SLOWLY II SEVERE-PERCS SLOWLY
I I II
SCAMP AREAS I I PLAYGROUNDS
SII I

SSEVERE-PERCS SLOWLY I I SLIGHT
SI PATHS
PICNIC AREAS I AND
I II TRAILS

CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT) (C)
CLASS- CAPA- I
DETERMINING 1 ABILITY
PHASE I I I I I I I I
SINIRRIIRRIRRNIRR IIRR. INIRR JIRR. IIRR IRR. NIRR IIRR IIR I NRR IIRRI. NRR IIII RR. NIRR IIRR.
ALL
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I



I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1

I I I I I 3 I I 3 3
I fi
I I I I I I I I I

,_-IWOODLAND SUITABILITY (D)
S CLASS- I ORD IM MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
I DETERMINING ISYM I EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT I COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
i PHASE I I HAZARD I LIMIT MORTSY.I HAZARD.I COMPETE IINDXI I
IALL I3C SLIGHT MODERATE SLIGHT SLIGHT MODERATE LOBLOLLY PINE 80 LOBLOLLY PINE
1 SLASH PINE 90 SLASH PINE











W INDBREAKS
.CLASS-DETERMIN'G PHASE] SPECIES HT| SPECIES., HTI SPECIES IHTI SPECIES JHTJ
I I I I I I I I I I
3 I I 3 I I I I I I I

I II I I 1 1 I I I I

I 3 3 I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I











,_WMILDL-IFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
CLASS- POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL. AS HABITAT FOR:
DETERMINING GRAIN 6|GRASS &I WILD HARDWD ]CONIFERISHRUBS |WETLAND|SHALLOWIGPENLD IWOODLD iMETLANDIRANGELD
S PHASE I SEED ILEGUMEI HERB.I TREES PLANTS I PLANTSS I .WATER IWILOLF IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF
I 1 I 3 I 3 II I I I I







I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I II I I I









POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)-
PLANT PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT) BY CLASS DETERMINING PHASE
SI (N I (I LPN)














POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT):

NORMAL YEARS
I UNFAVOABLE YEARS
FOOTNOTES
A BASED ON TEST DATA OF TYPICAL PEDON FROM COLUMBIA COUNTY, PL.
B ESTIMATES BASED ON NATIONAL SOILS HANDBOOK NOTICE 24 3/31/78.
C YIELD ESTIMATES NOT AVAILABLE
D RATINGS BASED ON SOIL SURVEY INTERPRETATIONS FOR WOODLAND PROGRESS REPORT W-1, JULY 1968.
SITE INDEX FIGURES REPRESENTATIVE QF MEASUREMENTS IN COLUBTR A COUNTY FL,
I~~~~ 3





















*SITE INDEX FIGURES REPRESENTATIVE QF MEASURIEMjENTS IN COLUYBJA COUNTY? IL,


S O IL I NT E R P R E T A T I O N S R E COR D

28 BLANTON FINE SAND. 0 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


USOA-SCS
12-78


THE BLANTON SERIES CONSISTS OF MODERATELY WELL DRAINED NEARLY LEVEL TO STRONGLY SLOPING SOILS IN THE COASTAL PLAIN. IN A
REPRESENTATIVE PROFILE. THE SURFACE LAYER IS GRAY FINE'SAND ABOUT 9 INCHES THICK. THE SUBSURFACE LAYER IS BETWEEN DEPTHS
OF 9 TO 58 INCHES AND 15 SUBDIVIDED INTO LAYERS OF LIGHT YELLOWISH-BROWN. VERY PALE BROWN AND WHITE SAND. THE SUBSOIL IS
BETWEEN DEPTHS OF 58 TO 85 INCHES OR MORE. IT IS PALE BROWN SANDY LOAM IN THE UPPER 4 INCHES; BELOW THIS IT IS PALE
BROWN AND LIGHT BROWNISH GRAY SANDY CLAY LOAM.
I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES I
IDEPTHI I I FRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS ILIQUID IPLAS- I
I(IN.)| USDA TEXTURE UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. LIMIT ITICITYI
S-I I (PCT)1 4 I 10 I 40 I 200 1 INDEX I
0-521FS ISP-SM IA-3. A-2-4 1 0 1 100 100 65-100 5-12 I NP
152-801SCL. SL..FSL ISC. SM-SC. SM IA-4.A-2-4,A-2-6.A-6 1 0 3 100 100 69-95 25-50 12-37 1 3-20

I I I I I I I I
II I I I

IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK) PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSICNIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
.I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHDS/CM)I SWELL FACTORS EROD.IMATTER I__
S I1<2MM)I (G/CM3S I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL CONCRETE
0-521 2-7 11.35-1.60 I 6.0-20 I 0.03-0.07 14.5-6.0 IVERY LOW 1.171 5 I 2 I .5-1 1_ HIGH I HIGH I
152-80112-3011.60-1.70 1 0.6-2.0 1 0.10-0.15 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.321 I I
I I I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENC IHYDIPOTENT*LI
I I DEPTH 3 KIND MONTHS jDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS 1 (FT) I I ](IN) I II IN) I I IN) ( JI I I ACTION I
l NONE I 1 15.O-6.0OPERCHED JAN-APRI I I >60 II I I A I I

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SEVERE-POOR FILTER 3 GOOD
SEPTIC TANK I
ABSORPTION R ROADFILL
FIELDS I
I I I
SSEVERE-SEEPAGE I PROBABLE
SEWAGE II
LAGOON' SAND
AREAS .

SEVERE-TOO SANDY I IMPROBABLE-TCO SANDY
SANITARY
LANDFILL I GRAVEL
(TRENCH)
I- I II I
SSEVERE-SEEPAGE POOR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY II
LANDFILL 3 TOPSOIL
(AREA)

SPOOR-TOO SANDYSEEPAGE
DAILY I II WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR I I SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I POND
I I II RESERVOIR
S AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II
SSEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE I SEVERE-SEEPAGE
SSHA "LOW EMBANKMENTS
WtCCAVATIONS I II DIKES AND
I LEVEES
I I II I I
SISLIGHT SEVERE-NO WATER
DWELLINGS I I EXCAVATED
WITHOUT II PONDS
BASEMENTS IIAQUIFER FED
I I II
IMODERATE-WETNESS I I DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS II
WITH II DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS II
.3 I II I I
I SLIGHT DROUGHTY.FAST INTAKE.SOIL BLOWING
SMALL I
COMMERCIAL 3 IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I
3 I II I ___ _
SSLIGHT TOO SANDY.SOIL BLOWING
LOCAL II TERRACES
ROADS AND I AND
STREETS. DIVERSIONS

LAWNS. I SEVERE-DROUGHTY A3 DROUGHT
LANDSCAPING II GRASSED I
AND GOLF I WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS I I
R QNI II I NTERPRETAT
REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS

I I_ I








4C 5L.NTCN-bONNEAU-SUSOUEHANNA COMPLEX, 5 TC 8 PtRCENT SLOPES
SLANTCN PART


USOA-SCS
12-78


----- ------------------.. B-B--le-IIAL_BEL-MeBMI- __ _--
4 SEVdRL-TOO SANDY I| SEVERE-TOO SANDY
I 4I I
CAMP ARLAS I PLAYGROUNDS

-- --------- - - ----- --- -------- - -------- ---- --_-_-_--- -- ----
ScVaRS-TO.O ANDY | ScVERE-TOO SANDY
II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS II AND
II I TRAILS
------------------------------------ -- ------------------------I--------- -- --- ---I
-......--- - ---- cA-----A- AY _FO__.eJSii.sBi sANf..eAUURE tiT5_JJIa_LEVj~MANAGgiiF.&U__.---
I CAPA- I CCRN I SOYeEANIS PEANUTS I WATER- I TOBACCO IBAHIAGRASS I IMPROVED
ABILITY I I I I MELONS I I IBERMUDAGR.
-...------.....J--_-Ju)- .--- --L_.-Al_---_-TLSl_ _Ls---11 __l_---I-LA MlI __LAB.L __l
35 60I I 25 I z12200o 12 I 2000 6.5

I 4 I I I 4 I I 4 I I I I I I 4
I






---------- -....-.....-..-.......

wRO --- --- -----~iEf-BflSa-_-__~ilBl~~A-fC^IVY
I YM ROSION QUIP. IS EDLING WINDTH. PLANT I I I C REES ITE TREES TO PLANT

3S SLIGHT IMOO4 RAT4IMOORATE SLIGHT IMO RATE LASH PINE 80I I SLASH PIN
SI I ILBLOLLY PINE 180
1 I I LCGL AF PINE 170 I











------------- ----- -----_I---cta __ui__~acsll~ii~ZiEiiiZi~lZmsnSm~
SLASH PINE 1451LOBLOLLY PINE 14.S | SCUTHERN REDCEDAR |401CARLLINA LAURELCHY 1301
I JAPANESE PRIVET 251 I 1 I
I I I I I I II I I I
I 4 I 4 I I I I
















--------- ------- --T------ --BBl -asiMs -n -^^^^^^n ^^_
I-_ _--------- E---i ------l----- ---
1GRAIN &IGRASS &l WILD IMARDWO ICONIFER-SHRUBS IW| TLANOISHALLOWIOPENLD IWOOOLO WCTLANDIRANGELD
--------- --------l- SBlia -- -_----- I~____~fi!lA_ll^.J^~e.-a.~L-l~~L
SPOUR FAIR FAIR I POOR I FAIR IV. PORMV.O PCR| FAIR ITFAIR IV. POOR
I I I I II LI I I






















----- -L-G-----T----eM- ---------A-i-M-IBSLGHT fiERiifiisi iPiNE I OISLASH PIN
PLANT -- I I LIY PN8 I
I I I I I I I I








I I I I I I I I
I I I I 4 I I 4 I I











COMMON PL NT NA SYMBOL

FA--O Y=- ~ ~ 1 ~L _------ ----------------- -- --
PLLEYTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRARAALHY WT):D30

FAVORAL Y ARS I I II










NORMAL YARSI I I
. - I ... - -I . .

-----------T-------------------------------------T1 -S


USDA-SCS
12-78


S O I L I N T E R P R Z T T I O N S R d C C R O

4C BLANTON-BONNEAU-SUSQUEHANNA COMPLEX, 5 TO 8 PERCENT SLOPES
BONNEAU PART


THE BONNEAU SERIES CONSISTS OF WELL DRAINED OR MODERATELY WELL DRAINED SOILS ON NEARLY LEVEL TO GENTLY SLOPING UPLANDS
OF THE COASTAL PLAIN. TYPICALLY, THESE SOILS HAVE THICK SANDY A HORIZONS OVER BROWNISH YELLOW AND YELLOWISH BROWN SANDY
LOAM AND SANDY CLAY LOAM BT HORIZONS.


-. -.. .. .....--.. ..... .-IB II_ p_ I ....... .....- __ - 1
DEPTH I I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS- I
I(IN.)| USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED | AASHTO |>3 INI _THAN_ __"PASS INGSg.V N. I LIMIT ITICITYI

I 0-29IFS SM IA-2 I 0 o100 100 50-80 13-35 I NP
129-471SL. SCL SC, SM-SC IA-2,. A-6, A-4 I C 100 100 60-90 30-50 4 21-37 4-14
47-s80SL. SCL, SC JCL. SC, SM-SC, CL-MLIA-4, A-6 a ooU 100 60-95 36-60 4 20-40 4-18


IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULKI PERMEA- 4 AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY 4 SHRINK- I5ROSIOGNWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHGS/CM)I SWELL I|FALIMIEROD.IMATTER I
I____ SMIIi/Ca-__ILi ti_____ Njj____________IEII......... -------P---I aILA __J-l-I_1 El--_EIsCIIJI __ Ci.l
I 0-291 2-15ll.30-1.70 I 6.0-20o o0.05-0.11 4.5-6.0 LCW .15s I a I 2 .5-2 2 __L __L IGHI
129-47118-351.40-.60o I 0.6-2.0o I o0.10-0.15s 4.5-5.5 I LOW 1.201 | I I
147-80115-4011.40-1.60 I 0.6-2.0 0.10-0.16 14.5-5.5 s- LOW I.z0o_ ___ I
I I I .I I I I I I
I I I I I I I 4 I I
I FLOODING I __ i L(iATiAfiLE____4L.gM NTbp PA _I._ ,BUCL__ 2ggL i _IHYD POTENT LI
I_____ DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARONESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT .TOTALIGRPI FROST I
I _-..__ S_ -.-....... ....__- 3I-L=S..i.PE4EiUiJ.DC- _ti J--__ .J--. -__L _J-._" -

SANaTARYjACIL 5TCONZIRMOiJCTlN MATIIAL_ _
I MODERATE-WETNESS 4 GOOD
SEPTIC TANK I 14
I ABSORPTION I II ROAOFILL
I FIELDS I II
-- ---------------------- ---------1- .-_----
SEVERE-SEEPAGE IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE I II I
LAGOON SAND
AREAS
I I__________--------______ ____-____
I SEVERE-WETNESS II I IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SANITARY I II
LANDFILL GRAVEL I
(TRENCH)

I MODERATE-WETNESS IPOER-TOO SANDY I'
SANITARY I
LANDFILL I I TOPSOIL
(AREA) 4 I I

I GOOD I
DAILY I gATE. MANggNT .
I COVER FOR I I MODERATE-SEEPAGE
I LANDFILL I POND
II.--.-.---- .-.-_-_--_-_- 1 RESERVOIR
1 AREA
BUILDING SITIEgVFlE.MF_ 11 NT-
S, MODERATE-WETNESS I SLIGHT
SHALLOW I IIEMBANKMENTS I
EXCAVATIONS I II DIKES AND
I II LEVEES

SLIGHT SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS EXCAVATED
WITHOUT I PONDS
BASEMENTS I I AQUIFER FED I

MODERATE-WETNESS 4 DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS
WITH DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS

I LIGHT ~ 4 DROUGHTY.FAST.INTAKE.SLOPE
SMALL I II I
. COMMERCIAL I 4 IRRIGATION I
BUILDINGS I II

I SU.IGHT 1 1 SOIL BLOWING
LOCAL I I TERRACES I
I ROADS AND I 4I AND I
I STREETS I II DIVERSIONS I

LAWNS. I MODERATE-OROUGHTY I DROUGHT
LANDSCAPING I II GRASSED 4
AND GOLF I I WATERWAYS I
FAIRWAYS I II 4
IIONAL INTERPRETATIONS I
REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I I 1
I I I
I I I







4C BLANTON-BONNEAU-SUSQUEHANNA CCMPLX,. 5 TO 8. PERCENT SLUPES
BONNEAU PART


USOA-SCS
12-78


SSEVERE-TCO SANDY I I SI =VR-TOO SANDY
t I I I
I CAMP AREAS I I PLAYGROUNDS I
I I I1
I --- -- --------
I I SEVERE-TOO SANDY II SVERE-TOO SANDY
SI PATHS
PICNIC AREAS II AND I
I I II TRAILS

86I81611-^I1 iINlil^^iELD 858-& Bi^E-E- i98--o--iZt - I-- ---------------- _
I CAPA- I CORN TOBACCO COTTON I SOYBEANS IBAHIAGRASS I IMPROVED I I
I ABILITY I LINT I I BEAMUDAGR. I I
I I----- __LI-i___J._ __L.i__ ___Si.__..I___i I__ ...__miU1i___-iUl-.,l-------
2S 1 185s 12600 1 1 7001 130 1 8 8.51 1*1







I RD I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

SYM EROSION EQUIP. SEEDLING WINOTH. I PLANT CCMMN TREES SITEI ITR TO PLANT.
S____I__ I I I I I I I I I I I I
2S I SLIGHT I I I ODERATEMODERATE SLIGHT I I ILOBLOLLY PINE I 95 L I PINE
SLONGLEAF PINE 75 I I I I I LONGLEAF PINE I I
_I i I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

















-1-ZZZ-__ --I-_-__-___ --W---gH--- T aH----- T---T--- - --------------------------'------
--------- 1J...-l .l.2LlBi.LT AB ....efl.TI--------------- -- -1ASH JECB











GRAIN GRASSS I\ E ILD HARDWN I CONIFERISHRUBS P WETLAND I SHALLCWN IPENL ITWODLD WETLANDIRANELDI
I I I I I I I I F I










GOOD GOOD GOOD GI I I I I I I I GOOD POOR
I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I











PLANT I I I I I IPERCENA ICO O I ITJ
COMMON PLANT NAMI I I I I I I I I

IPINELAND THREEAWN ARST I I I 1 I I I I
I I ITOOTHA I I I I I I I I
IMUHLYI I I I I I 1 I I 25
SWITCHGRASS PAV2 8I
LARGE HOLLY ILCO O 12

















POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT): I
NORMAL YEARS 1200
1_ __________-EA2AlB.F. YEAR i--25aIS--922_1------- ---- I------:----1 -----------
I I







U........ AN S .W.ILDLF 1W IL 1LF LDLF

NOI I II I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I

I PLANT I I I i
COMMON PLANT NAME I SYMBOL
LITTLE BLUESTEM ANSC2 I I I
APANICUM G PANIC I 8 I I T I I
IPINELAND THREEAWN I ARST5 I 8 I I R
TOTHACHEGRASS CTAR 1 I I
IM Y SMUHLE 25 I I I


IVIAI I I I I I I
I I I10II I I I

I I IPANT I .ER.ENTAG IIZN IDRL ...... I





FOOTNOTES


S O IL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD
40C BLANTON-BONNEAU-SUSQUEHANNA VARIANT COMPLEX, 5 TO 8 PERCENT SLOPES
SUSQUEHANNA VARIANT PART


I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPEgTIES (A) I
IDEPTHI I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS- I
(IIN.)I USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 IN THAN 3 PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITVI
I I I IIPCT)I 4 1.. 10 I 40 I 200 _1IINDEXI
I I I I I I I I I
0-13 PS ISP-SM, SM 1 A-3, A-2-4 I 0 100 100 65-85 15-30 I NP
j13-55 C MH IA-7 I 0 I 100 100 100 50-80 I 40-50 14-20
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I
i 4 I I 4 I 4. 4________
IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND JORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)](PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY (WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONItMMHOS/CM)i SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I _
I 1<2MM)N (G/CM33 I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PHI I POTENTIAL X I T IGROUPI (PCTI I STEEL CONCRETE
I 0-13 I 5-121 1.50-1.55 1 6.0- 20.0 10.05-0.10 I 4.5-5.5 1 I LOW 1.35 1 I- .5-2 I HIGH 1 HIGH 1
113-55 i 50-801 1.25-1.55 s <0.06 10.12-0.18 14.5-6.5 I IMODERATE 1.32 I | |
I I I I i I I i J I I I
I I J I* I 1 I I I I
I I I I i I

FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE 1HYDIPOTENT'LI
UID I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FTJ I I I(IN) I I (IN) I I(IN) J(IN) I I ACTION I
I NOl 4I I I > 6 4 1 I 155 IRIPPABLE I I ID 1I
SANITARY FACILITIES (B) CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL (B)
I SEVERE-PERCS SLOWLY I POOR-LOW STRENGTH, THIN LAYER
SEPTIC TANK I I4
I ABSORPTION 1 4I ROADFILL
I FIELDS I I
I 1 II
II5-7%: MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK, SLOPE iI I IMPROBABLE SOURCE-THIN LAYER, EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE 7-8%: SEVERE-SLOPE 1 S
I LAGOON I SAND
AREAS I I
I iI
SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, TOO CLAYEY IMPROBABLE SOURCE-EXCESS FINES, THIN LAYER
SANITARY I I|
LANDFILL I I GRAVEL
(TRENCH) I

MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK SEVERE-THIN LAYER
I SANITARY I I 4
LANDFILL I TOPSOIL
(AREA)I I I
SIII I
IPOOR-TOO CATEY, HAD TO ROCK IB
DAILY CLAEY HAD TO ROCK WATER MANAGEMENT (B) -- -__
COVER FOR POND MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK, SLOPE
__ I |I RESERVOIR
11 AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT (B) II
SHALLOW MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK, TOO CLAYEY EMBANKMENT SEVERE-HARD TO PACK
SHALLOW IEMBANKMENTS V
EXCAVATIONS I|I DIKES AND I
i 1 LEVEES I

DMELLINGS MODERATE-SHRINK-SWELL EXCAVATED EVR-DEP TO WATER
I WITHOUT | I PONDS I
I BASEMENTS r|I AQUIFER FED
I ____________ -.JJ :II. I--
DWELLINGS MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK, SHRINK-SWELL DEEP TO WATER
WITH |I DRAINAGE I
BASEMENTS II I

SMALL MODERATE-SHRINK-SWELL, SLOPE 1 FAST INTAKE, 'PERCS SLOWLY, SLOPE
COMMERCIAL II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I

.LOCAL MODERATE-SHRINK-SWELL, LOW STRENGTH TERRACES PERCS SLOWLY
ROADS AND 4I AND
STREETS I DIVERSIONS
I I I _____I
I LAMNS. I GI I
LANDSCAPING SLIGHT Ii GRASSED 4PERCS SLOWLY
I AND GOLF 1 I WATERWAYS I
I FAIRWAYS I I
RI LII *II
---- REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS -- ____
I I I
I I I

I I I








S IL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD

10B BONNEAU FINE SAND. 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


__ RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (B)
SEVERE-PERCS SLOWLY 5-6%: SEVERE-PERCS SLOWLY
S S l A 6-8%: SEVERE-PERCS SLOWLY, SLOPE
SCAMP AREAS I PLAYGROUNDS I
I II I
I I II I
I SEVERE-PERCS SLOWLY II I
II I PATHS SLIGHT
PICNIC AREAS 11 AND
SI TRAILS |

CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT) (C)
CLASS-I CAPA- I I I I I I
DETERMINING 1 ABILITY A A I 1 A I
PHASE I i I I I I I I I
_I NIRRAIRR.INIRR IIRR. INIRR JIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR 1 IRR. INIRR IIRR. INIR IIRR. I




SA1 I I I I I I I i I I I A A A I I
AI I6E I 1 A 1 I I I I I A










DETERMINING SYM EROSION EUIP. SEEDLING WIDTH. PLANT COMMON TREES ISITE] TREES TO PLANT
I I 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I I








ALL 3C SLIGHT MODERATE SLIGHT SLIGHT MODERATE LOBLOLLY PINE 80 LOBLOLLY PINE
SLASH PINE 90 SLASH PINE











__ ---------________________WINDBREAKS _____ Z----------------------
AI PHASI I I I I l SCII I T
I I I I J I I 1 1 I








I II I I I I I I I
SI I











WOODLAND SUITA ABILITY ()Y
S CLASS- I ORD MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTEIVIT I I
I DETERMINING I SYM I EROSION E UIP. SEEDLINGWD COINDTHI LANT ELANCOMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLAANT
S PHASE I SEEDHAZARD LIMIT MORES I HAZARDNTS PLANTS OPE IINDXI






A I A I I I I I I
S I I I I I
I I I I I 1 I I I I A









A SE I PLANT I SIRCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT) BY CLASS DETERMINING PHASE II
IC N P T I I I I IMI




II I- I I I I I I I
I I 1 1I I I A I
SI I I I I I I I
SI I I I A I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I


































POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (L6S./AC. DRY Wf: _



A BASED ON TEST DATA OF TYPICAL PEDON FROM COLUMBIA COUNTY, FL
B ESTIMATES BASED ON NATIONAL SOILS HANDBOOK NOTICE 24 3/31/78. S I E
D RATINGS BASED O SOIL SURVEY INTERPRETATIONS FOR OODLA D PROGRESS REPORT W-lS I JULY 1968.SIE I
I I 1II II I II
I I I I I I IA I
I I I AI I I II
I I I I I I I II
I I I l I I J IiI
I I I I I i I I I !
I I I I I I I I I
II I I I I I I A





I I I I I I I l
S CLASS- I POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS I ,POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FO l I



I I I I I I I I I !
I I I I I I I I
I I I I A I I I i1 I I
A I I I I I I I i1 I
POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
I PLANT J PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT) BY CLASS DETERMINING PHASE
COMMON PLANT NAME I SYMBOL I iI
II IN n I I I I I
I I A I I I I





FAVORABLE I J





I NORMAL YEARS I I I I
SUNFA AB YEAR I I I
I I I I I








A BASED ON TEST DATA OF TYPICAL PEDON FROM COLUMBIA COUNTY, FL
B ESTIMATES BASED ON NATIONAL SOILS HANDBOOK NOTICE 24 3/31/78.
C YIELD ESTIMATES NOT AVAILABLE
D RATINGS BASED ON SOIL SURVEY INTERPRETATIONS FOR WOODLAND PROGRESS REPORT W-1 JULY 1968.


USDA-SCS
12-78


THE BONNEAU SERIES CONSISTS OF WELL DRAINED OR MODERATELY WELL DRAINED SOILS ON NEARLY LEVEL TO GENTLY SLOPING UPLANDS
OF THE COASTAL PLAIN. TYPICALLY. THESE SOILS HAVE THICK SANDY A HORIZONS OVER BROWNISH YELLOW AND YELLOWISH BROWN SANDY
LOAM AND SANDY CLAY LOAM BT HORIZONS.

I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES I
IDEPTHI I | IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS-
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE 1 UNIFIED i AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I IA l(PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 I 2001 IINDEX
A0-29IFS ISM |A-2 I 1100 100 50-80 13-35 I NP
A29-47|SL. SCL 1SC. SM-SC IA-2, A-6, A-4 I' 0 100 100 60-90 30--50 21-37 A 4-14
A47--80SL. SCL. SC )CL. SC, SM-SC. CL-MLIA-4. A-6 I0 100 100 60-95 36-60 1 20-40 4-18
A I I I I I A

IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY A SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONA(MMHOS/CM)A SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER IA IA
S I1<2MM)1 (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALl K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
S0--291 2-1511.30-1.70 6.0-20 1 0.05-0.11 14.5-6.0 1 LOW .15) 5 A 2 A .5-2 1 LOW A HIGH A
129-47118-35A1.40-1.60 0.6-2.0 I 0.10-0.15 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.20) I I 1
147-80115-4011.40-1.60 1 0.6-2.0 1 0.10-0.16 14.5-5.5 1 A LOW i.201 A I I
I I I I I I I I I I
A I I I I A1 I A I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE JHYDIPOTENT'LI
S_____ DEPTH A KIND |MONTHS IDEPTHIHARONESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALGRPI FROST A
A FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) I I (IN) I I(IN) |(IN) i I ACTION A
I NONE I I 13.5-5.OIAPPARENTIDEC-MARI I I >60 I I|- A AI A A
___SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
A MODERATE-WETNESS I I GOOD
ASEPTIC TANK I I1
ABSORPTION II ROADFILL
S FIELDS I I
I I AA
I SEVERE-SEEPAGE If IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE 11
S LAGOON II SAND
S AREAS I

SSEVERE-WETNESS I I IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SANITARY II
LANDFILL A II GRAVEL
(TRENCH) I II

MODERATE-WETNESS A A POOR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY ) II
LANDFILL IIA TOPSOIL *
(AREA) I Al A
I I I I I
GOOD II
S DAILY I IA WATER MANAGEMENT
A COVER FOR I| MODERATE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I POND
A AI RESERVOIR I
IA AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II I
SA MODERATE-WETNESS 1 I SLIGHT
SSHALLOW A IJEMBANKMENTS I
AEXCAVATIONSI II DIKES AND I
III LEVEES I
I I II I
SI SLIGHT II SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS I II EXCAVATED
WITHOUT A II PONDS
BASEMENTS I IJAQUIFER FED I

SMODERATE-WETNESS Ii I DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS II I
S WITH I I DRAINAGE I
BASEMENTS I I
I I II I
I SLIGHT II I DROUGHTYFAST INTAKE.SLOPE
SMALL II
COMMERCIAL ] II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I II
I I II I
A SLIGHT II A SOIL BLOWING
LOCAL ] TERRACES I
ROADS AND I I AND I
STREETS I I DIVERSIONS I
I I II I
LAWNS. I MODERATE-DROUGHTY II DROUGHT
LANDSCAPING I II GRASSED
AND GOLF A II WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS I I
A I AA


iCIUA I IrCCCIIn
I I I1
i A I
I I I


40 BLANTONa ONNEAUTSUSqUEHANNA YA4XANT COMPLEX, 5 to 8 PERCENT SLOPES
SUSQUEHANNA VARIANT PART






lOB BONNEAU FINE SAND. 2 TC PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
12-78


RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
SEVERE-TOO SANDY I SEVERE-TOO SANDY

CAMP AREAS I PLAYGROUNDS
II
SEVERE-TOO SANDY 1 SEVERE-TCO SANDY
S PATHS
PICNIC AREAS I AND
I1 TRAILS
1 II I I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACE OF CROPS ANDPASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
I CAPA- I CORN j TOBACCO 1 COTTON I SLYBEANS IBAHIAGRASS | IMPROVED
I ABILITY I I LINT I I IEERMUDAGR.
I I (sU) l LBS) I (LBS) I (BU) I (AUM)LI (AUM) I I
I ____NIRRIIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR, INBR IIRR. INIRR IIRR INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR.I
2S 1 85 12600 1 700 I I 30 1 1 8 1 8.5 1
I I I I I I I I


I I I 3 3 I | | | | I I | |
I | | I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I 3 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I


WOODLAND SUITABILITY
ORD j MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
ISYM I EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT I COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
I I I HAARD I LIMIT I MORT'Y.I HAZARD I COMPET.I IINOXI
12S SLIGHT IMODERATEIMODERATE SLIGHT LOBLOLLY PINE 195 LOBLOLLY PINE
SI I ILONGLEAF PINE 175 ILONGLEAF PINE
I I I I J I I I 1 I











WINDBR AS_.
I I ECIES ITI SPECIES HTI SPECIES ITI SPECIES
NONE I 1 I I I
II I I I I I I I I









WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY~
I POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR:
GRAIN GRASSS &I WILD |HARDWD |CONIFER(SHRUBS I WETLANDISHALLOWIOPENLD IWOODLD 1 WETLANDIRANGELDI
I SEED ILEGUME I HER TREES PLANTS IIPLANTS I AFTER IWILOLF IWILDLF IWILOLF IILDLF
GOOD GOOD GOOD GOOD I GOOD j POOR POOR GOOD I GOOD I POOR -
I J I I 1 I I I
I III I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I














II I I I II

POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
PLANT I PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION DRY WIGHT) I
COMMON PLANT NAME I SYMBOL
I I I I I NLSPN)
LITTLE BLESTEM ANSC2 9
IPANICUM PANIC 8
IPINELAND THREEAWN ARST5 8
|TOOTHACHEGRASS CTAR 17
IMUHLY MUHLE 25
ISWITCHGRASS I PAVI2 B
LARGE HOLLY ILCO 112
|UNKNOWNS UUUu 1 13
I I I I I I I I



























POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT)E L FL A H F
FAVORABLE YEARS 1 50I
NORMAL YEARS 1200
I UNFAVORBLE YEARS 950 I
FOTNOTES


S O IL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD
10C BONNEAU FINE SAND, 5 TO 8 PERCENT SLOPE


THESE ARE MODERATELY WELL DRAINED SOILS ON NEARLY LEVEL TO GENTLY SLOPING UPLAND RIDGES OF THE COASTAL PLAINS. THEY HAVE GRAYISH BROWN FINE SAND
SURFACES UNDERLAIN BY LIGHT YELLOWISH BROWN AND YELLOW FINE SAND SUBSURFACE LAYERS. AT DEPTHS OF 20 TO 40 INCHES IS BROWNISH YELLOW LOAMY SAND
UNDERLAIN BY YELLOWISH BROWN SANDY LOAM AND SANDY CLAY LOAM TO DEPTHS OF 80 INCHES. SLOPES RANGE FROM 5 TO 8 PERCENT.



I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES I
IDEPTHI I I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS ILIQUID IPLAS- I
IlIN.)I USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED ) AASHTO |>3 INI THAN 3 PASSING SIEVE NO. LIMIT ITICITYI
I I |I IlPCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 I 200 I INDEX
0_29 I Fs II II
0-29 F SP-SM A-2-4, A-3 0 100 98-100 65-85 15-35 NP
29-47 SLL SC, SM A-2, A-4, A-6 0 100 98-100 80-95 31-49 21-40 8-25
47-80 SL, SCL, SC SM-SC, SC A-4, A-6 0 100 100 80-98 40-65 21-40 8-25 :
I I 1 I I I I I
I I I I I I I
IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND JORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN (PCT I DENSITY i ABILITY IMATER CAPACITYIREACTIONJ MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORI EROD.IMATTER I
I I<2MM) IfG/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALI IK T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCKETE
I 0-291 I 6.0-20 I 0.05-0.08 14.5-6.0 I I LOW 1.20 I 5 I I LO I HIGH. I
1 29-471 1 2.0-6.0 I 0.08-0.12 14.5-5.5 I LOW 1.20 I I I
I 47-801 1 1 0.6-2.0 1 0.10-0.14 I 4.5-5.5 I 1 LOW .20 1 I J _
I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I II I I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIOENCE 1HYDIPOTENTILI
-I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I tiIN Ij(I ) I (IN) I(IN) I I ACTION I
I NONE I I 4-6 IPERCED IAPR-JUNE1 1>60 I I I IA I I

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
MODERATE-WETNESS I GOOD
SEPTIC TANK 1 II |
I ABSORPTION I I ROADFILL
FIELDS II
I 1 II I I
5-7%: SEVERE-SEEPAGEII I IMPROBABLE SOURCE-EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE 7-8%: SEVERE-SLOPE, SEEPAGE I
LAGOON I I SAND
AREAS I J
I I II
SI SLIGHT IMPROBABLE SOURCE-EXCESS FINES
SANITARY I
LANDFILL I GRAVEL
(TRENCH) I
i I II I
SEVERE-SEEPAGE I POOR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY II
LANDFILL | TOPSOIL
(AREA) I I
I I II
SPOOR-TOO SANDY, THIN LAYER
DAILY I WATER MANAGEMENT_
I COVER FOR PD SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL II POND
S.I II RESERVOIR
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT I I
SSEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE j SEVERE-SEEPAGE
SHALLOW I I3EMBANKMENTS I
EXCAVATIONS I I DIKES AND
II II LEVEES
I II ___
N SLIGHT SEVERE-NO WATER
DWELLINGS I EXCAVATED
WITHOUT II POtB
BASEMENTS IJ IAQUIFER FED
I II I ,
DWELLING MODERATE-WETNESS DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS |I
WITH I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I
I II
SMALL MODERATE-SLOPE FAST INTAKE, DROUGHT, SLOPE
COMMERCIAL I IRRIGATION
I BUILDINGS I
I I i I
I SIGH II SOIL LOWING
LOCAL SLIGHT I TERRACES SOIL NG
ROADS AND | AND
STREETS I DIVERSIONS
II i- I- _
LAWNS. I II I
LANDSCAPING SLIGHT GRASSED DROUGHT
AND GOLF I I WATERWAYS I
FAIRWAYS II
SIj II I I

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I
I I I
I I I
I I__I







10C BONNEAU FINE SAND, 5 TO 8 PERCENT SLOPE


SO IL I NTERPRETAT I O N S RECORD

12B BONNEAU-BLANTON COMPLEX. 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES
BONNEAU PART


RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT __
SEVERE-TOO SANDY I 5-6%: SEVERE-TOO SANDY
ICP A S PS 6-8%: SEVERE-TOO SANDY, SLOPE
I CAMP AREAS PLAYGROUNDS
I I II I

SEVERE-TOO SAND I SEVERE-TOO SANDY
IIII PATHS SE -T0SAY
PICNIC AREAS I AND I
SITRAILS
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
ECLASS- CAPA- I I CORN TOBACCO SOYBEANS PEANUTS i 1 PASTURE
DETERMINING j ABILITY I I I I I I
PHASE I (BU) (LBS)BS) (B) (AUM)
NIRRIIRR.INIRR IaRR. INIRR JIRR. INIIR IRR. LINIR NIRR RR. NIRR R INI IIRR. INIRR IIRR. I
SI I I I I I I 1
ALL 3 70 12100 20 2500 7.5

7







CLASS---------- ---ORD------ MANAGE--WOODLAND SUITABILITY 6_____________"-
I CI IMT P S I POTENTIAL R TIVITY
i I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I
1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1






I PAl- I H IL I MT II M I I HAZARD I I OMET..


ALL 3S SLIG MODERATE DERATE LOBLOLLY PINE LOBLOLLY PINE
II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I









I I ION I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

-i I I I
ALL 3S SLIGHT MODERATE MODERATE LOBLOLYPIEG 82 LOBLOLLY PINEO





I I I I I I I I I I



1 ]
I] I II I I I I I








I I P I I I I O I I I

I I I I I IA I I II

1 I I .I I I II I
S------- -- -- ----I I I
SEtDl IEO HABITAT STABILITY R
DETERMINING GRAIN & GRASS SI WILD C HARDWD ]CONIFER"SHRUB 1 ETLAND|SHALLODIOPENLD 1MOODLD (IWTLANDIRANGCBD

ALL FAIR GOOD GOOD GOOD GOOD V. POOR IV. POOR I GOOD I GOOD V. POOR I
I IN I I I I I I







FLOWERING DOGWOOD COFL2










POTENTIAL PRODUCTION FAVORABLE YEARS I I
I I I I i I I II II I 1





















UNFAVORABLE YEARS __
L L FOOTNOTESND OR FOREST UN
PLANT I PIERCE TAGE COMPOSITIONS DRY IEGHT) BYCLASS DETERIlNING PHASE I
COMMON PLANT NAME ISYEBOL I
I I I I I I I
AInRICAN HOLLY ILOPI












POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS I/AC DRY PT): P
FAVORABLE YEARS I


FOOTNOTES


THE BONNEAU SERIES CONSISTS OF WELL DRAINED OR MODERATELY WELL DRAINED SOILS ON NEARLY LEVEL TC GENTLY SLOPING UPLANDS
OF THE COASTAL PLAIN. TYPICALLY, THESE SOILS HAVE THICK SANDY A HORIZONS OVER BROWNISH YELLOW AND YELLOWISH BROWN SANDY
LOAM AND SANDY CLAY LOAM BT HORIZONS.


I--- ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS-I
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO._ LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I II(PCT)l 4 I 10 I 40 I 200 1 INDEX
I 0-29IFS ISM IA-2 G I 100 100 50-80 13-35 NP
129-471SL. SCL ISC, SM-SC IA-2. A-6. A-4 0 I 100 100 60-90 30-50 21-37 4-14
147-80OSL. SCL, SC ICL, SC. SM-SC. CL-MLIA-4. A-6 0 I 100 100 60-95 36-60 20-40 4-18

I I I I ii
IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULKI PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY SHRINK- IEROSIGNIWIND IoRGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I___
1 1<2MM)I (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I_ POTENTIALI K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
I 0-291 2-1511.30-1.70 1 6.0-20 I0.05-0.11 14.5-6.0 I LCW .1515] I 2 I .5-2 ILOW I HIGH I
I29-47118-3511.40-1.60 I0.6-2.0 1 0.10-0.15 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.201 I I
147-8015-4011.40-1.60 0.6-2.0 I 0.10-0.16 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.201___ l_
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I
I J II I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEORCCK SUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT.LI
I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARONESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
I FREQUENCY I / DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I IKIN) I I (IN) I ((IN) I(IN) I I ACTION
I NONE I I 13.5-5.01APPARENTIDEC-MARI I I >60 I I I A I -

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SMODERATE-WETNESS II GOOD
SEPTIC TANK
ABSORPTION II ROADFILL
FIELDS
i I II
SEVERE-SEEPAGE IIMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE I
LAGOON SAND
AREAS
I I I_
SEVERE-WETNESS II I IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SSANITARY II
LANDFILL GRAVEL
(TRENCH) I
i II I -
MODERATE-WETNESS POCR-TOO SANCY
SANITARY
LANDFILL TOPSOIL
(AREA)
I II I
GOOD
DAILY II WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR II I MODERATE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL II POND
SI _II RESERVOIR
I AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT I I
MODERATE-WETNESS II SLIGHT
SHALLOW IIEMBANKMENTSI
EXCAVATIONS II DIKES AND I
II LEVEES
I I II I -
S SLIGHT II SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS II EXCAVATED
WITHOUT PONDS
BASEMENTS IIAQUIFER FED I
i I II I
MODERATE-WETNESS II DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS
WITH II DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS II
i I II I
SLIGHT II DROUGHTY.FAST INTAKE.SLOPE
SMALL II
COMMERCIAL II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS
I I II I
SLIGHT Ii SOIL BLOWING
LOCAL II TERRACES
ROADS AND II AND
STREETS I II DIVERSIONS
II I-I I
LAWNS. I MODERATE-DROUGHTY I DROUGHT
LANDSCAPING GRASSEDI
AND GOLF I II WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS I II

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS I
REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS


USDA-SCS
12-78


I _I






128 BCNNEAU-BLANTON COMPLEX, 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES
BONNEAU PART


USDA-SCS
12-78


___~___~~___RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT~_7-
SEVERE-TOO SANDY II SEVERZ-TGO SANDY
I II I
CAMP AREAS I IIPLAYGROUNDS I
I I
I ___ I ~ _11_ i
SEVERE-TOO SANDY SEVERE-TOO SANDY
PATHS
PICNIC AREAS II AND
TRAILS

CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACR GF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
SCAPA- CORN I TOBACCO I COTTON I SOYBEANS IBAHIAGRASS I IMPROVED I
I ABILITY I I I LINT I I IBERMUDAGR. I
I I (BU) __ (LBS J___.LBS) I (BU) I (AUM) I (AUM) I
INIRRIIRR.INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IRR. INIRR |1RR.
I2S 1 85 126001 700 1 1301 I 1 8.5










WOODLAND SUITABILITY
ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY |
SYM EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.1 PLANT COMMON TREES SITE TREES TO PLANT
I HAZARD I LIMIT I MGRTIY., HAZARD I COMPETE. In I IDX
S SLIGHT MODEATEMOERATE SLIGHT LOBLLLY PINE 19 I I ILOBLOLLY PINE
LONGLEAF PINE 75 ILONGLEA PINE












--- HLAND53EAKS____T_______________________HABITAT____ABILITY
I I
II O1 I A P LM I I I OI




I I I I I I I I I








COM LWLDLAN HABITAT SUITABILITY
POTENTIAL CR HABITAT ELEMENTS POTENTIAL S HABITAT FOR
IGRAIN IIGRASS I I L 1 WETLANDIRANGE
I I I I I I 3
I I HEEA U HERB. I TREES IP II I IIWILDL I



GOOD GOOD I GOO GOOD I I POOR POOR GOOD GOOD POOR



I O E I O I O I I I
I I I II I I I
I I I I I I 1 I I I
I I I I I I I


LITTLE II II I LUESTEM ANSC2 9I









|PINELAND THREEAWN ARSTS 8
ITOOTHACHEGRASSI CTAR 17

ISWITCHRASS PAVI2 8
LARGE HOLLY ILCO 1 12 |
|UNKNOWNS UUUU 1 13
I I I I I I II
FOOPOTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS I PSTTIAL AS HABITAT FOR: I
I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I II
II I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I

SI PLANT P PERCENTAGE COMPOSTING (DRY WEIGHT)




MAINLAND THREEAWN ARST5 8 B I I I I I
TOTHACHEGRASS CTAR 217














FOOTNOTES


USDA-SCS
12-78


128 BONNEAU-BLANTON COMPLEX. 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES
BLANTON PART


THE BLANTON SERIES CONSISTS OF MODERATELY WELL DRAINED NEARLY LEVEL TO STRONGLY SLOPING SGILS IN THE COASTAL PLAIN. IN A
REPRESENTATIVE PROFILE. THE SURFACE LAYER IS GRAY FINE SAND ABOUT 9 INCHES THICK. THE SUBSURFACE LAYER IS BETWEEN DEPTHS
OF 9 TO 58 INCHES AND 15 SUBDIVIDED INTO LAYERS OF LIGHT YELLOWISH-BROWN. VERY PALE BROWN AND WhITe SANC. THE SUBSOIL IS
BETWEEN DEPTHS OF 58 TO 85 INCHES OR MORE. IT IS PALE BROWN SANDY LOAM IN THE UPPER 4 INCHES; BELCW THIS IT IS PALe
BROWN AND LIGHT BROWNISH GRAY SANDY CLAY LOAM.
I ________ESTIMATED SIL PROPERTIES
DEPTH I I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS ILIOUID IPLAS-I
(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NG. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I 1 I (PCT) 4 I 10 LJ 40 I 2Q00 _I
0-521FS ISP-SM IA-3, A-2-4 0 I 100 100 65-100 5-12 I NP
52-80 SCL, SL. FSL ISC. SM-SC. SM IA-4.A-2-4,A-2-6.A-6 O 0 100 100 69-95 25-50 | 12-37 I 3-20

S I I I I I I I

II I II I __________L ___ -___ I
IOEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULKI PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
(IN.) I (PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITY REACTION (MMHOS/CM) I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD. I MATTER ___________
I 1<2MM)l (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALI K I TGROUPJ (PCT) STEEL ICONCRETEI
I 0-521 2-7 11.35-1.60 1 6.0-20 I 0.03-0.07 |4.5-6.0 IVERY LOW 1.171 5 | 2 I .5-1 I HIH I HLGH _
152-80112-3011.60-1.70 0 0.6-2.0 .10-.15 14.5-5.5 I LOW .2
I I I I I I I I I I i ___I
I I I I I I I I
I I I I I 1I .I I
I I I I I I I I
FLOODING 1 HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT*LI
I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIOEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) I I (IN) I __(N) I(IN) I I ACTION I
I NONE I -_ JSI .0-6.0 PERCHED IJAN-APRI I I >60 I I -I __I__ _LA --I

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SEVERE-POUR FILTER II GOOD
SEPTIC TANK II
ABSORPTION I ROADFILL
FIELDS I I 1
I I II I_
SEVERE-SEEPAGE II I PROBABLE
SEWAGE I
LAGOON II SAND
AREAS I
I _____I ___II__ I___________ _________
SEVERE-TOO SANDY I IMPROBABLE-TCO SANDY
SANITARY I
LANDFILL I GRAVEL
(TRENCH) I
II -_ _
SEVERE-SEEPAGE I POOR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY
LANDFILL TOPSOIL
(AREA) I

POOR-TOO SANDY.SEEPAGE
DAILY I I .- WATER MANA-GEMENT
COVER FOR I SIVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I POND
-__ ..II RESERVOIR
I AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT
ISEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE I SVERc-SeEPAGE
I SHALLOW I IIEMBANKMENTS I
EXCAVATIONS I II DIKES AND I
II LEVEES
I ________ L.. .. _____---1
SLIGHT I SEVERE-NC WATER
DWELLINGS EXCAVATED
WITHOUT PONDS
BASEMENTS I AQUIFER FEC I
--I ________---1 ----- ----- I
MODERATE-WETNESS II DEP TC WATER
DWELLINGS
WITH I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS
I I _.____ L- L __ ------ -----__
SLIGHT DRCUGHTY.FAST INTAKE.SCIL BLOWING
SMALL
COMMERCIAL I IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I I
I I __I _
SLIGHT TOC SANDYSCIL BLOWING
LOCAL I TERRACES
ROADS AND I AND
STREETS DIVERSIONS

LAWNS. SEVERE-DROUGHTY I DROUGHT
LANDSCAPING I GRASSEDI
AND GOLF WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS


SREGICNAL INTERPRETATIONS____






12B BONNEAU-BLANTON COMPLEX, 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES
BLANTCN PART


USDA-SCS
12-78


-- _- BRECRETIONALL DEVELOPMENT __
I SEVERE-TOO SANDY II SEVERE-TOO SANDY
I 1I
CAMP AREAS I PLAYGROUNDS
SI I I
I I I I
SSEVERE-TOO SANDY II SEVERE-TOO SANDY
II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS AND
II TRAILS
I II I I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
SCAPA- I CCRN SOYBEANS PEANUTS WATER- TOBACCO IBAHIAGRASS J IMPROVED
ABILITY I MELONS I IBERMUDAGR.
I I (BU) I (6U) I (LBS) I (TONS) I (LBS) I (AUM) 1 (AU1M
INIRRIIRR.INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR JIRR. NIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR.L
3 S 60 I 25 2200 12 2000 6.5 1 8


I
I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I
SI I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I


OwOODLAND SUITABILITY
IORD IR MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
SYM EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.1 PLANT COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
I I --- HAZARD 1 LIMIT I MORT'Y.I HAZARD I COMPET.I IINDXl
13S SLIGHT IMODERATEIMODERATEI SLIGHT MODERATE SLASH PINE 180 ISLASH PINE
LOBLOLLY PINE 180
ILCNGLEAF PINE 170
I-
I I I I I I I 1

I I I I I I I I i I i








------WINDBREAKS
I SPECIES IHTI SPECIES TI ISPCIES IHTI SPECIES IHTI
ISLASH PINE 145JLOBLOLLY PINE 45S UTHERN REDCEDAR I40 CAROLNA LAURELCHY I30
IJAPANESE PRIVET 25
1 I I I I I 1 I
I I I I I i
I II II I I I Ii
I I I I I I I I I








_W----ILDLIF _HABIEATK SUITABILITY
I POTENTIAL FOR HABTAT ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR:
GRAIN EIGRASS &I WILD IHARDWD ICONIFERISHRUBS IWETLANDISHALLOWIOPENLD IWOOOLD IWETLANDIRANGELDI
I SEED_ ILEGUME I HERB.2 _jES IMPLANTS I IPLANTS I WATER IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF
I POOR FAIR FAIR POOR I FAIR I -- V. PCORlV. POCRI FAIR I FAIR IV. POOR -
I III I I I I I
S I I I I I I I I

IR I I I I I I I II I

I I I II I I I I I


POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
G PLANT I PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT)
COMMON PLANT NAME i SYMBOL
-- --__ I(NLPN) I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I















FAVORABLE YEARS I I I I
NORMAL YEARS
I UFAVORBLE YEARS I I
FOOTNOTES


SOIL INTERPRET T IONS RECORD

12C BONNEAU-BLANTON COMPLEX, 5 TO 8 PERCENT SLOPE
BONNEAU PART


THESE ARE MODERATELY WELL DRAINED SOILS ON NEARLY LEVEL TO GENTLY SLOPING UPLAND RIDGES OF THE COASTAL PLAINS. THEY HAVE GRAYISH BROWN
FINE SAND SURFACES UNDERLAIN BY LIGHT YELLOWISH BROWN AND YELLOW FINE SAND SUBSURFACE LAYERS. AT DEPTHS OF 20 TO 40 INCHES IS BROWNISH
YELLOW LOAMY SAND UNDERLAIN BY YELLOWISH BROWN SANDY LOAM AND SANDY CLAY LOAM TO DEPTHS OF 80 INCHES. SLOPES RANGE FROM 5 TO 8 PERCENT.


I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS ILIOUID IPLAS-I
IIIN.)! USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED ) AASHTO 1>3 INIl THAN PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I II J I(PCT)I 4 1 0 I 40 I 200 I IINDEX I
I 0-291 FS SP-SM IA-2-4, A-3 1 0 I 100 98-100 65-85 15-35 I NP
I 29-47 SCL, SL SC, SM A-2, A-4, A-6 I 0 100 98-100 80-95 31-49 I 21-40 1 8-25
I 47-801 SL, SCL, SC SM-SC, SC A-4, A-6 I 0 I 100 100 80-98 40-65 21-40 1 8-25
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I
1 I I I I i I I
IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULKI PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY j ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)| SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I_ I
I 1<2MM)I (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALI K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETE
S0-291 I 6.0-20 I 0.05-0.08 14.5-6.0 I LOW 1.201 5 I I I.-- nw OIt TGr
S29-41 2.0-6.0 I 0.08-0.12 14.5-5.5 I LOW .201 I I I
S47-8d I 1 0.6-2.0 1 0.10-0.14 4.5-5.5 I LOW I.201o 1 1I I
I I I I I I I I I
I 1 I I 1 I I I I I

FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE 1HYDIPOTENT LI
I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT} I I |(IN) I I (IN) I IIN) I(IN) I I ACTION I
I NONE i I I 4-6 1 PERCHED IAPR-JUNEI I 1 > 60 I I I A I

-__ SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SMODERATE-WETNESS I GOOD
SEPTIC TANK I II
ABSORPTION I II ROADFILL
FIELDS I
I 1 I1 I
S5-7%: SEVERE-SEEPAGE I IMPROBABLE SOURCE-EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE1N 7-8%: SEVERE-SLOPE, SEEPAGE I
LAGOON II SAND
AREAS I I
S______
SSLIGHT IMPROBABLE SOURCE-EXCESS FINES
SANITARY II
LANDFILL I GRAVEL
(TRENCH)

S A SEVERE-SEEPAGE POOR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY II
LANDFILL I TOPSOIL
(AREA) I
I_ II
DAILY POOR-TOO SANDY, THIN LAYER A WATER MANAGEMENT ___
COVER FOR I E-SEEPAGE
ADLLI POND SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I POND
I I II RESERVOIR
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT
ALLOW SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE BA CENTS SEVERE-SEEPAGE
I SHALLOW I EMBANKMENTS
IEXCAVAtIONS I I DIKES AND
I LEVEES
I I- II
DWELLINGS SLIGHT EXCAVATED SEVERE-NO WATER
WITHOUT 11 PONDS
BASEMENTS IIAQUIFER FED
I -________ II I _________
SII II
DWELLINGS MODERATE-WETNESS DEEP TO WATER
WITH I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I I
I I II I
I S_ &L I _ODE.l TE-S].)PI _" I
L MODERATE-SLOPE FAST INTAKE, DROUGHT, SLOPE
SMALL 11
COMMERCIAL II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I
SII II
LOCAL II TERRACES SOIL BLOWING
ROADS AND II AND
STREETS II DIVERSIONS I
I II I _-I
LAWNS. II
LANDSCAPING SLIGHT II GRASSED DOUGHTY
IAND GOLF I II WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS 1 II I
II II II I

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I
I I I
S I I







12C BONNEAU-BLANTON COMPLEX,5 TO B PERCENT SLOPES
BLANTON PART


USDA-SCS
12-78


RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
SEVERE-TOO SANDY I SEVERE-SLOPE.TOO SANDY
II I
CAMP AREAS I PLAYGROUNDS
I I II
I II
SEVERE-TOO SANDY II SEVERE-TOO SANDY
S1 PATHS
PICNIC AREAS i AND
I I TRAILS
I I I_ I __
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CAPA- CORN I SOYBEANS PEANUTS I WATER- I TOBACCO IBAHIAGRASS I IMPROVED I
ABILITY I I I MELONS I I IBERMUDAGR. I
( U) I (BU) I (LBS) I (TONS) I (LBS) I (AUM) 4 (AUM) __
I INIRRIIRR.INIRR IRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR INIR IIRRE INIRR IIRR.I
4IS 1 50 I 1 20 12000 1 10 oI 1700 1 6.5 7.5 I








MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I I I AL PRODUCTIVITY I
I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I
| I I 1 I I I I I I I I
i 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I







SYM EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH. PLANT COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
I HAZARD LIMI I MORTY.I HAZARD I COMPET. I I I I I I
3S SLIGHT I I I IIODERATEODRATE SLIGHT IMODERATEISLASH PINE I 0 SLASH PINE
I I I I ILOBLOLLY PINE I 80
LONGLEAF PINE 170 1
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I


















WINDBREAKS-
I SPECIES IlTI SPECIES IHTI SPECIES IHTI SPECIES IHTI
SLASH PINE 1451LOBLOLLY PINE 1451SOUTHERN REDCEDAR 1401CAROLINA LAURELCHY IZ30
IJAPANESE PRIVET 125| I1111 I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1














WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR:

I SEED LEGUME HERB. I TREES PLANTS IW PLANTS I WATER IILDLF ILDLF IILDLF IWILLFT
SPOOR FAIR I FAIR I POOR FAIR -I V. POORLV. POOR FAIR I FAIR I. POOR
I I I I I LLLLYPINE 80 I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I










I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I II
I I I I I I I I 1 I






















POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
PLANT I PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY EIGHT)
COMMON PLANT NAME I SYBOL I I
i (N IPN) I I I I
I I I I I I I II
I I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I





INDREASNORMAL YEARS















FAVORABLE YEARSIIII I
FOOTN I OTES
II POTENTIAL FORHABITAT EL NTSF OO POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR I


SOIL I N T E R P R E T A T I N S RECORD

12C BONNEAU-BLANTON COMPLEX, 5 TO 8 PERCENT SLOPES
BLANTON PART


USOA-SCS
12-78


THE BLANTON SERIES CONSISTS OF MODERATELY WELL DRAINED NEARLY LEVEL TO STRONGLY SLOPING SOILS IN THE COASTAL PLAIN. IN A
REPRESENTATIVE PROFILE. THE SURFACE LAYER IS GRAY FINE SAND ABOUT 9 INCHES THICK. THE SUBSURFACE LAYER IS BETWEEN DEPTHS
OF 9 TO 58 INCHES AND 15 SUBDIVIDED INTO LAYERS OF LIGHT YELLOWISH-BRCWN, VERY PALE BROWN AND WHITE SAND. THE SUBSOIL IS
BETWEEN DEPTHS OF 58 TO 85 INCHES OR MORE. IT IS PALE BROWN SANDY LOAM IN THE UPPER 4 INCHES; BELOW THIS IT IS PALE
BROWN AND LIGHT BROWNISH GRAY SANDY CLAY LOAM._ __ __
I ... .ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIESS ___
IDEPTHI I IFRACTIPERCENT CF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS-
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE UNIFIED AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I II- __ ___ _(_PCT) -4 L__10 I 4 _I 20___ I IINDEx_
SO-49IFS ISP--SM IA-3, A-2-4 I 0 oo100 100 65-100 5-12 I NP
149-801SCL. SL, FSL ISC. SM-SC, SM IA--.A-2-4,A-2-6.A-6 I 0 I100 100 69-95 25-50 12-37 I 3-20
I I I I I I I



IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA-- AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD. MATTER 1_____ I
1 I<2MM)I {G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCTj_ISTEELI CONCRETErI
S0-491 2-7 11.35-1.60 I6.0-20 1 0.03-0.07 14.5-6.0 IVERY LOW 1.171 5 | 2 1 .5-1 I1 HIGH__I__JI.H_
149-80112-3011.60-1.70 0.6-2.0 0.10-0.15 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.321 I
I I I I I I I I I 1 I i I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I 1 I I I I I
I I I I I L I I _I__
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABL__I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK I SUSIDENCE _HYDIPOTENT*LI
I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNeSSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
I FREQUENCY I DURATIONjLIMONTHS (FT) I I IN(IN I I (IN) I I(IN) I(IN) I I ACTION
I NONE I I15.0-6.0 PERCHgD IJAN-APRI I I >60 | _I -

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIALL_
SSEVERE-POOR FILTER GOOD
SEPTIC TANK I
ABSORPTION III ROADFILL
FIELDS I II
I I I I I
I I SEVERE-SEEPAGE II PROBABLE
SEWAGE I II
LAGOON I I SAND
AREAS I II
I I II _
I SEVERE-TOO SANDY I I IMPROBABLE-TCO SANDY
SSANITARY II
LANDFILL II GRAVEL
(TRENCH) I II
II II I
SSEVERE-SEEPAGE II POCR-TOO SANCY
SANITARY I I
LANDFILL I I TOPSOIL
(AREA) I I
I I II
IPOOR-TOO SANDY.SEEPAGE II
DAILY II WATER MANAGER ENT__
COVER FOR II SVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL II POND
_ I I RESERVOIR
I AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT ___
I SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE SEVERE-SEEPAGE
SHALLOW IIEMBANKMENTSI
EXCAVATIONS II DIKES AND
I LEVEES I

SLIGHT II SEVERE-NO WATER
DWELLINGS II EXCAVATED
WITHOUT I I PONDS
BASEMENTS IIAQUIFER FEDI

MODERATE-WETNESS II DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS I II
WITH I 1 DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS
__ --_______ __ _- I
MODERATE-SLOPE II DRCUGHTY.FAST INTAKE,SOIL BLOWING
SMALL II
COMMERCIAL I II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I II
I I I I I I
SSLIGHT II TCC SANDY.SOIL BLOWING
LOCAL I I TERRACES
ROADS AND II AND
STREETS II DIVERSIONS
I I I I I
LAWNS. I SEVERE-DROUGHTY I I DROUGHT
LANDSCAPING I GRASSED I
IAND GOLF I II WATERWAYS I
FAIRWAYS I
1 I I I I


I-REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS

I I I
I I I






52B CHIPLEY FINE SAND. 0 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
12-78


RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
SSEVERE-TOO SANDY I SEVERE-TOO SANDY
1 I I I
CAMP AREAS PLAYGROUNDS
I II i
SEVERE-TOO SANDY I SEVERE-TOO SANDY
S PATHS
PICNIC AREAS I AND
TRAILS
i II I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CAPA- CORN I SOYBEANS PEANUTS TOBACCO I WATER- IBAHIAGRASS I IMPROVED I
ABILITY I MELONS I IBERMUDAGR.
I I (BU) I (BU) I (LBS) I (LES) I (TONS) I (AUM) I (AUM) I
INIRRIIRR.INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR (IRR, INIRR IIRR, INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR.
3IS I s50 I 1 20 I 12200 I 12000 1 1 5 1 I 7.5 I 1 8.0
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

I I I
I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I





~_WOODLAND SUITABILITY
ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
SYM EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH. PLANT COMMON TREES SITE I TREES TO PLANT
I I HAZARD LIMIT I IORT I I I IZAD I IIN DX I -
I SLIGHT IMODERATEI SLIGHT SLIGHT IMODERATEISLASH PINE 190 SLASH PINE













SI SPECIES I SPECIES IHTI SPECIES ITI SPECIES I I
SLASH PINE 155ILOBLOLLY PINE IS0 SOUTHERN REDCEDAR I4ICAROLINA LAURELCHY 1301
IJAPANESE PRIVET I30o111 I I1
II I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I











I I I I I I I Il I I

WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
I OR POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR: I
GRAIN G GRASS &N WILD P HARDWD ICONIFERISHRUBS WETLANDISHALLOWIOPENLD IWUODLD WETLANDIRANGELD
I SEED ILEGUME I HERB. I TREES PLANTS I C PLANTS I WATER IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF WILFI
POOR FAIR FAIR I FAIR I FAIR I IV. POO OO POORI FAIR I FAIR S V. POCR
I I I I I 1 I NGLEA PINE 80I











I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I























~_ __ POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY RANGELANDC OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
PLANT PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT)
COMMON PLANT NAME I SYMBOL
SI I I I I (NLSPN)














POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC DRY T) I
FAVORABLE YEARS
NORMAL YEARS I I
UNFAVORABLE YEARS I I I I I
FOOTNOTES
1 EXCESSIVE PERMEABILITY RATE MAY CAUSE POLLUTION OF GROUND WATER.


SOIL I NTERPRE TAT I O NS RECORD

32 ELECTRA VARIANT FINE SAND, 0 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
9-79


THE ELECTRA SERIES CONSISTS OF SOMEWHAT POORLY DRAINED, NEARLY LEVEL SOILS THAT OCCUR ON SLIGHT RIDGES IN THE FLATWGODS
AREAS OF THE LOWER COASTAL PLAIN OF FLORIDA. TYPICALLY, THESE SOILS HAVE A THIN GRAY SURFACE HORIZON AND LIGHT GRAY OR
WHITE SUBSURFACE LAYER TO A DEPTH OF 47 INCHES, BLACK OR DARK REDDISH BROWN WEAKLY CEMENTED LAYERS BETWEEN DEPTH OF 47
TO 60 INCHES.

I -- ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIS-
IDEPTHI I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS--
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NOl LIMIT ITICITY
I- I I I I(PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 I 200 i INDEX
I 0-4 IFS ISP, SP-SM IA-3 0 I 100 95-100 75-99 3-10 I hP
I4-381S, FS ISP. SP-SM IA-3 0 1 100 95-100 75-99 3-10 NP
138-531S, FS ISP-SM. SM IA-3, A-2-4 0 1 100 100 80-99 8-15 NP
153--80SCL. SC, FSL ISC. SM-SC IA-2, A-4. A-6 0 I 100 100 80-99 20-45 I 20-40 4-20
I I I I I
I I I I I
IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL ] SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I__
I 1<2MM)I (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
I 0-4 I 1-6 11.40-1.55 I 6.0-20 0.05-0.10 13.6-6.5 I IVERY LOW 1.151 5 2 I 1-2 I LOW I HIGH I
I 4-381 1-6 11.45-1.70 I6.0-20 I 0.02-0.07 13.6-6.5 I IVERY LOW 1.15 I I I
138-531 1-6 11.50-1.70 I0.6-2.0 0.10-0.15 13.6-5. I IVERY LOW I.201 I I I
s53-eoIl8-3811.60-1.75s <0.2 I 0.10-0.15 13.6-5.5 I IVERY LOW 1.321
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I
I FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK SUBSIDENCE IHYOIPOTENT'LI
1_ 1I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS ]DEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I J I(IN) 1 I (IN) I_ (IN) IIN) I ACTION
I- NONE I- I 2.0-3.5 APPARENTIJUL--CTI I 1 >60 1 I I I C I -
SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SEVERE-WETNESSPOOR FILTER I FAIR-WETNESS
SEPTIC TANK I
ABSORPTION I I ROADFILL
I FIELDS I
I II
1 I SEVERE-SEEPAGEWETNESS I PROBABLE
S SEWAGE I
I LAGOON I SAND
AREAS I
I II I
I ISEVERE-WETNESS.TOO SANDY I IMPROBABLE-TCO SANDY
SANITARY I
LANDFILL I GRAVEL
(TRENCH)
I I I
SEVERE-SEEPAGE.WETNESS I POOR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY I
LANDFILL I TOPSOIL
(AREA) II
I IIII
IPOOR-SEEPAGETOO SANDY
I DAILY II WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR II SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I POND I
I II RESERVOIR I
II AREA I
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II 1
ISEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVEWETNESS i I SEVERE-SEEPAGE.PIPING
SHALLOW IIIEMBANKMENTS I
EXCAVATIONS III DIKES AND I
I LEVEES
II II
MODERATE-WETNESS II SEVERE-SLOW REFILLCUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS II EXCAVATED
WITHOUT PONDS
BASEMENTS IIAQUIFER FEDI
I I II I .1
ISEVERE-WETNESS CUTBACKS CAVE
DWELLINGS II
I WITH II DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I
I I II I
MODERATE-WETNESS WETNESS.DRCUGHTY.FAST INTAKE
SMALL II
COMMERCIAL II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I

MODERATE-WETNESS WETNESSTOO SANDY.SOIL BLOWING
LOCAL I TERRACES
ROADS AND I AND
STREETS I DIVERSIONS
I II t I I
LAWNS I SEVERE-DROUGHTY I DROUGHT
LANDSCAPING I GRASSED
AND GOLF I WATERWAYS
I FAIRWAYS I


REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I II
I I I
I I I
I- I I






32 ELECTRA VARIANT FINE SAND. 0 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES USDA--SCS
9-79
------- ECR--------_-_- -_..__------____ __ECATIONALoCEVL(PMEIL____ 9-
SEVERE-TOO SANDY ii SEVERE-TOO SANDY
I I I
CAMP AREAS I PLAYGROUNDS
I II
--I -- I I
SEVERE-TOO SANDY II SEVERE-TOO SANDY
II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS II AND
11 TRAILS
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE CF CROPS ANC PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CAPA- IBAHIAGRASS I I
8ILITY I I

NIRRsIRR. N.RR IRRIRR RR. NIRR IIRR. INIRR IRR NI IRR. NIRR IIRR INIRR IIRR. NIRR IRR.
6S 6.0







SI I I I I I I II I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I i i i i I I I

-------------;-- -RD-__ WOODlAND SUITABILITY
ORD MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY |
SYM IEROSIONI EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH. PLANT I COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
I----HA----- AR LIMIT I MORT'Y. HAZARD I COMPET.I IINDXI
45 SLIGHT MODERATE SEVERE SLIGHT SLIGHT SLASH PINE 170 ISLASH PINE
SAND PINE 165 SAND PINE
ILONGLEAF PINE 165 IS FLORIDA SLASH PINE
Is FLORIDA SLASH PINEI35









SIES I Ti WINDBREAK
-----------------------;--_--- ---------_ I I I I I ..L........ I I .L.......







---OOWDIL"LIFE HABITAT SUITTABILITY_
POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS TI POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FCR:
GRAIN &|GRASS &I WILD |HARDWD ICONIFERISHRUBS |WETLANDISHALLOWIOPENLD |OODLD WETLANDIRANGELD|
SC____________I_ I MORT IHTI SPECIES IHTI SPECIM N








4SIEE SL GUMEIHERBAE TREES PLANTS IGTIPLANTSH PIATER IWIO.DLF WISLAH PIILNLF kLE I
I-ENTIAL NAE P 140AN N D PINE 3 SCTH ERN REDCEDAR 40ICARO L INA LAURELCHY siTATIO







PLANT PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION GDRY WEIGHT)N16 I OD SLSPNE
COMMON PLANT NAME I SYMBOL
I I I I I I I i I I
















ICREEPG-----------WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
LOPSIDED INDIANGRASS SOSE5 10
CHALKY BLUESTEM FR HAB ELEMENTSANCA4 10
IPI CM PNIC 5
I I I I I I I II
I I I I









IPINELAND THREEAWN ARSTI 5
_ COMMUNITY (RANGEAN OR FOREST UNERSTORY VEGETATION









OTHER ANNUAL FORBS AAFF 5I






POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBSAC COMPORYSITT):ION RY GHT
NORMAL YEARS 4200
--UNFAVRABLENLS I A I3000
EEPIN BLEE FOOTNOTES


SNOT USED FOR POND RESERVOIR AREAS DUE TO LOW STORAGE POTENTIAL BEHIND AN EMBANKMENT
OTHER ANNUAL FOREST IAAFF T 5
OTHER PERENNIAL GRASSES POOR 5 P I F I P i
I I I II 1 I II I I I










FAVORABLE YEARS 5000 I I I I
NORMAL YEARS 4200 I I I I
UNFAVORALE I EARS 3 I i I I I I
1 NOT USED FOR POND RESERVOIR ARTAS DUE TO LOW STORAGE POTENTIAL BEHIND AN EMBANKMENT.


S OIL INTERPRETAT IONS RECORD

032 ELECTRA VARIANT FINE SAND, OCCASIONALLY FLOODED,
0 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES

THESE SOILS CONSIST OF SOMEWHAT POORLY DRAINED SOILS THAT OCCUR ON LOW RIDGES ON RIVER TERRACES IN THE COASTAL PLAIN. TYPICALLY, THEY
HAVE A THIN GRAY SURFACE HORIZON AND LIGHT GRAY OR WHITE SUBSURFACE LAYERS TO A DEPTH OF 41 INCHES, BLACK OR DARK REDDISH BROWN WEAKLY
CEMENTED LAYERS BETWEEN DEPTHS OF 41 TO 50 INCHES, A BROWN SANDY LAYER BETWEEN DEPTHS OF 50 TO 74 INCHES, AND BELOW THIS TO 72 INCHES
OR DEEPER GRAYISH MOTTLED LOAMY SUBSOIL LAYERS." SLOPES ARE 0 TO 5 PERCENT.

I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI I I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS ILIQUID IPLAS- I
I(IN.,) USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3 PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I I I(PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 I 4 12 I INDEX
I 0-411 FS, S SP, SP-SM I A-3 I 0 I 100 95-100 75-99 3-10 NP
141-50 FS, S SP, SP-SM A-3, A-2-4 1 0 00 100 80-99 8-15 NP
150-541 FS, S I SP-SM A-3, A-2-4 0 0 0 100 80-99 5-12 NP
S54-721 S SCSC, SL SC, SM-SC A-2-6, A-2-4' A-6, A-41 0 00 100 80-99 20-45 20-40 4-20
I I I I I I
IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONJWIND JORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.I](PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SMELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I I
I 1<2MMNI (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALI K IT IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
I 0-411 I 1 6.0-20 I 0.02-0.07 13.6-5.5 1 I LOW .151 5 I 2 I I 2w H.TRn I
S41-50l I I 0.6-2.0 I 0.10-0.15 13.6-5.5 I LOW .201 I I I
I 50-541 I 1 6.0-20 I 0.07-0.10 I3.6-5.5 I 1 LOW I .201 1 I J I
154-721 J 1 0.2-0.6 I 0.10-0.15 13.6-5.5 1 I LOW I.321

I I I I I I I I II
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIOENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
I I DEPTH | KIND MONTHS DEPTH HARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I 1(IN) I I (IN) I 1(IN1 MIN) I I ACTION
COMMON V. LONG I APR-SEP I 2.0-3.51 APPARENT I JUN-OCTI I I > 60 I I | | C I

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SI II I
SEPTIC TANK ISEVERE-FLOODS, WETNESS II FAIR-WETNESS
ABSORPTION I ROADFILL
FIELDS I
I II JI__________________ I
ISEVERE-FLOODS, WETNESS, SEEPAGE I I PROBABLE SOURCE
SEWAGE I II
LAGOON I SAND I
AREAS I I
I I ii I
SI SEVERE-FLOODS, WETNESS, TOO SANDY I IMPROBABLE SOURCE-TOO SANDY, THIN LAYER
SANITARY 1I
LANDFILL II GRAVEL
(TRENCH) II
I II I I
ISEVERE-FLOODS, WETNESS, SEEPAGE I POOR-TOO SANDY, THIN LAYER
SANITARY II
LANDFILL I TOPSOIL
(AREA) I I
1 .I II I
POOR-TOO SANDY, SEEPAGE, THIN LAYER I
DAILY I 1 WATER MANAGEMENT __
COVER FOR I II SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I II POND
I jII RESERVOIR
I AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II __
ISHSEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE, WETNESS IS SEVERE-SEEPAGE, PIPING
I SHALLOW I IIEMBANKENTS SEVERE-SEEPAGE, PIPING
EXCAVATIONS II DIKES AND
SI II LEVEES

DWELLINGS SEVERE-FLOODS SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE
I DWELLINGS II EXCAVATED I
WITHOUT I PONDS
BASEMENTS IAGUIFER FED

DEALINGS SEVERE-FLOODS, WETNESS FLOODS, CUTBACKS CAVE
DWELLINGS 1 1 11
WITH I I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I I
i II
SEVERE-FLOODS II WETNESS, DROUGHT, FAST INTAKE, SOIL BLOWING
SMALL 1
COMMERCIAL II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS II
I I_ II I I
SSEVERE-FLOODS II WETNESS, SOIL BLOWING
LOCAL II TERRACES
ROADS AND I| AND
STREETS I DIVERSIONS

LAWNS. MODERATE-FLOODS DROUGHT
LANDSCAPING I GRASSED ROUGHTY
AND GOLF II WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS II


REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I I I
I I I
I I I





032 ELECTRA VARIANT FINE SAND, OCCASIONALLY FLOODED
_RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
I SEVERE-FLOODS, TOO SANDY II SEVERE-TOO SANDY

I CAMP AREAS I IPLAYGROUNDSI
I I II I
I I II I
I SEVERE-TOO SANDY I I SEVERE-TOO SANDY
II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS 1 AND
II TRAILS
I I II I
-CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CLASS- CAPA- BAHIAGRASS I
DETERMINING ABILITY (AUM)
PHASE I (AUM) I
A INIRRIRRNIRRINIR IIRR INIRR JIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IRR. INIRR IIRR.
ALL 6S 6.0


S 60 I I I I I I I I I I 1

I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I 1I
i I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
WOODLAND SUITABILITY
CLASS- I ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
DETERMINING SYM I EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT I COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
I PHASE I I HAZARD I LIMIT I MORT'Y,. HAZARD I COMPETl IINDXI
ALL I 4S I SLIGHT MODERATE I SEVERE I SLIGHT I SLIGHT SLASH PINE 1 70 SLASH PINE
SAND PINE 65 SAND PINE
I I I I I ILONGLEAFPINE 65








1
I I I I I I I i I



1 I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I







WINDBREAKS
CLASS-DETERMIN' PHASE SPECIES IHT I ECIE I II SPECIES IHTI SPECIES IHT
ALL SLASH PINE 401 SAND PINE 135 SOUTHERN RECEDAR 140 CAROLINAA URELHY 25
S1JAPANESE PRIVET 251 BAMBOO 125 1
I II I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I








WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
CLASS- POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT. ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR: I
DETERMINING GRAIN 6-GRASS &l WILD IHARDWD ICONIFERISHRUBS IWETLANDISHALLOWI OPENLD 1WOODLD IWETLANDIRANGELDI
PHASE I SEED ILEGUME I HERB. I TREES PLANTS _I PLANTS I WATER IWILOLF JWILLILDLFWILDLF IWILDLF I
ALL POOR I POOR I FAIR I POOR I POOR POOR I POOR POOR 1 POOR 1 POOR
I I II I I I I I I


I I I I II i I I







POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY IRANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
SI I PLANT U I PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT) BY CLASS DETERMINING PHASE

I (NLSPN) I I I I -
SCREEPING BLUESTEM ANST
LOPSIDED INDIANGRASS SOSE5
CHALKY BLUESTEM ANCA4
BLUE MAIDENCANE AMMU2
ILOW PANICUMS PANIC
IPINELAND THREEAWN ARST5
ISAWPALMETTO SERE2
I GALLBERRY I 1LGL
IWAXMYRTLE MYCE
IPASPALUMS PASPA2


i' I I I I I I
S POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT): I
FAVORABLE YEARS
NORMAL YEARS
__I UNFAVORABLE YEARS I I I I I
FOOTNOTES


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD
036 FLUVAQUENT


THIS IS A NEARLY LEVEL, POORLY DRAINED, CLAYEY SOIL ON FLOOD PLAINS OF RIVERS AND STREAMS OF THE COASTAL PLAINS. THEY HAVE CLAY
LAYERS TO DEPTHS OF 31 INCHES OVER LIMESTONE ROCK. SLOPES ARE 0 TO 2 PERCENT.



I ~ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS-
I(IN.) USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I I(PCT) 4 I 10 I 40 1 200 I INDEX
0-14 MH A-7 I 0 I 100 100 85-100 75-95 30-45 120-40
14-31 SCL, SC SC, CL A-6, A-7 I 0 I 100 100 70-90 30-65 15-45 I5-20
SI I I I I I
I I I I I I I
IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND JORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.) (PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I ___
I J<2 N) ( G/CM3) 1 (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALI K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
ISANME 006-0.2 0.14-0.18 17.4-9.0 I MODERATE I- I- I IHI I HIGH I
AS I 0:06-0.2 10.10-0.16 i7.4-9.0 I MODERATE I I
I I I I I .1 I
ABOVE I I I I

II I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT-LI
S___I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS (FT) I I(IN) I (IN) (IN) LIN) I I ACTION
I COMMN i IoG. | P-JJNI 0-.5 APPARENT IDEC-APR I24-50 IjRIPPABLE I D |

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SEPTIC TANK SEVERE-WETNESS, FLOODS I POOR-WETESS, LOW STRENGTH
I ABSORPTION II ROADFILL
S FIELDS II
I II
I | IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE SEVERE-WETNESS, FLOODS IMPROBABE-EXCESS FINES
LAGOON SAND
AREAS |

ANTA SEVERE-WETNESS, FLOODS I IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SANITARY SEVERE-WETNESS, FLOODS II
LANDFILL I GRAVEL
(TRENCH) II

SANITARY SEVERE WETNESS, FLOODS POOR-WETNESS, TOO CLAYEY
LANDFILL II| TOPSOIL
(AREA) I

I POOR-WETNESS II
DAILY I R T WATER MANAGEMENT ___
I COVER FOR II
COVERANDFORL POMODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK
I LANDFILL III POND I
II RESERVOIR
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT I I
SEVERE-WETNESS, FLOODS II SEVERE-WETNESS, HARD TO PACK
SHALLOW IIIEMBANKMENTS
IEXCAVAtIONS I DIKES AND
I LEVEES
II I
SEVERE-WETNESS, FLOODS XI I SEVERE-SLOW REFILL
DWELLINGS II EXCAVATED
WITHOUT PONDS
BASEMENTS i AQUIFER FED
I II
SDWELINS SEVERE WETNESS, FLOODS PERCS SLOWLY, FLOODS
DWELLINGS I
WITHIN DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS

SMALL SEVERE-WETNESS, FLOODS I WETNESS, SLOW INTAKE, FLOODS
SALL I
COMMERCIAL IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS i
I II
LOCAL SEVERE-WETNESS, FLOODS S DEPTH TO ROCK, WETNESS, PERCS SLOWLY
LOCAL TERRACES
ROADS AND I AND
STREETS DIVERSIONS
I _____--- -- -
LAWNS. DEPTH TO CK, PCS SLOWLY
LANDSCAPING I SEVERE-FLOODS, WETNESS, TOO CLAYEY GRASSED DEPTH TO CK, PES SLOWLY
AND GOLF I I WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS I
I II I

II I
I I I
I ___________R I_____________





198 FORT MEADE VARIANT LOAMY FINE SAND. 0 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
2-77


HRECREATIUNAL DEVELOPMENT
SMODERATE-TOO SANDY I I MODERATE-SLOPE.TOO SANDY
S' II I
CAMP AREAS I 1IPLAYGROUNDSI
11
I II I
SMODERATE-TOO SANDY I I MODERATE-TOO SANDY
II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS 1 AND
II TRAILS
I II I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
SCAPA- I ORANGES GRAPEFRUIT I CORN I PEANUTS I WATER- I TOBACCO IBAHIAGRASS I
i ILITY I I I I I MELONS I I I
I I (BOXES) S) I BOXES) I (BU) I (LBS) I (TONS) I (LBSI I (AUM) I
SINIRRIIRR.INIRR IIRR. NIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IRR. INRR IIRl. NIRR IIRR. INIRR IAIRR.
S3S 600 750 I I 60 I 13000 I 110.0 12300 I I 9.0
-I


I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I IS

I I I I I I, I I I I P I I I E 11


I I I I I S EI I I I I I I I I I I
W-OODLAND SUITABILITY
I ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
I SYM I EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT I COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
J I HAZARD I LIMIT I MORT*Y.I HAZARD CONPET.I IINOXI
13S SLIGHT I SLIGHT I SLIGHT SLIGHT IMODERATEISLASH PINE I80 SLASH PINE
I I I I LOBLOLLY PINE I80
LCNGLEAF PINE 170





S I SPECIES I I J SPECIES I V SECIESTI I SE ES IHT






CJAPANESE PRIVET |30|BAMBOO J251 |
I I 1 1 1
I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I II
II I I I I I I I Il
I I I 1 I I I I I I i










NI scI PHTIAL FOR HAI TAT ELEMENTS POTENTIA AS HABITAT FO HT
SLASH PINE I45 LOBLOLLY PINE |40150UTHERN REDCEDAR (45|CAROINA LAURELCHY YEAR





GRAIN G|GRASS G6 WILD IHARDWO ICONIFERISHRUBS WETLANDD SHALLOW IOPENLD IWOODLD WETLANDIRANGELD
I SEED LEGUME I HERB, I TRES PLANTS I PLANTS I WATER IWILOLF IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF
FAIR I FAIR I GOOD 1 FAIR FAIR I VV. POORLV. POCRI FAIR FAIR |V. POOR -
S I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I

-----TNTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMaIY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
PLANT --PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION {DRY IGHT)__ -_I
COMMON PLANT NAME I I I I SYMBOL
I I I I NLSPN _












SUNFAVORABLEI I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I
- -I-I-I- - I








UNFAVORABLE YEARS I
FOOTNOTES
RATINGS BASED ON SRWPC COMMITTEE 4 GUIDE APRIL 1970.


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD
478 CHIEFLAND PEDRO VARIANT COMPLEX, 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES
CHIEFLAND PART

THE CHIEFLAND SERIES CONSISTS OF WELL DRAINED NEARLY LEVEL TO GENTLY SLOPING SOILS. TYPICALLY, THEY HAVE DARK GRAY FINE SAND SURFACE
LAYERS, PALE BROWN AND VERY PALE BROWN SUBSURFACES TO 23 INCHES UNDERLAIN BY SANDY CLAY LOAM OVER LIMESTONE ROCK AT 31 INCHES.



~I _ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES I
IDEPTHI I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS ILIQUID IPLAS- I
ItIN.)l USDA TEXTURE ) UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3j PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
SI IIlJIPCT)I 4 I 110 I 40 1 200 I INDEX
I 0-23 FS SP-SM A-3 0 100 100 75-99 5-10 NP
123-31 SCL M-S, SC A-6 0 100 100 80-99 22-40 <35 NP-16
I I I Il
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I II I I
IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSION|WIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
ItIN.) (PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.I MATTER II
I l<2MM)I (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (1N/IN) i (PH) I IPOTENTIALI X I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
ISAE I I I 6.0-20 i .'0.05-0.08 14.5-4 I I V. Low 1.17 I 5 I 2 I I Low I High I
I A I I I 0.6-2.0 0.12-0.17 16.0-8.0 1 j Low 1.321 I I I
ABOVE I I I I I 1 I I 1 _I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I 1 I
I I I I I I I I _
I FLOODING HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK SUBSIDENCE 1HYDIPOTENT'LI
I I__ DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY I DURATION I MONTHS I (FT) (IN) I I JIN) J__ M(IN) IIN) I I ACTION I
None I I I 6.0 I I I 1 30-40 1 I I L I

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK II POOR-AREA RECLAIM, THIN LAYER
SEPTIC TANK I I I
ABSORPTION | j ROADFILL
FIELDS I I
I II I
SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, SEEPAGE IMPROBABLE SOURCE THIN LAYER
SEWAGE I I
LAGOON I I SAND
AREAS II
I II I
SSANITARY SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, TOO SANDY I IMPROBABLE SOURCE TOO SANDY,THIN LAYER
LANDFILL I I GRAVEL
(TRENCH) II

II I
SANITARY SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK,SEEPAGE POOR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY ||
LANDFILL II TOPSOIL
(AREA) II
I I! I I
PII
DAILY POOR-AREA RECLAIM,SEEPAGE,TOO SANDY I WATER MANAGEMENT ___
I COVER FOR I IIE E G
COVER FOR 1 SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I I POND I
SII RESERVOIR
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II I
SHALLOW SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK,CUTBANKS CAVE EMBANKMENTS SEVERE-THIN LAYER,SEEPAGE
EXCAVATIONS I I DIKES AND
II LEVEES

DWELLINGS MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK EXCAVATED SEVERE-NO WATER
WITHOUT T I PONDS
BASEMENTS J AQUIFER FED I
I II I I
II I
DWELLINGS SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK DEEP TO WATER
WITH I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I I
I II I
S SMALL 2 20 4%: .MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK FAST INTAKE,SOIL BLOWING,DPTH TO ROCK
COMMERCIAL 4 TO 5%: MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK, SLOPE II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I II,
I I II I
II I
I LOCAL T MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK I
LOCAL MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK TERRACES DEPTH TO ROCK,TOO SANDYISOIL BLOWING
ROADS AND II AND
STREETS I DIVERSIONS

LAWNS. I I I
LANDSCAPING I MODERATE-THIN LAYER,DROUGHTY II GRASSED DROUGHTY,DEPTH TO ROCK
SAND GOLF I I WATERWAYS
I FAIRWAYS I II I
I I II I
REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I I I
I I I
I I I





L4J3




RECREATIONAL ODEELOPMENT
I SEVERE-TOO SANDY, "R000 SEVERE-TOO SANY
I CAMP AREAS I PLAYGROUNDS I
I I II I
I II I i
SSEVERE-TOO SADY SEVERE-TOO SANDY
SI 11 PATHS I I
PICNIC AREAS I AND I
I I II TRAILS I
I I II f_ I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
I CLASS- I CAPA- I I I I 1
DETERMINING 1 SILITY I
PHASE I I I I I i
i INIRRIIRR.INIRR lIRR. INIRR IIRR, INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIR. INIRR IRR. INIRR 1 II. NIRR IIRR.
MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I I I I I I I POTENTIAL I I I I I I I
DETERMINING I I I I I I I COMMON TREES I I I I TREES I I
P S I I I I I I I LIMIT I I I I I
SI I J I

I LASS-DETERMNG I I CIES I J I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I. 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I




HI SI I I I I III I I
I I I I I I I II
POTENTIAL I PLANT COMMUNITY RANGELANDI I FOREST ERST VEGETATI
WOODLAND SuCITABII NTy






SPOTENTIALAI PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT POTE L PY















FAVORABLEDETERMINING SYM EROSINI EQUIP SEEDLING WINDTH.I PLANT COMMON TREES ISTEI TREES TO PLANT






















NORMAL YEARS
I I I I I I I I I I I
I 1 I I I I I I I I
II I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I 1 I I
I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I 1 I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I

I I I l I I I I
SI I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I 1 1
I I I I I I I I I I
CTASN I -NTVLAT ITD FRHABITAT SUITABILITY U PGTA TAON|
IIDETERMINING G A WILD PHARDD CONIERSHRUBS IETLNDTSNLLOEPEID IODLD .IMETLANDIRANGDI
I---PS I SEED ILEGiME I MERBe I TREES IPIAN I I IPIANTS I WATER IWILDIF IWIIDLF Islnl IWILDLF II
I1 1 I I 1I I I 1 I II
i I I I I I I I I
.I I II I I I I I



CONNON PLANT NAME I SYMOaL I 1 I I

I I I I I I I



I___.1 I 1 I W L I
I I I I I 1 I I
I I I I I I I I
I I i i I I


I I I I I I
I I I I I
I I I I I I i1 I
POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBSe/ACe DRY WT): P
I FAVORABLE YEARS I I
I NORMAL YEARS I I I I I I
1 UNFAVORABLE Y~EAR I I
FOOTNOTES


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD
47B CHIEFLAND PEDRO VARIANT COMPLEX, 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES
PEDRO VARIANT PART
THE PEDRO VARIANT SERIES CONSISTS OF WELL DRAINED, NEARLY LEVEL TO GENTLY SLOPING SOILS. IN A REPRESENTATIVE PROFILE, THE SURFACE LAYER IS GRAY
FINE SAND. THE SUBSURFACE IS PALE BROWN FINE SAND. THE SUBSOIL IS YELLOWISH BROWN SANDY CLAY LOAM. BETWEEN DEPTHS OF 16 TO 20 INCHES IS SOFT,
PARTIALLY DECOMPOSED LIMESTONE. BELOW THIS IS HARD LIMESTONE. SLOPES RANGE FROM 2 TO 5 PERCENT.


I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI I I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS- I
I|IN.)I USDA TEXTURE UNIFIED AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3 PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I ILtPCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 200 I INDEX
0-13 S, PS SP-SM A-3, A-2-4 .0-1 100 95-100 90-100 5-12 NP
13-16 SCL SC A-2, A-4, A-6 0-1 90-100 85-100 80-100 25-40 25-35 8-16
I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- | AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND JORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.) IPCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I I
I I<2MMl (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALi K I T IGROUPI (PCTI I STEEL ICONCRETEI
I I I I I6 I I I I I I I Ij,01_ I
0-131 6.0-20 0.03-0.08 5.1-6.5 LOW .1711 2 I
S13-161 2.0-6.0 0.12-0.15 6.1-7.8 J LOW .28i ] I I I__
S I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
SI I I I I I I I
I FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK SUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH (HARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
I FREQUENCY I DURATION I MONTHS I (FT) I ICIN) I I (IN) I 1IN) ItIN) I I ACTION I
I NONE I | >6 i I I 10-20 HARD I I I 0 I -

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK I POOR-THIN LAYER, AREA RECLAIM
SEPTIC TANK I I
I ABSORPTION I I ROADFILL
S FIELDS I I
I II I
SEVERE-DEPT TO ROCK IMPROBABLE SOURCE-THIN LAYER
I SEWAGE I I
I LAGOON 1. I SAND I
AREAS II
II II
I ISEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, SEEPAGE IMPROBABLE SOURCE-TOO SANDY, THIN LAYER
I SANITARY I I I
LANDFILL I I GRAVEL I
I (TRENCH) II I
III I -I
SANITARY SEVERE-SEEPAGE, DEPTH TO ROCK j POOR-TOO SANDY, AREA RECLAIM
I ISI POT ,AAEI
I LANDFILL I I TOPSOIL I
(AREA) I I I
I I II I -
I I PO II
DAILY POOR-THIN LAYER, AREA RECLAIM, SEEPAGE II WATE_ MNAG___NT _____
DAILY WATERMANAGN______
I COVER FOR I i P SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, SEEPAGE
I LANDFILL I If POND I
I jI II RESERVOIR
II AREA I
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT I I
SHALLOn SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, CUTBACKS CAVE MBASEVERE-THIN LAYER, SEEPAGE
EXCAVAtIONS I DIKES AND I
II LEVEES 1
II I
I WSEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK EXCAVSEVERE-NO WATER
I DWELLINGS II EXCAVATED I
WITHOUT I I PONDS I
BASEMENTS IAQUIFER FEDI
I I I
DWELLINGS SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK I DEEP TO WATER
S WITH I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I II
SSEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK I I
SMALL SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK DROUGHTY, SEEPAGE; DEPTH TO ROCK
COMMERCIAL I IRRIGATION I
I BUILDINGS I
II
S OCA SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK j TERRACES DEPTH TO ROCK, TOO SANDY, SOIL BLOWING
I ROADS AND I I AND I
STREETS I I DIVERSIONS I
I I II I ,,___________ _I
LAWNS, I I
LANDSCAPING SEVERE-THIN LAYER jI GRASSED I DROUGHT, DEPTH TO ROCK
AND GOLF I 1 WATERWAYS I
FAIRWAYS II I
I I AII 1 I

I I I
I I I
I I I
I I I






47B CHIEFLAND PEDRO VARIANT COMPLEX, 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES
PEDRO VARIANT PART


____ RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT_
SSEVERE-TOO SANDY, DEPTH TO ROCK SEVERE-TOO SANDY, DEPTH TO ROCK
I I II I
SCAMP AREAS I PLAYGROUNDS I
II 11 I

SEVERE-TOO SANDY, DEPTH TO ROCK SEVERE-TOO SANDY
II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS jI AND
I I TRAILS I
I I II L i
-CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CLASS- I CAPA- I PEANUTS WATERMELONS I BAHIAGRASS I CORN TOMATOES I
DETERMINING ABILITY (LBS) (TONS) (AUM) (BU) (LBS)
PHASE I I I I I
j INIRRIIRR, NIRR IIRR INIRR IIRR, INIRR IIRR, INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR, INIRR IIRR I
ALL 45 2900 10 48 55 18000
I L I I I I
S 1C I 1 1 I1 I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I 1 1 I I I I I


I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I 1 1
I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1



WOODLAND SUITABILITY
CLASS- i ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
DETERMINING I SYN I EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT I COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
I PHASE I I HAZARD I LIMIT I MORTEY.E HAZARD I COMPETE. IlINDXl I
ALL 3 SLIGHT MODERATE MODERATE MODERATE SLIGHT SLASH PINE 80 SLASH PINE
O PLLOBLOLLY PINE 80
C B LONGLEAF PINE I 70











CLASS-DETERMIN'G PHASE I SPECIES I tI i SPECIES I NT SPECIES HTi SPECIES IHT

ALL SLASH PINE 55LOLOLLY INE LONGLEAF PINE 35 SOUTHERN REDCED 40
II I i










CAROLINA LAUELCH 30 JAPANESE PRIVET
I I I I I I I 1I

I I I I I I I L




lI I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I







D WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
WINDBREAKS




I DETERMINING GRAINPHASEI SPECIEGASS ID HARDWD ]CNIERSHRUS |WETLAND SHALLOpecIE OPENS IHTOOD SPECIES TLANDRANGELD




HAS SLASH PINLEGUME 55 i LOBLOLLY PINE 40 LONGLEA PINE 35L SOUTHERN REDCEDLF 40LLF
ALL CAROLINA LAUELCHY 30 JAPANESEPRIVET 25 I





I I I I I I I r l I l l
I II I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I II



I I I I I I I I I I I I
A POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY F RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTRY VEGTATIN
I PLANT ]L PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT) B.Y CLASS DETERMINING PHASENG.DI
A POOR FAIR FAIR POOR FAIR V OR'V.POOR FAIR





COMMON PLANT NAME SYMBOL
I I I I I P I I I I I I I
POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
I PLANT B PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT) BY CLASS DETERMINING PHASE
I 1 NLSPN) I I I I j
CHALKY BLUESTEM ANCA4
CREEPING BLUESTEM ANST
HAIRY PANICUM PARH
DWARF HUCKLEBERRY GADU
PINELAND THREEAWN ARST5
BLACKBERRY RUCU
DOG FENNEL EUCO7
LIVE OAK 2/ QUVi
SLASH PINE 2/ PIEL
LONGLEAF PINE 2/ PIPA2
POST OAK 2/ OUST 1
TURKEY OAK 2/ QULA2 I

I I I I I I I
2 U I I I I V
POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT): j ___
FAVORABLE YEARS I I J J I'
NORMAL YEARS I I I I I
I UNFAVORABLE YEARS I I I I I i
FOOTNOTES
A RATINGS BASED ON "GUIDE FOR INTERPRETING ENGINEERING USES OF SOILS", NOV. 1971.
B RECREATION RATINGS BASED ON SOILS MEMORANDUM-69, OCT. 1968.
C WILDLIFE RATINGS BASED ON SOILS MEMORANDUM-74, JAN. 1970.
D DATA NOT AVAILABLE FOR PRODUCTION ESTIMATES.
1 RATINGS BASED ON SRWPC COMMITTEE IV GUIDE, DRAFT, 4/70.
2 NOT USUALLY UTILIZED BY LIVESTOCK.


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD

47C CHIEFLAND-PEDRO VARIANT COMPLEX, 5 TO 8 PERCENT SLOPES
CHIEFLAND PART



THE CHIEFLAND SERIES CONSISTS OF WELL DRAINED SLOPING SOILS OF THE UPLANDS. TYPICALLY, THEY HAVE DARK GRAY FINE SAND SURFACE
LAYERS, PALE BROWN AND VERY PALE BROWN SUBSURFACES TO 23 INCHES UNDERLAIN BY SANDY CLAY LOAM OVER LIMESTONE ROCK AT 31 INCHES.


I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES I
IDEPTHI IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS ILIOUID IPLAS- I
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3 PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I(PCT)I 4- I 10 I 40 I 2QO I IINDEX I
0-231 FS SP-SM IA-3 10 100 100 75-99 5-10 1 I NP
23-311 SCL SM-SC, SC IA-6 0 100 100 80-99 22-40 1 05 | NP-16


I 1 1 I I
IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA- | AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND JORGANICI CORROSIVITY
(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY j ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER 1_
I I<2MM)l (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALI K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL CONCRETE
1 0-231 I 1 6.0-20 1 0.05-0.08 I 4.5-6.0 1 I V.LOW 1.171 5 1 2 1 I LOW HIGH I
I 23-311 1 I 0.6-2.0 1 0.12-0.17 I 6.0-8.0 I LOW I .321 I I I
I I 1 1 I I I I I 1 I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I 1 I I I I 1 I
I I I I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK SUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
I_ I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY I DURATION INONTHS 1 (FT) I I(IN) I I (IN) I I-J(IN I[(IN) I I ACTION
I NONE I I I >6.0 I I I I 130-40 1 I |I I A |I

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK POOR-AREA RECLAIM, THIN LAYER
SEPTIC TANK II 1
ABSORPTION I RDADFILL I
FIELDS I I
I II I _
5-7%: SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, SEEPAGE IMPROBABLE SOURCE THIN LAYER
LAGOON 7-8%: SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, SEEPAGE, SLOPE SAND
AREAS
II II
SANITARY SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, TOO SANDY IMPROBABLE SOURCE TOO SANDY, THIN LAYER
LANDFILL I GRAVEL
S(TRENCH) I
I I I I ___
I 1
SANITARY SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, SEEPAGE POOR-TOO SANDY
LANDFILL I TOPSOIL
(AREA)
SII I I
POOR-AREA RECLAIM, SEEPAGE, TOO SANDY II
DAILY I II WATER MANAGEMENT_
COVER FOR I I I SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL 1 I POND
I I II RESERVOIR
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II I
SSEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, CUTBACKS CAVE I SEVERE-THIN LAYER, SEEPAGE
SHALLOW IIEMBANKMENTS
EXCAVATIONS II DIKES AND
SI |I LEVEES )
SI II I
SMODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK II SEVERE-NO WATER
DWELLINGS I II EXCAVATED
WITHOUT I II PONDS
BASEMENTS I IIAQUIFER FED
I 1 II
SSEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK I DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS II
WITH II DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS
I II I I
MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK, SLOPE II FAST INTAKE, SOIL BLOWING, DEPTH TO ROCK
SMALL I I I
COMMERCIAL IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I

MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK DEPTH TO ROCK, TOO SANDY, SOIL BLOWING
LOCAL TERRACES
ROADS AND II AND
STREETS DIVERSIONS
SI II I ___
LAWNS. MODERATE-THIN LAYER, DROUGHT I DROUGHT, DEPTH TO ROCK
LANDSCAPING GRASSED
AND GOLF I I WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS II
_I L II R S

REGIONAL INTERPETATIONS








47C CHIEFLAND-PEDRO VARIANT COMPLEX, 5 TO 8 PERCENT LOPES

Ip 1RECRE AT IONAL DEVELOPMENT
SI SEVERE-TOO SANDY II I 5-6%: SEVERE-TOO SANDY
I I II 6-87: SEVERE-TOO SANDY, SLOPE
I CAMP AREAS I PLAYGROUNDS I
I I II I
I I II I
I ISEVERE-TOO SANDY I I SEVERE-TOO SANDY
I I .I PATHS I
PICNIC AREAS II AND I
I I 11 TRAILS I
I I II I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CLASS- CAPA- I I
DETERMINING ABILITY I I I I I
PHASE I I I I I I
I INIRRIIRR. NIRR IIRR. INIRR JIRR INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRRE NIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR.
Si I I I II I I I I









___________________WOO1DLAN D SUITABILITY--------------------------
CLASS- ORD MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I I I I I I
DETERMINING M EROION EQUIP. SEEDLING I PLANT COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
I I I I I I II I I I I I I I
SI I L I IR I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I EI I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I 1 1 1 1 I I I I I



WOODLAND SUITABILITY
CLASS- I ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS AI POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY IT
DETERMINING I GAIN EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT I CANON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT G
I PHASE I I HAZARD I LIMIT | MORT*YeI HAZARD I COMPET.I IrNDxl I
I II IHERB. I TREES I I PLANTS I I I
I I 1 I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I 1
I I I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I 1 I I I
I. I I I I I I I I I
I I I II I I I I
I I I I 1 I I I I I I
SI I I I I I1 1 I I
I I I I I I I 1 I I I
WINDBREAK U














CA-- POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY RANGELANDD OR FOREST PEETATION)T ASA
AS P I PLANT I PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT) BY CLASS DETERMINING PHASE HT
I I I I I I I I I I
1 1 I II I I I I I
II I I I I I I I I
I i I I I I I I




ILIECOMMON PLANT NAMESYMBSITABOLY
I. 1 I I I I I N, N I
II I II I I I J I

III I I I I I 1 II
I 1 1 II I I 1 A I

POTENTIAL POTENTIAL NATIVE NT COMMUNITY RANGELAND R FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
F AVORABLE YEARSNT PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY HT) BY CLASS DETERMINING PHASE


___N PLANT NAME SYBLE OL YEAS










POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBSN/ACE DRY NTC): G
FAVORABLE YEARS I I I I
II RAL YEARS I i I
I NFAVI ABI I I I I






FOOTNOTES


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD
47C CHIEFLAND PEDRO VARIANT COMPLEX, 5 TO 8 PERCENT SLOPES
PEDRO VARIANT PART

THE PEDRO VARIANT SERIES CONSISTS OF WELL DRAINED, NEARLY LEVEL TO GENTLY SLOPING SOILS. IN A REPRESENTATIVE PROFILE, THE SURFACE LAYER
IS GRAY FINE SAND. THE SUBSURFACE IS PALE BROWN FINE SAND. THE SUBSOIL IS YELLOWISH BROWN SANDY CLAY LOAM. BETWEEN DEPTHS OF 16 TO 20
INCHES IS SOFT, PARTIALLY DECOMPOSED LIMESTONE. BELOW THIS IS HARD LIMESTONE. SLOPES RANGE FROM 5 TO 8 PERCENT.


I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES -
IDEPTHI IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID FPLAS- I
I(IN.)i USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED AASHTO J>3 INl_ THAN PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITY]
I I I PC IPT)I 4 1 10 I40 I 200 I IINDEX I
I 0-13 I S, FS SP-SM A-3, A-2-4 0-1 I 100 95-100 90-100 5-12 I NP
113-16 SCL SC I A-2, A-4, A-6 0-1 190-100 85-100 80-100 25-40 25-35 8-16
i I i I I I I I


IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND ORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)IIPCT DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONIIMMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD. MATTER I I
J 1<2MM I (S/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALlI I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
ISAME I 6.0-20 0.03-0.08 1 5.1-6.5 LOW 1 .171 1 I 2 1 I LOW MODERATE
SAS I 2.0-6.0 0.12-0.15 ) 6.1-7.8 I LOW I .281 I I I
ABOVE 1 II I I 1 I J I
I I I I 1 I I I I
1 I I I I I I I I I
SI I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK SUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
I__I DEPTH | KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY I DURATION I MONTHS I (FT) 1 I I(I-|JN} A IJ-( | HIN) I(IN) I I ACTION I
S NONE I I I >6 1 I I 10-20 1 HARD I I I I

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
ET T SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK I I POOR-THIN LATER AREA RECLAIM
ISEPTIC TANK II
ABSORPTION I I ROADFILL
FIELDS II
I II I I I
li I
SEWAGE 5 TO 7%: SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK I IMPROBABLE SOURCE-THIN LAYER
LAGOON 7 TO 8%: SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, SLOPE I SAND
AREAS |
SA I I A I


SEVERE-DEPTH TO OCK, SEEPAGE IMPROBABLE SOURCE-TOO SANDY, THIN LAYER
SANITARY SEVERE-DEPTH TOROCK, SEEPAGE i
LANDFILL II GRAVEL .
S(TRENCH) I I
I I II I
SANTAR SEVERE SEEPAGE, DEPTH TO ROCK POOR-TOO SANDY, AREA RECLAIM
SANITARY
LANDFILL II TOPSOIL
(AREA) II
AII I I
DAILY POOR-THIN LAYER, AREA RECLAIM, SEEPAGE WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR I SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, SEEPAGE
LANDFILL II POND
_I _1 RESERVOIR
I AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II I


I SHALLOW
EXCAVATIONS
I

DWELLINGS
WITHOUT
I BASEMENTS
I
DWELLINGS
S WITH
I BASEMENTS
I -
SSMALL
I COMMERCIAL
BUILDINGS

S LOCAL
ROADS AND
STREETS
I -
LAWNS.
LANDSCAPING
AND GOLF
FAIRWAYS

I- ___________


I1
1-
]


SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, CUTBANKS CAVE



SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK



SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK



SEVERE-DEPTH TO' ROCK



SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK



SEVERE-THIN LAYER


I IEMBANKMENTS
I DIKES AND
I LEVEES
II
II EXCAVATED
II PONDS
JiAQUIFER.FED
II

II DRAINAGE
II

II
II IRRIGATION
II
II
II TERRACES
11 AND
II DIVERSIONS
I1
II GRASSED
II WATERWAYS
II


I
I


SEVERE-THIN LAYER, SEEPAGE



SEVERE-NO WATER



DEEP TO WATER



DROUGHT, SEEPAGE, DEPTH TO ROCK



DEPTH TO ROCK, TOO SANDY, SOIL BLOWING



DROUGHTY, DEPTH TO ROCK


-I





-I

-I


REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS


L


__







p1e pe.'--rO--RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
I I SEVERE-TOO SANDY, DEPTH TO ROCK II 1 5 TO 6%: SEVERE-TOO SANDY, DEPTH TO ROCK
I I 11 I 6 TO 8%: SEVERE-TOO SANDY, DEPTH TO ROCK, SLOPE
I CAMP AREAS PLAYGROUNDS I
I I II I I
ISEVERE-TOO SANDY, DEPTH TO ROCK II I SEVERE-TOO SANDY
SI Ij PATHS
PICNIC AREAS II AND
I I I TRAILS
I I II _L I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CLASS- CAPA- PEANUTS I WATERMELONS BAHIAGRASS I CORN I
DETERMINING ABILITY (LBS) (TONS) (AUM) (BU)
PHASE I I I I I I I I
I INIRRIIRR.INIRR IIRR, INIRR IIRR. INIRRIRRRR. NIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR.
ALL 4 2900 10 8 55





CLASS- ORD MA EMS POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
ETERMININ SYI EROSII I I I I I I TREES I I I I I ITE TREES TO PLANT
PHASEIHAADI I I I I I I COPET I I I I I I I INX





ALL. 3S SLIGHT MODERATE MODERATE MODERATE SLIGHT SLASH PINE 80 SLASH PINE
I LOBL Y PINE
I I I 1 1 1 I i 1 I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I J
I I I 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I




LONGLEAF PINE 70
I I I I i I I I I I I I I I I I I I




ALL 3 SLIGHT MODERATE MODERATE MODRATY PINE SLIGHT SLASH PINE 8035 SLASH PINE















CAROLINA LAURELCHY 30 JAPANESE PRIVET 25
LOBLOLLY PINE 80
FELONGLEAF PINIT 70








CLASS- POTENTIAL FOR HABI ATI EEMENTSI POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR I I
I DETERMINING GRAIN I I GRASS &I WILD HARDWD ]CONIFERDSHRUS | WETLANO|SALLONIOPENL IOOE L TRETLANDRANGLD
I PHASE I I SEE LEGUME I HERB TREES PANTS PLANTS ATER I I WILOLF I NILDLF















I PHANT MPERCENTAGEACOMPOSITION (DRY SEIGHTL BY CLASS DETERMINING PHASE
COMMON PLANT NAME SYMBOL I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
HAII I I I I I I
IND BREAKS



I SS-DETERMING PHASE SPECIES JI H SPECIES. IMT SPECIES INT SPECIES I7T
I AI I III I I II




ALL SLASH PINE 1A LOBLOLLY PINE 140 1 LONGLEAF PINE SOUTHERN REDCEDAR 140
LONLEACAROLINA LAUPINECHY 130 JAANESE PIVET 125IPA2
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I II II II I
S1 I I I I I I




LLOTENTIAL O TAIF HABITAT SUITABILITY
LASS- POTENTIAL FOR HATAT ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR: Y
PHASE SEED ILEGUME I ER. I TREES PLANTS I PLANTS I WATER IWILOLF WILDLF IWILOLF IWILDLF
ALL I POOR I FAIR FAIR POOR FAIR I V. POOR1 V.POOR j FAIR 1 FAIR I V. POOR I -
II I I I I I i I i




OI I I I I I I E I

POTUENTIFA NATIB E PLANT COMMUNITY (RARNGELANOR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
PLANT PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY EHT BY CLASS DETERMINING PH
COMMON PLANT NAME I SYMBOL I I
I (NLSPN) I I I

CREEPING BLUESTEM ANST
HAIRY PANICUM PARH
DWARF HUCKLEBERRY DGADU TI
PINELAND THREEAWN ARSTS I i
BLACKBERRY RUCU
DOG FENNEL A EUC07
LIVE OAK QNUVA Fl
SLASH PINE PIEL I
LONGLEAF PINE PIPA2 I I
POST OAK QuST I
TURKEY OAK QULA2 I i

POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT): i I
FAVORABLE YEARS I I I I J
NORMAL YEARS I
UNFAVORABLE YEARS I I I i J
FOOTNOTES


S O IL I N T E RP R E T A TI O N S RECORD
047 CHIEFLAND PEDRO VARIANT COMPLEX, OCCASIONALLY FLOODED, 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES
SCHIEFLAND PART
THE CHIEFLAND SERIES CONSISTS OF WELL DRAINED NEARLY LEVEL TO GENTLY SLOPING SOILS. TYPICALLY, THEY HAVE DARK GRAY FINE SAND SURFACE
LAYERS, PALE BROWN AND VERY PALE BROWN SUBSURFACES TO 23 INCHES UNDERLAIN BY SANDY CLAY LOAM OVER LIMESTONE ROCK AT 31 INCHES.


I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES I
IDEPTHI IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS-I
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE UNIFIED AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3 PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT JTICITY
I J I I(PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 I 200 I INDEX
0-23 FS SP-SM A-3 0 100 100 75-99 5-10 NP
23-31 SCL SM-SC, SC A-6 100 100 80-99 22-40 <35 NP-16
I I I I II
I 1 I I I I I I

IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)IPCT I DENSITY ) ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I
I I<2MM) l(G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALI K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL CONCRETE
ISAMEI I 6.0-20 1 0.05-0.08 14.5-6.0I 1V. Low 1.17 1 5 I 2 1 nu I JHIGH_
IAS I I 1 0.6-2.0 1 0.12-0.17 16.0-8.0 I I Low 1.321 I I I
ABOVE I I I I I I ____
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
I I l I I I I _ _
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
FREQUENCY I DURATION qNTHS I (FT) I I(IN) I I N) I i(IN) (N) I I ACTION I
Common Long IApr-June A. > I I I f-40 I I I A I -

--SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
l II -I
SEPTIC TANK SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, FLOODS POOR-AREA RECLAIM, THIN LAYER
ABSORPTION II ROADFILL
FIELDS ( II
iI II I
I I I
SEWAGE I SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, SEEPAGE, FLOODS IMPROBABLE SOURCE THIN LAYER
LAGOON 1 II SAND
AREAS I I
I I i_
SI II I
SANITARY SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, TOO SANDY, FLOODS IMPROBABLE SOURCE TOO SANDY, THIN LAYER
LANDFILL I GRAVEL
(TRENCH) I

I I II -II
SANITARY I SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, SEEPAGE, FLOODS POOR-TOO SANDY
LANDFILL i I TOPSOIL
(AREA) I
I II _I
II II
DAILY IPOOR-AREA RECLAIM, SEEPAGE, TOO SANDY II WATER MANAGEMENT_
COVER FOR II
LANDFILL I POND SEVERE-SEEPAGE
--- J II RESERVOIR I
II AREA I
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II _I
I I II I
SHALLOW SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, CUTBANKS CAVE I IEMBANKMENTSI SEVERE-THIN LAYER, SEEPAGE
EXCAVATIONS 1 I DIKES AND
S LEVEES
I II _
DWELLINGS SEVERE-FLOODS EXCAVATED SEVERE-NO WATER
WITHOUT PONDS
BASEMENTS AQUIFER FED
----- II I
DWELLINGS SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, FLOODS DEEP TO WATER
WITH DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS
I------_ II i I
I I
SMALL SEVERE-FLOODS 11FAST INTAKE, SOIL BLOWING, DEPTH TO ROCK, FLOODS
COMMERCIAL I IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I
i I I i I
SI II
LOCAL SEVERE-FLOODS II TERRACES DEPTH TO ROCK, TOO SANDY, SOIL BLOWING
ROADS AND I II AND
STREETS I DIVERSIONS
I -l _
LAWNS. II I
LANDSCAPING MODERATE-THIN LAYER, DROUGHT, FLOODS II GRASSED DROUGHT, DEPTH TO ROCK
AND GOLF I WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS

-REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I I
I I I






04l

0* c
Ck-*

RECREATIONAL DEELPUDMT
SEVERE-TOO SANDY, FLOODS SEVERE-TOO SANDY.
CAMP AREAS I PLAYGROUNDS I
I I II I
I II I
SEVERE-TOO SANDY 11 SEVERE-TOO SANDY
EI I PATHS
PICNIC AREAS I AND
I I TRAILS
I I II __ I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CLASS- | CAPA- I I
DETERMINING BILIT I I I I
PHASE I I I I I I I I
I INIRRIIRR.INIRR IIRR. INIRi JlRR, INIR IRR NIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR.
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I .
I 1 I 1 1 I111 11 1 I 1 1 I I I

LI I I I I IT PI I I I I IA I I I I I
I DEI R I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
iPH H I I IO I I I I I I I I I 1

1 D I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ES
I I I I I i I I I I I I I I I I I


I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
WOODLAND UITATBILITYIL
S CLASS- I ORD I TMANACGEENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I A
I DETERMINING I SYN I EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTHE. PLANT |W COMMON TREES ISITEW TREES TO PLANT G
I PHASE J I HAZARD I LIMIT I MORT'Y. HAZARD COMPET.JI IINDXI I
I I SEED I I TREES I I PLANTS I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I J I I I I I I






P IOEI IVE I I I I I FOI ISTOY V TAT
I I I I I I I I I I

1 1 I I 1 I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I





































D R NA G S ID R NE US T SL P D L.TRUNFAVORABLE YEARSA1IB.D|
I I I I I I I I I II


I I I I I i I I I
I I I I II I i I I

I I I I II I I II
I I I I II II II
WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
I DETERMINING GRAIN (IGRASS I] WIED AHARDWD HCONIAERISHRUBS IWETLANDISHALLOWIOPENOD NIODLD .IWETLANDIRDNGLDI

I I I I I I I I I I 1I
I I I I I I I I I I l I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I
I 1 I I I I I I I I I 1 I I
III I I I I I I I I I I I I
POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
I PLANT l PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT) BY CLASS DETERMINING PHASE I
COMMON PLANT NAME I SYMBOL I I I I
I (NLSPN) I I I I i
I I I I I I I
II I I I I I I
I 1 I 1 1 I I
I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I
SII I



I I I I
POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBSe/ACe DRY WT): J
FAVORABLE YEARS I I I I I
NORMAL YEARS I I I I
SUNFAVORABLE YEARS I I I
FOOTNOTES


.Wro= vln.A


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD
047 CHIEFLAND PEDRO VARIANT COMPLEX, OCCASIONALLY FLOODED, 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES
PEDRO VARIANT PART

THE PEDRO VARIANT SERIES CONSISTS OF WELL DRAINED, NEARLY LEVEL TO GENTLY SLOPING SOILS. IN A REPRESENTATIVE PROFILE, THE SURFACE
LAYER IS GRAY FINE SAND. THE SUBSURFACE IS PALE BROWN FINE SAND. THE SUBSOIL IS YELLOWISH BROWN SANDY CLAY LOAM. BETWEEN DEPTHS
OF 16 TO 20 INCHES IS SOFT, PARTIALLY DECOMPOSED LIMESTONE. BELOW THIS IS HARD LIMESTONE. SLOPES RANGE FROM 2 TO 5 PERCENT.


I .... ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES I
IDEPTHI I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS-I
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE j UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INj THAN 3 PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I I ItPCT) 4 1 10 I 40 I 200 1g INDEX
I0-13 ', FS SP-SM A-3, A-2-4 0-1 100 95-100 90-100 5-12 NP
S13-16 SCLFS sc A-2, A-4, A-6 0-1 90-100 85-100 80-100 25-40 25-35 8-16
I 1I I (


IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA-- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- 1EROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT i DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)| SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I _
I IJ<2MM)I (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALI K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEI ICONCRETEJ
1 0-131 I16.0-20 1 0.03-0.08 5.1-6.5 LOW .17 11 2 1 I-LOW- IMODERATEI
S13-16 2.0-6.0 0.12-0.15 6.1-7.8 LOW .28 I
I I I 1 I I I 1 I 1 I
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I i I
I I I I I I I I I
I FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENTLI
I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH (HARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY I DURATION I MONTHS I (FT) I I (IN) I I JI) I (IN) I(IN) I ACTION
COMMON LONG IAPR-JUNE >6 I I 10-20 ARD 0

_SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
I II I -
ISEPTIC TANK ISEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, FLOODS I POOR-THIN LAYER, AREA RECLAIM
ABSORPTION I I ROADFILL
FIELDS I

SSEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, FLOODS I I IMPROBABLE SOURCE-THIN LAYER
SEWAGE I
LAGOON II SAND
AREAS II

SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, SEEPAGE, FLOODS IMPROBABLE SOURCE-TOO SANDY, THIN LAYER
SANITARY I
LANDFILL I I GRAVEL
S(TRENCH) [
SI Il I
SEVERE-SEEPAGE, DEPTH TO ROCK, FLOODS POOR-TOO SANDY, AREA RECLAIM
SANITARY I
LANDFILL I TOPSOIL
(AREA) I I
I II I I
POOR-THIN LAYER, AREA RECLAIM, SEEPAGE
DAILY I WATER MANAGEMENT __
COVER FOR i I SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I II POND
I II RESERVOIR
I AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT _,
ISHALLW SEVEIE-DEPTH TO ROCK, CUTBANKS CAVE I I SEVERE-THIN LAYER, SEEPAGE
SHALLOW I IEMBANKMNTS I
EXCAVATIONS I II DIKES AND
II LEVEES
1 I II I
SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, FLOODS SEVERE-NO WATER
DWELLINGS I | EXCAVATED
WITHOUT I J PONDS
BASEMENTS I AQUIFER FED
I I I I I
S SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, FLOODS DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS II
WITH I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I
I _ II I. I
SEVERE DEPTH TO ROCK, FLOODS DROUGHT, SEEPAGE, DEPTH TO ROCK, FLOODS
SMALL S D OO
COMMERCIAL I II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I I I
I I II I I
I SEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, FLOODS DEPTH TOROCK, TOO SANDY, SOIL BLOWING
LOCAL I I TERRACES
ROADS AND I I AND
STREETS I I DIVERSIONS
I _ . II I
S LAWNS. SEVERE-THIN LAYER, FLOODS GS DROUGHT, DEPTH TO ROCK
LANDSCAPING I GRASSED I
IAND GOLF I WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS I I

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS







Ofedro vyr-D C:b gr
RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
I I II I
SEVERE-TOO SANDY, DEPTH TO ROCK, FLOODS SEVERE-TOO SANDY, DEPTH TO ROCK
CAMP AREAS I PLAYGROUNDS
I I II I
I II
SEVERE-TOO SANDY, DEPTH TOROCK j PATHS SEVERE-TOO SANDY
PICNIC AREAS I AND
I TRAILS
I I I-l --________-J____________ I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CLASS- CAPA- I PEANUTS I WATERMELONS BAHIAGRASS CORN TOMATOES
DETERMINING ABILITY (LBS) (TONS) (AUM) (BU) (LBS)
I PHASE I I I I I I I I I
SINIRRIIRR.INIRR IIRR. INIRR JIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR 1IRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. I
ALL 45 2900 10 8 55 18000
I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I
SI I I I I I I I I

I I 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I

1 I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I



EROSIONEQUIP SE I IITH PLANT I COONE TREES TO PLANT






I I LOGEI I I I I I I A PINE 1 70
I I I 1 I I I I I











I I S I ES I i SI I I I I I I I I I I E
I 1I I I I I I
J I I I J 1 1 I 1 __
WOODLAND SUITABILITY
CLASS- P ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
DETERMINING I SYM I EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT I COMMON TREES ISITEi TREES TO PLANT
I PHASE I -I HAZARD LIMIT I MORTEY.E HAZARD COMPETE. IINDXFI I
ALL 3S SLIGHT MODERATE MODERATE MODERATE SLIGHT SLASH PINE 80 SLASH PINE
S I I LOBLOLLY PINE 80
SI I I LONGLEAF PINE 170









II I I I II I I
I I III I I I I
CLASS-II T FT I I I





E I I ID 1 I I IN L
I







I I I I i I I I I I
I-




PINELAND THREAT ARST5INDBREAKS
ILASS-ETERMNG PHASE I SPECIES IHT SPECIES. iTQl SPECUIESV IT SPECIESII OK QnT
SLASH SLASH PINE PINEP 55 LOBLOLLYPINE 40 LONGLAF PINE 351 SOUTHERN EDCED PINE 40
LEAFCAROLINA LAUELCHY 30 JAPANESE PRIVET 25
1























POST OAK QUEST
I I I I oI I II
WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
SS- POTENTIAL FOR HABTATEL NTSI POTENTIAL PRODUCTIONS HABITAT FORDRY WT):
DETERMINING GRAIN &|GRASS c1 WILD JHARDWD ICONIFER1SHRUBS I|ETLANOISHALLOWIOPEMOD I1t0DLD .IWETLANDIRANGLDI
i PHASE --- SEED LEGUME HIERB. TREES PLANTS I IPPLANTS I WATER JllILO LF IWILOLF IWlLOLF I
'ALL POOR FAIR FAIR POOR 'FAIR I 1V.POOR V. POOR FAIR i FAIR IV.POORI -- I











I FAVORABLE YEARS I I I
1
S I I I I I I I

POTENTIAL .NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELRAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION
I PLANT I PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT) BY CLASS DETERMINING PHASE
COM)N PLANT NAME SYMBOL I I I Ii
I I (NLSPN)I I I I I















NORMAL YEARS
CHALKY BLUESTEM ANCA4
CREEPING BLUESTEM I ANST I I
HAIRY PANICUME ARH
DWARF HUCKLEBERRY GADU
PINELAND THREEAWN AST5 I I
i1 I I II I I I
BLACKBERRY RUCU
DOG FENNEL EUCO7 M
LIVE OAK QUV1
SLASH PINE PIEL
LONGLEAF PINE PIPA2
POST OAK QUST

i L I S I I I 1 I

POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT)I I ___________________________________ I
FAVORABLE YEARS
I YPNORMAL YEARS P |
L EI UNFAVORABLE YEARS_ I I
FOOTNOTES


SC IL I N T E R P RE T A T I O N S R E C.O R D

8B LAKELAND FINE SAND. 0 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
12-78


THE LAKELAND SERIES CONSISTS OF EXCESSIVELY DRAINED NEARLY LEVEL TO STEEP SOILS ON COASTAL PLAIN UPLANDS. TYPICALLY,
THESE SOILS HAVE A VERY DARK GRAYISH BROWN SAND SURFACE LAYER ABOUT 3 INCHES THICK. YELLOWISH BROWN SAND OCCURS BETWEEN
DEPTHS OF 3 AND 64 INCHES. AND BELOW 64 INCHES TO'BEPTHS OF 90 INCHES OR MORE VERY PALE BROWN SAND OCCURS.


I __-- ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID OPLAS-
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE UNIFIED AASHTO 1>3 INITHAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. LIMIT ITICITYI
I-I-I I I(PCT)l 4 I 10 I 40 I 200 I IINDEX
I0-S51FS ISP-SM IA-3. A-2-4 0 190-100 90-100 60-100 5-12 NP
155-80S, FS ISP, SP--SM IA-3, A-2-4 I0 190-100 90-100 50-100 1-12 NP


I I I I
IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL JFACTORSIEROD. MATTER I__
I I<2MM)I (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) i (IN/IN) I (PH) I POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
I 0-551 2-8 11.35-1.s55 >20 0.05-0.08 14.5-6.0 I I LOW 1.171 5 I 2 1 >1 I LOW IMODERAT I
55-801 2-6 11.50-1.60 >20 1 0.03-0.08 14.5-6.0 I LOW 1.171 I
I III I I I
II I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENTLI
I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I(IN) I I (IN) I I(IN) LL(I NI I ACTION _
I NONE I 1I >6.0 I I I II >60 I I I A

S SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
II GOOD
SEPTIC TANK SLIGHT II
ABSORPTION II ROADFILL
I FIELDS IL
I I I I
I SEVERE-SEEPAGE II PROBABLE
SEWAGE II
LAGOON I SAND
I AREAS II
I IIII
SEVERE-SEEPAGE,TOO SANDY II IMPROBABLE-TOO SANDY
SANITARY II
LANDFILL II GRAVEL
(TRENCH) II
I L II I
ISEVERE-SEEPAGE POOR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY I
LANDFILL TOPSOIL
(AREA) II
I I II I
II POOR-SEEPAGE.TOO SANDY i
S DAILY II WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR II SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I POND I
I III RESERVOIR I
II AREA I
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II I _
SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE II SEVERE-SEEPAGE
SHALLOW IIEMBANKMENTS ]
EXCAVATIONS II DIKES AND I
II LEVEES I
-- II i
SLIGHT II ISEVERE-NO WATER
DWELLINGS III EXCAVATED
WITHOUT I 11 PONDS I
BASEMENTS AQUIFER FEDI
I I II i
I SLIGHT II DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS II
WITH I I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS II
I I I I I I
SLIGHT II DROUGHTYFAST INTAKE.SOIL BLOWING
SMALL Ii
COMMERCIAL III IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS II
I II I i
SLIGHT II I TOO SANDY.SOIL BLOWING
LOCAL TERRACES
ROADS AND II AND I
STREETS II DIVERSIONS
I 1 I
LAWNS, MODERATE-DROUGHTY II I DROUGHT
LANDSCAPING II GRASSED I
AND GOLF II WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS II
II I I
REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I I I
I I
I II






8B LAKELAND FINE SAND. 0 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
12-78


--------------- _____RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT-__________
SEVERE-TOO SANDY I SEVERE-TOO SANDY

CAMP AREAS PLAYGROUNDS


SEVERE-TCO SANDY I SEVERE-TOO SANDY
I II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS II AND
I I II TRAILS

CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE F CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
I CAPA- I CORN I SOYBEANS I PEANUTS TOBACCO IBAHIAGRASS I IMPROVED I CATS
I ABILITY I I I IBERMUDAGR. I
I -I I (BU) I IBU I (LS) I (LS) I (AUM) I (AUM) I (ByJ I
INIRRI RR.INIRR |IRR, INIRR IRR, INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IRR. INIRR IIRR INIRR IRR. I
4S 551 1201 12000 117001 17.0 7. 20








ORD MANAGEMETPROLEMS POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I I I I


SYM EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLING WINDTH. PLANT I COMMON TREES I SITE TREES TO PLANT
I I- HAZARD I LIMIT I MCT IY. HAZARD IICOMPET. I IIND X I
3S SLIGHT I MODERATEIMODERATE I SLIGHT I SLIGHT SLASH PINE I ]SLASH PINE
I I I I I BLOLLY PINE 80 LOBLOLLY PINE
LONGLEAF PINE 170 1






I I I I I I I I I
WILDLIFE HABANDSUITAT BILITYA__________
I RD IMANAGEMPOTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS MENTAL POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR:I



I I SIGHTRASS & WDATIMDAT SLIGHT SLIGHT RUBS WETLASH PINE SLASH PINETLANDRANGELD
I SE EGUME HERB, TREES PLANTSIPLANTS I AFTER IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILLF IWILDLF











I POOR FAIR FAIR POOR I FAIR I IV. POOR. POOR FAIR IFAIR IV. POOR -
I I I I I




PLANT IT PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT) I I I
COMMON PLANT NAME I SYMBOL





- IJ---IN II- (NLSPN)A C JPAES RVT S AM5 I
CREEPING BLUESTEM I I ANSTI I
LOPSIDED INDIANGRASS I ISOSE II I I
HAIRY PANICUM II I I IPARH 5 I
POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FO
ISED SLEGUMC I HERD I TREES PLANTS I IRLANTS I PATER IWILDLF IWILDLF IS LDLF ICI LDLF I

I POR IPIFAIR I FAIR I POOR FAIR I P POE RI FAIR 5FAIR A V. PDDRI -






IPANICUM PANIC 6
I I I I I TURKEY OAK I IQULA2 5
I I I I II I OTHER ANNUAL OR
LAI I I I I I UMA3I I I
OTHER TREES I I I I I


















IPOTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT):________________________________
P POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAN OR FOREST NDERSTORY VEGETATION
PLANT PERNORMAL YEARNTAGE MPITION (RY W33HT)

UNFAVORABLECREEPING BLUESTEM ANRS 250
LOPSIDEDINFOOTNOTEANGRASS SOSES 5


I IF WATER SUPPLIES STREAMS E TC. RECEIVE SEEPAGE FROM ABSORPTION FIELC A CONTAMINATION HAZARD MAY EXIST.
PAN ICUM MB OAN L2 6I

OTHER ANNUAL FORBS AAFF 5
OTHER PERENNIAL GRASSLIKES PUSE 5



IBROMSEDGE BLUESTEM ANVI2 1



NALORATHE YEARS T3000 I I I I

UNFAVORARU R YAARF I 200 I I I I

1 IF PATER SUPPLIES STREAMS ETC. RECEIVE SEEPAGE FROM ABORTION FIELC A CONTAMINATION HAZARD MAY EXIST.


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD

8D LAKELAND FINE SAND, 5 TO 12 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
12-78


THE LAKELAND SERIES CONSISTS OF EXCESSIVELY DRAINED NEARLY LEVEL TO STEEP SOILS ON COASTAL PLAIN UPLANDS. TYPICALLY.
THESE SOILS HAVE A VERY DARK GRAYISH BROWN SAND SURFACE LAYER ABOUT 3 INCHES THICK. YELLOWISH BROWN SAND OCCURS BETWEEN
DEPTHS OF 3 AND 64 INCHES. AND BELOW 64 INCHES TO DEPTHS OF 90 INCHES OR MORE VERY PALE BROWN SAND OCCURS.


I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
DEPTH I I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS ILIOUID IPLAS- I
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I II(PCT) I 4 I 10 I 40 I 200 I IINDEXI
I O0-441FS ISP-SM IA-3. A-2-4 I 0 190-100 90-100 60-100 5-12 I NPI
144-80S. FS ISP, SP-SM IA-3. A-2-4 I 0 190-100 90-100 50-100 1-12 NP
I I I I I I II I
II I J I II I
I I I I I II I
IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SCIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)ItPCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I__
I <2MM)I1 (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALI K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
I 0-441 2-8 11.35-1.55 >20o 0.05-0.08 14.5-6.0 I 1 LOW 1.171 5 2 I >1 I LOW IMODERATEI
144-801 2-6 11.50-1.60 I >20o 0.03-0.08 14.5-6.0 I I LOW 1.171 I I I
I I I I I I I I I I. . I I
I I I I I I I I

FLOODING 1DEHIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENTeLI
I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) I I (IN) I I(IN) I(IN) I I ACTION
S NONE I I I >6.0 I I I I I >60 I I I I A I. -

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
GOOD
SEPTIC TANK MODERATE-SLOPE
I ABSORPTION ROADFILL
I FIELDS 1

SEVERE-SEEPAGE.SLOPE PROBABLE
I SEWAGE
I LAGOON SAND
I AREAS

SEVERE-SEEPAGE.TOO SANDY IMPROBABLE-TCO SANDY
SANITARY I
LANDFILL GRAVEL
I (TRENCH)11

SEVERE-SEEPAGE POOR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY
LANDFILL I I TOPSOIL
(AREA)

I POOR-SEEPAGE.TOO SANDY I
DAILY I 1| WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR I I SEVERE-SEEPAGE.SLOPE
LANDFILL I I POND I
I| RESERVOIR I
AREA I
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT
I SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE I SEVERE-SEEPAGE
SHALLOW I EMBANKMENTS
EXCAVATIONS I DIKES AND
I LEVEES

MODERATE-SLOPE SEVERE-NO WATER
DWELLINGS EXCAVATED
WITHOUT 11 PONDS I
BASEMENTS AQUIFER FED

SMODERATE-SLOPE DEEP TO WATER
I DWELLINGS11
I WITH 11DRAINAGEI
BASEMENTS DANG

I ISSEVERE-SLOPE DROUGHTY.FAST INTAKE.SOIL BLOWING
I SMALL 11
COMMERCIAL IRRIGATION
I BUILDINGS

MODERATE-SLOPE SLOPE.TOO SANDY.SOIL BLOWING
LOCAL TERRACES
I ROADS AND II AND I
I STREETS DIVERSIONS

LAWNS, MODERATE-DROUGHTY.SLOPE.TOO SANDY SLOPE.DROUGHTY
LANDSCAPING GRASSED
I AND GOLF WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS |


REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I I I
I I I






8D LAKELAND FINE SAND. S TO 12 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
12-78


SEVERE-TOO SANDY II I SEVERE-SLOPE.TOO SANDY
II I1 I
CAMP AREAS j IIPLAYGROUNDSI
I Ia
SEVERE-TOO SANDY I SEVERE-TOO SANDY
I PATHS
PICNIC AREAS II AND
II TRAILS
I II
_CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
I CAPA- I CORN I SOYBEANS i PEANUTS I TOBACCO IBAHIAGRASS I IMPROVED I OATS
ABILITY 1 I I IBERMUDAGR. I I
I 1 (BU) __ i(BU) I (LBS) 1S) I (UMLBS) (AU MAUM I (BU) I
____ INIRRIIRR.NRR RRINIRR IIIRR INIRR JIRR IRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. NIRRR IIRR. I
6S 1 6. 5 I 1 6.5 -



I I I I l I






WCCDLAND SUITABILITY
ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
SYM EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI wINDTH. PLANT COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
I I HAZARD I LIMIT I MORTY.I HAZARD I COMPET.I INDEX I
13S SLIGHT MODERATEIMODERATE SLIGHT SLIGHT ISLASH PINE 180 ISLASH PINE
LOBLOLLY PINE 80 I LOBLOLLY PINE
ILONGLEAF PINE 170











_____WIN BREAKS -__
I SPECIES_ IHTI SPECIES IHTI SPECIES I HTI SPECIES IHTI
ISLASH PINE 1451LOBLOLLY PINE 1401SAND PINE Io30EASTERN REDCEDAR 145
ICAROLINA LAURELCHY 1301JAPANESE PRIVET 1301BAMBCO 1251 I

I I I I I I I I I I

WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
I __POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT LAMENTS ____ POTENTIAL AS HABIe.AT FCe _
IGRAIN GRASSS &I WILD IHARDWC ICONIFERISHRUBS IWETLANDISHALLCWIOPENLD IWOODLD IWETLANDIRANGELDI
I__ _e ILGUM I HERB._I_TREES__PLANTS I PLANTS I WATER IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF-1
POOR I FAIR I FAIR I POOR I FAIR IV. POOR|V. POCRI FAIR FAIR IV. POOR -


a aa i i a a a a a a a a a a


POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELjND ORFOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
PLANT PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT)
COMMON PLANT NAME SYMBOL
f__ aI a a (NLSPN)
CREEPING BLUESTEM ANST 50
LOPSIDED INDIANGRASS SOSE5 5
IHAIRY PANICUM PARH 5
SLENDER BLUESTEM ANTE 5
IPINELAND THRZEAWN ARST5 5
|PANICUM PANIC 6
TURKEY OAK QULA2 1 5
EITHER ANNUAL FOR8S AAFF 5
|OTHER PERENNIAL GRASSLIKES PPGL 5
|BLACKJACK OAK QUMA3 1
ICTHER TREES TTTT I
|PURPLE LOVEGRASS ERSP 1
IBROOMSEDGE BLUESTEM ANV12 I 1


POTENTIAL PRODUCTICh (LBS./AC. DRY WT): I
FAVORABLE YEARS I 4000
NORMAL YEARS I 3300
UNFAVORABLE YEARS 2500 I I I I
FOOTNOTES
S IF WATER SUPPLIES. STREAMS. ETC. RECEIVE SEEPAGE FROM ABSORPTION FIELD A CONTAMINATION HAZARD MAY EXIST.
I a a I a a a a I
UTNTaL NaTV PLN aOMNT (R EAN aRF~S UDRTYVGTATN i
aPLAN a a PECN AG aQPSTQ a a EGH)
coM PAN NAM a aYBO a aa
a a aI aNS N a
a aIN LU S E a aAaSaa a0
aOPaDEaINaINaR Sa aSOa5 5
aARYPAICM AH a a a


SOIL I N T E R P R E T A T I N S RECORD

16 LEEFIELD FINE SAND


USDA-SCS
12-78


THE LEEFIELD SERIES CONSISTS OF SOMEWHAT POORLY DRAINED LEVEL SOILS OF THE COASTAL PLAIN. IN A REPRESENTATIVE PROFILE
THE SURFACE LAYER IS VERY DARK GRAY LOAMY SAND ABOUT 10 INCHES THICK. THE SUBSURFACE LAYER IS LIGHT BROWNISH GRAY LOAMY
SAND TO DEPTH OF 23 INCHES. THE SUBSOIL IS LIGHT YELLOWISH BROWN SANDY LOAM AND SANDY CLAY LOAM TO A DEPTH OF 33 INCHES.
BELOW THIS TO A DEPTH OF 75 INCHES ARE SANDY CLAY LOAM LAYERS WITH PLINTHITE. THEY ARE OLIVE YELLOW IN UPPER PART AND
RETICULATELY MOTTLED IN THE LOWER PART. THE SUBSOIL HAS GRAY MOTTLES THRCUGHCUT.
-I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
DEPTH I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS |LIQUID |PLAS-
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE UNIFIED AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO, LIMIT ITICITYI
I LC------T)I 4 I 10 40 I 200 I IINDEX
a 0-271FS ISM. SW-SM, SP-SM IA-2 a 0 a98-100 95-100 65-95 10-20 I NP I
127-311SL. SCL ISC. SM. SM-SC IA-2, A-4, A-6 0 195-100 93-100 65-95 20-40 <40 INP-16
131-801SL. SCL ISC. SM. SM-SC |A-2, A-4. A-6 I0 95-100 95-100 65-90 20-40 <40 INP-20



IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SCIL I SALINITY | SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND DORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL aFACTORS|EROD.IMATTER I _
I <27 MMI (G/CM3 I N/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) J POTENTIAL K T IGROUPI (PCT) STEEL ICONCRETE
I 0-271 5--10 6.0-20 I 0.04-0.07 14.5-6.0 LOW .101 5 I 1-2 IMODERATEI HIGH I
127-31115-251 I 0.6-2.0 10.10-0.13 14.5-5.5 LOW 1.151 1 I I
131-80115-301a 0.2-0.6 I 0.0O-0.12 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.101 1 I

I I I I I I I I

FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT.LI
I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS DEPTH HARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) I _I (IN) I(N) IINI I I ACTION
I NONE I I l.s5-2.5 APPARENTIDEC-MARI 1 I >60 I I I I CI -

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION L MATERIAL
SEVERE-WETNESSPERCS SLOWLY II FAIR-WETNESS
SEPTIC TANK II
ABSORPTION | ROADFILL
FIELDS II
a II
SEVERE-SEEPAGE.WETNESS | IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE |
LAGOON I SAND
AREAS
I
SEVERE-WETNESS IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SANITARY a
LANDFILL a GRAVEL
(TRENCH) aa
I cI i a
SEVERE-SEEPAGE.WETNESS POCR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY
LANDFILL TOPSOIL
(AREA)
I I II i
I FAIR-WETNESS |
DAILY i a WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR MODERATE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL II POND
SI I__I RESERVOIR
aI AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II
SSEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE,WETNESS I SEVERE-PIPINGWETNESS
SHALLOW I|EMBANKMENTS
EXCAVATIONS j I DIKES AND I
11 LEVEES
I I I I
I MODERATE-WETNESS I SEVERE-SLOW REFILL.CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS I EXCAVATED
WITHOUT I I PONDS
BASEMENTS IIAQUIFER FED
I I I
SEVERE-WETNESS I, FAVORABLE
DWELLINGS II
WITH DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS II
a I II I
MODERATE-WETNESS I WETNESS.DROUGHTY.FAST INTAKE
SMALL II
COMMERCIAL II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS II

MODERATE-WETNESS i WETNESS
LOCAL II TERRACES
ROADS AND II AND
STREETS II DIVERSIONS
a _r II a
LAWNS. MODERATE-WETNESS.DROUGHTY.TOO SANDY II DROUGHT
LANDSCAPING 1a GRASSED
AND GOLF I I WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS II


I II
EI IIGINAL INTERPRETATIONS

I I I








16 LEEFIELD FINE SAND


USDA-SCS
12-78


S______RECREATIONAL DEVELOPM~ANTHI.-
I SEVERE-TOO SANDY II SEVERE-TGO SANDY
I Ii
CAMP AREAS I PLAYGROUNDS
I1
I I II _
SSEVERE-TOO SANDY II SEVERE-TOO SANDY
II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS II AND
I I TRAILS
II 1
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE UF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LtVEL MANAGEMENT)
SCAPA- I CORN I TOBACCO I COTTON I PEANUTS IBAHIAGRASS IMPROVED I GRASS HAY
ABILITY I I LINT I I IBERMUDAGR. I I
II (UI u (LeS I (LBS ) I LBS) I B) (AUM AUlM) I I(TON.S
INIRRIIRRINIRR IIRR, INIRR IIRR. NIRR IRR._|NIRR IIRR, INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR, INIRR IRR. I
2W 1 85 12300 1 1 500 122001 1 8.0 8.7 5.3










_WOODLAND SUITABILITY-
-ORD MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS __ LJ_ POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY 1
SYM VERSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT COMMON TREES SITEl TREES TO PLANT
I I I I HAZARD LIMIT I I Y I HAZARD I COMPETE I I
I3W SLIGHT IMDERATEIMODERATE I ILBLOLLY PINE I4 LOBLOLLY PINE
I I SLASH PINE 184 |SLASH PINE
ILCNGLEAF PINE 70
S I




1





WINDBREAKS IHTIS-E-E------
___I -SPECIES IHTI sPECIES- l.lT SPECIES J -- SPECIES -- HTI
NONE I I
Si I I I I I I I I I I I I I













WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITYY-
I POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR I

GRAIN GRASSS &I WILD IHARDWD ICONIFERISHRUBS IWeTLANDISHALLCWIOPENLD IWOODLD IWETLANDIRANGELDI
I SEED I LEGUME I HERBP. TREES PLANTS I PLANTS WATER IWILDLF WILDLY LDLF WILDLF I
FAIR I FAIR GOOD I FAIR FAIR FAIR FAIR FAIR FAIR FAIR


PLANT I O PERCENTAGE I COMPOSITION IDRY WEIGHT



COMMON PLANT NAME SYMBOL I
SI (NLSPN) I I I
I I I I I I I I I





































POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS/AC DRY WT)
FAVORABLE YEARS 1400
NORMAL YEARS 1200 I
S UNFAVORABLE YEARS I 00 I I
FOOTNOTES
I I I INITISI


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD


31 Leon Fine Sand


THE LEON SERIES CONSISTS OF POORLY DRAINED SANDY SOILS THAT OCCUR IN THE LOWER ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTAL PLAIN FLATWOODS. TYPICALLY,
THEY HAVE A 4 INCH THICK GRAY FINE SAND SURFACE LAYER AND A 8 INCH THICK LIGHT BROWNISH GRAY SAND SUBSURFACE LAYER. THE SUBSOIL IS
BLACK, DARK REDDISH BROWN AND DARK YELLOWISH BROWN SAND 12 INCHES THICK. THE SUBSTRATUM IS GRAYISH BROWN OR BLACK SAND TO 80 INCHES
OR MORE DEEP.- SLOPES ARE 0 TO 2 PERCENT.
I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES a
DEPTH I I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS ILIQUID IPLAS- I
I(IN.)l USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. LIMIT ITICITYI
I I l IPCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 1 200 I IINDEXI
I 0-121 FS SP, SP-SM IA-3, A-2-4 I 0 100 100 80-100 2-12 NP
I 12-241FS SM, SP-SM, SP IA-3, A-2-4 1 0 100 100 80-100 3-20 I NP
S24-801 FS SP, SP-SM IA-3, A-2-4 0 100 100 80-100 2-12 I NP
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I 1 I
I I' I I I I ... I
IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY, WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONJIMMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I I
I I<2MM) (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALI K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETE
0-121 1-61 1.40-1.65 6.0-20 0.02-0.05 I 3.6-.5 L .201 5I 1 1 .5-1 1HIGH HIGH
S12-241 2-8 1.30-1.70 0.6-6.0 0.05-0.10 3.6-5.5 I LOW .201 I I
S24-801 1-6 I 1.40-1.65 1 6.0-20 1 0.02-0.05 3.6-5.5 I LOW I .171 I IJ I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENTLLI
I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTH|HARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) I I (IN) I I(IN IIIN) I I ACTION I
I NONE J I I 0-1.0 APPARENT IJUN-FEB I I >60 1 I- I lAiD I

SANITARY FACILITIES (A) CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL (A)
SEPTIC TANK I SEVERE-WETNESS,POOR FILTER POOR-WETNESS
I ABSORPTION II ROADFILL
I FIELDS 11
I _____ ___________________________II I________--_______________I
SI II. I I
SEWAGE i SEVERE-SEEPAGE,WETNESS I PROBABLE
LAGOON II SAND
AREAS I I
I II II
I I II
SANITARY SEVERE-SEEPAGE,WETNESS,TOO SANDY IMPROBABLE-TOO SANDY
LANDFILL I I GRAVEL
S(TRENCH) I I

SEVERE-SEEPAGE,WETNESS I I POOR-TOO SANDY,WETNESS
SANITARY I I
LANDFILL | TOPSOIL
(AREA) I I
I I I I
SPOOR-SEEPAGE, TOO SANDY,WETNESS I
DAILY I l WATER MANAGEMENT (A) __
COVER FOR I I I SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I I POND
I| 11 RESERVOIR I
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT (A) I AR
SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE,WETNESS 11 SEVERE-SEEPAGE,PIPING,WETNESS
SHALLOW IIEMBANKMENTS I
IEXCAVAtIONS I I DIKES AND
I II LEVEES 1
I II I I.
I I SEVERE-WETNESS II SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS | EXCAVATED
WITHOUT I II PONDS
BASEMENTS I j|IAUIFER FED
I I II I
SEVERE-WETNESS CUTBACKS CAVE
DWELLINGS II
WITH II DRAINAGE I
BASEMENTS I I
I -_I I I _
L SEVERELWETNESS II WETNESS,DROUGHTY,FAST INTAKE
SMALL .I I
COMMERCIAL I II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I II
I I II I I
LOCAL SEVERE-WETNESS WETNESS,TOO SANDY,SOIL BLOWING
If TERRACES
ROADS AND I AND
STREETS DIVERSIONS
I --,II
I LAWNNS.I SEVERE-WETNESS,DROUGHTY WETNESS,DROUGHTY
LANDSCAPING I II GRASSED
AND GOLF WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS I
I__ R_ I I__II -__I I

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I I I

I I I






31 LEON Fine Sand

RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (A)
SSEVERE-WETNESS,TOO SANDY I I SEVERE-TOO SANDY,WETNESS
I I II I
CAMP AREAS I PLAYGROUNDS I
S I II
I I II i
SEVERE-WETNESS,TOO SANDY I S SEVERE-WETNESS,TOO SANDY
I II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS II AND
II I TRAILS
I I II _______I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CLASS- CAPA- CORN CABBAGE POTATOES, COMMON BER- BAHIAGRASS I
DETERMINING j 8ILITY IRISH 3 MUDAGRASS
PHASE I (BU) I (CRATES) I (CWT) I (AUM) I (AUM) I I I
I INRRIRRlRReNIRR IIRR. INIRR JIRR. INIRR IRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR.
ALL 4W 50 220 150 9 7.5 I
I 1 i I1
I I I I I I II III
I I I 1 I I I I I I I I
1 I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I
II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
SI II
I III I I I III
i I I I I I II I
-- -WOODLAND SUITABILITY (B)
CLASS- ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
DETERMINING I SYN I EROSION EQUIP. ISEELINGI WINDTH.I PLANT COMMON'TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
PHASE I .HAZARD I LIMIT I MORT*Y.I HAZARD. COMPETE. i IINDXI I
'ALL 4W SLIGHT 'MODERATE MODERATE MODERATE MODERATE SLASH PINE 70 SLASH PINE
LONGLEAF PINE 65










WI NDBREAKSi

NONE
S I I I I I TS I I
I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I


I I I I I I I I

I i I I I I I i I

WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY (C)
CLASS- | POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT. ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR. j
DETERMINING |GRAIN GRASSS &I WILD |HARDWD 1CONIFERISHRUBS |WETLANDISHALLOWIOPENLD IWOODLD .IETLANDIRANGELDI
PHASE I SEED LEGUME I HERB,.I TREES PLANTS J PLANTS I WATER IIILOLF IWILDLF IWILDILF IILDLF I
(ALL POOR FAIR GOOD POOR FAIR FAIR POOR FAIR FAIR POOR
I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I J
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I

POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION) (D)
PLANT I PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT) BY CLASS DETERMINING PHASE
COMMON PLANT NAME SYMBOL ALL
I (NLSPNI I I I
CREEPING BLUESTEM ANST 50
CHALKY BLUESTEM ANCA4 10
HAIRY PANICUM PARH 5
LOPSIDED INDIANGRASS SOSE5 10
PINELAND THREEAWN ARST5 5
PANICUM PANIC 5
SAWPALMETTO SERE2
INKBERRY ILGL
OTHER ANNUAL FORBS AAFF 5
OTHER PERENNIAL GRASSES PPGG 5
OTHER PERENNIAL FORBS PPFF 5

I I I I

POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT): -
FAVORABLE YEARS 5500 I
'NORMAL YEARS I 5000
UNFAVORABLE YEARS 1 4000 1 1 i
FOOTNOTES
A RATINGS BASED ON NSH GUIDES, 3-31-78.
B WOODLAND RATINGS BASED ON PROGRESS REPORT W-16, JAN. 1970.
C WILDLIFE RATINGS BASED ON SOILS MEMORANDUM-74, JAN. 1972.
D ACID FLATWOODS RANGE SITE.
1 SOIL MATERIAL IS GOOD AFTER EXCAVATION.


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD
031 Leon Fine Sand, Occasionally Flooded


THE LEON SERIES CONSISTS OF POORLY DRAINED SOILS THAT OCCUR IN THE LOWER ATLANTIC AND GULF COASTAL PLAIN FLATWOODS. TYPICALLY,
THEY HAVE A 4 INCH THICK GRAY FINE SAND SURFACE LAYER AND A 8 INCH THICK LIGHT BROWNISH GRAY SAND SUBSURFACE LAYER. THE SUBSOIL
IS BLACK, DARK REDDISH BROWN AND DARK YELLOWISH BROWN SAND 15 INCHES THICK. THE SUBSTRATUM IS GRAYISH BROWN OR BLACK SAND TO
80 INCHES OR MORE DEEP. SLOPES ARE 0 TO 2 PERCENT.
I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES I
DEPTH I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS-
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3 PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I I I( PCT)I I 10 I 4O I 200 I IINDEXI
S0-12 FS SP, SP-SM A-3, A-2-4 I 0 100 100 80-100 2-12 NP
112-241 FS SM, SP-SM, SP A-3, A-2-4 0 100 100 80-100 3-20 I NP
S24-80 1 FS SP, SP-SM A-3, A-2-4 I 0 1 100 100 80-100 2-12 NP

I I I 1 I I I
IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND ORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTION)(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROO.IMATTER i| _
I <2MNMi (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALI K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL CONCRETE
S0-12 1-6 1.40-1.65 I 6.0-20 0.02-0.05 13.6-5.5 I LOW I.20 5 I 1 I .5-1 1 HIGH I HIGH
112-24 12-8 1.30-1.70 1 0.6-6.0 0.05-0.10 13.6-5.5 LOW I .201 1I I
S24-80 1-6 11.40-1.65 1 6.0-20 1 0.02-0.05 13.6-5.5 I I LOW .17 1I _____
I I I 1 I I I I
1 I I I I I I I I I___
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK SUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENTLI
I__ I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
- FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I(IN) I I (IN) I I(IN) I(IN) I I ACTION I
I OCCASIONAL I LONG MARCH-MAYI 0-1.0 1 APPARENT I JUN-FEB I I I >60 I I I __ I-A/D -

_SANITARY FACILITIES (A) CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL (A)
SEPTIC TANK SEVERE-WETNESS,POOR FILTER,FLOODS POOR-WETNESS
ABSORPTION ROADFILL
FIELDS
i II 1
I I ..
SEWAGE SEVERE-SEEPAGE,WETNESS,FLOODS PROBABLE
LAGOON II SAND
AREAS I
I JII
SANITARY SEVERE-SEEPAGE,WETNESS,TOO SANDY,FLOODS IMPROBABLE-TOO SANDY
LANDFILL GRAVEL
(TRENCH)
_I ._A I I ___ _
II II
SANITARY SEVERE-SEEPAGE,WETNESS,FLOODS POOR-TOO SANDY,WETNESS
LANDFILL TOPSOIL
(AREA)
[_ II 1_ _
I II
DAILY POOR-SEEPAGE,TOO SANDY,WETNESS WATER MANAGEMENT (A)____
COVER FOR I II I
|COVER FOR SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I POND
I I II _RESERVOIR
I I AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT(A) II ____ _
SSEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE,WETNESS,FLOODS SEVERE-SEEPAGE,PIPING,WETNESS
SHALLOW I IIEMBANKMENTS I
IEXCAVAtIONS I DIKES AND I
II LEVEES I
_II I _-
SEVERE-WETNESS,FLOODS I SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS I EXCAVATED
WITHOUT II PONDS
BASEMENTS I IAQUIFER FEDI
I _1_ II I I
SEVERE-WETNESS,FLOODS I UTBANKS CAVE,FLOODS
DWELLINGS II
WITH II DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS
I II I
SEVERE-WETNESS,FLOODS WETNESS,DROUGHTY,FAST INTAKE,FLOODS
SMALL I S E
COMMERCIAL IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS
I J II I
SEVERE-WETNESS,FLOODSI WETNESS,TOO SANDY,SOIL BLOWING
LOCAL I TERRACES
ROADS AND AND
STREETS DIVERSIONS I
__ II .-_ _ ___- _I
A LAWNS. SEVERE-WETNESS,DROUGHTY WETNESS,DROUGHTY
LANDSCAPING I GRASSED
AND GOLF II WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS I I
I R II I

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS __.
I I I
I I I
I I I
I I I









031 LEON Fine Sand
OCCASIONALLY FLOODED
-_ RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (A)
SEVERE-WETNESS,TOO SANDY,FLOODS SEVERE-TOO SANDY,WETNESS,FLOODS
CAMP AREAS PLAYGROUNDS

I II
SEVERE-WETNESS,TOO SANDY,FLOODS PSEVERE-WETNESS,TOO SANDY, FLOODS
ii PATHS
PICNIC AREAS I AND
I II TRAILS
I I If I II
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CLASS- I CAPA- I CORN CABBAGE I POTATOES, COMMON BER- I BAHIAGRASS J
DETERMINING I ABILITY I IRISH 4 MUDAGRASS I I
PHASE f (BU) (CRATES) (CT) (AUM) I (AUM)
IINIRRIIRR.INIRR IIRR, INIRR JIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. I
ALL 4W 50 220 i 150 1 9 7.5
C SI I M I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
INIG SM E IO IP I I I I I N I I I
I I I I I I
I I I J I I I I I I I I I


CLASS- I I I I I I I I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR

DETERMINING I I I I I 1 CONIFERSHRUBS I I I I I I I
1 I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 1



PHASE I I I I I I I WATER I I I I I II
--------------------- I I ____I I I I I
POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY AND GELANDITABILITY ) OR FOREST ERST VEGETATION) (D)
I CLASS- I ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I I
DETERMINING I SYM j EROSION EOUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT I COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
PHASE I HAZARD I LIMIT MORT'Y HAZARD. COMPETE IIDETERMNNG PHASE
COMALL 4W SLIG MODEATE MODERATE ODERATE MODERATE SASH PINE 70 SLSYMBOLASH PINE
CREEPING EE LONGLEAFPINE 65 50
LOPSIDED IDI S I I I I I I I I 0

I N I II I II

P II I I I I P UI I I I I
FAVORABLE Y I I I I
I I I I J I I I j I I


N R I I I I I I I I


I I IUNFAVORA I I I I I
FO I I I I NOTES
I I I I I I I I I I L MEMORANDUM- A
D I FAT SI I I I I I I I





I SOIL MATERIAL I I I IS GOOD AFTER EXCAVATION.
WINDBREAKS
I(ASS-DETERMIN G PHASE SPE CIES |HTJ SPECIES. INT| SPECIES I NTIL SPECIES IHTl
I NONE I I I I i I I I
SI I I I I I I I I
I I I I I 1 I I II
J I I I I I I I
SI I I I I I I I I
II I I I I I I I I
WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY (C)
I CLASS- I POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR:
DETERMINING GRAIN GRASSS CJ WILD jHARDWD ICONIFERISHRUBS IWETLANDISHALLOWIOPENLD IWOODLD ,IWETLANDIRANGELDJ
PHAsE I SEED ILEGUME I HERB. J TREES IMPLANTS I PLANTS I WATER I|ILOLFJWILDLF IJILDLF IIILDLF I
ALL POOR FAIR GOOD POOR FAIR F'AIR POOR FAIR FAIR POOR '
I I I I I I I I I f I I I


I I I I I I I I I I I
POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION) (D)
I f PLANT j PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT) BY CLASS DETERMINING PHASE
COMRDN PLANT NAME f SYMBOL f ALL f I f
I (NLSPN) I I I f
CREEPING BLUESTEM ANCT 10
CHALKY BIUESTEM ANCA4 o10
HAIRY PANICUM JAR 5
LOPSIDED INDIANGRASS SOSES 10
SPINELAND THREEAWN ARST5 5
IPANICUM PANIC 5
SAWPAU4ETTO SERE2
INKBEERRY ILGL
OTHER ANNUAL FORCES AAFF 5
OTHER PERENNIAL GRASSES PPGG 5
OTHER PERENNIAL FORBS PPFF 5

I I I
POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT): I JI
FAVORABLE YEARS I 5500 I I
NORMAL YEARS I 5000 I
UNFAVORABLE YEARS I 4000 I I I i
FOOTNOTES
A RATINGS BASED ON NSH GUIDES, 3-31-78.
B WOODLAND RATINGS BASED ON PROGRESS REPORT W-16, JAN. 1970.
C. WILDLIFE RATINGS BASED ON SOILS MEMORANDIUM-74, JAN. 1972.
D ACID FLATWOODS RANGE SITE.
1 SOIL MATERIAL IS GOOD AFTER EXCAVATION.


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD

118 LOCHLOOSA VARIANT LOAMY FINE SAND. 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
8-79


THE LOCHLOOSA SERIES CONSISTS OF SOMEWHAT PCORLY DRAINED. NEARLY LEVEL TO SLOPING SOILS THAT OCCUR PRIMARILY IN THE
CENTRAL PART OF FLORIDA. TYPICALLY THESE SOILS HAVE DARK GRAY SANDY SURFACE HORIZONS ABOUT 7 INCHES THICK, VERY PALE
BROWN AND PALE BROWN SANDY SUBSURFACE HORIZONS ABOUT 21 INCHES THICK. AND SUBSOIL LAYERS THAT ARE YELLOWISH BROWN FINE
SANDY LOAM AND SANDY CLAY LOAM IN THE UPPER 7 INCHES AND GRAY SANDY CLAY LOAM AND SANDY CLAY IN THE REMAINDER OF THE
SUBSOIL.*________________________________
I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES I
DEPTH| I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS- I
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO.J LIMIT ITICITYI
I I II I(PCT)j 4 I 10 I 40 I 200J INDEX I
I O-21ILFS ISP-SM, SM IA-2-4, A-3 0 195-100 95-100 90-98 8-20 I NP
I21-24IFSL, SL, LS ISM. SM-SC IA-2-4 0 195-100 95-100 90-98 18-30 1 <28 INP-6 I
124-69SCL, SL ISC. SM-SC IA-2, A-4. A-6 0 195-100 95-100 90-98 25-40 125-40 I 5-18
169-80oSC. SCL iSC IA-6. A-7 0 195-100 95-100 90-98 40-50 35-45 115-25

I I I I I I I
IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULKI PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL 1 SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSJEROD.IMATTER_ j
I 1<2MM)I (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
I 0-21) 2-1211.35-1.60 o 6.0-20 I 0.05-0.10 14.5-5.5 I LW 1.201 5 I 2 I 1-4 I HIGH J IGH I
121-24113-2011.55-1.70 I 2.0-6.0 I 0.10-0.15 14.5-5.5 I LOW 1.241 I 1 I
124-69115-3511.55-1.70 I 0.6-2.0 0 .12-0.15 14.5-5.5 I I LW 1.321 I I
6le-80120-4511.60-1.70 I 0.6-2.0 I 0.13-0.18 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.281
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I II
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT*LI
I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST |
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) 1 I (IN) I I(IN) I(IN) I I ACTIONLI
S NONE I I 12.--s-5.APPARENTIJUL-OCTI I I >60 I I I I I

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SSEVERE-WETNESS I FAIR-WETNESS
SEPTIC TANK I I
ABSORPTION II ROADFILL
FIELDS II
I II I
ISEVERE-SEEPAGEWETNESS II IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE II
LAGOON I II SAND
AREAS I I
I I II I
ISEVERE-WETNESS I IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SANITARY I
LANDFILL GRAVEL
(TRENCH) I I
I I I
I EVERE-SEEPAGE.WETNESS I POOR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY
LANDFILL I TOPSOIL
(AREA) I
I I II I I
I FAIR-WETNESS
DAILY I II WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR II SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL POND
I_ I |_ RESERVOIR
S AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II I
SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE II MODERATE-WETNESS
SHALLOW IIEMBANKMENTS I
EXCAVATIONS I DIKES AND I
I LEVEES
I II I
SLIGHT I SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS EXCAVATED
WITHOUT II PONDS
BASEMENTS IIAQUIFER FED I
I IIf I
MODERATE-WETNESS I SLOPE
DWELLINGS I J
WITH I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS II
I II I
SLIGHT I WETNESS.DRCUGHTY.FAST INTAKE
SMALL II
COMMERCIAL I IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS II
I. II I I
SLIGHT WETNESS.SOIL BLOWING
LOCAL TERRACES
ROADS AND AND
STREETS DIVERSIONS

LAWNS. MODERATE-DROUGHTY IDROUGHTY
LANDSCAPING I GRASSED
AND GOLF WATERWAYS
.FAIRWAYS I
I I II I I


nEUIUNiAL InTnErEnIATIUN
I I I

I I I
I I







118 LOCHLOOSA VARIANT LOAMY FINE SAND. 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
8-79


SSEVERE-TOO SANDY II SEVERE-TOO SANDY

CAMP AREAS IIPLAYGROUNDS
I I I I I I

SEVERE-TOO SANDY II SEVERE-TOO SANDY
li PATHS
PICNIC AREAS II AND
I II TRAILS
I 1II __1 I I I I I I I I I I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS ANO PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CAPA-- ORANGES GRAPEFRUIT I CORN I PEANUTS I TOMATOES WATER- IBAHIAGRASS I
ABILITY I I I I MELONS I I
I- I (BOXES (BOXES) I (BOXES) I (BU) I (LBS) I (TQNS) jI___(TONS) I (AUML I
INIRRIIRR.INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR lIRR. INIRR IIRR. NIRR IJIRR. INIRR IIRR. I
2W 1 475 675 60 12700 110.0 11 10








I I I I I I I I I 1 1 I I 1 1 I


'OCDLAND SUITABILITY
ORD MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
SYM EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT I COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
SI I HAZARD LIMIT I MGRTYI HAZARD I COMPET.I IINDXI
20 SLIGHT I SLIGHT SLIGHT SLIGHT I SLIGHT SLASH PINE 190 SLASH PINE
LOBLOLLY PINE 190 |LOBLOLLY PINE













WINDBREAKS
I SPECIES IHTI SPECIES IML SPECIES IHTI SPECIES I HTI
ISLASH PINE ISSILOBLOLLY PINE 1451SOUTHERN REDCEDAR I451CAROLINA LAURELCHY 1301






POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT F IR: I
GRAIN GRASSS &| WILD IHARDWD CONIFERISHRUBS ]WETLANDISHALLOWJoPENLD IWOODLD WETLANDIRANGELDI
I EED LEGUME I HERB. I TREES PLANTS PLANTS I WATER IjILOLF IWILOLF IWILDLF IMILDLFI
FAIR I FAIR GOOD FAIR I FAIR I I POOR IV. POOR FAIR FAIR IV. POOR
S II I II
SII I I I III











POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELANC OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
I PLANT I PERCENTAGECOMPOSITION (DRYIWEIGHT)
COMMON PLANT NAME SYMBOL




IPINELAND THREEAWN ARST5 I 10
ITOOTHACHEGRASS CTAR 5
|DWARF HUCKLEBERRY GADU 5
PANICM PANIC 10
LOPSIDED INDIANGRASS SOSES 5

HOARY TICKCLOVER DECAS 5
IINKBERRY / ILGL 5
WAXMYRTLE / MYCE 5
|SWEETGUM 1/ LIST 1 5
|RED MAPLE I/ ACRU 1 5
THEIR TREES/ TTT 5 I I I I
POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT): C
| FAVORABLE YEARS
NORMAL YEARS
INFAVORABLEYEARS I
FOOTNOTES
1 NOT NORMALLY UTILIZED BY LIVESTOCK.


SOIL I N T E R P R E T A T I O N S RE CORD

11C LOCHLOOSA VARIANT LOAMY FINE SAND. S TC 8 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
8-79


THE LOCHLOOSA SERIES CONSISTS OF SOMEWHAT POORLY DRAINED. NEARLY LEVEL TO SLOPING SOILS THAT OCCUR PRIMARILY IN THE
CENTRAL PART OF FLORIDA. TYPICALLY THESE SOILS HAVE DARK GRAY SANDY SURFACE HORIZONS ABOUT 7 INCHES THICK. VERY PALE
BROWN AND PALE BROWN SANDY SUBSURFACE HORIZONS ABOUT 21 INCHES THICK. AND SUBSOIL LAYERS THAT ARE YELLOWISH BROWN FINE
SANDY LOAM AND SANDY CLAY LOAM IN THE UPPER 7 INCHES AND GRAY SANDY CLAY LOAM AND SANDY CLAY IN THE REMAINDER CF THE
SUBSOIL.
I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES I
IDEPTHI I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS-I
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 5" PASSING SIEVE NO._I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I I I PCT)I 4 I 10 1 40 I 200 I INDEX I
0I -24ILFS ISP-SM. SM IA-2-4. A-3 o 0 195-100 95-100 90-98 8-20 1 I NP
124--27FSL. SL, LS ISM, SM-SC IA-2-4 J 0 195-100 95-100 90-98 18-30 1 <28 INP-6
127-561SCL. SL Isc. SM-SC IA-2. A-4. A-6 I 0 195-100 95-100 90-98 25-40 I 25-40 1 5-18
156-801SC. SCL ISC IA-6, A-7 I 0 195-100 95-100 90-98 40-50 3I 5-45 115-25

I I I I II I I I
IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SCIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I4PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I__
I I<2MM)I (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) J I PH)i tIPOTNTIAL/ K I IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
I0-241 2-1l11.35-1.60 I 6.0-20 1 0.05-0.10 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.l S 2 I 1-4 I HIGH I HIGH I
124-27 13-72011.55-1.70 I 2.0-6.0 I 0.10-0.15 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.241 I I
127-s561l15s3511.55-1.70 I 0.6-2.0 1 .12-0.15 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.321 I I 1
156-80120-451 .60-1.70 I 0.6-2.0 1 0.13-0.18 14I.5-5.5 I LOW 1.281
I I I I 1 I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
FLOODING i HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT-LI
I__ I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS |DEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) I I (IN) I I(IN) I(IN) I I ACTION
NN I12.5-5.OIAPPARENTIJUL-OCTI I >60 I I I I -

_SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SEVERE-WETNESS II FAIR--ETNESS
SEPTIC TANK I1 R
ABSORPTION RADFILL
FIELDS II
S I II
SEVERE-SEEPAGE.WETNESS I I IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE II
LAGOON --SAND
AREAS II


ISANITARYI II
LANDFILL I GRAVEL
(TRENCH) 1

SEVERE-SEEPAGE.WETNESS I POOR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY II
LANDFILL II TOPSOIL
(AREA) I

FAIR-WETNESS II
DAILY lI WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR II SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I POND
___ II RESERVOIR
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II 1
SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE II 1 MODERATE-WETNESS
SHALLOW IIEMBANKMENTS
EXCAVATIONS 1 DIKES ANDI
I III LEVEES
I II
SLIGHT II I SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS I EXCAVATED
WITHOUT II PONDS
BASEMENTS IIAGUIFER FEDI
I I -II i i
S MODERATE-WETNESS I I. SLOPE
DWELLINGS 1AI i
WITH II DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I
I I II I
MODERATE-SLOPE II WETNESS.DROUGHTY.FAST INTAKE
SMALL I II
COMMERCIAL I I IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS II
I I II I
SLIGHT iI I WETNESS.SOIL BLOWING
LOCAL II TERRACES j
ROADS AND I AND
STREETS II DIVERSIONS
II I I
LAWNS. I MODERATE-DROUGHTY I DROUGHT
LANDSCAPING II GRASSED
AND GOLF II WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS II
SI PETITIONS
REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I l I








11C LOCHLOGSA VARIANT LOAMY FINE SAND. 5 TO 8 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
8-79


RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
I SEVERE-TOO SANDY I I SEVERE-SLOPE.TOO SANDY
I I II I
I CAMP AREAS I PLAYGROUNDS I


SEVERE-TOO SANDY I I SEVERE-TOO SANDY
I II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS] I AND
II ] TRAILS
I I I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
SCAPA- ORANGES GRAPEFRUIT I CORN I PEANUTS I TOMATOES I WATER- IBAHIAGRASS I
ABILITY I I I I I I MELONS I I
I I (BOXES) I (BOXES) I (BU) I (LBS) I (TONS) I (TONS) 1 (AUM)
I INRRIIRRBINIRR 1IRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR INIII R IIRR. INIRR IIRR, I
3E 475 I 675 I 55 I 12600 I I 9.5 I 11 I 10







I HAZARD I LIMIT IMPORT HAZARD I CMPET. l I I I I I





2o SLIGHT SLIGHT SLIGHT SLIGHT SLIGHT SLASH PINE I90 SLASH PINE
LOBLOLLY PINE 190 LOBLOLLY PINE
S III
II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I












1 SPECIES I I I I I I I I SP ISI I I I I IHI
JI I
I 1 I I I I I II I
S I I I I I I I I I I I I
WOILDLIFEAND SUITABILITYABILITY
I ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS ELEMENTS POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I AS HABITAT FOR:
I SYM I EROSION EQUIP. SEEDLING WINDTH I PLANT I COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT -
FAI I HAZARD I LIMIT I MORTY HARD I PE I FAIINR XI IV. POOR
120 I SLIGHT P SLIGHT A SLIGHT I SLIGHT I SLIGHT ISLASH PINE 190 SLASH PINE
COMMON LOBLOLLY PINE 190 LOBLOLLY PINESYMBOL
















CREEPING BLUESTEM ANST 0I I I I I I I
CHALKY BLUSTER I I M ANCA4 10
















IPANICUM PANIC 10 I I I I I I
LOPSIDED INIAN S SOSE 5
I IGRAP I I I I I 5 I














HOARY TICKCLOVER ECA I I I I I I5I
I I INKERRY / ILGL I I I 5 I I


















IWAXMYRTLE 1/ MYCE 5
ISI I I I I I IST2 5
IRED I IM I I I I I














FAVORABLE YEARS |O I E 4S 45 ALA AU C 0
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I 'I











I I I I I YERS










PTNV POTNT UIA ORHA T NTFOOT NOTES ET ON
IP NOT NORMALLY UTILIZED BY LIVESTOCK.I SC I
I I I I II I I I I
I I I I I I 'I
I I I II I I I I I I I
I I I I I I II *II II 1
I I I I I I I I I I
POTENTIAL NAORVE PAATA C U T R ELEMENT ST UD SR POETTENTI I

I ICM A I S B I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I
C REEPNGLIS I AIS I ITI


PINELAND TEA I IST I 10 I



Io IPslED IN I SSI |

IKERRY PLANT I ERNA C I D
OM P AN NAMTE 1/SMBOL I I I I I I




NORMAL YEARS 5 I
I PFANIvCaUM YPANR I 1 I I I I
FOOTNOTES
IHNOT NORMALLY UTILIZED BY LIVESTOCK.
IINKERRY, ILGL 5 I II
IWAXYRTL 1/ MYC I S I I I










1 O OMLYU IIZED IN LIVERSTOCK. HRW0|OIEIHUS WTADSALWIPNOIODDIWTADRNED


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD
62 Mandarin Fine sand


THE MANDARIN SERIES CONSISTS OF SOMEWHAT POORLY-DRAINED NEARLY LEVEL SOILS. THEY OCCUR ON NEARLY LEVEL LANDSCAPES THAT ARE SLIGHTLY
HIGHER THAN THE ADJACENT FLATWOODS. TYPICALLY, THESE SOILS HAVE FINE SAND SURFACE AND SUBSURFACE LAYERS LESS THAN 30 INCHES THICK OVER
WEAKLY-CEMENTED SANDY LAYERS, ABOUT 14 INCHES THICK. BELOW THIS, TO DEPTHS OF 73 INCHES, ARE LAYERS OF LOOSE FINE SAND UNDERLAIN BY A
LAYER OF BLACK WEAKLY-CEMENTED FINE SAND, SLOPES RANGE FROM 0 TO 2 PERCENT.
I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES I
IDEPTHI I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS-I
IIN.)I USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED I AASHTO I>3 INI THAN 3 PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I _I IITlPCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 1 200 I INDEX
I 0-26 I FS SP, SP-SM A-3 I 0 100 100 90-100 2-10 NP
126-40 FS SP-SM, SM A-3, A-2-4 i 0 I 100 100 90-100 5-15 I NP
140-73 I FS SP, SP-SM A-3 0 1 100 100 90-100 2-7 I NP1
173-80 I FS SP, SP-SM A-3, A-2-4 0 I 100 100 90-100 3-12 I NP
I I I I I I I I I
IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.) (PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I |'
S I <2MM)i (G/CM) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) 3 (PH) I IPOTENTIALI K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
0-26 I1-6 1.40-1.65 I 6.0-20 I 0.03-0.07 3.6-6.0 LOW 1.15 5 2 .2-.7 I LOW I HIGH
126-40 3-8 1.30-1.70 0.6-2.0 I 0.10-0.15 ) 3.6-6.0 5 I LOW 1.20 I I I I
140-73 I 1-6 1.40-1.65 6.0-20 j 0.03-0.07 I 5.6-7.3 LOw 1.15 J I J I
173-80 I 2-8 j 1.40-1.70 0.6-2.0 I 0.10-0.15 1 5.6-7.3 I I LOW 1.15 I
I 1 I I II I I i I
l I J I I I I I I
I FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
S FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) 1 I I(INJ) I (IN) 1I I(IN) IIN) I I ACTION I
I NONE 1 I 1.5-3.5 1 APPARENT IJUN-DEC I I I >60 I I I lA/D I -

SANITARY FACILITIES (A) CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL (A)
SEVE-WETNESS FAIR-WETNESS
ISEPTIC TANK I I
ABSORPTION I I ROADFILL
FIELDS II 1

SEAE SEVERE-SEEPAGE,WETNESS PROBABLE SOURCE
SEWAGE I II
LAGOON i II SAND
AREAS I ,I
i I
SSEVERE-SEEPAGE,WETNESS,TOO SANDY IMPROBABLE SOURCE-TOO SANDY
SANITARY II
LANDFILL II GRAVEL
S(TRENCH) I I
I U II -.J..________________ -__ I
I II
S SEVERE-WETNESS,SEEPAGE POOR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY II
LANDFILL II TOPSOIL
(AREA) I
I I II
POOR-TOO SANDY
DAILY PI R- Y AFTER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR ISEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I I POND
3 _| | RESERVOIR
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT (A) 11 I
I I SEVERE-WETNESS,CUTBANKS CAVE SEVERE-SEEPAGE,WETNESS
I SHALLOW I IIEMBANKMENTSI
EXCAVATIONS I I DIKES AND
I II LEVEES
I I I I
SMODERATE-WETNESS I SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE
I DWELLINGS I EXCAVATED
WITHOUT I I PONDS
I BASEMENTS I IIAGUIFER FED
I Ii I I
SEVERE-WETNESS I CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS II
WITH I II DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I II

MODERATE-WETNESS II WETNESS,DROUGHTY,FAST INTAKE
SMALL I
COMMERCIAL | I IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I
I I II I I
MODERATE-WETNESS II WETNESS,TOO SANDY,SOIL BLOWING
LOCAL II TERRACES
ROADS AND II AND
STREETS I DIVERSIONS
I _______.L. IU I _____________________________ii I
LAWNS. MODERATE-WETNESS,DROUGHTY I DROUGHT
LANDSCAPING j GRASSED
AND GOLF I I WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS II
IIi


REGIUIONL INR I EHGJTATONS .






62 Mandarin Fine Sand

RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (B)
SEVERE-TOO SANDY SEVERE-TOO SANDY
CAMP AREAS I IJPLAYGROUNDS
II II I I

SEVERE-TOO SANDY II SEVERE-TOO SANDY
S1 PATHS
PICNIC AREAS II AND
I I TRAILS
I I II I I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CLASS- CAPA- I BAIAGRASS I I I
DETERMINING I BILIT I I
PHASE I (AUM) _
I INIRRIRR.INIRR IIRR. INIR JIIRR. INIRR IIRR. NIR IRRNIIRR 1 IRR. NIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. I
ALL 6S 6.01 I I

I DE G S I E IN EUIP. LIN I IPN T S I I I
I I L I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I O I I I N I I I I I I I
Ass-1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I J I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I


I I I I I I IE I I I I I I A I I I 2
I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I
I I I I I I I 1 I
I I 1 I I I I | | I I I I
WOODLAND SUITABILITY
CLASS- I ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I A
S DETERMINING I SYN I EROSION E UIP. ISEERDLINI WINDTH.I PLANT I CONON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT G
I PHASE I I HAZARD I LIMIT I nORTRYeI HAZARD- CONPETIL IINDXI F
SALL I I SLIGHT MODERATE SEVERE SLIGHT MODERATE SLASH PINE I 70 SLASH PINEV



I I I I I I I I


COMMO I I I I II I
I I I I I I I I I I I


PIN D T N AST5I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I
















SAPANETTO 2/ SERED2REAS
Iass- rHe PASE I SPECIES I SpeCIES. ITI SPECIES TI SPECIES IHT
ALL I SLASHING 140 COLINA LAURELCHY i 3I JAPANESE PRIVET 1301 BMoo 125



LOPSIDED I I I I ISOSE
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I
SI I II I I I II
I I I I I I I I I I I














WILDLIFETTERBUSH LYONIA 2/ LYLU3SUITABILITY
WINDREAKLIVE OAK 2/ QUVI
TENTIAL PRO TI P SP S NTI F. HSCI EL NTSD SPE I TICNTl .AS HAPCI INTD
S WLDL E RATING SA INE 4 IARDODLINIERSELCHY I 3 JAPANESEILLOI I BAMBOO 25MEM, J.

-II I WEI iI IT T S MI IB
I I I NO Z I D I IVE
I I I III II II I I
I I I I I I I I II l
I I II I I I I I I I I
POTENTCLASS- I POTENTIAL FOR HA(R TATNEELEMENTS I POTENTIAL S HABITAT OEETAIO)
I DETERMINING IGRAIN SIGRASS L ILD1 PARD CONIFER COMPOSITION (DRY EETLANDISHALLT IOPE BY CLASS DETER .ININWTL PHASE NDIANGDI
OMN PLANT NAIE IEGUME I RB TREES IMPLANTS I IMPLANTS I WATER IILLF IILLF IILDLF IILDLF 1
I I (NLSPN i I I I I
PINELA I I I I I I ARST5 I I I I
CREEPING B I I I I 1 I I
I I SAWPAI I METTO I I I I I ISERE

I PLANTLOPSIDED PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY EIGHT) SOSE5Y CLASS DETERMINING PHASE
PANICUM DN PLANT NAME I SYMBOL ALL
PASPALUM i (PASPAN)
OTHER PI ANNUAL FORES ARSTAFF
OTHER PERENNIAL FORUESTEM IANST Pp
SAFETTEUSH LYONIA 2/ iSERE2 L3 I
PANLIVE OAK 2/ IQI
OTHER ANNUAL ORS AAFF I I




II I
POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT'):___
FAVORABLE YEARS I I
NORMAL YEARS I i.
UNFAVORABLE YEARS I I I I l
FOOTNOTES
A RATINGS BASED ON NSH NOTICE 24, 3-31-78.
B RECREATION RATINGS BASED ON NSH NOTICE 24, 3-31-78.
C WILDLIFE RATINGS BASED ON SOILS MEMORANDUM-74, JAN. 1972.
1 WETNESS AT TIMES MAY BE A HAZARD TO ITS USE.
2 NOT UTILIZED BY LIVESTOCK.


S O I L I NTERPRETAT I N S RECORD

33 MASCOTTE FINE SAND


USDA-SCS
5-79


THE MASCOTTE SERIES CONSISTS OF POORLY DRAINED NEARLY LEVEL SOILS IN THE SOUTHERN COASTAL PLAIN AND ATLANTIC COAST
FLATWOODS. IN A REPRESENTATIVE PROFILE. THE SURFACE LAYER IS VERY DARK GRAY FINE SAND AEOUT 3 INCHES THICK. THE
SUBSURFACE LAYER IS GRAY FINE SAND ABOUT 13 INCHES THICK. BETWEEN DEPTHS LF 16 TO 28 INCHES IS DARK REDDISH BROWN AND
DARK BROWN FINE SAND. BELOW THIS IS A LAYER OF PALE BROWN FINE SAND ABOUT 6 INCHES THICK, UNDERLAIN TO DEPTHS OF 60
INCHES BY GRAY AND LIGHT GRAY LOAMY MATERIALS.
I .ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES __
DEPTH I I FRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS-I
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE UNIFIED AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIV. eNO,.I LIMIT ITICITYI
I-- I-I I IPCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 1200 1 IINDEX
I0-14IFS ISP-SM IA-3, A-2-4 0 1 100 100 85-100 5-12 NP
114-31|FS. S. LFS ISP-SM, SM IA-3, A-2-4 0 I100 100 85-100 8-15I NP
131-361FS. S. LFS ISP-SM IA-3. A-2-4 I 0 100 100 85-100 5-12 NP
136-651SCL. SL, FSL ISC. SM-SC. SM IA-2, A-4, A-6 I 0 I 100 100 85-100 19-45 <38 INP-15
I I I 1 I I
I I I I I
ICEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE | SOIL I SALINITY | SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND ICRGANICI CORROSIVITY I
I(IN.) (PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTDRSIEROD.IMATTER I__ _
I 1<2MM)I (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETJ
I 0-141 1-8 11.20-1.45 I 6.0-20 I 0.03-0.08 3.6-5.5 I IVRY LOW 1.201 5 1 1 3-11 I HIGH I HIGH (
114-31 5-1211.35-1.0 I 0.6-2.0 I 0.10-0.15 13.6-5.5 I VERY LOW 1.201 1 |
131-361 2-8 11.35-1.50 I 6.0-20 1 0.03-0.08 13.6-5.5 IVERY LOW 1.201 I I I
136-65114-3511.5-1.65 I 0.6-2.0 I 0.10-0.15 13.6-5.5 I I LOW 1.321
SI I I I I I i
I I I I I I I I I I
I FLOODING I HIGH WATERTABLE I CEMENTED PAN 1 BEDROCK ISUBSIDENC IHYDIPOTENTLI
---I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS |IEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) I I (IN) I (IN) I(IN) I I ACTION_
.1 NONE I I I 0-I.OIAPPAREKTIJUN-SEPI I1 >60 I 1 I IB/D

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
I SEVERE-WETNESS II POOR-WETNESS
ISEPTIC TANK I
I ABSORPTION ROADFILL
FIELDS II
I III I
SSEVERE-SEEPAGEWETNESS II IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE I
LAGOON I SAND
AREAS II
I II I
SSEVERE-WETNESS I IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SANITARY II
LANDFILL I. GRAVEL
(TRENCH) 1 II
I I II i
I SEVERE-SEEPAGEWETNESS 1 POCR-TOO SANCY.WETNESS
SANITARY I
LANDFILL II TOPSOIL
(AREA) I
I II i
IPOOR-WETNESS II
DAILY II WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR II SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL II POND
I I 1I RESERVOIR
1I AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II
I ISEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE,WETNESS II SEVERE-PIPING.WETNESS
SSHALLOW I1EMBANKMENTSI
EXCAVATIONS II DIKES ANDI
I II LEVEES
I I I
SEVERE-WETNESS I SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS I EXCAVATED
WITHOUT PONDS
BASEMENTS AQUIFER FED I
I II
SEVERE-WETNESS I FAVORABLE
DWELLINGS I
WITH II DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I I

SEVERE-WETNESS WETNESS.DROUGHTYFAST INTAKE
SMALL I
COMMERCIAL I IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I

SEVERE-WETNESS I WETNESS.TOO SANDY.SOIL BLOWING
LOCAL I IITERRACESI
ROADS AND I AND I
STREETS DIVERSIONS
I 1 11 11
- LAWNS. SEVERE-WETNESS II WETNESS.DROUGHTY
LANDSCAPING II GRASSED
IAND GOLF I WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS III
I II i
REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS

I I -|i






SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD
033 MASCOTTE FINE SAND, OCCASIONALLY FLOODED

THESE SOILS CONSIST OF POORLY DRAINED, NEARLY LEVEL SOILS ON LOW RIVER TERRACES IN THE COASTAL PLAIN. TYPICALLY, THE SURFACE LAYER IS
VERY DARK GRAY FINE SAND 3 INCHES THICK. THE SUBSURFACE LAYER IS GRAY FINE SAND 13 INCHES THICK. BETWEEN DEPTHS OF 16 TO 28 INCHES IS
DARK REDDISH BROWN AND DARK BROWN WEAKLY CEMENTED FINE SAND. BELOW THIS IS 6 INCHES OF PALE BROWN FINE SAND AND THEN TO DEPTHS OF 60
INCHES OR MORE IS GRAY AND LIGHT GRAY LOAMY MATERIALS. SLOPES ARE LESS THAN 2 PERCENT.


I-__ EgSTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS- I
IIIN.)| USDA TEXTURE UNIFIED ) AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3 PASSING SIEVE NO, I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I I (PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 1 200 I INDEX
S0-16 FS, S SP-SM A-3, A-2-4 1100 100 85-100 5-12 I NP
116-28 FS, S SP-SM, SM A-3, A-2-4 0 1o00 100 85-100 8-15 I NP
128-34 I FS, S SP-SM A-3, A-2-4 0 100 100 85-100 5-12 I -- NP
34-60 SCL, SL SC, SM-SC A-2, A-4, A-6 0 I 100 100 85-100 25-45 1 20-38 14-15
1 I I I I 1 I
I I I I I I I
IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA-- AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONJWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)J SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I __
I I<2MM)l (G/CM3) 1 (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL CONCRETE I
SAME I I I 6.0-20 1 0.03-0.08 14.5-5.5 I VERY LOW !.17 5 I 2 I I HIGH 1 HIGH I
DEPTH I I 0.6-2.0 I 0.10-0.15 14.5-5.5 I 1 VERY LOW 1.17 I I
AS I 1 6.0-20 1 0.03-0.08 14.5-5.5 I VERY LOW 1.17 J I J I
ABOVE I 0.6-2.0 1 0.10-0.15 14.5-5.5 I ILOW 1.28
I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK SUBSIDENCE 1HYDIPOTENTLLI
1 I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY V DURATI ON I MONTH (FT) 1 (LN) I IrI) I I(IN) I I ACTION I
ICOMN I V. LONG IR-SE I ;-1.0 IAFIAR NT IJUN-OCTI I I I I I I1B/I -- I

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
I SEVERE-FLOODING, WETNESS II IPOOR-WETNESS
SEPTIC TANK II
ABSORPTION I I ROADFILL
S FIELDS II
I II I I
ISEVERE-SEEPAGE, FLOODS, WETNESS I11 IMPROBABLE SOURCE-EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE II
LAGOON I SAND
AREAS I .
I I II I
I SEVERE-FLOODS, SEEPAGE, WETNESS, TOO SANDY II IMPROBABLE SOURCE-TOO SANDY
SANITARY I
LANDFILL I GRAVEL
(TRENCH) I

I R SEVERE-FLOODS, SEEPAGE, WETNESS I POOR-TOO SANDY, WETNESS, THIN LAYER
SANITARY II
LANDFILL I TOPSOIL
(AREA)
I. I
POOR-TOO SANDY, WETNESS, THIN LAYER
DAILY II WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR I1 ISEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I POND
J J1 RESERVOIR
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II I
I I SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE, WETNESS SEVERE-WETNESS, SEEPAGE
SHALLOW I IIEMBANKMENTS I
EXCAVATIONS II DIKES AND
SI JI LEVEES
SI I I
SEVERE-FLOODS, WETNESS I SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS I EXCAVATED
WITHOUT i 1 PONDS
BASEMENTS IIAQUIFER FED
I_-- I i I
DWELLINGS SEVERE-FLOODS, WETNESS I FLOODS, CUTBACKS CAVE
I WITH II DRAINAGE
I BASEMENTS I
I .. II i I
SMALL SEVERE-FLOODS, WETNESS II WETNESS, FAST INTAKE, FLOODS, DROUGHT
SMALL I OI
COMMERCIAL I IRRIGATION
I BUILDINGS I|
I II I
I LOCAL SEVERE-WETNESS, FLOODS II WETNESS, SOIL BLOWING, TOO SANDY
LOCAL I TERRACES I
ROADS AND I AND
STREETS I DIVERSIONS
I I -I II
LAWNS. i EN DROUGETY
LANDSCAPING SEVERE-WETNESS GRASS WETNESS DROU
IAND GOLF II WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS II
I I II I

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I II
I I I


33 MASCOTTE FINE SAND USDA-SCS
5-79
RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
SSEVERE-WETNESSTOO SANDY II SEVERE-WETNESS.TOO SANDY
II I I
CAMP AREAS i PLAYGROUNDS 1
II I
11 I
SSEVERE-WETNESS.TOO SANDY I I SEVERE-WETNESS.TOO SANDY
II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS! II AND
II TRAILS
I II I I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
SCAPA- CORN I SOYBEANS I WATER- I POTATOES. I TOMATOES IBAHIAGRASS I GRASS- I
I ILITY 1 I I MELONS I IRISH I I I CLOVER
I I (BU) I (BU) I (TONS) I I(CT) I (TONS) I (AUM) I (AUM) I
INIRRIIRR .N IR. INIRR IIRR. INIRN IIRR. INIR R IIRR. INIRR IR. IIRR. INIRR 1IRR. I
4 50 20 5 175 6 8.0 I I I

I I I I I I I I I J I I I I I I I







WOODLAND SUITAB3LITY
I I I I I I I I I i i i i i i





SORD MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
SYM I EROSION EQUIP. SEEDLING INDTH. PLANT COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
I 1 I HAZARD LIMIT I MORTY. HAZARD I COMPET.I IINDX
I3 SLIGHT IMODERATEMODERATE SLIGHT MODERATE SLASH PINE 80 SLASH PINE
SILOBLOLLY PINE 180 LOBLOLLY PINE
LONGLEAF PINE 170










WI NDBREAKS
S SPECIESl HT1ES LT SPECIES JHTj SPECIES IHTI SPECIES IH7 I
NONE I I I I I I


.
I I I I I I I I I I I I I1























WILDLIFE HAB SUITABSUITYABILITY
I POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS POTENTIAL AS HABITATFOR:
GRAIN GRASSS &I WILD JHARDWD I CONIFERISHRUBS IWETLANDISHALLOW IOPENLD IWOODLD WETLANDS RANGELDI
I SEED LEGUMEUIHE RB, TREESDL PLANTS PLANTS I WATER IWILDLF W LDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF I
POOR FAIR FAIR I POOR FAIR POOR FAIR FAIR FAIR POOR
I I I I I I I i I













POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY REST UNESTRY VEGETATION
PLANT PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT)
COMMON PLANT NAME SYMBOL
--- I C I I (N L SP N ) I i i
II I I I
I I I I I I I

























POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBSI/AC. DRY I T): I

NORMAL YEARS
UNFAVORABLE YEARS I I I I
FOOTNOTES
IAVRABLN YEGARSS IML HRM CNFRSRB MTADSALWOEL WOL MTADRNE
NOMA SEADRSUEIHR.ITES PLNSI ILNSIMTRIIDL WLL WLL WLL
I POR IFAI I FIR POR IFAI IPOR IFARNFARITARIEORS






SOIL INT ERPRETATIONS RECORD

61B NORFOLK LOAMY FINE SAND. 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


__RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
SEVERE FLOODS, WETNESS, TOO SANDY II SEVERE-WETNESS, TOO SANDY
I I II
SCAMP AREAS I IPLAYGROUNDSI
i I II I I
I I II
SEVERE-WETNESS, TOO SANDY II SEVERE-WETNESS, TOO SANDY
I I II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS II AND
I I 1I TRAILS
I I II I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CLASS- i CAPA- I BAHIAASS I I I I
DETERMINING I ABILITY
PHASE I (AUM) _I I
I INIRRIIRR.INI II IN JRIR. NIR IIRRR INIRR RR NIRR IIR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. I
ALL 5W 7.5 I I
SI I 1 I
EI TI I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
P AI I I I I I I I 1 1 1 I I N I I I

SI I I J E I I I I I 8I I I SLAS PI

I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I IPi
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I


SI I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I


















CLASS-DETERMIN-6 PHASE] SPECIES IT SPECES. l SPEC IESI IJ SPECIES rIj
WOODLAND SUITABILITY
CLASS- I ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I I
S DETERMINING I SYM I EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTHIF PLANT | COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
I PHASE I I HAZARD I LIMIT I MORTRY.I HAZARD I COMPETI I INDXI F






I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I J I I



SI I I I I I I I I

WINBREAORKSAL YEARS
ICAss-DETERMIN'G PHASE SPECIES IHTI SPECIES. INTI SPECIES IHTI SPECIES INTl
I I I I i I i I i II I I

































UAVORALE YEARS
I I I I I F I i
1J I I I 1I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
I i I I I I I I I I
WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
CLASS- I POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT.ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR: I
I DETERMINING IGBAIN SIGRASS C" WILD IHARDWD ICONIFERISHRUBS IWETLANDISHALLOWIOPENLD IWOODLD IWErLANDIRANGELIDI
e PHASE I SEED ILEGUME I HERB. I TREES PLANTS I PLANTS I WATER I|ILLF IWILDLF IWILOLF IWILDLF i
I I I I I 1 I I I I I
ALL POOR FAIR FAIR POOR FAIR POOR FAIR FAIR FAIR POOR -
I I I I I I i 1 I I i
1I I I I I I I 1 I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I i
I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I
POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
I PLANT I PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT) BY CLASS DETERMINING PHASE I
COMMON PLANT NAME I SYMBOL I ALL 1 I I
I (NLSPN) I I I I I
I I I I I J I
I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I 1
i I I I I I I
I I I I *I I I
I I I I I I I
1 I I I I I I
II I I I I. I
II I I I I
I I I 1 I I I I
SI I I : I I


I POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT): I
FAVORABLE YEARS I I I I I
NORMAL YEARS I I I I I I
I UNFAVORABLE YEARS I II I I I
FOOTNOTES


USDA-SCS
7-79


THE NORFOLK SERIES CONSISTS OF WELL DRAINED NEARLY LEVEL TO SLOPING SOILS ON UPLANDS IN THE COASTAL PLAIN. IN A
REPRESENTATIVE PROFILE. THE SURFACE LAYER IS GRAYISH BROWN LOAMY SAND ABOUT 9 INCHES THICK. THE SUBSURFACE LAYER IS
LIGHT YELLOWISH BROWN LOAMY SAND. 5 INCHES THICK. THE SUBSOIL EXTENDS TO A DEPTH OF 82 INCHES. IT IS YELLOWISH BROWN
SANDY LOAM IN THE UPPER PART. YELLOWISH BROWN SANDY CLAY LOAM IN THE MIDDLE PART AND MOTTLED BROWNISH YELLOW. STRONG
BROWN, YELLOWISH RED SANDY CLAY LOAM IN THE LOWER PART.
I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES I
DEPTH I I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS ILIOUID IPLAS-I
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I I I(PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 I 200 I INDEX I
S0-13ILFS ISM IA-2 I 0 195-100 92-100 50-91 13-30 <20 I NP I.
113-451SL. SCL. CL ISC. SM-SC. CL. CL-MLIA-2. A-4. A-6 I 0 195-100 91-100 70-96 30-55 I 20-38 4-15
14S-sBISCL. CL. SC ISC. SM-SC. CL. CL-MLIA-4. A-6. A-7-6 I 0 1 100 98-100 65-98 36-72 20-45 I 4-22
I I I I I I I I
1I I I
IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROO.IMATTER I_
I I<2MM)I (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALI K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
I 0-131 2-8 11.55-1.75 i 6.0-20 I 0.06-0.11 14.5-6.0 I I LOW 1.171 5 I I .5-2 IMODERATEI HIGH I
113-45118-3511.35-1.45 0.6-2.0 1 0.10-0.15 14.5-5.5 1 I LOW 1.241 I I
145-80120-4011.30-1.40 I 0.6-2.0 I 0.10-0.15 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.241 I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I 1 I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
I | DEPTH | KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) I I (IN) I I1IN) IINA I I ACTION I
I NONE I I 14.0-6.OIAPPARENTIJAN-MARI I I >6o I I I I B I I
SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SMODERATE-WETNESS II GOOD
SEPTIC TANK I 1I
ABSORPTION I II ROADFILL
FIELDS
I __________I. II I I
MODERATE-SEEPAGE IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE I
LAGOON II SAND
AREAS I

SLIGHT IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SANITARY II
LANDFILL I GRAVEL
(TRENCH) II

SSLIGHT I FAIR-TOO SANOY
SANITARY II
LANDFILL I TOPSOIL
(AREA) I
I I II I I
SLIGHT II
DAILY I II WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR II MODERATE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I II POND
I I II RESERVOIR
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II
SMODERATE-WETNESS |I SLIGHT
SSHALLOW I IIEMBANKMENTS
EXCAVATIONS I II DIKES ANDI
SI 1 LEVEES
I I II I
SSLIGHT II SEVERE-DEEP TO WATER
1 DWELLINGS I II EXCAVATED
WITHOUT I II PONDS
BASEMENTS I IIAQUIFER FED
i. I II
SMODERATE-WETNESS I DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS I
WITH I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I
I I II I I
SLIGHT I SLOPE
SMALL III
COMMERCIAL II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I I
I I II I
I SLIGHT I I FAVORABLE
LOCAL I TERRACES
ROADS AND II] AND
STREETS DIVERSIONS
I I II I
LAWNS. SLIGHT II FAVORABLE
LANDSCAPING I GRASSED
AND GOLF I WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS I
REGIONAL PETITIONS
REGIONALJNIRPRETATIONS

I I I
I _


033 MASCOTTE, OCCASIONALLY FLOODED







618 NORFOLK LOAMY FINE SAND. 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
7-79


__RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
SSLIGHT II MODERATE-SLOPE
I II
CAMP AREAS I IIPLAYGROUNDS
III
I __ II
SLIGHT I SLIGHT
IIII PATHS
PICNIC AREAS jI AND
j jI TRAILS
I I II -- I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
I CAPA- I COTTON I TOBACCO I CORN I SOYBEANS I WHEAT I PEANUTS I PASTURE
ABILITY I LINT I I I I I I
I B I (LBS) LBS (s) _I (BU) I (BU) (BU) I (LBS) I (AUM) I'
__ INIRRIIRR.INIRR JIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR 1RR. I
I2E 650 162900 100 I 35 I 55 IT3700 110.0 I
-I










bOOPLAN O SUITABILITY
ORD I ANAGMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY
SYM IROSIONI EUIP SEEDLINGS WINDTH.1 PLANT COMMONTREES ISTE TREES TO PLANT I
SI I HAZARD LIMIT I MORTY. HAZARD COMPETE. IINDXI I
20 SLIGHT SLIGHT I SLIGHT I I ILCBLCLLY PINE 186 *SLASH PINE
LONGLEAF PINE I68 *LOBLOLLY PINE I
II I I I SLASH PINE 86
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I i



















.. ..-____ WINDBREAKS____
I SPECIES I I SPECIES IHTI SPECIES IHTI SPECIES I
NONE

N NI I I I I I I I I

P I I I I I IIONGLEAF PINE 6 I LOBLOLLY II


---------------- POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENT__S I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR:
I I I I I I ISS LASH PINE S IY
II R I TI I I I I I LDLF LF W
GOODI I GI I IGO I GOOD GOOD V. POOR











I I III I
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I II










I I I I I I I I II
II I I I I I I I







































POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LS./AC. DRY WT):
FAVORABLE YEARS
NORMAL YEARS I I I I
UI n v L I I AI I I I YE I.
FOOTNOTES
SITE INDEX IS A SUMMARY OF OR MORE MEASUREMENTS ON THIS SOIL.
SITE INDOX IS A SUMMARY OF S ON NONE MEASUREMENTS ON THIS SOIL.


SOIL INTERPRETAT I O N S RECORD

61C NORFOLK LOAMY FINE SAND. 5 TO 8 PERCENT SLOPES


THE NORFOLK SERIES CONSISTS OF WELL DRAINED NEARLY LEVEL TO SLOPING SOILS ON UPLANDS IN THE COASTAL PLAIN. IN A
REPRESENTATIVE PROFILE. THE SURFACE LAYER IS GRAYISH BROWN LOAMY SAND ABOUT 9 INCHES THICK. THE SUBSURFACE LAYER IS
LIGHT YELLOWISH BROWN LOAMY SAND, 5 INCHES THICK. THE SUBSOIL EXTENDS TO A DEPTH OF 82 INCHES. IT IS YELLOWISH BROWN
SANDY LOAM IN THE UPPER PART, YELLOWISH BROWN SANDY CLAY LOAM IN THE MIDDLE PART AND MOTTLED BROWNISH YELLOW. STRONG
BROWN. YELLOWISH RED SANDY CLAY LOAM IN THE LOWER PART.
I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES I
IDEPTHI I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS--
|(IN.)l USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I | IPCT)Il 4 I 10 1 40 1 2 0I IINDEX
0-1SILFS ISM IA-2 0 |95-100 92-100 50-91 13-30 <20 I NP
15-371SL. SCL. CL ISC, SM-SC, CL, CL-MLIA-2. A-4, A-6 0 195-100 91-100 70-96 30-55 20-38 I 4-15
37-80jSCL. CL. SC ISC, SM-SC, CL, CL-MLIA-4. A-6, A-7-6 0 I 100 98-100 65-98 36-72 20-45 I 4-22
I I I I I I
I I I I I I

IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULKI PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)i SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I_
I 1<2MM)I (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) 1 (IN/IN) I (PH) I POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL CONCRETE
I 0-151 2-8 11.55-1.75 6I .0-20 I 0.06-0.11 14.5-6.0 I LOW 1.171 5 I I .5-2 IMODERATEI HIGH-I
115-37118-3511.35-1.45 I0.6-2.0 1 0.10-0.15 14.5-5.S I I LOW 1.241 I I
137-80120-4011.30-1.40 0.6-2.0 I 0.10-0.15 14.5-5.5 1 I LOW 1.241t I
I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
II I I I I I I I
FLOODING j HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
I | I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) I I (IN) I I(IN) I(IN) I I ACTION
I NONE I 14.0-6.OIAPPARENTIJAN-MAR I I >60 I I --I I B I -

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
MODERATE-WETNESS II GOOD
SEPTIC TANK I
ABSORPTION II ROADFILL
FIELDS

MODERATE-SEEPAGE II IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE I
LAGOON I SAND
AREAS II
I I II I '
SSLIGHT IIMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SANITARY I I
- LANDFILL I II GRAVEL
(TRENCH)
_I II I
SLIGHT FAIR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY II
LANDFILL I I TOPSOIL
(AREA) I

S SLIGHT
DAILY I II WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR II I MODERATE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I II POND
I I II RESERVOIR I
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II
SMODERATE-WETNESS II SLIGHT
SHALLOW I IIEMBANKMENTS I
EXCAVATIONS II DIKES AND
I I II LEVEES

I SLIGHT I SEVERE-DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS lI EXCAVATED
WITHOUT I II PONDS
BASEMENTS I IJAQUIFER FEDI
I I II I
I MODERATE-WETNESS i DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS I
WITH I I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I I
I I i I I
IMODERATE-SLOPE I SLOPE
S SMALL I I
COMMERCIAL I I IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS II
I I I I
SSLIGHT FAVORABLE
LOCAL I I TERRACES
ROADS AND I AND
STREETS II DIVERSIONS
S2I
LAWNS. I SLIGHT II FAVORABLE
LANDSCAPING I i GRASSED I
AND GOLF I If WATERWAYS
I FAIRWAYS I II
II II I

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I I I

I I I


USDA-SCS
7-79






61C NORFOLK LOAMY FINE SAND. 5 TO 8 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
7-79


_RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
SSLIGHT II 4 SEVERE-SLOPE
I II I
CAMP AREAS I .4 PLAYGROUNDS I
I I 11
- -- ii I-
I SLIGHT t SLIGHT
III PATHS I
PICNIC AREAS I AND
4 TRAILS

CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE CF CROPS AND PATURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT) -
SCAPA- COTTON TOBACCO CORN SOYBEANS WHEAT PEANUTS PASTURE
ABILITY LINT I I
I I (LBS) I (LBS) 1_(BU) I (BU) I (BU) I LBS) I (AUM) I
I NIRRIIRR, NIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRRe IhIRR IIRR, INIRR 1RR, INIRR IIRRIRR NIRR IRR,
I 3E 1600 ( 12700 1 90 30 50 s 13300 1' I9.5










WCDLACP4DSUITABILITY '
ORD M MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS____ I POTENTIAL aPRCUCTIVITY I
SM EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLNGI WINDTH. PLANT COMMON TREES ISTEI TREES TO PLANT
I 1 HAZARD I LIMIT I MORT'Y HAZARD I COMPETE, I I I
120 SLIGHT SLIGHT SLIGHT ILCLCLLY PINE 86 SLASHH PINE
SLONGLEAF PINE LOBLOLLY PINE
SLASH PINE 186











WINDBREAKS
I SPECIES HTI SPECIES mIHTI SPECIES IHTI -SPECIES -- HTI
I NONE I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I 4 4 4 I I I I II
I I I I 4 I I I I 4 I4 I I I I I


























WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
SORD ANAGPOTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS PTNT POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR

]GRAIN &IGRASS &I WILD IHARDWD ICONIFERISHRUBS IWETLANDISHALLOWIOPENLD IWOOOLD IWETLANDIRANGELDI
I SE ILEGUME IHERB. I TREES PLANTS NDTH PL PLANT S I WATER IILMN TREES LF IILDLF ILTREES TLF IILDLFANT

FAIR GOOD GOOD GOOD I GOOD I V. POCR|V. POOR GOOD I GOOD IV. POOR
I I AARD I I H I COMP I























20 POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY RANGELAND O LCLCLLR FOREST UNDERSTORY EGETATION)86 SLASH PINE
PLANT PERCENTAGE COMPOSITIONGLEA PY WEIGHTNE 68 LOLOLLY PINE
COMMON PLANT NAME SYMBOL ISLASH
S4 I (NL PN)






























POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT): 4
FAVORABLE I I I I
NORMAL YEARS I I
I I I I I I I I I I I








































UNFAVORABLE YEARS I I
NEFOOTNOTES



SSITE INDEX IS A SUMMARY OF 5 OR RE MEASUREMENTS ON THIS SOIL I
I4I I II 41 II II
I I I I I I I I I I
I I 4 I I II II I I
I I I I I I I I I i

I POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR: 4

SI SEED (LEGUME I HERB I TREES PLANTS I PLANTS I WATER IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF I

I I I 4 4 4 4 I I I I I I

4 I I 4 1 I 4 4 I 4 I



PLANT 4 PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT)





I I I I I 1 I I














FOOTNOTES
SITE INDEX IS A SUMMARY OF 5 OR MORE MEASUREMENTS ON THIS SOIL.


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD

68 OCILLA FINE SAND. 0 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
1-79


THE OCILLA SERIES CONSISTS OF SOMEWHAT POORLY DRAINED. NEARLY LEVEL SOILS THAT HAVE A THICK SANDY SURFACE LAYER. THESE
SOILS OCCUR ON SMOOTH LANDSCAPES. THE SURFACE LAYER IS LOAMY SAND ABOUT 28 INCHES THICK; IT IS VERY DARK GRAY IN THE
UPPER PART AND LIGHT BROWNISH GRAY TO PALE BROWN IN THE LOWER PART. THE SUBSOIL IS BROWNISH YELLOW SANDY LOAM TO A DEPTH
OF 49 INCHES; UNDERNEATH TO A DEPTH OF 67 INCHES IS BROWNISH YELLOW AND MOTTLED STRONG BROWN, YELLOWISH RED AND LIGHT
GRAY SANDY CLAY LOAM, IT HAS GRAY MOTTLES THROUGHOUT.
I1 _ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI I I FRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS ILIOUID IPLAS-I
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I J I PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 I 200 I I INOEI
I 0-261FS ISM. SP-SM IA-2. A-3 1 0 100 95-100 75-100 8-12 1 I NPI
126-681SL. SCL ISM. CL. SC JA-2. A-4. A-6 0 100 95-100 80-100 30-55 I <40 INP-18


I I II I I I I I

IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I__
I 1<2MM)I (G/CM3) (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL CONCRETEI
S0-261 4-101 2.0-20 I 0.05-0.08 14.5-5.5 I LOW .171 5 I 1-2 I HIGH IMODERATEI
126-68115-351 0.6-2.0 I 0.09-0.12 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.241 I I I
I I I 4 1 I 4 4 I I I
I 4 I i I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
FLOODING | HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENTeLI
I | I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS JDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I J(IN) I I (IN) I I(IN) I(IN) I I ACTION 4
SNONE-COMMON I BRIEF IDEC-APRII.0-2.51APPARENTIDEC-APRI 1 I >60 I -1 I C I -

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SSEVERE-WETNESS 4 I FAIR-WETNESS
SEPTIC TANK I II
ABSORPTION II ROADFILL
FIELDS I II
I I II I
SSEVERE-SEEPAGE.WETNESS II IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE I I ,I
LAGOON I II SAND
AREAS I

SSEVERE-WETNESS I I IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SANITARY I II I
LANDFILL I II GRAVEL
I (TRENCH) I II
I I I I I
SEVERE-SEEPAGE.WETNESS II I POOR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY I 1I
LANDFILL I I TOPSOIL
(AREA) I I
I I II iI
SFAIR-WETNESS II
DAILY I WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR I i I SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL II POND
I I I1 RESERVOIR
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II I
SSEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE.WETNESS II SEVERE-PIPING.WETNESS
SHALLOW I IIEMBANKMENTS
EXCAVATIONS II DIKES AND I
SI II LEVEES -1
I I II I I
MODERATE-WETNESS II SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS 1 II EXCAVATED
WITHOUT I II PONDS
BASEMENTS IAOUIFER FED
I I II I
ISEVERE-WETNESS II I FAVORABLE
DWELLINGS I I
WITH II DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I II I
I I II I I
I SEVERE-WETNESS I WETNESS.DROUGHTYFAST INTAKE
SMALL I
COMMERCIAL I II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I
I I II I I
SMODERATE-WETNESS I I WETNESS
LOCAL I 4 TERRACES
ROADS AND I I AND
STREETS DIVERSIONS

LAWNS. MODERATE-WETNESSDROUGHTY II I DROUGHT
LANDSCAPING II GRASSEDI
AND GOLF WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS


REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I I I
I I
1 I I






6B OCILLA FINE SAND. 0 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES USDA-SCS
1-79
RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
SEVERE-TOO SANDY I I SEVERE-TOO SANDYFLOODS
II I
CAMP.AREAS IIPLAYGROUNDS I
II 1 I
II I
SEVERE-TOO SANDY I I SEVERE-TOO SANDY
II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS II AND
II TRAILS
__LII I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE CF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
I CAPA- I CORN I PEANUTS I SOYBEANS I TOBACCO IBAHIAGRASS I IMPROVED I
I ABILITY I I 1 II IBERMUDAGR. I
SI (BUJ I (LBS) I (BU) I (LBS) I (AUM) I (AUM) I
INIRRIIRR.INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. I
3W I I 75 12200 35 12600 I 7.5 I I 8.5
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I





ORD I I I ANAGMENTROBEM I I I I I I OTNTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I I I I I
I SYMI I I UIP ISEED I I I PLANT I I I I COMMON TREES I I I' I TREES TO PLANT


I I I I LIMIT I OR HAZAR I I I I I I I I NDXI I
13W SLIGHT I I MODERATE I I I I INE 185 ILOBLOLLY PINE I



I I I ISLASH PINE 190 ISLASH PINE I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I






















S SPECIES I I SPECIES IHTi SPECIES IHTI SPECIES I1HI
SWOODLAND SUITABILITYABI
I OR0D MANAGEMENT PRDABEMS ELE I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
ISYM EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT I COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
AI I HAZARD IMIT I MORT'Y.I HAZARD I COMPET. I INR pX



I I I I I I I I I
I POTENTIAL NATIV ATEO I ILBLOLLY PINE 15I ILOBLLOR Y V TI











SLASHCOMMON PLANT NAME SLASH PINE
I G E I A I I I I





II SPE IE I H SPECI I I I ISPECIESHI EI



FV OI IE I I I


II NFI I I I Y_ I IS
I I I II I IED WITH SUBSOIL.
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I1







I_ POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS_ _I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FIR:_
GRAIN SPIGRASS & ILD SPEHARDW ICONIFERiSHRUBS I TLAND SHALLOW OPENLY IWOO SPLD WETLANDS RANGED
I NONE I TRES PLANTS I PLANTS WATER IWILOLF IWILDLF IWILDLF IWLLF
I I I I I I I III
SI IIII I I I I I
SI I I I II I I I
I III III I I I I
I I I I I I I I




POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY RANGELAN OR FOREST UNERSTRY VEGETATION
PLANT NTIA PERCENT HABITAT ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL ITA HABITAT pRY WFIGHTFR:
COMMON PLANT NAME LEGUSYMBOLE HERB. TREES PLANTS I PLANTS I WATER WILOLF IWILLF IWILLF IWILLF I
---I I I I P I I I I I I I







POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT) I I I I I I I I I I
FAVORABLE I I I I I I I I
NORMAL I I I I I I I I I I I I
_UNFAVRABL YEARS I I j I I I I I

CM1 SLIGHT LIMITATIONS IF SURFACE LAYER IS MIXE WITH SUBSOIL.









SLIGHT LIMITATIONS IF SURFACE LAYER IS MIXED WITH SUBSOiL.


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD
6C OCILLA FINE SAND, 5 TO 8 PERCENT SLOPES


THE OCILLA SERIES CONSISTS OF SOMEWHAT POORLY DRAINED, NEARLY LEVEL SOILS THAT HAVE A THICK SANDY SURFACE LAYER. THESE SOILS OCCUR ON
SLOPING LANDSCAPES. THE SURFACE LAYER IS FINE SAND ABOUT 26 INCHES THICK. THE SUBSOIL IS BROWNISH YELLOW AND MOTTLED STRONG BROWN,
YELLOWISH RED AND LIGHT GRAY SANDY CLAY LOAM. IT HAS GRAY MOTTLES THROUGHOUT.


I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES I
IDEPTHI I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS-I
IIIN.)I USDA TEXTURE UNIFIED AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I IT(PCT)I t I 10 i 4o 200 I INDEX I
0-26 FS SM, SP-SM IA-2, A-3 I I 100 95-100 75-100 8-12 I NPI
26-80 SL, SCL, SC SM, CL, SC IA-2, A-4, A-6 0 100 95-100 80-100 30-55 <40 INP-18
I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I

IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONJWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY I
i(IN.) (PCT I DENSITY ] ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONItMMHOS/CM) SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I
1 1<2MM)I (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALI K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
ISAME 4-10 12.0-20 I 0.05-0.08 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.171 5 I I 1-2 I HIGH IMODERATE ]
I AS 115-351 0.6-2.0 I 0.09-0.12 14.5-5.5 I I LOW I.241 I I I
IABOVEI I l I-- I J.LI rl --__
I ABOVE I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I_
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK SUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT LI
_I._ I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS FT 1I (I I ' NONE I 11.0-2.5 lAPARENT IDEC-A -_ I I > 60 I I I Ic I I

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
ISEVERE-WETNESS I I FAIR-WETNESS
SEPTIC TANK I II
ABSORPTION I I ROADFILL
FIELDS I I

S5-77.: SEVERE-SEEPAGE, WETNESS .II IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES, THIN LAYER
SEWAGE I 7-8%: SEVERE-SEEPAGE, WETNESS, SLOPE II
LAGOON 1 II SAND
AREAS I I
I I iI__
I SEVERE-WETNESS I IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES, THIN LAYER
SSANITARY
LANDFILL I I GRAVEL
S(TRENCH) I I
___ __ II _I_-
SSEVERE-SEEPAGE, WETNESS I I LFS: FAIR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY II IFS: POOR-TOO SANDY
LANDFILL II TOPSOIL
S (AREA) I
SII I
S FAIR-WETNESS
DAILY WATER MANAGEMENT__
COVER FOR II
LANDFILL I POND MODERATE-SEEPAGE, SLOPE
J_ I JI RESERVOIR I
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II I I
I SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE, WETNESS II I SEVERE-PIPING, WETNESS, SEEPAGE
SHALLOW I IEMBANKMENTS
JEXCAVAtIONS I I DIKES AND
I LEVEES
I II I I
SEVERE-WETNESS ISEVERE-UTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS 1 EXCAVATED
WITHOUT 1 I PONDS
BASEMENTS I j AQUIFER FED
I II I
WI SEVERE-WETNESS ISEVERE-SLOPE
DWELLINGS
WITH I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I
I I_ I. I I I
I SEVERE-WETNESS WETNESS, DROUGHT, FAST INTAKE
SMALL 1
COMMERCIAL I I IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I
I II I
L L MODERATE-WETNESS TERRACES WETNESS
S LOCAL TERRACES
ROADS AND I AND
STREETS I IIDIVERSIONS
I I I_ __
LAWNS. I 1 DROUGUT
ILANDSCPIN I MODERATE-WETNESS, DROUGHT 1 DOUGHTY
LANDSCAPING I +I GRASSED I
IAND GOLF I | WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS I I
I I II I
REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I I I
I I I
I _ I






SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD USDA-SCS
21 ORANGEBURG LOA INE SAN TO PERCENT SLOPES7-79
218 ORANGEBURG LOAMY FINE SAND. 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
LFS: MODERATE-WETNESS 5-6%: LFS, MODERATE-WETNESS
FS: SEVER-TOOSANDY I 5-67.; FSi SEVERE-TOO SANDY
CAMP AREAS I ET I PLAYGROUNDS 6-8%: LF SEVERE-SLOPE
16-8%: LFS, SEVERE-TOO SANDY, SLOPE
LFS: MODERAT-WETNESS I PAI TS: 'ODERATE-WETNESS
S V O II PATHS I
PICFS: SEVEE-TOOSANDY AND FS: SEVERE-TOO SANDY
PICNIC AREAS I ANDS
I II TRAILS
I I I- -L _____________________________ I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CLASS- CAPA- I CORN I PEANUTS SOYBEANS TOBACCO BAHIAGRASS IMPROVED
DETERMINING BIUT I I I IBERMUDAGRASS I
PHASE I (BU) (LBS) (BU) (LBS) (AUMi) I BE(M) IR
I INIRRIIRR.INIRR IIRR. INIRR JIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. I
ALL 3W 75 2200 35 2600 7.5 8.5 I

I I I I A ILI
SCLASS- OI P TI I I I I II
~DEG SSI I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I

HAZARD I I I I I CO I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I

SPHASE SPECIES SPEC I IES.SPECIESSPECIES I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
WOODLAND SUITABILITY
CLASS- P ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
DETERMINING I SYG I EROSION E UIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT I COMON TREES IISITEI TREES TO PLANT
I PHASE I I .HARD I LIMIT I MORT'YR I HAZARD I COMPETE IWILDL I



I I I I


I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I 1 I I I I T I I




II I IIII I I I IL
I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I


I I I I II I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I







WIDIF E H HABITAT SUITABIIT
POTENTIAL PR CTION (LBS./A C PTNTIAL FORHSPBI. E NT SPECIES INTI SPCIESTT FR
DETERIINNG I N IRASS i WILD HARDWD II I CONIESUI IIETLNDiSHALLOOPED WLD iTLNDRN
I PHASE 1 SEED LEGUE ERB TREES PLANTS I PLANTS I .ATER ILDL IWILF I















FAVORABLE YEARS
SI I I I I 1 I I
IIII II I II




I I I I I I I I
S CLASUPOTENTLF NA E Y PLANT COU Y (RANTAT ELED OR FREST UNIY VET NTIAL AS H T
I DETERMINING GRAIN &GRASS L PERCENTAGE CORPOSIHRU IOS (DRY WEIGHT) BY CLASS IDOOETERNLD IETLANG PNDIRASENGD
I COONI SEED LEGUME I MER. TREES PLANTS I PLANTS I WATER ILFWILDLF IILL IILDLF I
I I I (NLIPN) I I I I I
SOUTHERN BAYBERRY I I I I I I IC I I
INKBERRYI I ILGL I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I








POTENTIAL PRODUCPOTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION
CO N PLANT NAME SYMVORABLEBOL I I I I
NOAL YEARS I I I I I

SOERN BAYBERRY FOOTNOTES







FOOTNOTES


THE ORANGEBURG SERIES CONSISTS OF DEEP. WELL DRAINED. NEARLY LEVEL TO STRONGLY SLOPING SOILS ON UPLANDS OF THE COASTAL
PLAIN. IN A REPRESENTATIVE PROFILE THESE SOILS HAVE A DARK GRAYISH BROWN LOAMY SAND SURFACE LAYER ABOUT 7 INCHES THICK.
THE SUBSOIL IS PREDOMINANTLY YELLOWISH RED. FRIABLE, SANDY CLAY LOAM THAT EXTENDS TO 64 INCHES OR MORE.


ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
DEPTH I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS- I
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I I(PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 I 200 I IINDEX I
0-8 ILFS ISM IA-2 I 0 198-100 95-100 60-87 14-28 I NP
S8-13SL ISM IA-2 0 198-100 95-100 70-96 25-35 I <30 INP-4I
13-351SCL. SL ISC. CL. SM, SM-SC )A-6. A-4 0 198-100 95-100 71-96 38-58 I 22-40 I 6-19 I
35-80SCL. SC. SL ISC. CL IA-6. A-4. A-7 0 198-100 95-100 70-97 40-65 I 24-46 I 8-21
I I 1 I I I I I
II I I I I I
DEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULKI PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY SHRINK- IEROSIONJWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY I
(IN.)](PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM) SWELL FACTORSlEROD. MATTER I__
S 1<2MM)l (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (II/N) I (PH) i POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEl
S0-8 I 4-101l 2.0-6.o o.o06-0o.9 14.5-6.0 1 I LOW 1.10t S I .5-1 IMODERATEIMODERATEI
S8-131 7-18 I 2.0-6.0 I 0.09-0.12 14.5-6.0 I I LOW 1.201 I I I
13-35118-35s I 0.6-2.0 I 0.11-0.14 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.24 I I
35-80120--451 I 0.6-2.01 0.11-0.14 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.241
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I i
FLOODING ] HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT.LI
|I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) I I (IN) I I(IN) ILIN) I I ACTION I
NO--- NE I I >6.0 I I I >60 I I I I S I a -

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SSLIGHT II GOOD
SEPTIC TANK
ABSORPTION I ROADFILL
FIELDS II
SI II .I
I MODERATE-SEEPAGE.SLOPE II IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
I SEWAGE I I
I LAGOON SAND
AREAS I
II II I
SLIGHT II IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SANITARY II
LANDFILL GRAVEL
(TRENCH)

SLIGHT IFAIR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY I
LANDFILLi TOPSOIL
(AREA)

GOOD I
D AILY WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR I MODERATE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I POND
I II RESERVOIR
I AREA.
-BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II 1 I
SLIGHT II MODERATE-PIPING
SHALLOW IIIEMBANKMENTSI
EXCAVATIONS 1 DIKES AND I
I LEVEES
SLIGHT SEVERE-NO WATER
DWELLINGS EXCAVATED
WITHOUT j PONDS
BASEMENTS AQUIFER FED

SLIGHT DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS
WITH DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS

SLIGHT I SLOPE
SMALL I
COMMERCIAL IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS
I I II I I
SLIGHT II I FAVORABLE
LOCAL TERRACES
ROADS AND I AND
STREETS I DIVERSIONS
I I I I I
LAWNS. SLIGHT Ii i FAVORABLE
LANDSCAPING I I GRASSEDI
AND GOLF I WATERWAYS I
FAIRWAYS I II
I I I I i

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS







218 ORANGEBURG LOAMY FINE SAND. 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
7-79


_-___ RECREATIONAL IVELOPMENT
SSLIGHT II I MODERATE-SLOPE
I II I
CAMP AREAS IIPLAYGROUNDS
II I
i I II _i__
SLIGHT II SLIGHT
III PATHS
PICNIC AREAS AND
II TRAILS
-__ -C CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (hIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CAPA- I CORN I COTTON I PEANUTS I SOYBEANS I TOBACCO I IMPROVED IBAHIAGRASS I
I ABILITY I I LINT I I IBERMUDAGR. I I
I I (BU) I (LaS) ILBS) I (lU) I (LBS) I IAUM) I (AUM) I
INIRRIIRR.INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR R INIRR IR INRRIIR INIRR IIRR.T NIRR IARR
2E 120 900 14000 I 45 I 2400 110.5 I 8.5

1 I I I I I ] I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I I I i I I i I I I



SI I I I I I I I I I I I I I I IITY



I CRD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
ISYM I EROSION EQUIP I SEEDLINGI INDTH.I PLANT COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
S I HAZARD I LIMIT I MORTHYI HAZARD I COMPET.I IINDXI I
120 SLIGHT I SLIGHT I SLIGHT ILGBLCILY PINE 180 SLASH PINE
SLASH PINE Is86 LOBLOLLY PINE
LGNGLEAF PINE 177

I I
I I








SISPECIES I IHTI SPE IE IHTI SPECIES IHTI
I I OI I I I I I I I




II III I I I
I_____1 I I I I ABIL I
I I HAZARD LIMIT I MORTY. HAZARD I I I















WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
0 SLIGHT SLIGHPOTENTIAL FOR TAT ELEL Y PINNT I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR:NE
GRAIN GRASSS l1 WILD IHARDWO ICONIFERISHRUBS IWETLANDISH PINE LLOWI 86 OPENED IWOODLD IWETLANDIRANGELD
I I I I I I I I




I I I I I I I I I I
SI I I I II I II I
I I I I I I I I I










.__PTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGE A OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
1 PLANT 1 PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION fDRY WEIGHT)
COMMON PLANT NAME SYMBOL
II (NLSPN)I







IPINEHILL BLUESTEM ANDI 15
]LITTLE BLUESTEM ANSC2 T15
SLENDER BLUESTEM ANTE 20
APANICUM PANIC 15
IBEAKED PANICUM PAAN 1 20
ILESP I DEZA LESPE
TICKCLOVER ESMO
IGRASSLEAF GOLASTER I CHGR







FAVORABLE YEARS I I
NORMAL YEARS I 00II I I










UIUFAVORAL YEAR I I I i
POTENTIAL FO ATNOTES
1 RATINGS BASED CN SRWPC COMMITTEE 4 GUIDE APRIL 1W70
IGOOD IGD GOOD IGOC IGOD PCOR IV. POCRI GOOD GOOD |V. POORI





TNPLANT PERCENTAGE COMPETITION DRY WEIGHT)S

VA Y NLSPN1I I I I



I LEAKED PANICUM PAAN 20 |













FCCTNOTES
RATINGS BASED ON SRWPC COMMITTEE 4 GUIDE. APRIL 1970.


SO IL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD

21C ORANGEBURG LOAMY FINE SAND, 5 TO 8 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
7-79


THE ORANGEBURG SERIES CONSISTS OF DEEP, WELL DRAINED. NEARLY LEVEL TO STRONGLY SLOPING SOILS ON UPLANDS OF THE COASTAL
PLAIN. IN A REPRESENTATIVE PROFILE THESE SOILS HAVE A DARK GRAYISH BROWN LOAMY SAND SURFACE LAYER ABOUT 7 INCHES THICK.
THE SUBSOIL IS PREDOMINANTLY YELLOWISH RED. FRIABLE. SANDY CLAY LOAM THAT EXTENDS TO 64 INCHES OR MORE.


I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI I I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS-I
I(IN.)| USDA TEXTURE | UNIFIED 1 AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I I I(PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 I 200 1 IINDEX I
I 0-7 ILFS ISM IA-2 I 0 198-100 95-100 60-87 14-28 I NP
I 7-15ISL ISM A-2 I0 98-100 95-100 70-96 25-35 <30 INP-4I
115-38ISCL. SL ISC. CL. SM. SM-SC IA-6. A-4 I 0 198-100 95-100 71-96 38-58 I 22-40 I 6-19
138-80ISCL, SC. SL ISC. CL IA-6. A-4. A-7 0 198-100 95-100 70-97 40-65 I 24-46 I 8-21
I I I I I I I
IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK) PERMEA- | AVAILABLE I SCIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)i SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I I
I 1<2MM)i (G/CM3) I(IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
I 0-7 4-101 2.0-6.0 I 0.06-0.09 14.5-6.0 I LOW 1.10 S I I .5-1 IMODERATEIMODERATEI
I 7-151 7-181 2.0-6.0 I 0.09-0.12 14.5-6.0 I I LOW 1.201 I I
I15-38e18-351 0.6-2.0 I 0.11-0.14 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.241 I 1 1
138-80120-451 0.6-2.0 I 0.11-0.14 14.5-5.5 -. I LOW 1.241
II I I I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT*LI
I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I IIN) I1 I (IN) I IIN) I(IN) I I ACTION I
I NONE I j I >6.0 I I I I I >60 I I I I I

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SSLIGHT II GOOD
SEPTIC TANK I II
ABSORPTION ROADFILL
FIELDS II
I I II
SMODERATE-SEEPAGESLOPE I IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE II
LAGOON II SAND
-AREAS I I
I I 11 II
SLIGHT ii I IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SANITARY II I
LANDFILL II GRAVEL
(TRENCH) II I
I I II I I
SI SLIGHT FAIR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY I
LANDFILL I TOPSOIL
(AREA) I I
I I I I I
GOOD II
DAILY II WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR I I I MODERATE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I II POND
I I II RESERVOIR
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II I I
SI SLIGHT II MODERATE-PIPING
I SHALLOW I EMBANKMENTS I
EXCAVATIONS I II DIKES AND I
I I II LEVEES
I I II I
I I SLIGHT II I SEVERE-NO WATER
DWELLINGS I EXCAVATED I
WITHOUT II PONDS
I BASEMENTS I IIAGUIFER FED I

SLIGHT II I DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS I II I
WITH II DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS II
I I II I I
MODERATE-SLOPE II I SLOPE
SMALL I
COMMERCIAL I I IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I
I I II I
I SLIGHT I I FAVORABLE
LOCAL I I TERRACES
ROADS AND I I AND
STREETS I II DIVERSIONS

LAWNS. I SLIGHT II I FAVORABLE
LANDSCAPING II GRASSED I
AND GOLF I. 1 WATERWAYS I
FAIRWAYS I II
I II i


NEGILJNAL INTGNPRETATIONS
I I I


I I I








RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT


USDA-SCS
7-79


SLIGHT II SEVERE-SLOPE
I II I
CAMP AREAS I1IPLAYGROUNDS I
SI II I
1 I__ _
SLIGHT I SLIGHT
II PATHS
]PICNIC AREAS I AND
II TRAILS
I I I I I I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CAPA- I CORN I COTTON I PEANUTS SOYBEANS TOBACCO I IMPROVED IBAHIAGRASSI
I LITY LIN I I IT I IBERMUOAGR I I
I I (Ul I ( I _I_ NIRRIIRR.INIRR IIRR. INIRR JIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIR IIRR, INIRRBi JIRR. INIRR IIRR. I
3E 1 1 95 1 800 13200 35 12200 110.0 1 8.0










WOODLAND SUITABILITY
ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
SSYM EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
SI ] HAZARD I LIMIT I MORT*Y. HAZARD I COMPETE. INDIJ X
20 SLIGHT SLIGHT I SLIGHT I LOBLOLLY PINE I0 SLASH PINE
S SLASH PINE ]86 LOBLOLLY PINE.



I I I I I I I I I I I I
LCNGLEAF PINE 177












I I SPECIES IHTI SPECIES InTI SPECIES IHTI SPECIES IHTI
NONE I
I I I II I III




WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
| POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR:___
GRAIN ,&GRASS I& WILD IHARDWD ICONIFERISHRUBS IWETLANDISHALLOWIOPENLO IWOODLO IWETLANDIRANGELDI
I SEP I LEGUME I HERB. I TREES PLANTS I PLANTS I WATER IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF
FAIR GOOD GOOD GOOD GOOD IV. PORIV. POCRI GOOD GOOD IV PORIII I
I |I I II
I I IIIII I I
S1 I 1 1 I I I
SI I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I I I I I
POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
PLANT PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT)
COMMON PLANT NAME SYMBOL
S(NLSPN) I I
PINEHILL BLUESTEM ANDI 15
LITTLE BLUESTEM ANSC2 15
SLENDER BLUESTEM ANTE 20
IPANICUM PANIC I 15
IBEAKED PANICUM PAAN 20
ILESPEDEZA I LESPE 5
ITICKCLOVER IDESMO 1 5
IGRASSLEAF GOLDASTER CHGR4 5







FAVORABLE YEARS I
NORMAL YEARS 1000
UNFAVORABLE YEARS __ I i I I
FOOTNOTES
1 RATINGS BASED ON SRWPC COMMITTEE 4 GUIDE. APRIL 1970.


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD

45 Pamlico Muck


THESE ARE VERY POORLY DRAINED, EXTREMELY ACID ORGANIC SOILS ON NEARLY LEVEL FLOOD PLAINS AND DEPRESSIONS OF THE COASTAL PLAIN.
THEY HAVE BLACK AND VERY DARK BROWN ORGANIC LAYERS 16 TO 51 INCHES THICK OVER LOAMY SAND AND SANDY SEDIMENTS. THEY FORMED
IN ORGANIC SEDIMENTS. SLOPES ARE LESS THAN 1 PERCENT.


I ~ ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI I I |FRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS ILIOUID IPLAS- I
IIIN.)I USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED AASHTO |>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I I(PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 1 200 IJINDEX I
1 0-30 1 MUCK I PT o 0I I
130-60 I LS,FS,LFS I SM, SP-SM A-2, A-3 I0 100 100 70-95 5-20 NP

I I i I I I iI
I I I I I I I I I
IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK-- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I (PCT I DENSITY. I ABILITY IWATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI I <2MM)i (G/iCML I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
I 0-30 I 0.15-0.35 10.6-2.0 I 0.24-0.26 3.6-4.4 I I I 40-60 I-JGH-I J HIGH 1
130-60 1 3-10 I 1.30-1.60 16.0-20 0.03-0.06 1 3.6-5.5 I I LOW I I I
I I I I I I I I I I_

I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I
I FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE 1HYDIPOTENT-LI
I- I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) I I (IN) I 1(IN) I(IN) I I ACTION I
FREQUENTT I V.LONG INOV-JUN l1)-1.0 I SWAMP INOV-JUL I II >60 I I 4-12 1 10-361 D I

SANITARY FACILITIES (A) .CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL (A)
I ISEVERE-WETNESS,FLOODS,PONDING II POOR-WETNESS
SEPTIC TANK I I
I ABSORPTION I ROADFILL
FIELDS II
I II I
I SEVERE-WETNESS,FLOODS,EXCESS HUMUS 1 LS, LFS:IMPROBABLE EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE II FS:PROBABLE I"
LAGOON II SAND I
AREAS I |
I I ii I I
SSEVERE-WETNESS,FLOODS,SEEPAGE I I FS:IMPROBABLE-TOO SANDY
SANITARY J I LS,LFS:IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
LANDFILL I I GRAVEL
(TRENCH) I|I
I- I I- - I
I SEVERE-WETNESS ,FLOODS,SEEPAGE I I POOR-WETNESS,EXCESS HUMUS
SANITARY I I
LANDFILL I II TOPSOIL
(AREA) I I
I I II
I POOR-WETNESS,PONDING,THIN LAYER I
DAILY III WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR I I SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I I POND
II| RESERVOIR
11 AREA I
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT IJ I
I SEVERF-FLOODS,WETNESS,EXCESS HUMUS 11 FS:SEVERE-SEEPAGE,WETNESS
SHALLOW II EMBANKMENTS I LS,LFS:SEVERE-SEEPAGE,PIPING,WETNESS
IEXCAVAtIONS II DIKES AND I
SI I LEVEES I
SII I I
SSEVERE-WETNESS,FLOODS,LOWI STRENGTH I ISEVEE-CUTBANS CAVE
DWELLINGS II EXCAVATED
WITHOUT I PONDS
BASEMENTS AQUIFER FED I
I -II I I
ISEVERE-WETNESS,FLOODS,PONDING I i FLOODS,PONDING,CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS II
WITH I I DRAINAGE I
BASEMENTS II
I- I--_ II I i
S SEVERE-WETNESS,FLOODS,LOW STRENGTH II I WETNESS,FLOODS,PONDING
I SMALL 11 1
COMMERCIAL II IRRIGATION
I BUILDINGS |II I
I I II I
I I SEVERE-WETNESS,FLOODS,LOW STRENGTH II I WETNESS,PONDING,TOO SANDY
S LOCAL I i TERRACES
ROADS AND II AND I
STREETS I I DIVERSIONS
i I I
LAWNS. I SEVERE-WETNESS,FLOODS,EXCESS HUMUS II I WETNESS
LANDSCAPING I II GRASSED
I AND GOLF I Ii WATERWAYS
I FAIRWAYS I II
I i REGI II I R
REGIONAL INTERPBETATIONS








45 PAMLICO MUCK


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD


SHECREATZONAL OEVELOPMENJT _
I SEVERE-WETNESS,FLOODS,EXCESS HUMUS I I SEVERE-WETNESS,FLOODS,EXCESS HUMUS

CAMP AREAS I PLAYGROUNDS

1 I II I I
I SEVERE-WETNESS,FLOODS,EXCESS HUMUS I SEVERE-WETNESS,FLOODS,EXCESS HUMUS
I II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS I AND
I I TRAILS
I I:II .I-- __ __
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CLASS- CAPA- .CORN SOYBEANS WHEAT I PASTURE
DETERMINING 1 BILIT I (SU) (BU) (BU) I (AUM)
PHASE I I I I I I i i I
IINIRRIIRR.INIRR lRR. INIRR JIRRo INIRR lRRe INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR lIAR. INIRR IIRR. I
UNDRAINED 7W I II I I I I I I I I I
DRAINED 4W 115 40 50 10.0



II I
I CI I I I I I MI I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
DET1 I 1 I I I I P A I I I I I I I I
1 P I I I I MO HAZ1 1 1 1 1 1 I I
I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I
I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I
I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I I HIR I I 1 -
WOODLAND SUITABILITY
I CLASS- I ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
I DETERMINING I SYM I EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT I CONMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
I PHASE I I .HAZARD I LIMIT I MORTYe.I HAZARD. COMPETe.l IINDXI I
ALL '4W SLIGHT SEVERE SEVERE SLASH PINE 70 SLASH PINE 2/
POND PINE 55 LOBLOLLY PINE 2/
BALDCYPRESS WATER TUPELO
I I AFTER TUPELO
I I 1 I -1 1 I I I I

S 1 I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I 1 I
I I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I
I I i I I I I I

____- WINDBREAKS- -. .
CLASS-DETERMIN'G PHASE SPECIES 1TI SPECIES. IHTI SPECIES InTl SPECIES INTI
NONE


I I I I I I I
I I I II I I I
I i I I I I I I
WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
CLASS- I POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR:
DETERMINING IGRAIN SIGRASS &l WILD IHAROWD ICONIFERISHRUBS IWETLANDISHALLOWloPENLD IWOODLD .IWETLANOIRANGELDI
I PHASE I SEED ILEGUME I HERB. I TREES PLANTS I PLANTS I WATER IWILOLF IWILDLF IILDIF IWILDLF I
UNDRAINED IV. POOROO POR OOR POOR I POOR I GOOD GOOD POOR POOR I GOOD -
DRAINED I POOR GOOD GOOD GOOD GOOD POOR GOOD GOOD 1 GOOD FAIR
STI I I I I I I I I, I- I I I
I I I I I I 1 I I I I
I I II "I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
PLANT I PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT) BY CLASS DETERMINING PHASE
COMMON PLANT NAME SYMBrOL 1 I
I. I (NLSPN1 I I I I I
I BITTER GALLBERRY I GL. I I
I LARGE GALLBERRY ILCD I I I
HUCKLEBERRY GAYLU
IGREENBRIER I SMILA2 I I I
IWAX MYRTLE MYCE
GIANT SWITCHCANE ARGI I I
SWITCHCANE ARTE4
BLUEBERRY IVACCI
I 1I II I
1 1 I I
I I I A I I I I



POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT'): I I____
FAVORABLE YEARS
NORMAL YEARS I I I
_UNFAVORABLE YEARS I_ I I I I
FOOTNOTES
A RATINGS BASED ON NSH NOTICE 24
C WOODLAND RATINGS BASED ON WOODLAND PROGRESS REPORT W-16, JAN., 1970
D WILDLIFE RATINGS BASED ON SOILS MEMO-74, JAN, 1972
2 TREES SHOULD ONLY BE PLANTED IN ADEQUATELY DRAINED AREAS


43 PELHAM FINE SAND


USDA-SCS
1-79


THE PELHAM SERIES CONSISTS OF POORLY DRAINED NEARLY LEVEL SOILS ON THE COASTAL PLAIN. TYPICALLY THE SURFACE LAYER IS
VERY DARK GRAY LOAMY SAND'ABOUT 6 INCHES THICK. THE SUBSURFACE LAYER IS GRAY LOAMY SAND ABOUT 21 INCHES THICK. THE
SUBSOIL EXTENDS BELOW A DEPTH OF 68 INCHES. IT IS MOSTLY LIGHT GRAY SANDY CLAY LOAM MOTTLED WITH YELLOW AND RED.


I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS-I
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I II I I(PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 I 200 I IINDE2LI
I0-291FS ISM IA--2 0 1 100 95-100 75-90 15-30 I NP
129-45|SCL. SL ISM. SC. SM-SC IA-2. A-4. A-6 I 0 I 100 95-100 65-90 30-50 1 15-30 2-12
145-80oSCL, SL. SC ISC. SM-SC. ML. CL IA-2, A-4. A--6 A-7 I 0 100 95-100 65-90 30-65 15-45 5-20
I I I I I I I I

IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL | SALINITY 1 SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICL CORROSIVITY
l(IN.)I(PCT j DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I_
I <2MM)I (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALI K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
I 0-291 5-101 6.0-20 o10.05-0.08 14.5-5.5 I IVERY LOW 1.101 5 I I 1-2 I HIGH I HIGH I
129-45115-301 I 0.6-2.0 0.10-0.13 14.5-5.5 I LOW 1.24 I I
45--8015-401 I 0.6-2.0 I 0.10-0.16 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.241 I I I
I I I I I I I I I 1
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK SUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT*LI
I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I (IN) II I (IN) I 1(IN) I(IN) I I ACTION I
I COMMON 1 BRIEF IDEC-MARIO.5-1.51APPARENTIJAN-APRI I I >60 I I I IB/DI _

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SSEVERE-FLOODS.WETNESS I I POOR-WETNESS
SEPTIC TANK I I
ABSORPTION I ROADFILL
FIELDS I I
I I I I
SEVERE-SEEPAGE.FLOODS.WETNESS I IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE I
LAGOON I SAND
AREAS I
I I I
SEVERE-FLOODS.WETNESS II IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SANITARY
LANDFILL I I GRAVEL
(TRENCH) II

SEVERE-FLOODS.SEEPAGE.WETNESS Ii POOR-TOO SANDY.WETNESS
SANITARY I I
LANDFILL I I TOPSOIL
(AREA)

SPOOR-WETNESS.TOO SANDY
DAILY I WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR I SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I POND
SI_ RESERVOIR


SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE.WETNESS SEVERE-PIPING.WETNESS
SHALLOW I EMBANKMENTS
EXCAVATIONS I II DIKES AND
I LEVEES

I SEVERE-FLOODS.WETNESS I SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS I i EXCAVATED
WITHOUT II PONDS
BASEMENTS I IIAQUIFER FED I I

SEVERE-FLOODS.WETNESS II FLOODS
DWELLINGS
WITH DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS

SEVERE-FLOODS.WETNESS I WETNESS.DROUGHTY.FLOODS
SMALL
COMMERCIAL IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS

SEVERE-WETNESS.FLOODS I WETNESS
LOCAL I TERRACES
ROADS AND I AND
STREETS I DIVERSIONS

LAWNS. SEVERE-WETNESS I I WETNESS.DROUGHTY
LANDSCAPING GRASSED I
AND GOLF I WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS I
II R I II1

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I








43 PELHAM FINE SAND


USDA-SCS
1-79


RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
SI SEVERE-FLOCOSWETNESS.TOO SANDY II SEVERE-TOO SANDY,WETNESS

CAMP AREAS I IPLAYGROUNDSI
I I I I
_ 1 II I
I SEVERE-WETNESS.TOO SANDY I SEVERE-WETNESS.TOO SANDY
SI PATHS
PICNIC AREAS I] AND
A I1 TRAILS
I L I --_
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ABCE CF CROPS ANC PASTURE (hIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CAPA- IBAHIAGRASS TALL CORN SOYBEANS
ABILITY I FESCUE
I(AUM) 1L ___.A.LUM) ( LBUI I (BU) --
_____ NIRRIIR IRR IRR. INIRR IIRR. IIRRR IRR. IN IRRINR RR. NIRR IIRR. NIRR IIRR.
4W I 6.0 1 8.0 75 30
1









________________________ OOLAND SUITABILITY------------------
ORD MANAGEMENT PRO .EMS __ II POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY
SYM EROSION EQUIP. SEEDLING WINDTH. PLANT COMMON TREES |SITE| TREES TO PLANT
SI HAZARD LIMT MCRTY.I HAZARD I COMPT IN ----------------------
12 SLIGHT SEVERE I SEVERE I I I I SLASH PINE 190 ISLASH PINE
L BLOLLY PINE 0 I LOBLOLLY PINE
ILONGLEAF PINE j80
1 ISWEETGUM 80I






SI I LACKGUM I 80
]WATER OAK 1801
1
SI I I I I I I I I I I I I I I



















________ ___________WINCBREAKS ---------
I E-I I I-PCIE IIHT lIEI I I I|HT I SPECI ES I-TJ
NONE I I I I I I I










I
IOO0LAND SUITABILITY I Y-
SMPOTENTIAL FOR HAB TATELENSAL PRODUCPOTENTIAL AS HABITAT FRVTY
SYM I EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT I COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
























GRAIN &I-RASS A WRILD DHARDWD ICONIFERD SHRUBS |THTLANDI SHALLOWOPE NL OODLD WXETLANDIRANGELD
2 SED LIGHT UMEV HER SEVEREES I PLANTS I ILASH PINE WATER IWI IWISLASH PINE
























POOR FAIR FAIR FAIR FAIR FAIR FAIR FAIR FAIR I FAIR
LLLY PINE LOBLOLLCOMMON PLANT NAME SYMBOL PINE
















I__ ---_____________________ (NLSPN_ ---
PINEHILL BLUESTEM ANDI PINE
LITTLE BLUESTEM ANSC2s
AIPANICM PANIC 9
















IPINELAND THREEAWN ARST5 9
WATER OAK 80

































|TOOTHACHEGRASS CTAR 1 13
MUHLY MHLEI I I 2
ISWITCHGRASS PAVI
INKBERRY ILGL 10
II I I I I




























OTHER ANNUAL GRASSLIKES AAGL 10
|SOUTHERN BAYBERRY MYCE 5
SI II I I

















FAVORABLE YEARS
NORMAL YEARS 1200
I I Fav I I I I I
FO IOTNI OTI IES
_I I I J I I_______UNFAVRABLEYEARS I--HABI-TAT

POTENTIAL NATIV PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGLAN OR FORST UNDRSTORY VGTATION)
I PLANT I PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION TDRY W TEGHT)


PINEHILL BLUESTEM ANDI 5
LITTLE BLUESTEM ANSC2 5
IPANICUM PANIC I 9
NPINELAND THREEAWN A ARST5 F 9O
TOOTHACHEGRASS CTAR P 13
CMUPLYE I MBOLE 20

INKBERRY I ILGL | 10A
OTHER ANNUAL GRASSLIKES I AAGL A 10






FAVORABLE YEARS I A A I
NORMAL YEARS 1200 I I I
UNFAVORABLE YEARS I A A A

FOOTNOTES


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD
3 PITS


PITS CONSIST OF EXCAVATIONS FROM WHICH SOIL AND GEOLOGIC MATERIAL HAVE BEEN REMOVED PRIMARILY FOR USE IN ROAD CONSTRUCTION OR FOR FOUNDATIONS.
INCLUDED WITH PITS ARE WASTE MATERIALS MOSTLY MIXTURES OF SAND, SANDY LOAM, AND SANDY CLAY LOAM PILED OR SCATTERED AROUND THE EDGES OF THE
PITS. MANY OF THE PITS HAVE BEEN ABANDONED. PITS HAVE LITTLE OR NO VALUE FOR AGRICULTURE OR GROWING PINE TREES.



ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
DEPTH) I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS- I
|(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED AASHTO G>3 INI THAN 3. PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYV
S I I I I(PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 200 INDEX I
S TOO VARIABLE TO ESTIMATE I I
I I I I I I I

I 1 I A I I l

DEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONJWIND ORGANIC| CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY (WATER CAPACITY REACTION)IMMHOS/CM)) SMELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I_
I 1<2MM) LtG/CM) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALI XIK T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL CONCRETE
I I I ITOO VARIABL TO ESTIMATE.
A I I I I ____ I
I I I I I I I I
I I I I I A I I I
I I I I1. I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK SUBSIDENCE 1HYDIPOTENT-LI
| DEPTH I KIND MONTHS DEPTH HARDNESSIDEPTH I HARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) 1 I I(IN) I I (IN) I N IIN) I ACTION
I I I I I I I I I I I 1 i

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SNOT APPLICABLE OR TOO VARIABLE TO RATE FOR TOO VARIABLE TO RATE FOR SOURCE MATERIAL.
SEPTIC TANK SANITARY FACILITIES.
ABSORPTION I ROADFILL
FIELDS I
I II

SEWAGE I I
LAGOON II SAND
AREAS I II
I s II y I i
II II
SANITARY A II
LANDFILL II GRAVEL
S(TRENCH) I
I I II I A
SANITARY
LANDFILL j j TOPSOIL
S (AREA) I II
Ii II I I
I II
I DAILY I II MATER MANAGEMENT __
COVER FOR I I NOT APPLICABLE OR TOO VARIABLE TO RATE FOR
LANDFILL I POND WATER MANAGEMENT.
A I II RESERVOIR
ii AREA I I
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II I E
NOT APPLICABLE FOR COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT. EMA
SHALLOW IIEMBANKMENTS
EXCAVATIONS I II DIKES AND
II LEVEES


DWELLINGS I I EXCAVATED
S WITHOUT I II PONDS
BASEMENTS I I AQUIFER FED
SI I I
I II
DWELLINGS I
WITH I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I I
1 II
I II
SMALL I I
COMMERCIAL IIRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I
I I II I
LOCAL I II TERRACES
ROADS AND II AND
STREETS A II DIVERSIONS
I II -I
LAWNS. I Ii A
LANDSCAPING I GRASSED I
AND GOLF I WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS I I
-- II I IN
REGION L INTRPRETATIONS


I 1








3 PITS (This mapping unit is not rated for most uses because of the limited value of these areas for these uses.)


--RECREEATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
NOT APPLICABLE FOR RECREATION I
CAMP AREAS I | PLAYGROUNDS
I 11
II I

I PATHS
PICNIC AREAS| AND
I II TRAILS
I II I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT) _
CLASS- I CAPA-- I 1 I I I
DETERMINING I ABILITY
PHASE I I I I I I I I
SINIRRIIRR.INIRR IIRR. INI RRRR IRRRR. R NIRRRR INIRRIRR IRR IRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR.
NOT APPLICABLE FOR CROPS I
SWOODLD S BILI I I
CLASS- ORD MAEMS POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I









DETERMINING SYM EROSION EQUIP. SEEDLING WIDTH. PLANT I COMMON TREES I SITE TREES TO PLANT
I I I J i I I I I 1 I I I 1 I I I
1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
HAI I I II I .1- I I I M H R I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I


I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I
_WOODLAND SUITABILITY
S CLASS- I ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I I
I DETERMINING i SYM I EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT I COMMON TREES SITE TREES TO PLANT
S PHASE I I HAZARD I LIMIT I MORTaY.I HAZARD I COPETI I INDXI I
TOO VARIABLE TO PRE- I
DICT POTENTIAL
PRODUCTIVITY
I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I I I




WINDBREAKS
ICLASS-DETERMIN-G PHASE SPECIES IHTI SPECIES. INTI SPECIES INTj SPECIES INTl
TOO VARIABLE TO PREDICT

S1I I II I I II
I I I I I I I i

WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
CLASS- I POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR: I
DETERMINING GRAIN GRASSS &I WILD IHARDWD ICONIFERISHRUBS IWETLANDISHALLOWIOPENLD IWOODLD IWETLANDIRANGELD
S PHASE I SEED ILEGUME I HERB. I TREES PLANTS I PLANTS I WATER IMILOLF IWILDLF IILOLF IWILDLF
II 1 I I I 1 1 I I I I I 1
TOO VARIABLE TO PREDICT
I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I 1 1
I 1 i I I I I I I I I i i i
POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
I PLANT I PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT) BY CLASS DETERMINING PHASE
COMMON PLANT NAME I SYMBOL I 1 |
I (NLSPN) 1 I I I


I I I I I 1 I
I I I I I I I


i I I I i I I I







POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LS/AC DRY WT): I I I
FAVORABLE YEARS I I I I I
NORMAL YEARS
POTENTIAL PR TUNFAV ABLEE/ YEARS __
I___._UNFAVORABLE YEARS JIII_


FOOTNOTES


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD USDA-SCS
5-79
41 PLUMMER FINE SAND, 0 TO 2 PERCENT SLOPES

THE PLUMMER SERIES CONSISTS OF POORLY DRAINED SOILS ON SMOOTH LANDSCAPES AND ALONG POORLY DEFINED DRAINAGEWAYS OF THE
COASTAL PLAIN. IN A REPRESENTATIVE PROFILE THE SURFACE IS DARK GRAY SANO 9 INCHES THICK. THE SUBSURFACE LAYER IS LIGHT
GRAY SAND 41 INCHES THICK. THE SUBSOIL TO A DEPTH OF 72 INCHES IS LIGHT GRAY SANDY LOAM WITH YELLOWISH BROWN MOTTLES.


I _ESTIMATED SOILPROPERTIES I
IDEPTHI IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS ILIQUIC IPLAS--
l(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. ( LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I I I(PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 I __L INDEX
0 -621FS SM, SP-SM IA-2-4. A-3 I 0 I 100 100 75-96 5-26 I I NP
162-80|SL. SCL, FSL ISM, SC. SM-SC IA-2-4, A-2-6 I 0 1 100 97-100 76-96 26-35 I <31 INP-14

II I I II
I I I I I I I I I
IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA- 1 AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I I
I 1<2MM)1 (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALI K I T IGROUPI (PCT) _LSTEgL ICONCRETEI
I 0-621 2-7 11.45-1.65 2.0-6.0 I 0.03-0.08 3.6-5.5 1 IVERY LOW 1.101 5 I I 1-3 IMODERATEI HIGH- I
162-80115-3011.50-1.70 0.6-2.0 I 0.10-0.13 13.6-5.5 IVERY LOW 1.151 I I
I I I I I I I I I ______I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK SUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I IIN) I I (IN) I I(IN) I(IN) I I ACTION I
NONE I I Q- I 151APPARENTIDEC-JUL I I >60 I I I iB/ -

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SEVERE-WETNESS II POOR-WETNESS
SEPTIC TANK II
ABSORPTION II ROADFILL I
FIELDS II
I I II I
ISEVERE-SEEPAGEWETNESS I IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE II
LAGOON SAND
AREAS II
II II I
SSEVERE-TOO SANDY.WETNESS IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SANITARY II
LANDFILL I II GRAVEL
I(TRENCH) I II
I I II I I
I SEVERE-SEEPAGEWETNESS II POOR-TOO SANDY.WETNESS
SANITARY
LANDFILL II TOPSOIL I
I (AREA)
I I I I I
SI POOR-SEEPAGE.TOO SANDY.WETNESS II
I DAILY II WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR I II I SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I II POND I
I II RESERVOIR I
I AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II I
SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE.WETNESS II 1 SEVERE-SEEPAGE.PIPING.WETNESS
SHALLOW I IIEMBANKMENTS I
EXCAVATIONS I II DIKES AND I
II LEVEES I
I I II I
SSEVERE-WETNESS II I SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS I II EXCAVATED I
WITHOUT I II PONDS I
BASEMENTS I IIAUIFER FED
I I II,,1
SEVERE-WETNESS II 1CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS I II
WITH I II DRAINAGE
.BASEMENTS II
I I II I
SEVERE-WETNESS 1 DROUGHTY.WETNESS
SMALL I III
COMMERCIAL I I IRRIGATION I
BUILDINGS I II
I I II I
SSEVERE-WETNESS II WETNESS.TOO SANDY
LOCAL I TERRACES
ROADS AND I AND
STREETS I I DIVERSIONS
I I II II
S LAWNS. I SEVERE-DROUGHTY.WETNESS II I WETNESS.DROUGHTY
LANDSCAPING I II GRASSED II
SAND GOLF I II WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS I II


REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I I I
I I I






41 PLUMMER FINE SAND, 0 TO 2 PERCENT SLOPES USDA-SCS
5-79
____ RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
SSEVERE-TCO SANDY.WETNESS ISEVERE-TOO SANDY,WETNESS
II I
CAMP AREAS I PLAYGROUNDS

II II I I
SSEVERE-TOO SANDY.WETNESS I SEVERE-WETNESS.TOO SANDY
SIPATHS
PICNIC AREAS I AND
II TRAILS

CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE CF ROPS ANO PASTURE (hIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
SCAPA- IMPROVED IBAHIAGRASS
I ABILITY IBERMUDAGR. I I I I I I
I 1 (AUM) I (AUM) I I __
SNIRRIIRRINIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR INIRR IIRR INIRR IIRR. NIRR IRR. I
4 0 5.0
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I









IOLDLAKD SUITABILITY
ORD MANAGEMENT PRO MI POTENTIAL POCCTIVITY
SYM EROSION EUIP. SEEDLING WINDTH PLANT COMMON TREES SITE TREES TO PLANT
.I__ __ HAZARD LIMIT I MORT'Y.I HAZARD COMPETiI INDXlI
2W SLIGHT SVER I SEVERE I I SLASH PINE I LOLOLLY PINE
LCBLGLLY PINE 191 9 SLASH PINE
LCNGLEAF PINE 170











__WINDBREAKS
I SPECIES I T ISES I I SPECIES IHTI SPECIES IHTI
NONE
I I I I I I I 1 I I II I I I I I













________I II________________________ ILI I SITIL_________I

WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITAbIITY
POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR:
GRAIN GRASSS L WILD IHARDWD CONIFER ISHRUBS |WETLANDISHALLOWOPENLD IUOODLD IWETLANDIRANGELDI
SISEED ILEGUH E I HERE I TREES PLANT I IMPLANTS I WATER IILOLF IWILLF IWILDLF IWILDLF
POOR FAIR FAIR FAIR FAIR FAIR FAIR FAIR FAIR FAIR I

I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I

























PLANT PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY EIGHT I
COMMON PLANT NAME SYMBOL
S I I NLSPN)I I I
PINEHILL LUESTEM ANDI I I
LITTLE BLUESTEM ANSC2 3
IPANICUM PANIC 9
IPINELAND THREEAWN ARST 5 9
TOOTHACHEGRASS ICTAR 16
]MUHLY MUHLE 25
1SWITCHGRASS PAVI2 9
INKBERRY ILGL 11
OTHER ANNUAL GRASSLIKES AAGL 11
|SOUTHERN BAYBERRY MYCE 5
IBRACKENFERN PTAQ



POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT)
FAVORABLE YEARS 1200
NORMAL YEARS 000I
I- UNFAVORABLYEAR 7 I I
NAL________ ______________ I FOTNOTES U T
I POTENTIAL FOR ABITANTEEMPNS T


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD

41D PLUMMER FINE SAND, 5 TO 12 PERCENT SLOPES


THIS IS A DEEP, POORLY DRAINED, MODERATELY PERMEABLE SOIL THAT OCCURS ALONG DRAINAGEWAYS AND AROUND THE EDGES OF LAKES. THEY HAVE
SANDY SURFACE AND SUBSURFACE LAYERS MORE THAN 40 INCHES THICK UNDERLAIN BY SANDY CLAY LOAM SUBSOILS. SLOPES RANGE FROM
5 TO 12 PERCENT.


I ~ ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES (A) I
IDEPTHI I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS ILIOUID IPLAS- I
ItIN.)l USDA TEXTURE UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3_ PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I i I(PCT)I I 10 I 40 1 200 I INDEX
S0-401 FS SP-SM A-2-4 0 100 100 75-96 5-26 NP
140-801 SCL, SL SM, SC A-2-6 0 100 97-100 76-96 26-35 431 NP-14
I I I I I I I


IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULKi PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- EROSION WIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONIIMMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I _
I I<2MM)l (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
I 0-401 2- 7 I1.45-1.65 I 2.0-6.0 I 0.03-0.08 I3.6-5.5 I IVERY LOW I .101 5 I I 1-3 I MODERAIT I HIGH
S40-80115-30 1.50-1.70 I 0.6-2.0 I 0.10-0.13 3.6-5.5 IVERY LOW I.151 I

I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I 1 I
I I I I __-_____
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
S __DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(JIN) I I INI I I(IN) I(IN) I I ACTION I
I NONEi I | 1 0-1 APPARENT IDEC-JUL I I 1 >60 I I I L D I i

__- SANITARY FACILITIES (B) CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL (B)
SEVERE-WETNESS POOR-WETNESS
SEPTIC TANK II i
ABSORPTION I I ROADFILL
FIELDS I I
I II I I
SEWAGE SEVERE-SEEPAGE, WETNESS PROBABLE SOURCE
LAGOON II SAND
AREAS I
I II I
SANITARY SEVERE-WETNESS, TOO SANDY IMPROBABLE SOURCE-EXCESS FINES
LANDFILL GRAVEL
(TRENCH) I

I I
SANITARY SEVERE-SEEPAGE, WETNESS POOR-TOO SANDY, THIN LAYER, WETNESS
LANDFILL II TOPSOIL
(AREA) I I

I I
DAILY POOR-SEEPAGE, TOO SANDY, WETNESS II WATER MANAGEMENT (B)_
I COVER FOR I ]I
S ADFILL O PD 5-8%: SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL P I POND
__ RESERVOIR 8-12%: SEVERE-SEEPAGE, SLOPE
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT (B) I ___
SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE, WETNESS ISEVERE-SEEPAGE, WETNESS
SHALLOW IIEMBANKMENTS
EXCAVATIONS I II DIKES AND
SI II LEVEES

SEVERE-WETNESS I I SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE
SDELLINGS I EXCAVATED
WITHOUT I PONDS
BASEMENTS I AQUIFER FED

SEVERE-WETNESSI SLOPE, CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS II
WITH I I DRAINAGE
I-BASEMENTS I II
I- Ii-
5-8%: SEVERE-WETNESS WETNESS, DROUGHT, FAST INTAKE
COSMALL 8-127: SEVERE-WETNESS, SLOPE IR
COMMERCIAL II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I

SEVERE-WETNESS I 5-8%: WETNESS, TOO SANDY
LOCAL I TERRACES 8-12%: WETNESS, TOO SANDY, SLOPE
ROADS AND I AND
STREETS I I DIVERSIONS

S LAWNS. I SEVERE-WETNESSI 5-8%: DROUGHT
LANDSCAPING I I GRASSED 8-12%: DROUGHT, SLOPE
AND GOLF II WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS I
_I_ I IEII I

-__-- REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I I I
I I I
I I I







41D PLUMMER FINE SAND, 5 TO 12 PERCENT SLOPES


R_ RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
SEVERE-WETNESS, TOO SANDY
CAMP AREAS PLAYGROUNDS
I I II

SEVERE-WETNESS, TOO SANDY P
III PATHS
PICNIC AREAS II AND
I II TRAILS
I I II
._CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE


(B)
5-6%: SEVERE-WETNESS, TOO SANDY
6-12%: SEVERE-WETNESS, TOO SANDY, SLOPE



SEVERE-WETNESS, TOO SANDY



(HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)


CLASS- I CAPA- I IMPROVED IBAHIAGRASS I I1
DETERMINING ABILITY j BERMUDA I I
PHASE I I (AU) I (AUM) I I I I I I
I INIRRIIRR.INIRR IIIRR INIRR JIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. I
ALL 14W1 16.0 15.0 I
WOODLAND SUITA LITY ( I





CLASI I S- I I I I I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I I
I DETERMINING SYM EROSION EQUIP. I SEEDLING WIDTH. I PLANT COMMON TREES I SITE TREES TO PLANT
I I I I I I I I I I I I





I I I PHASE HI_ I I M RT Y I I _I I ND I I I I
I I I I 1 I




I CLI I I 1 I I I I I I I I I i I I 1ES
I I I I I I I I I | | | I | I | I
WOODLANDIF ITABITITY (C)
S CLASS-- I ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PREDUCTIVTY
1 DETERMINING SY IN E GRSIONI EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTHIF PLANT I COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT G
I PHASE I I HAZARD T LIMIT I MORTR' I HAZARD I TS PLANTS T IINOXI
ALL 2W SLIGHT I SEVERE SEVERE I SLASH PINE I88 ILOBLOLLY PINE


SI I I I I










I PEPI I IE I CENTAGE I TIONI (DRY I
I I I I I I I I I I








FAVOR I I I I I YEARS
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I


I I I I I I I I I I I










B 1 I I I I I I I RATINGS BASED ON NATIONAL SOILS IH

































C "SOIL SURVEY INTERPRETATIONS FOR WOODLANDS," PROGRESS REPORT W-16, JAN. 1972.
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I

I I_ I II I I I I
W NOBREAKS
I( AS#DETERASING PHASEI SPECIES IHTlIgg. |CES NTl SPECIES HNTl SPECIES HTi l





I I I II I I I
I II I I I I I
SII II I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I II




CLASS- POTENT PLANT COUNTY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTOI POTENTIAL AS HAVITAGETATT FR:ON)
PLANT I SEED LEGUME I PERCENTAGE OPOSIT N (DRY WEIGHT) BY CLASS DETERLF ININLLF IILDLF I
COMN PLANT NAIE sN I I
I I I i I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I J I
I I I I I* I I I I I








POTENTIAL PRODUCTIOTENTIAL NATI LAT ITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNERSTORY VEGETATION)

FAVORABLE I I I I I I

NOR I I I I I
I IUNFARABE YEARS I I I I 1 I
AI 1PEDON FROM WAYNE COUNTY GA.I





S POTENTIALL SURVEY INTERPRETATIONS FOR WOODLANDS," PROGRESS REPORT W-16, JAN. 1972.WT)


C "SOIL SURVEY INTERPRETATIONS FOR WOODLANDS," PROGRESS REPORT W-.16, JAN. 1972.


I


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD USOA-SCS
5-79
38 PLUMMER FINE SANDi DEPRESSIONAL

THE PLUMMER SERIES CONSISTS OF POORLY DRAINED SOILS ON SMOOTH TO DEPRESSIONAL LANDSCAPES OF THE COASTAL PLAIN. IN A
REPRESENTATIVE PROFILE THE SURFACE IS DARK GRAY SAND 9 INCHES THICK. THE SUBSURFACE LAYER IS LIGHT GRAY SAND 41 INCHES
THICK. THE SUBSOIL TO A DEPTH OF 72 INCHES IS LIGHT GRAY SANDY LOAN WITH YELLOWISH BROWN BOTTLES.


I---- ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS- I
(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I I(PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 I 200 I IIN0EX I
0-57IFS ISM. SP-SM IA-2-4. A-3 0 I 00 100 75-96 5-26 1 I NP
157-80jSL. SCL, FSL ISMN SC. SM-SC A-2-4. A-2-6 0 I 100 97-100 76-96 26-35 <31 INP-14 I
I t I I I I I

I I I I I I
IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER II_
I I<2MM)I (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALI K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
S0-571 2-7 11.45-1.65 I 2.0-6.0 1 0.03-0.08 13.6-5.5 IVERY LOW 1.101 5 | I IMODERATEI HIGH I
157-80115-3011.50-1.70 0.6-2.0 I 0.10-0.13 13.6-5.5 1 IVERY LOW 1.151 I |
I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I l I I
I I I I I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) I I (IN) I IlINI I(INI I I ACTION I
I NONE I I +2-1.51APPARENTIDEC-JULI I I >60 I I I IB/DI -

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SSEVERE-PONDING | POOR-WETNESS
SEPTIC TANK I J
ABSORPTION I ROADFILL
FIELDS I I
I I II I
SEVERE-SEEPAGEPONDING I IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE
LAGOON I I SAND
AREAS I
II II I i
SEVERE-PONDING.TOO SANDY I IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SANITARY I
LANDFILL I GRAVEL
(TRENCH)
I II i
SEVERE-SEEPAGE.PONDING I POOR-TOO SANDY.WETNESS
SANITARY
LANDFILL TOPSOIL
(AREA)
I I II I
POOR-SEEPAGE.TOO SANDYPONDING I
DAILY II WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR I SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I POND
II RESERVOIR
I AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II I
SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE.PONDING SEVERE-SEEPAGE.PIPING.PONDING
SHALLOW I IIEMBANKMENTS
EXCAVATIONS I I DIKES AND
LEVEES
I I I I
ISEVERE-PONDING SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE:
DWELLINGS I EXCAVATED
WITHOUT PONDS
BASEMENTS AQUIFER FEDI
I I I I I
S SEVERE-PONDING I PONDING.CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS I
WITH I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I

SEVERE-PONDING II PONDING
SMALL
COMMERCIAL IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS II
i I II I
SEVERE-PONDING II I PONDINGTOO SANDY
LOCAL I TERRACES
ROADS AND II AND
STREETS DIVERSIONS
i I II I
S LAWNS. SEVERE-PONDING I1 WETNESS
LANDSCAPING II GRASSEDI
AND GOLF II WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS I
I II Ii

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS







38 PLUMMER FINE SAND. DEPRESSIONAL


USDA-SCS
5-79


RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
SSEVERE-PONDING.TOO SANDY II SEVERE-TOO SANDY.PONDING
II.
CAMP AREAS I PLAYGROUNDS
II II
ISEVERE-PONDING.TOO SANDY ISEVERE-PONDING.TOO SANDY
I PATHS
PICNIC AREAS II AND
SII TRAILS
I II_ IIi
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CAPA- I
ABILITY I I
I I I I I I I I
INNINIR NIRRIIRR.INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRRI IRR INIRRRIIRRR INIRR IIRR INIRR IIRR8 INIRR IIRR I

IS sw I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

SI HAZARD LIMI HA D I I I I





4W SI GHT I SEVERE I SEVERE IPOND PINE I I I
S I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I




























WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
_POTENTIAL FORHABITAT ELEMENTS POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FCR-
GRAIN IGRASS I WILD I SI I FE I 1 SHALLOWOPENL I I IETLAND I IRANGE
I ISE I GUM I I HERB. I I IMPLANT I IIDR I II WIO I
I I I I I I .II I I I I I I






V. I I I POORI I I I I I I I GOOD GOOD POOR POOR I GO OD
SI I I I
I I .I I I I I I

































_POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNERSTRY VEGETATO----
PLANT_ WOODLAND SUITAGE BILITYIT
R IORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY
SYM I EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.j PLANT I COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
I I HAZARD I LIMIT I MORT'Y.I HAZARD I COMPETE. IINDXI

OTNOTES BALDYPRESS -
I I I I ISMAMP TUPELO I-
I I I I I I I II I I I I




EI I CI I 1IE I P IES I I S E E I
I N | I I I I I





I I I I I II I I I
SI I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I T F E I I I





I A A l I I IN I I I
I E GI I R I R I I I I IL F I
SI I I I I I I I

NONE IIIII




I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I
__ I I N L N

POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL HABITAT FR: I



F A I I I I I I I I

N Y I I I I I I I I I I I

__ I Y I I I I I I I I
POTENTIALL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELANO OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)




















FOOTNOTES


S O I L INTERPRETATIONS RECORD


USDA-SCS
6-79


46 POTTSBURG VARIANT FINE SAND


PCTTSBURG VARIANT SOILS CONSIST OF NEARLY LEVEL, SOMEWHAT POORLY DRAINED SOILS THAT OCCUR ON LOW RIDGES BETWEEN THE
COASTAL PLAIN UPLANDS AND LOWER LYING FLATWOODS. TYPICALLY. THEY HAVE A GRAYISH BROWN SAND SURFACE LAYER ABOUT 6 INCHES
THICK. THE SUBSURFACE LAYER IS SAND TO A DEPTH OF ABOUT 51 INCHES. IN SEQUENCE THE FIRST 4 INCHES IS BROWN. THEN 12
INCHES OF LIGHT YELLOWISH BROWN, THEN 12 INCHES OF VERY PALE BROWN, AND FINALLY 17 INCHES OF LIGHT GRAY. THE DARK BROWN.
BLACK AND DARK REDDISH BROWN SUBSOIL EXTENDS TO BELOW 80 INCHES.
I -- __ ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI I IFRACTIPERCENT CF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS- I
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3"PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
S I- __ II I(PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 I 200 1 INDEX J
I 0-6 IFS ISP, SP-SM IA-3 0 1 100 .100 90-100 2-7 I I NP
I6-51|S, FS ISP, SP-SM IA-3 I 0 I 100 100 90-100 2-7 I NP
151-551S. FS ISP-SM, SM IA-3, A-2-4 I 01 100 100 80-100 5-15 I NP
55-801S, FS ISP-SM. SM IA-3, A-2-4 I 0 100 100 80-100 '5-20 I I NP
I I I II I I
I I I I I I I I
IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SCIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I_
SL 1<2MM)I (G/CM3) (IN/HR) I (IN/N) (PHJ I IPOTENTIALI K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
S0-6 I 1-5 11.40-1.50 >20 I 0.03-0.07 14.5-5.5 I LOW 1.151 5 1 1 <2 I LOW I HIGH I
I 6-511 1-5 11.50-1.60 >20 j 0.02-0.05 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.201 I I I
151-551 2-7 11.30-1.40 2.0-6.0 I 0.10-0.15 14.5-5.5 1 I LOW 1.201 I I I
155-801 3-8 11.55-1.65 I0.6-2.0 1 0.10-0.15 14.5-5.5 1 I LOW 1.201
I I I I I I I I I
II I II I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK SUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT-LI
i I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY ] DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) I I (IN) I l(IN) (IN) I I ACTION
S NONE I I 0-3.51APPARENTIAPR-SEPI I I >60 I I I IA/cl I

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SEVERE-WETNESS II FAIR-WETNESS
SEPTIC TANK
ABSORPTION II ROADFILL
FIELDS II
S .I II I
SEVERE-SEEPAGE.WETNESS II PROBABLE
SEWAGE II.
LAGOON Ii SAND
AREAS II
I II
SSEVERE-WETNESSTOO SANDY II IMPROBABLE-TOO SANDY
SANITARY II
LANDFILL II GRAVEL
(TRENCH) II
I I I I
SEVERE-SEEPAGE.WETNESS I I POOR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY II
LANDFILL II TOPSOIL
(AREA) I I
I I II I
I SEVERE-SEEPAGE.TOO SANDY II
DAILY I II WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR I MODERATE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL II POND
I I II RESERVOIR
I1 AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II
SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVEWETNESS II SEVERE-SEEPAGE.PIPING
I SHALLOW I IIEMBANKMENTSI
EXCAVATIONS I 11 DIKES ANDI
I II LEVEES
I I II I
I MODERATE-WETNESS II MODERATE-DEEP TO WATERCUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS II EXCAVATED
WITHOUT II PONDS
BASEMENTS I AQUIFER FED
I I II I
SSEVERE-WETNESS II CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS I
WITH I II DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS
i I II I I
MODERATE-WETNESS II I WETNESSOROUGHTYFAST INTAKE
SMALL II
COMMERCIAL I I IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS II
II II I I
SMODERATE-WETNESS II WETNESS.TOO SANDY.SOIL BLOWING
LOCAL I I TERRACES
ROADS AND I II AND
STREETS I DIVERSIONS
I II I
LAWNS I SEVERE-DROUGHTY I DROUGHT
LANDSCAPING I GRASSED
AND GOLF I WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS I
I I I IN I
REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I I I
I I I







46 POTTSBURG VARIANT FINE SAND USDA-SCS
6-79
------- -RECREATIONAL DVLOPMENT~ ____ _
SEVERE-TOO SANDY SEVERE-TOO SANDY
CAMP AREAS PLAYGROUNDS

I--- II __
SEVERE-TOO SANDY I SLVERE-TGO SANDY
S PATHS
PICNIC AREAS I AND
II TRAILS
____ CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACREOF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
SCAPA- IBAHIAGRASS I IMPROVED I I I I I
ABILITY 1 IBERMUDAGR. I I I I I
I I (AUM) I (AUM) 1 I I I I
INIIIRR._r.INIRR IRR. INIRR EjRR. IRRIE IR.fNjIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR, INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. I
3WI 7.0 .0

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I



I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I






__---~~~~-----WOODLAND SUITABILITY
ORD MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTNTIA PRODUCTIVITY I I
SYM EROSION EQUIP. SEEDLING WINDTH. PLANT COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
SI HAZAR I LIMIT I MORT 'YI HAZARD I I COMPT.I I IN I I
2W SLIGHT MDERATEIMOOERATE SLIGHT IMODRATEI SLASH PINE 90 SLASH PINE
LONGLEAF PINE 175











_____WINDBREAKS
-I SPECIES IHT SPECIES LTl SPECIES IHTI SPECIES IHTI
NONE I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I III I I II I










-_I A I I i L I I I i













~--~- -WILDLIFE HABD ITAT SUITABILITY
POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FR:
GRAIN LIGRASS &I WILD IHARDWD ICONIFR ISHRUBS IWETLANDS I LLOW PENL OODL IWETLANDRANGELD
I SEED ILEGUME HER TREESPLANTSPLANTS I WATER IWILDLF WILDLF IILDLF IWILDLF
POOR POOR POOR FAIR FAIR I POOR IV. POOR POOR FAIR IV. POOR
I I I I I I III
I I I I I I


I I I I I II I
I I I I I I I III
I I I I I I

I ,I I I I II III
I I I I I I I I I I I I
















POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
PLANT PERCENTAGE COPOSITIN DRY GH
COMMON PLANT NAME SYMBOL















FAVORABLE YEARS
NORMAL YEARS I I
STUNFAVORABLE YEARS IITS I I I
FOOTNOTES
FOOTNITES


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD

34 Rutlege Fine Sand


THE RUTLEGE SERIES CONSISTS.OF VERY POORLY DRAINED SOILS ON NEARLY LEVEL DEPRESSIONAL LANDSCAPES OF THE COASTAL PLAIN. THE SURFACE
LAYER IS BLACK AND VERY DARK GRAY FINE SAND 16 INCHES THICK. THE SUBSURFACE TO A DEPTH OF 80 INCHES IS GRAYISH BROWN AND LIGHT GRAY
FINE SAND. SLOPES RANGE FROM 0 TO 2 PERCENT.


I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES I
IDEPTHI IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS- I
IIIN.)I USDA TEXTURE UNIFIED I AASHTO |>3 IN THAN 3 PASSING SIEVE NOg I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I(PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 1 200 I INDEX
0-16 I FS SM, SP-SM IA-3, A-2 I 0 100 100 75-100 5-26 I NP
16-80 FS SP-SM, SP A-3 0 1 00 100 80-100 1-12 I NP
I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I
I I 1 I I I I i I
I I I I J.
IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL | SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONJWIND JORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.) (PCT I DENSITY j ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I_
I 1<2MMl (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL CONCRETE
S0-161 2-8 I1.40-1.55 I 2.0-6.0 I 0.05-0.10 I4.5-5.5 I I VERY LOW 101 5 I 1 2.0-4.0 I HIGH I HI-EL I
116-801 1-7 I1.45-1.65 I 6.0-20 I 0.03-0.08 14.5-5.5 I VERY LOW I I I 0.5-1.5 I
I I I I I I I I I J I J I
I I I I I I iI I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
1-I DEPTH | KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) I I (IN) I I(IN) I(IN) I I ACTION I
I NONE I I 1+2-0 1 APPARENT I DEC-JULI - | >60 I I I I D D

_SANITARY FACILITIES (A) CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL (A)
II I -J
SEPTIC TANK SEVERE-PONDING,POOR FILTER II POOR-WETNESS
ABSORPTION I ROADFILL
FIELDS II
I II I
SEWAGE SEVERE-PONDING, SEEPAGE I PROBABLE SOURCE
I SEWAGE II
I LAGOON I I SAND
S AREAS I I
I - 1
SANITARY SEVERE-PONDING,SEEPAGE,TOO SANDY I IMPROBABLE SOURCE-EXCESS FINES
I SANITARY I II
LANDFILL II GRAVEL
S(TRENCH) II
II I _1
SANITARY SEVERE-PONDING,SEEPAGE POOR-WETNESS,TOO SANDY
S LANDFILL I II TOPSOIL I
I AREA) I I
I II I
II I
I DAILY SEVERE-PONDING,TOO SANDY,SEEPAGE (
I DAILYWATER MANAGEMENT (A)-
I COVER FOR I
LANDFILL I I POND ISEVERE-SEEPAGE
I1 RESERVOIR I
I AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT(A) 1 AR I
I EVERE-PONDING,CUTBANKS CAVE I 1 SEVERE-PONDINGPIPING,SEEPAGE
SHALLOW E I|EMBANKMENTS
EXCAVATIONS I DIKES AND
III LEVEES
I- III
SSEVERE-PONDING II SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS I EXCAVATED
WITHOUT I PONDS I
BASEMENTS I IAGUIFER FED I
SSv-PONDING II I
SELLING SEVERE-PONDING I PONDING,CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS II I
WITH II DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I
: --_- LII I
SSEVERE-PONDING I PONDING,DROUGHTY,FAST INTAKE
SMALL II I
COMMERCIAL II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS II
i I II I
LOCAL SEVERE-PONDING II PONDING,TOO SANDY
LOCAL I I TERRACES I
ROADS AND II AND
STREETS II DIVERSIONS

LAWNSPIG SEVERE-PONDING,DROUGHTY I WETNESSDROUGHTY
LANDSCAPING I I GRASSED ii
AND GOLF II WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS II
IJ. II I
REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I
I I I
I I I






34 RUTLEGE Fine Sand

RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (A)
SSEVERE-PONDING,TOO SANDY I i SEVERE-PONDING,TOO SANDY
CAMP AREAS I PLAYGROUNDS
I I II
I I II I I
SEVERE-PONDING,TOO SANDY I SEVERE-PONDING,TOO SANDY
S PATHS
PICNIC AREAS I AND
I I TRAILS
-I I -II --________________________ I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CLASS- CAPA- I I
DETERMINING 8ILITY
PHASE I I I I I I I
-I --INIRRIIRR.eNIRR IIRR,. NIR IRR NIR IRR. NIRR IIRR. NIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR, INIRR IIRRe
ALL 3W I
WOLN BIIYBI I I I


CLASS- OR I I I I I MA I I I I I I I I
DETERMINING I I IEQU I SEEDLING I PLANT COMMON TREES I I I I TREES TO PLANT
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

II I II
WOODLAND SUITABILITY (B)
CLASS-- ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
I DETERMINING I SYM 4 EROSION EQUIP. OSEEDLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT I. COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
I PHASE I I HAZARD I LIMIT I MORT'Y.I HAZARD J COMPET.I IINDXI
ALL 2W SLIGHT SEVERE SEVERE SLIGHT MODERATE SLASH PINE 90 SLASH PINE
SLOLOLLY PINE 90 LOBLOLLY PINE
LONGLEAF PINE 75
1 I I 'L N L A I EI0
SWEETGUM 90
I I I I I I |I I

S I I I I I I I I J
I I I I I I I I I I I
I I1 1 1 I I I I1
II I I I I I I I I I



WINDBREAKS
CLASS-DETERMIN.G PHASE SPECIES IHTI SPECIES. IHT I SPECIES ITHTJ SPECIES IHT
INone I I I i I I I
INone
I I 1 I I I I I I
1 I I II I I I I
I I I r I I I
I I I I I I I I
WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY (C)
CLASS- I POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR:
DETERMINING GRAIN GRASSS &| WILD IHARDWD ICONIFERISHRUBS JWETLANDISHALLOWIOPENLD IJOODLD .IwETLANDJRANGELDI
i PHASE I SEED ILEGUME I HERB. I TREES PLANTS I PLANTS I WATER IWILOLF IWILDLF IMILDLF IWILDLF
ALL V.POOR POOR POOR POOR POOR GOOD GOOD POOR POOR GOOD
SI
I I I I I I I I I l I I
S I I I I I I I 1 I I I I
4 I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I L I I I I I I I I I
POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
I PLANT j PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT) BY CLASS DETERMINING PHASE
COMMON PLANT NAME I SYMBOL
(NLSPN) I I
GALLBERRY ILGL
WAXMYRTLE MYCE
FETTERBUSH LYLU3





I I
I .1 I I I 1 1I



I I I 1 I I I I

I I I I I I
I I I r 4 I I
POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT): I
FAVORABLE YEARS
NORMAL YEARS
UNFAVORABLE YEARS I I i I
FOOTNOTES
A RATINGS BASED ON NSH GUIDES, 03-31-78.
B WOODLAND RATINGS BASED ON SOIL INTERPRETATIONS FOR WOODLANDS. PROGRESS REP. W-16.
C WILDLIFE RATINGS BASED ON SOILS MEMORANDUM-74, JAN. 1972.


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD


USDA-SCS
1-79


17 SAPELO FINE SAND


THE SAPELO SERIES CONSISTS OF POORLY DRAINED NEARLY LEVEL SOILS OF THE ATLANTIC COASTAL FLATWOODS. IN A REPRESENTATIVE
PROFILE THE SURFACE LAYER IS BLACK FINE SAND TO A DEPTH OF ABOUT 4 INCHES. THE SUBSURFACE LAYER IS LIGHT GRAY FINE SAND
TO A DEPTH OF 17 INCHES. THE SUBSOIL IS DARK BROWN WEAKLY CEMENTED FINE SAND TO A DEPTH OF 25 INCHES. BELCW TO A DEPTH
OF 49 INCHES IS PALE YELLOW FINE SAND. AND BETWEEN 49 AND 84 INCHES IS LIGHT GRAY SANDY CLAY LOAM.

I- ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI I FRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS-
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED 1 AASHTO j>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
-I I I I (PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 I 200 I INDEX
I 0-11FS ISM, SP. SP-SM IA-2, A-3 0 1 100 100 90-100 4-20 1 I NP
111-171FS. S. LFS ISM. SP-SM IA-2. A-3 I 0 I 100 100 95-100 8-20 i NP
117-501FS. S ISM. SP. SP-SM jA-2. A-3 1 0 I 100 100 90-100 4-15 NP
5I0-801SL, SCL. FSL ISM, SC. SM-SC IA-2, A-4, A-6 I 0 I 100 100 90-100 20-50 I <40 INP-20
I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I II
IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA- 1 AVAILABLE I SOIL | SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND ORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)](PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I____ ___
I 1<2MM)I (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) 1 (PH) I POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
I 0-111 2-5 I 6.0-20 I 0.03-0.07 13.6-5.5 I LOW 1.10) 5 | I 1-3 I HIGH I HIGH I
111-171 4-7 I I 0.6-2.0 1 0.10-0.15 13.6-5.5 I I LOW 1.15 I
117-501 3-6 1 I e.0-20 I 0.03-0.07 j3.6-5.5 I I LOW 1.171 I I 1
Is0-801is-30 0 .6-2.0 I 0.12-0.17 13.6-5.5 I I LOW 1.241
1 I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I
I FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I 8EDRCCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
I I1 DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY | DURATION MONTHS ) (FT) I I I(IN) I I (IN) I I(IN) I(IN) I I ACTION I
S NONE I Q.5-1.I5APPARENTINOV-APRI I >I >0Q I -I I 0I -

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SEVERE-WETNESS.POOR FILTER IPOOR-WETNESS
SEPTIC TANK I II
I ABSORPTION I ROADFILL
I FIELDS II
I I I I
II SEVERE-SEEPAGE.WETNESS II IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
I SEWAGE II
I LAGOON I SAND I
I AREAS I
I I II I
SEVERE-WETNESS,TOO SANDY I IMPROBABLE-TOO SANDY
SANITARY I
LANDFILL II GRAVEL
S(TRENCH) II
I I 2I --I
I I SEVERE-SEEPAGE.WETNESS II POOR-TOO SANDY.WETNESS
SANITARY I I
LANDFILL I I TOPSOIL
I (AREA) II
I II I I
POOR-SEEPAGE.TOO SANDYWETNESS II
DAILY I i WATER MANAGEMENT *
COVER FOR II SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL II POND
I II RESERVOIR
II AREA I
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II
SSEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVEWETNESS I SEVERE-SEEPAGE.PIPING.WETNESS
SHALLOW IIEMBANKMENTSI
EXCAVATIONS I DIKES AND
I1 LEVEES I
LI II I I
I MODERATE-WETNESS II SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS II EXCAVATED
WITHOUT II PONDS I
BASEMENTS IIIAQUIFER FED
I I II
SEVERE-WETNESS II CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS I
WITH II DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I
I ___1 i
MODERATE-WETNESS I WETNESSDROUGHTYFAST INTAKE
I SMALL I
COMMERCIAL I IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I
I I 1 1 1 ___1
IMODERATE-WETNESS I WETNESS.TOO SANDY
S LOCAL I TERRACES
ROADS AND I AND
STREETS I DIVERSIONS
II 2 1 -- __ I
LAWNS I SEVERE-DROUGHTY.WETNESS I DROUGHTY.WETNESS
LANDSCAPING II GRASSED
AND GOLF II WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS II
I--I

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS


I I _







17 SAPELO FINE SAND


_________________ RECREATI NALoEe.LOPMENT
SEVERE-TOO SANDY.WETNESS i SEVERE-TOO SANDY.WETNESS

II I
CAMP AREAS PLAYGROUNDS

_ I I 1I
] SEVERE-TOO SANDY.WETNESS I SEVERE-TOO SANDY.WETNESS
I PATHS
PICNIC AREAS I AND
J I TRAILS I
1 1 j II1 I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CRUPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGME-NT)
I CAPA- I CORN IBAHIAGRASS I SOYBEANS
ABILITY I I I I I
I (BU) "I (AUM) I (BU) I I I I
INIRRIIRR INIRR IIRRIjNIRR flRR INIRR IIRR. INIRR I IRRR. INIRR IIRR INIRR IIRR IINIRR IIRR. I
4W 50 7.5 1 120 I I

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I J I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I






Z WOODLAND SUITABILITY
ORD MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS PTENTI PRUCTIITY
SYM EROSION EUIP. SEEDLING WND PLANT COMMON TREES SITE TREES TO PLANT
S HAZARD I LIMIT I O I I I HAZARD I COMPETE I INX I
j3W SLIGHT IMODERATEIMODERATEI I LBGELOLLY PINE 177 LOBLOLLYY PINE
SLASH PINE I77 SLASH PINE
LONGLEAF PINE |65











WINDBREAKS
SSpECIES IHTI _SPECIES HTI SpECIE5 IHTI SPECIES IHTI
NONE I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I













WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR:
GRAIN GRASSS &1 WILD IHARDWD ICONIFERISHRUBS 1WETLAND]SHALLCWIOPENLD IWOODLD WETLANDIRANGELDI
I SEED ILEGUME I HERB. TREES PLANTS H I PLANTS I WATER IWILDLFS ILLF IWILDLF I WILDLF
POOR FAIR FAIR POOR FAIR FAIR FAIR FAIR FAIR FAIR
I HAZARD I IIII MORT*Y.I HAZARD | COMPET.II TNOXI

































COMMON PLANT NAME SLASH PNE SYMBOL
I_ I I II I I I I I I
I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I


I I I I I I I I I
J I I I I I I I I IRIT
I M I I I I I I I I I











I I N N 1, I I I I


























POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (L8S./AC. DRY WT): _
FAVORABLE YEARS
NORMAL YEARS I I I I I
I UNFAVORABL YAR I I I I I
FOOTNOTES
I WATER TABLE BELOW 20 INCHES DURING TIME OF USE.
WATER TABLE BELOW 20 INCHES DURING TIME OF USE.


S O I L I N T E R P R E T AT I ON S RECORD

39 CURRENCY FINE SAND


USDA-SCS
1-79


THE CURRENCY SERIES CONSISTS OF VERY POORLY-DRAINED SOILS ALONG UPLAND DRAINAGEWAYS AND IN DEPRESSIONS OF THE ATLANTIC
AND GULF COAST FLATWOODS. IN A REPRESENTATIVE PROFILE. THE SURFACE LAYER IS BLACK LOAMY SAND. 12 INCHES THICK. THE
SUBSURFACE LAYER IS GRAYISH-BROWN AND DARK GRAYISH-BROWN SAND. 20 INCHES THICK. THE SUBSOIL EXTENDS TO 65 IN. OR MORE.
IT IS LIGHT GRAY SANDY LOAM IN THE UPPER PART AND GRAYISH-BROWN SANDY LOAM IN THE LOWER PART. YELLOWISH AND BROWNISH
MOTTLES ARE COMMON.
I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS ILIQUID IPLAS- I
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE 1 UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I I I(PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 I 200 1 INDEX I
I 0-381FS ISM IA-2 1 0 I100 95-100 50-75 15-26 I NP
138-60ISCL ISM. SC. SM-SC IA-2. A-6S A-4 1 0 100 95-100 80-98 30-44 I <34 INP-21
I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I
II I I I I
IDEPTHICLAY.IMOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY | SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT | DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD. MATTER II
S I<2MM), (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) IIPOTENTIALI K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
I 0-381 5-101 I 6.0-20 0.05-0.08 13.6-5.0 I I LOW 1.101 5 1 1-4 I HIGH 1 HIGH I
138-60123-351 0.6-2.0 i 0.10-0.15 14.5-5.5 I I LOW .151 I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT-LI
I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS |DEPTHIHARONESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) I I (IN) I I(IN) I(IN) 1 I ACTION
I COMMON I V.LONG IDEC-MARI +1-0.5IAPPARENTIDEC-APRI I 1 >60 I I I I1 I

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SSEVERE-FLOODS.PONDING II POOR-WETNESS
SEPTIC TANK I
ABSORPTION jI ROADFILL
FIELDS II
I I II I I
SEVERE-SEEPAGE.FLOODS.PONDING I I IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE ii
LAGOON II SAND
AREAS II
I I I I I
II I IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SANITARY II
LANDFILL I GRAVEL
(TRENCH) ii

SEVERE-FLOODS.SEEPAGE.PONDING II
SANITARY II
LANDFILL II TOPSOIL
(AREA) I
I I II -

- DAILY II WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR lI I SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I1 POND
I I iI RESERVOIR
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II I
SSEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE.PONDING I I SEVERE-SEEPAGE.PIPING.WETNESS
I SHALLOW I EMBANKMENTS I
EXCAVATIONS ] II DIKES AND I
LEVEES
I I II I i
SEVERE-FLOODS.PONDING II ISEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS I II EXCAVATED
WITHOUT I II PONDS
I BASEMENTS I IIAQUIFER FED I
I II I
SSEVERE-FLOODS.PONDING II PONDING.FLOODS.CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS II
WITH II DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I
I I II I
ISEVERE-FLOODS.PONDING PONDING.DROUGHTY.FLOODS
SMALL I II
COMMERCIAL II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I II I
I I II 1
I EVERE-PONDING.FLOODS il I PONDING.TOO SANDY
LOCAL I 1 TERRACES
ROADS AND I II AND
STREETS II DIVERSIONS
I I II I I
LAWNS. II WETNESS.DROUGHTY
LANDSCAPING I GRASSEDI
AND GOLF II WATERWAYS I
FAIRWAYS I II I
I I II I I
REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS


USDA-SCS
1-79


I I I





39 CURRENCY FINE SAND


USDA-SCS
1-79


I.











I .








I .








I .


R___ECREATICNAL DEVELOPMENT

CAMP AREAS I PLAYGROUNDS

III

PATHS
PICNIC AREAS I I AND
I TRAILS
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)_~
CAPA-
BILITY I I I I I
I I I I I 1 I I I
I__ IRRIIRR.INIRR IIRR. INIRRR 1RR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR |IRR, INIRR IIRR.I
w I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I A I









WOODLAND SUITABILITY
ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS____ I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY |
SYM I EROSION EQUIP. SEEDLINGS WINDTH.I PLANT COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
SI HAZARD I LIMIT I MCRT'YI HAZARD I COMPET.I IINDXI I
12W SLIGHT I SEVERE I SEVERE I SLIGHT I SEVERE ILCBLCLLY PINE 195 LOBLOLLY PINE
S I I II SLASH PINE 190 SLASH PINE
II I I SWEETGUM 190 ISWEETGUM
SI I BLACKGUM AMERICAN SYCAMORE
I WATER OAK I- WATER TUPELO
SI I IBALDCYPRESS I-
1 WATER TUPELO I-











I GRAIN &IGRASS &I I D RYI H|CONIFER I SHRUBSI I IO 1WETLAN ANEL
1 A1I tI EI MI I SIGU
I I I I I I I I 1

WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
S ~ POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR: I
GRAIN GRASSS &J WILD jHARDWD |CONIFERISHRUBS IWETLANDISHALLOWIOPENLD IWOODLD IWETLANDIRANGELDI
I SEED ILEGUME I HERB. 1 TREES PLANTS I PLANTS I WATER IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF_
POOR POOR POOR POOR I POOR FAIR GOOD POOR POOR FAIR
I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I II I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I

S--POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
PLANT PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT)
COMMON PLANT NAME I SYMBOL
SNLSPN) I I













POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT): I ~
FAVORABLE YEARS
NORMAL YEARS
UNFAVORABLE YEARS 1 S I


FOOTNOTES


S OIL IN T E R R E T A T O N S RECORD
14B SUSQUEHANNA VARIANT FINE SAND, 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


THE SUSQUEHANNA VARIANT SERIES CONSISTS OF SOMEWHAT POORLY DRAINED, ACID, UPLAND SOILS. TYPICALLY, THESE SOILS HAVE GRAY FINE
SAND SURFACES 5 INCHES THICK AND LIGHT GRAY FINE SAND SUBSURFACES. AT A DEPTH OF 13 INCHES IS PALE BROWN CLAY WITH GRAY MOTTLES
OVER YELLOWISH RED CLAY UNDERLAIN BY LIMESTONE AT 55 INCHES.


I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES (A)
IDEPTHI j IFRACT)PERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS ILIOUID IPLAS-I
(IN.)i USDA TEXTURE UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THANN A PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITY
II I I PCT)I I t1 I 40 I o200 I IINEX I
S0-131 FS ISP-SM, SM IA-3, A-2-4 I 0 I 100 100 65-85 15-30 1 I
S13-55 C MH IA-7 I 0 1 100 100 100 50-80 1 40-50 14-20
SI I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I
__l I II 1__ I
IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE 1 SOIL I SALINITY 1 SHRINK- ]EROSIONIWIND lORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONJIMMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.I MATTER I ____
J I 0-131 5-12 11.50-1,55 1 6.0-20.0 I 0.05-0.10 1 4.5-5.5 LOW I .351 I I .5-2 I.Tr. I I
13-551 50-80 1.25-1. 50 I <0.06 0.12-0.18 4.5-6.5 MODERATE I .321 I I I
I I I I I I Ii
I I I I I I II I I
I JL1_ L I I I ii _
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK SUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
I- -I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
FR IOUFNCY_- RATION MONTHS I FT I I )N) (IN IN _) (IN_-L IN) I I ACTI I
I NONE I I I 6 6 I I I I 55 I RIPPABLEIj- I D

S-ANITARY FACILITIES (B) CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL (B)
SEVERE-PERCS SLOWLY POOR-LOW STRENGTH, THIN LAYER
SEPTIC TANK II I
ABSORPTION ROADFILL
FIELDS
_________ _________________________________.. _______ _. _______ ____ ____________ _
IMODERATE-DEPT TO ROCK I
SEAGEMODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK IMPROBABLE SOURCE-THIN LAYER, EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE II I
LAGOON II SAND
AREAS
I _L_- --1----W_ _
SANITARY SEVER-DEPTH TO ROCK, TOO CYEY IMPROBABLE SOURCE-EXCESS FINES, THIN LAYER
SANITARY II
LANDFILL I I GRAVEL
(TRENCH)
I I-t---------_L I
III
SANITARY MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK ISEVERE-THIN LAYER
I SANITARY II
LANDFILL I TOPSOIL
(AREA) I

AI POOR-TOO CLAYEY, HARD TO ROCK
DAILY ____ AFTERR MANAGfEMNT (B)
COVER FOR I ODRATE-DEPTH TO ROCK
LANDFILL I POND MOD TE-DEPTH TO ROCK
I I I RESERVOIR
S AREA
RULING SITE DEVELOPMENT (B) __ _____
MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK, TOO CLAYEY E SEERE-HARD TO PACK
SHALLOW IJEMBANK.MENTS
EXCAVAtIONS I DIKES ADO
I LEVEES
_11 | I

DEALINGS MODERATE- SHRINK-SWELL EXCAVATED SEVERE-DEEP TO WATER
DOELLINGSI EXCAVATED
WITHOUT PONDS
BASEMENTS IIACUIFER FED
I --- I- --_____ ___ I I -
ODELLINGS iODERATE-DEPTH IO ROCK, S:-.I:.-S..ELL D E 3 ;AIR
WITH 1i CAINAGE
BASEMENTS I I
i 1~-L_ __ S_ __K-_ _
I II I
ALL MODERATE- SRINK-SWELL FASI INTAKE, PERCS SLOWLY
COMMERCIAL I II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I II
i I II I
-------- - _______________________ _______ _____________---------- --

LOCAL i MODERATE- SHRINK-SIWELL, LOW STREET TERRACES PECS SLOWLY
ROADS AND I AND
STREETS I DIVERSIONS
i __________ II I__________ _______ ___
LAWNS, II
LANDSCAPING SLIGHT l GRASSED PERCS SLOWLY
AND GOLF I j ATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS I
AI I II I I

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS ___

I I I
I I I








14B SUSQUEHANNA VARIANT FINE SAND, 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES

-_ -_--_--___- ___ __ RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (B)


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD
14C SUSQUEHANNA 'VARIANT FINE SAND, 5 TO 8 PERCENT SLOPES


SEVERE-PERCS SLOWLY----I


Ii I
IIPLAYGROUNDS I
1I
II I


II
II PATHS
|| AND
II TRAILS
II


SLIGHT


I III-I
- CAPABILITY AND Y D F ARE Fr. CROPS END pASTURE (HIGH EVE MANAGEMELNTL_
CLASS- I CAPA- SOY BEANS BA DETERMINING ABILITY I I
PHASE I (BU) (AUM) (AUM) I_______
--INjT-RIRRI..NIR IIRR. INIRR JIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR.
ALL IIIEI 20 1 16.51 16.0



I I
:I I I I I .I I I I I I I



,I. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

I - -- __ II .VOODLAND.SUITABILITY (D)
I CLASS- ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY
S DTERMINING SYM I EROSION EQUIP ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT I COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
I- PHAg -- _ HAZgARD IT I MORT'YI HAZARD I_COI PET.I__ I I NDX I X I
ALL 3C SLIGHT MODERATE SLIGHT I SLIGHT MODERATE LOBLOLLY PINE 80 1 LOBLOLLY PINE
S 1 SLASH PINE 90.1 SLASH PINE






I ASS-TERMNI I I PHASEiSPE I I HT CIHTI


I 1111 I 1 I









CLASS- I APOTENTI. FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FO;
DETERMINING GRAIN GRASSS &I WILD IHARDWD CONIFERITSHRUBS I WETLANDISHALLOlOPELD IUOODLD IWTETLAN DIRANGELO
- PHASEI E SEED LEGUME I HERB. I TREES I PLANTS I IPLANTS I TATERE IILLF IMILDLF PWILDLF IIt0LBF I
ALL FAIR GOOD GOOD GOOD GOOD IV. POOR IV. POOR GOOD IGOOD IV. POOR I
I I I I I I I IA Ii
I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I Ii
I I I I I I I I I 1 I






I I I I I I I I I I
IT NI I I U I I I D I I NI













I I PLANT PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY EIGHT) BY LASS DER lNING PHA

COi I N PLANT I I I II
SI I I I, I I























POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY W OT):EA NSTNI A AIA O: I
FAVORABLE YEARS I




NORMAL YEARS I I
I I I I I I I I I I I



















I UNFAVORABLE YEARS
I o II I I I i II














FOOTNOTES

C YIEU) ESTIMAIES NOT AVAILABLE
D RATINGS BASED ON SOIL SURVEY INTERPRETATIONS FOR 1.OODLAIND PROGRESS REPORT W-l, JULY 1968.
S SITE INDEX FIGLES REPRESENTATIVE OF MEASUREMENTS IN COLL-.BIA COUNTY, FL.


ISEVERE-PRCS SLOWLY
I
CAMP AREAS
I I

ISEVERE-PERCS SLOWLY
I I
PICNIC AREAS
I I
I I


" 1


THE SUSQUEHANNA VARIANT SERIES CONSISTS OF SOMEWHAT POORLY DRAINED, ACID, UPLAND SOILS. TYPICALLY, THESE SOILS HAVE GRAY FINE
SAND SURFACES 5 INCHES THICK AND LIGHT GRAY FINE SAND SUBSURFACES. AT A DEPTH OF 13 INCHES IS PALE BROWN CLAY WITH GRAY MOTTLES
OVER YELLOWISH RED CLAY UNDERLAIN BY LIMESTONE AT 55 INCHES.


I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES (A)
IDEPTHI |IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS ILIOUID IPLAS- I
I|IN.)I USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED I AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I I(PCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 1 200 z I INDEX
S0-131 FS SP-SM, SM IA-3, A-2-4 I 0 I 100 100 65-85 15-30 I NP
S13-551 C IMH IA-7 I 0 I 100 100 100 50-80 40-50 I 14-20
I I iI I I I I I

I I Il I I I I
IOEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY 1 SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND JORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY ABILITY (WATER CAPACITYIREACTION)IMMHOS/CM)I SMELL FACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I I
I 1<2M) SI(G/CM31 I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) I IPOTENTIALI K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
I 0-131 5-121 1.50-1.55 I 6.0-20.0 I 0.05-0.10 I 4.5-5.5 I 1 LOW 1.351 1 I .5-2 1 ...HH I UTP.r
I 13-551 50-801 1.25-1.55 1 <0.06 I 0.12-0.18 4.5-6.5 I I MODERATE I .321 I I I
I1 I I I I I II

I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I II
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK SUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) I I (IN) I I(INJ IIIN) I I ACTION
S NONE I 1| 1 6 J I I I| 55 1 RIPPABLEI I LD I

SANITARY FACILITIES (B) CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL (B)
SEVERE-PERCS SLOWLY I j POOR-LOW STRENGTH, THIN LAYER
SEPTIC TANK I I
ABSORPTION I II ROADFILL
FIELDS I I
I II I
S5-7%: MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK, SLOPE .11 IMPROBABLE SOURCE-THIN LAYER, EXCESS FINES
I SEWAGE 7-8%: SEVERE-SLOPE SAND
I LAGOON I I SAND
S AREAS I I
I I 11
SSEVERE-DEPTH TO ROCK, TOO CLAYEY IMPROBABLE SOURCE-EXCESS FINES, THIN LAYER
SANITARY I II
LANDFILL I I GRAVEL
S(TRENCH) I I
I II
SANITY MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK ISEVERE-THIN LAYER
SANITARY ii
LANDFILL II TOPSOIL
(AREA) I I
I I I
DAILY IPOOR-TOO CLAYEY, HARD TO ROCKATR ANA NT (B)
SDA!LY WATER MANAGEMENT (B) _
I COVER FOR I II I
LANDFILL R I POND MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK, SLOPE
I 11 i RESERVOIR
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT (B) J I
MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK, TOO CLAYEY SEVERE-HARD TO PACK
I SHALLOW I EMBANKMENTS I
EXCAVATIONS I I DIKES AND I
II I LEVEES I
1 II I
SELLING MODERATE- SHRINK-SWELL SEVERE-DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS EXCAVATED
WITHOUT I I PONDS
BASEMENTS I AQUIFER FED
I I II I
I DEALINGS MODERATE-DEPTH TO ROCK, SHRINK-SWELL DEEP TO WATER
WITH I II DRAINAGE I
BASEMENTS I I
I I_ li I j
SMALL MODERATE- SHRINK-SWELL, SLOPE FAST INTAKE, PERCS SLOWLY, SLOPE
COMMERCIAL II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I II
I I II I I
I 1II II
LOCAL MODERATE- SHRINK-SWELL, LOW STRENGTH TERRACES PERCS SLOWLY
ROADS AND 1 II AND I
STREETS I IIDIVERSIONS I
I I II I -_--
LAWNS. II I I
LANDSCAPING I SL GRASSED I PERCS SLOWLY
IAND GOLF I II WATERWAYS I
FAIRWAYS I I

REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS
I I I

I I i






14C SUSQUEHANNA VARIANT FINE SAND, 5 TO 8 PERCENT SLOPES

RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (B)
SEVERE-PERCS SLOWLY 5-6%: SEVERE-PERCS SLOWLY
j I 6-8%: SEVERE-PERCS SLOWLY, SLOPE
CAMP AREAS I IIPLAYGROUNDS
I I II I
2 ___ II I I
ISEVERE-PERCS SLOWLY II I SLIGHT
SII PATHS
PICNIC AREAS II AND
| II TRAILS
I I II 1____
_CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT) (C)
CLASS- 3 CAPA- I BAHIAGRASS IBERMUDAGRASS I I I
DETERMINING I ABILITY (AUM) (AUM) I I I I I
PHASE I I I I _I __ I
I INIRIRlIRR.INIRR IIRR. INIRR JIRR.NIRR NR IIRR. R IINIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIR IIRR.
IALL 6E 15.5 5 .0












CLASS- ORD MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS POTENTIAL PRODUCTIITY
DETERMINING EROSION I I I I I I I I I I I I PLANT
1PH I ASE __I 1 I I I I I 1I
ALLI SLIGHT MODERATE SLIGHT SLIGHT MODERATE LOBLOLLY PINE 80 LOBLOLLY PINE
II I I I I I 1 I I I I I I i I










ICLASS-DEER MN PHASE SPECIES HTi SPECIESlSPECIESl SPECIESHT
II I


WOODLAND SUITABILITY (__D)
CLASS- ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY IAL AS HABITAT FOR
2 DETERMINING I SYM I ER ASIONI EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTFERI PLANT I COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
II S PHASE I I HAZARD I LIMIT I MO TREYI HAZARD I COMPETE I IIN OI



I I I I I I
S I f1I






















ALLI FAIR GOOD GOOD GOODI GOOD V. POOR V. POOR GOOD GOOD V. POOR
1I I J I
































POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT): I II
NRMAL YEARS I I












NFARABLE YEARS I I
COI M I I I I NI M I S
WIPNTBREAKS _PDT___RY________________________







































FOOTNOTES

B ESTIMATES BASED ON NATION SPECIESOILS HANDBOOK NOTICE 24 3/31/78.
II I I
21 I
I I I I lI II I I




















D RATINGS BASED ON SOIL SURVEY INTERPRETATIONS FOR WOODAND PROGRESS REPORT W- JULY 1968I


* SITE INDEX FIGURES REPRESENTATIVE IN COLUMBIA COUNTY FL
I I I I I I I I I i I I I I


POTENTIAL NATI P NT FITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
I TIG PLANT I PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT) BY CLASS DETERMINING PHASE N
S COMMON PLANT NAME I SYMBOL I IAT I I L
I(NLSPN) I I I




II I I


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD

23B TROUP LOAMY FINE SAND. 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
1-79


THESE ARE WELL DRAINED SANDY SOILS ON LEVEL TO HILLY COASTAL PLAIN UPLANDS. THEY HAVE SURFACE LAYERS THAT ARE GRAYISH
BROWN SAND OR LOAMY SAND. THE SUBSURFACE IS STRONG BROWN TO REDDISH YELLOW LOAMY SAND. AT ABOUT 40 TO 50 INCHES THE
TEXTURE IS SANDY LOAM OR SANDY CLAY LOAM. AVAILABLE WATER CAPACITY IS LOW.


ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI I I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS- I
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE UNIFIED I AASHTO I>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I IPCT)I 4 I 10 I 40 200 INDEX I
0I -521LFS ISM IA-2. A-4 I 0 1 too0 100 65-90 15-40 I I NP
152-801SCL, SL ISC. SM-SC. CL-ML, CLIA-4. A-2 I 0 195-100 95-100 70-90 24-55 | 19-30 I 4-10
2 II I I I I
I I I I I I
I I I I I I
IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE SOIL | SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I I
I 1<2MM)I (G/CM3O I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I (PH) i POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEI
1.0-52 1-1-01| 6.0-20. 0.05-0.10 J4.5-5.5 IVERY LOW 1.171 5 I I <1 I LOW IMODERATEI
152-80 15-351 0.6-2.0 0.10-0.13 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.201 I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I1 I

I I I I I I I I I I

FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT*LI
I I DEPTH | KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST I
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) I I (IN) I I(IN) I(IN) I I ACTION I
- NONE I I 1 >6.0 I I 1,60 I I I I A I I

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SLIGHT II GOOD
SEPTIC TANK II
ABSORPTION II ROADFILL
FIELDS II
2 I II I
SSEVERE-SEEPAGE lI PROBABLE
SEWAGE II
LAGOON II SAND
AREAS II

MODERATE-TOO SANDY II IMPROBABLE-TOO SANDY
SANITARY II
LANDFILL II GRAVEL
(TRENCH) II
2 AI II A I
SEVERE-SEEPAGE II FAIR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY II
LANDFILL II TOPSOIL
(AREA) II

FAIR-TOO SANDY II
DAILY I WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR II SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL II POND
SIIj _RESERVOIR I
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II I
SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE II J SEVERE-SEEPAGE.PIPING
SHALLOW IIEMBANKMENTS I
EXCAVATIONS j II DIKES AND '
II LEVEES 1
I I II I
SLIGHT II SEVERE-NO WATER
DWELLINGS II EXCAVATED
WITHOUT II PONDS
BASEMENTS IIAQUIFER FED 2
I II I
2 SLIGHT II DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS I
WITH II DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS II

SLIGHT 1 jDROUGHTY.FAST INTAKE,SLOPE
SMALL II
COMMERCIAL II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS 11
I I II
SLIGHT II FAVORABLE
LOCAL I I TERRACES
ROADS AND II AND
STREETS II DIVERSIONS

LAWNS. I MODERATE-DROUGHTY II DROUGHT
LANDSCAPING I II GRASSED I
AND GOLF III WATERWAYS I
FAIRWAYS j II
I I II


- -------- REG& G L I1NT cErPRTA IO NS






23B TROUP LOAMY FINE SAND. 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
1-79


RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
SLIGHT I I MODERATE-SLOPE
CAMP AREAS I PLAYGROUNDS
I II
I II I I
SSLIGHT II SLIGHT
II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS II AND
I 11 TRAILS
SI II
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACREF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
SCAPA- I CORN I PEANUTS IBAHIAGRASS I GRASS HAY I IMPROVED I COTTON I SOYBEANS
ABILITY I I I IBERMUDAGR. I LINT I
1I (BU) I (LeS) I (AUM) I (TONS) I (AUM) I (LBS) I (BU I
I RINIIRRiI.INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR, INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR lIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR I
I3S I I 60 12200 I I 7.2 I 14.0 I 7.5 I 500 I 1 25
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I


I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
SI
SI I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I


WOODLAND SUITABILITY
ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
SSYM I EROSION] EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.1 PLANT COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
I HAZARD I LIMIT I MGRT'Y.I HAZARD I COMPETE IINDX I
135 SLIGHT IMODERATEIMODERATEI SLIGHT I SLIGHT LOBLOLLY PINE I82 LOBLOLLY PINE
LONGLEAF PINE 164 ILONGLEAF PINE
SLASH PINE 184 SLASH PINE




I I I I





-----WINDBREAKS
S I SPECIES IHTI SPECIES IHTI SPECIES I I SPECIES IHT
NONE I I I
II I I I I I I I I II
I I I I I I I I I II
I I I I I I I I I I








--WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
--I POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FCR: I
GRAIN GRASSS &I WILD IHARDWD ICONIFERISHRUBS IWETLANDISHALLOW|OPENLD IWOODLD IWETLANDIRANGELDI
I- SEED ILEGUME I HERB. I TREES IPLANIS_ I__ PLANTS I WATER IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLFI
I POOR FAIR FAIR POOR POOR IV. POOR|V. POOR FAIR POOR jv. POOR -
I I I I I I I I I
I II I Ii I II II
I I I I I I I I I1
I I I I1I I I II'










POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY RANGELANDD OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
PLANT I PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT)
COMMON PLANT NAME SYMBOL
SI (NLSPNl I I I I I
PIKEHILL BLUESTEM I 50 II I
ITHREEAWN ARTIST 13 1
IPANICUMI PANIC 1 12
RUNNING OAK I OUPU* 1 6
OTHER PERENNIAL FORBS I PPFF 3









POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT): I C
FAVORABLE YEARS I
NORMAL YEARS I I I I
u.. ..I R I I I I I








S---AV RABLElRS
FOOTNOTES


S O IL INTERPRET T I O N S RECORD

23C TROUP LOAMY FINE SAND. 5 TO 8 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
1-79


THESE ARE WELL DRAINED SANDY SOILS ON LEVEL TO HILLY COASTAL PLAIN UPLANDS. THEY HAVE SURFACE LAYERS THAT ARE GRAYISH
BROWN SAND OR LOAMY SAND. THE SUBSURFACE IS STRONG BROWN TO REDDISH YELLOW LOAMY SAND. AT ABOUT 40 TO 50 INCHES THE
TEXTURE IS SANDY LOAM OR SANDY CLAY LOAM. AVAILABLE WATER CAPACITY IS LCW.


II ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI FRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS ILIQUID IPLAS- I
I(IN.)t USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. j LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I If(PCT)i 4' I 10 I 40 I 200 IINDEX I
I 0-50ILFS ISM IA-2. A-4 0 I 100 100 65-90 15-40 NP I
ISO-80SSCL, SL ISC. SM-SC. CL-ML, CLJA-4, A-2 I 0 195-100 95-100 70-90 24-55 i 19-30 i 4-10
I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I
IDEPTHICLAY MOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK-- EROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)i SWELL IFACTORSIERDD.IMATTER I __
I I<2MM)l (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/INJ I (PH) I POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETEl
I 0-50 1-101 I 6.0-20 1 0.05-0.10 14.5-5.5 I IVERY LOW 1.171 5 I I <1 _LOWQ I MODERATEI
50-80115-35 I 0.6-2.0 I 0.10-0.13 14.5-5.5 I I LOW 1.20o I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
FLOODING 1 HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT-LI
I __ I DEPTH I KIND ]MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS 1 (FT) I I IIIN) I I (IN) I I(IN) I(IN) 1 I ACTION
I NONE I I 1 >6.0 I I I >60 I I I A I I

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SLIGHT II GOOD
SEPTIC TANK I J I
ABSORPTION 11 ROADFILL
FIELDS II
I I II I
SSEVERE-SEEPAGE II PROBABLE
SEWAGE II
LAGOON I i SAND
AREAS II I
I I II I
SMODERATE-TOO SANDY II I IMPROBABLE-TGO SANDY
SANITARY i II
LANDFILL I II GRAVEL
(TRENCH) I|
II II I
SEVERE-SEEPAGE II FAIR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY I I
LANDFILL I 1 TOPSOIL I
(AREA) III
I II I I I
FAIR-TOO SANDY II
DAILY I I WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR II I SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I I POND
I _II RESERVOIR
II AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II I
SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE I I SEVERE-SEEPAGE.PIPING
SHALLOW IIEMBANKMENTS
EXCAVATIONS II DIKES AND
II LEVEES
i i l I I
SLIGHT II SEVERE-NO WATER
DWELLINGS II EXCAVATED
WITHOUT II PONDS
BASEMENTS IIIAUIFER FED I
I I II I I
SLIGHT II DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS I
S WITH I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I
I I II I i
MODERATE-SLOPE I DROUGHTY.FAST INTAKE.SLOPE
SMALL II
COMMERCIAL 11 IRRIGATION
I BUILDINGS I|

I SLIGHT I FAVORABLE
LOCAL I I TERRACES
ROADS AND 11 AND
STREETS I II DIVERSIONS

LAWNS I MODERATE-DROUGHTY I I DROUGHTYI
LANDSCAPING ( II GRASSEDI
AND GOLF I I WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS I I
EI I INTER
REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS


_I








23C TROUP LOAMY FINE SAND. TO 8 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
1-79


--RCREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
SLIGHT I SEVERE-SLOPE
I II I
CAMP AREAS j IPLAYGROUNDSI
S1 11
I I II I
SSLIGHT I SLIGHT
II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS Ij AND
I II TRAILS
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE CF CROPS ANC PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
I CAPA- CORN I PEANUTS IBAHIAGRASSI GRASS HAY IMPROVED I COTTON I SOYBEANS
I LITY I I I I IBERMUDAGR. I LINT I
I_ I (BU) I (LBS) (AUM) I (TONS) I (AUM) I (LBS) I (BU)
INIRRIIRR.INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. I
4S 55 11800 1 7.0 3.5 7.2 450 22






I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I


.WCGOLAND SUITABILITY
ORD MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVITY I
SYM EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT I COMMON TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT
I I HAZARD LIMIT I M -YI HAZARD I COMPETE. __ IINDX I I
3S SLIGHT IMODERATEIMODERATE SLIGHT SLIGHT ILCBLCLLY PINE 182 ILOBLOLLY PINE
I I I LONGLEAF PINE 64 ILONGLEAF PINE
]SLASH PINE i84 |SLASH PINE

I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I









WINDBREAKS
I I SPECIES I IT SPECIES IHTI SPECIES IHTI SPECIES IHT
NONE I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I



II I Ii II I I ii







-W WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITABILITY
I POTENTIAL FOR HABITAT ELEMENTS I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR:
|GRAIN GRASSS &I WILD JHARDWD ICONIFERISHRUBS I WETLANDISHALLOWIOPENLD IWOOOLD IWETLANDIRANGELDI
SSEED I|LEGUMe I HERB I TREES PLANTS I PLANTS I WATER IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF I
SPOOR FAIR FAIR POOR POOR IV. POCRIv. POOR! FAIR POOR IV. POOR -
I I I I I I II I INDI








I I I I I L I I S I I
I I I I I I I I I I I
III I I I I I I I I









POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATIONL
PLANT I PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT)
COMMON PLANT NAME SYMBOL
I (NLSPN) I I I I I
PINEHILL BLUESTEM ANDI 50
ITHREEAN ARTIST 13
PANICUM PANIC 12
RUNNING OAK QUPU* 6
OTHER PERENNIAL FORBS PPFF 3
ICTHER SHRUBS SSSS 3








POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT) I PC E
FAVORABLE YEARS
NORMAL YEARS 80 0
UNFAVORABLEYEA I I I I I
FOOTNOTES
I IF I INITISI


312 UDORTHENTS


THIS SOIL CONSISTS OF SILTY CLAY LOAM TO CLAY RESIDUE FROM PHOSPHATE AND LIMESTONE MINING OPERATIONS. TYPICALLY, THE RESIDUE
RANGES FROM ABOUT 10 TO 48 INCHES THICK OVERLYING FINE SAND THAT EXTENDS TO DEPTHS OF 80 INCHES OR MORE. SLOPES ARE LESS THAN
2 PERCENT.


I ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES 1
IDEPTHI I I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS IL UID PLAS- I
IIIN.)I USDA TEXTURE I UNIFIED i AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3- PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYV
I I I I IPCT)I 4 I 10 4 0 1 200 IIINDEX I
0-40 SICL, SIC, C MH, CH IA-7 0 I 100 100 95-100 75-95 50-80 20-45
140-80 1 FS SP-SM A-3, A-2-4 I 0 100 100 85-95 5-12 NP
I I I JI I I I I I
I I I I I I

IDEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA-- AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICJ CORROSIVITY I
(IN.)l(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONIIMMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I |'.. I
I 1.<2MM)I IG/CM3) (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) I IPH) I IPOTENTIALI K I T 1GROUPI (PCT) I STEEL LCONCRO|)
0-401 40-601 I0.06-0.6 0.14-0.18 16.6-8.4 j HIGH 1.321 51 4 1 3-8 I HIGH I LOW .3
I40-801 4- 8i I 6.0-20 I 0.05-0.10 I 6.6-8.5 1 I LOW I .171 i I I
I I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I I
I.. I 1 I I I I I I ____________
FLOODING N HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK SUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT"*
I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST {
I FREQUENCY I DURATION INMONTHS I (FT) I I I (IN) I IN I I(IN) I(IN) I I ACTION
I NONE I 1 I 15.0-6.0 1 APPARENT I JAN-SEPI I I >60 1 I I II

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SSEVERE-PERCS SLOWLY POOR-THIN LAYER
SEPTIC TANK I I 1
I ABSORPTION I II ROADFILL
I FIELDS I
I II I
S I SEVERE-SEEPAGE IMPROBABLE SOURCE-THIN LAYER
I SEWAGE II I
I LAGOON I SAND I
I AREAS I
I I lI I
II I
SANITARY SEVERE-SEEPAGE, WETNESS, TOO CLAYEY IMPROBABLE SOURCE-EXCESS FINES
LANDFILL I II GRAVEL
(TRENCH) I II
1 II .I i
SSLIGHT II POOR-TOO CLAYEY
SANITARY I
LANDFILL I I TOPSOIL
(AREA) I
I I ii I I
I POOR-TOO CLAYEY, HARD TO PACK II
DAILY II WATER MANAGEMENT ___
COVER FOR I II MODERATE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL I POND
3 I Ii RESERVOIR
I AREA I
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT 1l I
I SEVERE-CUTBANKS CAVE SEVERE-HARD TO PACK
SHALLOW I IIEMBANKMENTS
EXCAVATIONS I II DIKES AND I
i 1 II LEVEES
1 I I ,,,
S SEVERE-SHRINK-SWELL I SEVERE-NO WATER, CUTBANKS CAVE
DWELLINGS I EXCAVATED
WITHOUT | PONDS
BASEMENTS I IIAQUIFER FED

S SEVERE-SHRINK-SWELL DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS
WITH I I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I
I II _
ISEVERE-SHRINK-SWELL II SLOW INTAKE, PERCS SLOWLY
SMALL I i
COMMERCIAL I II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS I I
I I II I
ISEVERE-LOW STRENGTH, SHRINK-SWELL IPERCS SLOWLY
LOCAL II TERRACES
ROADS AND I I AND
STREETS I I DIVERSIONS

LAWNSo SEVERE-TOO CLAYEY PERCS SLOWLY
LANDSCAPING I GRASSED
AND GOLF WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS
I I I I


REGunI *N l ALCIT uRA Sfl


SOIL INTERPRETATIONS RECORD








SCIL INThRPRETATIONS RECORD
312 UDORTHENTS 22 WAGRAM LOAMY FINE SAND. 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLOPES


RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT _
S SEVERE-TOO CLAYEY I I SEVERE-TOO CLAYEY
I I II I
SCAMP AREAS I IJPLAYGROUNDS
II I
I I II I I
I SEVERE-TOO CLAYEY II SEVERE-TOO CLAYEY
I II PATHS
PICNIC AREAS II AND
I I TRAILS
'I _ I|_ _ _
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
CLASS- I CAPA- BAHIAGRASS I I I I
DETERMINING I BILITYI I I I I
I PHASE (AUM)
I INIRRiRRNR I IRRI INIRR JIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. NIRR lImR. NIRR IIRR. NIRR IIRR.
ALL 4W 8.5 I I I









--WOODLA N SUITABILITY
I CLASS- OD I I I I P I I I I I I I
I EI I I I I I I E I | II I I TI I
SII E I I I I I I I X I I
L 2W SI I J M ATE LI IG O S H I I 90 S PI
B I I I I I I I I I I I IN IE
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I
I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I 1

I-----------I I I I I ---I I I I I I I I I I I I
W OODLAND SUITAT SUITABILITY
CLASS- I ORD I MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS TAI POTENTIAL PRODUCTIVE I
DETERMINING SYN I EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTHeI PLANT COTL ON TREES NSITEI TREES TO PLANT
PHASE I I HAZARD IMIT I MORTYEE HAZARD CDMPET. I IINOXJF i















POTENTIAL NATIE PLANT COMMUNITY RANGELAND R F T UNDERTORY VE STATION
SI I 1 I I LOBLOLLY PINE 90 LOBLOLLY PINE
CI I I I LONGLEAF INE 75 SYCAMOgREL
I I I I SWEETGU

I II I I
I III I i I

SI I I I i


POTENTIAL PRODUCTION L AC
I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I j I 1

IFAVORAI I I I I I



















I UNFAVORABLE YEARS I
I I I I i I F iO T
I I i I I I I I
SI I I


I I IIi II I
-------------------.. _j I I
WILDLIFE HABITAT SUITASILITY
CLASS- POTENTIAL FOR HABITATELEMENTS I POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR: I
DETERMINING GRAIN SIGRASS &I WILD IHARDWD ICONIFERISHRUBs IWETLANDISHALLOwOPENLD IWrODLD IWETLANDiRANGELDI

ALL FAIR GOOD GD0D FAIR -
I I I I I I I

i I I I I I I I I



II I 1 I
I I I I I
I I I I
I i
I O P/-
A Y
I i i

I iAIALEIAI I I I I
i i TO I E
I iI I

POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY WT)I TENTIAL F ABTAT. i POTENTIAL_:A A AT
FAVORABLE YEARS I RI I
NRMALEAI IR I I
NFIA VOAL YEA II I I i


THESE ARE DEEP, WELL DRAINED SOILS ON NEARLY LEVEL TO STRONGLY SLOPING UPLAND RIDGES OF THE COASTAL PLAIN. THEY HAVE
GRAYISH BROWN AND PALE BROWN LOAMY SAND A HORIZONS. 20 TO 40 INCHES THICK. AND FRIABLE YELLOWISH BROWN SANDY CLAY LCAM
SUBSOILS. THEY FORMED IN COASTAL PLAIN SEDIMENTS.


ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS--
(IN.)| USDA TEXTURE UNIFIED I AASHTO J>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. I LIMIT ITICITYI
I I I (PCT)I a I 10 I 40 I 200 I IINDEX I
0-30ILFS SM, SP-SM IA-2. A-3 I I 100 98-100 50-85 8-35 I NP -
30-SOSOCL, SL ISO, SM IA-2. A-4, A-6. A-7 I 0 I 100 98-100 60-95 31-49 21-41 8-25

I I I

I11 I I I
IEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULK PERMEA- I AVAILABLE SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND ICRGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT 1 DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL JFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER I
S I<2MM)I (G/CM3) I (IN/HR) I (IN/IN) i (PH) I POTENTIAL K I T IGROUPI (PCT) I STEEL ICONCRETE
S0-301 2--101.60-1.75 I 6.0-20 I 0.05-0.08 14.5-6.0 I I LOW 1.151 S I I .5-2 I LOW I HIGH
I30-80110-3511.35-1.60 0.6-6.0 I 0.12-0.16 14.5-6.0 I I LOW 1.201 I I
I I I I I I l I I I_ I I l
I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I I
II I I I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATER TABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTENT'LI
I I DEPTH | KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARDNESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FTI I I(IN) I I (IN) I IltN) (IlN) I I ACTION I
I NONE I >. I 6.> I I I A I -

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SLIGHT I GOOD
SEPTIC TANK I I
ABSORPTION I II ROADFILL
FIELDS I

SEVERE-SEiPAGE I IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SEWAGE I
LAGOON SAND
AREAS II
I I III
SLIGHT IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SANITARY
LANDFILL GRAVEL
(TRENCH)
I I II I
SLIGHT I FAIR-TOC SANCY
SANITARY I
LANDFILL TOPSOIL
II I
I (AREA) II
FAIR-TOG SANDY
DAILY WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR II SEVERE-SEEPAGE
LANDFILL POND *I
_II RESERVOIR
AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT I I
SLIGHT SLIGHT
SHALLOW I IIEMBANKMENTSI
EXCAVATIONS DIKES ANDI
I LEVEES
I III1 I
SLIGHT SEVERE-NO WATER
DWELLINGS I EXCAVATED
WITHOUT I PONDS
BASEMENTS AQUIFER FEDI
I I II1
SLIGHT 11 DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS
WITH I DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS

SLIGHT 11 DROUGHTY.FAST INTAKE.SLOPE
SMALL II
COMMERCIAL I IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS

SLIGHT TOO SANDY
LOCAL TERRACES
ROADS AND I AND
STREETS DIVERSIONS

LAWNS. MODERATE-DROUGHTY I I DROUGHT
ILANOSCAPING I II GRASSED
SAND GOLF I l WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS
SII _________ I


USDA-SCS
8-79


REGIONAL"INTERPRETATIONS







8-79
________ RRECRATIONAL DEVELOPMENT__ ___
| MODERATE-TOG SANDY II MODERATE-SLOPE.TDO SANDY

CAMP AREAS I PLAYGROUNDS I
I I I
I __________ _I __ I -_ __
MODERATE-TOO SANDY I MODERATE-TCC SANDY
i I PATHS
PICNIC AREAS AND
. II TRAILS
S____ --_ CAPABILITY AND YIELDED E PASTUR__ 1HI g___ ____
CAPA- COTTON I CORN TOBACCO SOYBEANS PEANUTS WHEAT PASTURE
ABILITY LINT II
I LBS) j (BU) I (LBS)I (BU) (LBJ) (aUJI (AUM)
I-RRIRB, NIRR_ JRi_. NRRLR_!-_ NIRRiIRR. INIRR JIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR
25 1 550 i I 75 I 2400 I 25 12900 40 1 1 8.5





I __I I II_ CDLAN ABILITY





CRD MAN___MAgNAGEMENT PROBLEMS I__POTcNTIAL PRO ACTIVITY
SYM EROSI I UI I INGI PLANT MMN TREES SITE TREES TO PLANT
I I I I I I I IIT I MORT'Y._HZAR CoME-. I I I
SI-SLIGHT ODATE T LCLL PINE 18 LBLOLLY PINE




SLASH PINE 1O SLASH PINE
ILLNGLEAF PINE 167 *ILONGLEAF PINE
1 .. I I I I I I






















I_ I ISPEIES IHT SPECIES HTI SPECIES I II
NON|
I *_'I I 1 I I I I I I I
I I I II














woLICLANI F HA ~ITAT SUITABILITY TY
I ORD I POTENTIAL H T ELEO B~ TT -LI- POTENTIAOTENL AS HABITAT FCRPY
SYM I EROSIONI EQUIP. ISEEOLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT I C.MM0N TREES ISITEI TREES TO PLANT I

S3 i SLIGHT IMODDRATEIMODERAT I LOBLGLLY PINE 182 LOBLOLLYY PINE











GRAIN 6RASS & WILD HADWD CONIRISHRUBS LTLASH PINE SHALL P IODSLASH PIN RANGEL
I ILONGLEAF PINE I67 *ILONGLEAF PINE I






















I SEO ILEGUME I RBI TREES II I IATER I I IILLF IWI ILF
GOOD GOD GOOD GOD I GOOD POOR IV. POCRI GOOD GOOD V. POOR
I 1 I I I I 1 I I 1 I


























- POTENTIAL NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITY (RANGELAND OR FOREST UNOERSr(RY VEGETATION) __
PLANT PECENTAG COMPOSITIN (D Y WEIGHT) I
COMMON PLANT NAME SYMBOL
I _I I I I I I I













II I I S 1 1 I I I I




























POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LB./C. DRY WT): ____________
FAVORABLE YEARS
NORMAL YEARS
U CEYE___________UNA S OAL SPECIES RHT SPECIES IHTl SPEC_ _HT|



















FOOTNOTES
SITE INDEX IS A SUMMARY OF 5 OR MORE MEASUREMENTS ON THIS SOIL.
SI


SOIL I NTERPRETATI O N S RECORD

22C WAGRAM LOAMY FINE SAND, 5 TO 8 PERCENT SLOPES


USDA-SCS
8-79


THESE ARE DEEP. WELL DRAINED SOILS ON NEARLY LEVEL TO STRONGLY SLOPING UPLAND RIDGES OF THE COASTAL PLAIN. THEY HAVE
GRAYISH BROWN AND PALE BROWN LOAMY SAND A HORIZONS. 20 TO 40 INCHES THICK. AND FRIABLE YELLOWISH BROWN SANDY CLAY LOAM
SUBSOILS. THEY FORMED IN COASTAL PLAIN SEDIMENTS.


FI ESTIMATED SOIL PROPERTIES
IDEPTHI I IFRACTIPERCENT OF MATERIAL LESS LIQUID IPLAS- I
I(IN.)I USDA TEXTURE 1 UNIFIED 1 AASHTO 1>3 INI THAN 3" PASSING SIEVE NO. 1 LIMIT ITICITYi
I I I I(PCT) I4 I 10 I 40 1 200 iINDEX
I 0-31jLFS iSM. SP-SM IA-2, A-3 I 0 100 98-100 50-85 8-35 NP
I31-801SCL, SL Isc. SM IA-2, A-4, A-6. A-7 I 0 1 100 98-100 60-95 31-49 21-41 8-25
I I I i iI

I I I
DEPTHICLAY IMOIST BULKI PERMEA- I AVAILABLE I SOIL I SALINITY I SHRINK- IEROSIONIWIND IORGANICI CORROSIVITY
I(IN.)I(PCT I DENSITY I ABILITY WATER CAPACITYIREACTIONI(MMHOS/CM)I SWELL IFACTORSIEROD.IMATTER _I _
I <2MM)I (G/CM3) I (IN/HRI I (IN/IN) I (PH) I POTENTIAL K IT IGROUPI (PCT) j STEEL ICONCBETEI
S0-3ll 2-1011.60-1.75 I 6.0-20 0.05-0.08 14.5-6.0o I LOW .1515 I ) .5-2 LOW_ I HIGH I
Is31-80o11-351s.3S-1.60 0.6-6.0 I 0.12-0.16 14.5-6.0 I LOW 1.201 I I
I I I I I I II I I I. .1 I 1_
I I I I I I I I I
I I I 1 I I I I
I I I I I I I I I
FLOODING I HIGH WATERTABLE I CEMENTED PAN I BEDROCK ISUBSIDENCE IHYDIPOTET.LI
-I I DEPTH I KIND MONTHS IDEPTHIHARONESSIDEPTH IHARDNESSIINIT.ITOTALIGRPI FROST
I FREQUENCY I DURATION MONTHS I (FT) I I I(IN) I I (IN) I I(IN) I(IN) I I ACTION
I -- NONE I I >6.0 I I I >0 I I _

SANITARY FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL
SSLIGHT GOOD
SEPTIC TANK j
ABSORPTION I ROADFILL
FIELDS
i I II i
SSEVERE-SEEPAGE I IMPROBAELE-EXCESS FINES

SEWAGE
LAGOON I SAND
AREAS i
i II i
I LIGHT IMPROBABLE-EXCESS FINES
SANITARY
LANDFILL GRAVEL
TRENCH) I
I II i
SSLIGHT I FAIR-TOO SANDY
SANITARY I
LANDFILL I I TOPSOIL
(AREA) I I
I I II I
SFAIR-TOO SANDY I
DAILY I WATER MANAGEMENT
COVER FOR I SEVERE--SEPAGE
LANDFILL POND
I- ______I RESERVOIR
S AREA
BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT II I
SLIGHT SLIGHT
I SHALLOW IIIEMBANKMENTSI
EXCAVATIONS II1 DIKES AND
I. I II LEVEES
I I II I
I- I SLIGHT I SEVERE-NO WATER
DWELLINGS II EXCAVATED
I WITHOUT II PONDS
I BASEMENTS I AQUIFER FED
i II I
SLIGHT II DEEP TO WATER
DWELLINGS I
WITH II DRAINAGE
BASEMENTS I I
I II
MODERATE-SLOPE II DROUGHTY.FAST INTAKE.SLOPE
SMALL II I
COMMERCIAL II IRRIGATION
BUILDINGS II
I I II I I
SLIGHT Ii 1 TOO SANDY
LOCAL II TERRACES
ROADS AND I I AND
STREETS I DIVERSIONS
i,1 I
I LAWNS. I MODERATE-DROUGHTY II I DROUGHT
LANDSCAPING I GRASSED
AND GOLF II WATERWAYS
FAIRWAYS II
III i


I _____


REGIONAL INTERPRETATIONS1


22B WAGRAM LOAMY FINE SAND. 2 TO 5 PERCENT SLCPES


USDA-SCS









_RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
MODERATE-TOO SANDY I I SEVERE-SLOPE
I II I
CAMP AREAS PLAYGROUNDS
i I i II
MODERATE-TOO SANDY II MODERATE-TOO SANDY
11 PATHS
PICNIC AREAS II AND
II TRAILS
I II I
CAPABILITY AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (HIGH LEVEL MANAGEMENT)
I CAPA- COTTON CORN TOBACCO SOYBEANS PEANUTS WHEAT PASTURE
ABILITY LINT I I
I (LBS) I (BU) I (LBS) (BU) I (LBS) I IU I (AUM) I
INIRRIIRR.INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. INIRR IIRR. I
3S 1 500 1 170 1 12100o 120 125 130 1 1 7.5




I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I







WOODLAND SUITABILITY
ORD MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS I POTENTIAL PRODUCT I I I IITY
SYM EROSION EQUIP. ISEEDLINGI WINDTH.I PLANT I COMMON TREES SITE TREES TO PLANT
I I HAZARD I LIMIT I MORT'Y. HAZARD I COMPETE. I IINDX
13S SLIGHT IMODERATEIMODERATEI LOBLOLLY PINE 182 LOBLOLLYY PINE
I I I I SLASH PINE 180 SLASH PINE
LONGLEAF PINE 167 *ILONGLEAF PINE




I I I I I I I




I SPECIES HTI I SPECIES I I SPECIES IHTI SPECES IHTI
NONE I I I I
II I I 1
I I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I









I POTENTIAL FR HABITAT ELEMENTS POTENTIAL AS HABITAT FOR
GRAIN GRASSS &j WILD JHARDD ICNIFERISHRUBS WETLAND SHALLOWIOPENLD IWOODLD IWETLANDIRANGELD
I SEED ILEGUME I HERB, I TREES PLANTS I PLANTS I WATER IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF IWILDLF
FAIR GOOD I GOOD I GOOD I GOOD I IV. POOGRiV. POOR GOOD GOOD IV. POOR -
I I lIII II I I
1 I I I I I I II I II






POTENTIAL NATIVE PLAN& COMMUNITY RANGELANDC OR FOREST UNDERSTORY VEGETATION)
PLANT -PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION (DRY WEIGHT)}
S1 INLSPN) I












POTENTIAL PRODUCTION (LBS./AC. DRY ET):IES i I
FAVORABLE YEARS
NORMAL YEARS
UNFAVORABLE YEARS I i I I I I
FOOTNOTES
T SITE INDEX IS A SUMMARY OF 5 OR MORE MEASUREMENTS ON THIS SOIL.
I I I



I I I I III
I I I I I I









*SITE INDEX IS A SUMMARY OF 5 OR MORE MEASUREMENTS ON THIS SOIL.


INDEX OF SOIL SURVEY INTERPRETATION SHEETS


Albany
Alpin
Arents, sanitary landfill
Bayboro
Bigbee
Blanton
Bonneau
Chipley
Electra Variant
Electra Variant, occasionally flooded
Fluvaquent
Fort Meade Variant
Chiefland -Pedro Variant Complex
Chiefland -Pedro Variant Complex, occasionally flooded
Lakeland
Leefield
Leon
Leon, occasionally flooded
Lochloosa Variant
Mandarin
Mascotte
Mascotte, occasionally flooded
Norfolk
Ocilla
Orangeburg
Pamlico
Pelham
Pits
Plummer
Pottsburg Variant
Rutlege
Sapelo
Surrency
Susquehanna Variant
Troup
Udorthents
Wagram


22C WAGRAM LCAMY FINE SAND. 5 TO B PERCENT SLCPES


USDA-SCS
'8-79


I








Map Symbol

23B
23C
31
031
32
032


Map Symbol Mapping Unit Name


2B
2C
2D
3
4B
4C
5B
6B
6C
7B
7D
8B
8D
10B
10C
11B
11C
12B
12C
14B
14C
16
17
19B
21B
21C
22B
22C


Blanton fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes
Blanton fine sand, 5 to 8 percent slopes
Blanton fine sand, 8 to 12 percent slopes
Pits
Blanton-Bonneau-Susquehanna Variant complex, 2 to 5 percent slopes
Blanton-Bonneau-Susquehanna Variant complex, 5 to 8 percent slopes
Albany fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes
Ocilla fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes
Ocilla fine sand, 5 to 8 percent slopes
Alpin fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes
Alpin fine sand, 5 to 12 percent slopes
Lakeland fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes
Lakeland fine sand, 5 to 12 percent slopes
Bonneau fine sand, 2 to 5 percent slopes
Bonneau fine sand, 5 to 8 percent slopes
Lochloosa Variant loamy fine sand, 2 to 5 percent slopes
Lochloosa Variant loamy fine sand, 5 to 8 percent slopes
Bonneau-Blanton complex, 2 to 5 percent slopes
Bonneau-Blanton complex, 5 to 8 percent slopes
Susquehanna Variant fine sand, 2 to 5 percent slopes
Susquehanna Vairnat fine sand, 5 to 8 percent slopes
Leefield fine sand
Sapelo fine sand
Fort Meade Variant loamy fine sand, 0-to 5 percent slopes
Orangeburg loamy fine sand, 2 to 5 percent slopes
Orangeburg loamy fine sand, 5 to 8 percent slopes
Wagram loamy fine sand, 2 to 5 percent slopes
Wagram loamy fine sand, 5 to 8 percent slopes


Soil Survey
Columbia County, Florida


*Interpretation sheets for each soil map unit are in alphabetical order


LEGEND*


Mapping Unit Name

Troup loamy fine sand, 2 to 5 percent slopes
Troup loamy fine sand, 5 to 8 percent slopes
Leon fine sand
Leon fine sand, occasionally flooded
Electra Variant fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes
Electra Variant fine sand, occasionally flooded, 0 to 5
percent slopes
Mascotte fine sand
Mascotte fine sand, occasionally flooded
Rutlege fine sand
Bayboro sandy loam
Fluvaquent
Plummer fine sand, depressional
Surrency fine sand
Plummer fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes
Plummer fine sand, 5 to 12 percent slopes
Pelham fine sand
Pamlico muck
Pottsburg Variant fine sand
Chiefland-Pedro Variant complex, 2 to 5 percent slopes
Chiefland-Pedro Variant complex, 5 to 8 percent slopes
Chiefland-Pedro Variant complex, occasionally flooded
Chipley fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes
Bigbee fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes
Arents, sanitary landfill
Norfolk loamy fine sand, 2 to 5 percent slopes
Norfolk loamy fine sand, 5 to 8 percent slopes
Mandarin fine sand
Udorthents


33
033
34
36
036
38
39
41
41D
43
45
46
47B
47C
047
52B
052B
56
61B
61C
62
312






SCS SOILS 37A
3-7 CONVENTIONAL AND SPECIAL

Soi SurveyA ea: Columbia Co., SYMBOLS LEGEND
State: FL


DESCRIPTION


SYMBOL


CULTURAL FEATURES

BOUNDARIES

National. state or province


County or pariah


Minor civil division

Reservation (national ft os or ae,.
slate forest or park, and 1sr1. ,uir i;

Land grant


Limit of soil survey (label)


Field sheet matchline & neatOtl


AD HOC BOUNDARY (label) ---- -


Small airport, airfield, park, siliint. -----I --
cemetery, or flood pool


STATE COORDINATE TICK
1 890 000 FECT
LAND DIVISION CORNERS
(sections and land grants) +

ROADS

Divided (median shown if sca.!e prmils)i


County, farm or ranch


Trail

ROAD EMBLEMS & DESIGNATI'I'-S


Interst.ll" -

Federal


State


Other 398

RAILROAD I I I

POWER TRANSMISSION LINE ..--.--------.--
(normally not shown)

PIPE LINE (normally not shown) -i I--- -- -

FENCE (normally not shown) -< - -x--- ..x-


LEVEES

Withoutroad Il t rl i Nl llll l ll i

lilt 1 IIn i 1lill lt lt111 t 111
W e h r.il d IIn i I I I I illl l lI I i l


Win uoad ill

DAMS


cz~c~







a.-


DESCRIPTION


SYMBOL


CULTURAL FEATURES (cont.)

MISCELLANEOUS CULTURAL FEATURES

Farmstead. house (mitl In urban areas) a


Church

School

Indian mound ( lIhb ) /

Located object (label) O


Tank (label)


Wells, oil or gas

Wlindmll

Kitchen midden r


WATER FEATURES

DItAINAGE


Pirennlal, double line


Ferennial.single line ". .


Islermittant -


DOainage end "


Canals or ditches


Doubted Ine (l.hit, CANAL


Oranl.g. annd/or rigatlo .


LAKES. PONDS AND RESERVOIRS


PuLennlal

Intermittent



MISCELLANEOUS WATER FEATURES


Marsh or swamp


Spring


YHll. artesidn


erfi. irr.itihn

0i. spot


'rtre'rmiIccn? 'i~rt S
--


U "S U "':EA. NTE OF AGRICULTURE
SOIL CCZ S'-P'/,TION SERVICE



Dte: 8/24/76


DESCRIPTION SYMBOL


SPECIAL SYMBOLS FOR
SOIL SURVEY
SOIL DELINEATIONS AND SOIL SYMBOLS

ESCARPMENTS CeA FoB2


BEdrock (points do*n slope) eneweeItervvewv

Olhtr than bselrck ( po-nts town slope) l-t.. nmi*.l*ti.ll.i.*.*i....


SHORT STEEP SLOPE ...............

GULLY


DEPRESSION OR SINK 0


SOIL SAMPLE SITE (normally not shown) (

MISCELLANEOUS

Blowout


Clay spot

Gravelly spot ow

Gumbo, slick or scabby spot (sodic) 0

Dumps a d other similar non soil areas

Prominent hill or peak ,

Rock outcrop (includes sa.ndtone and shale) V


Saline spot +


Sandy spot

Severely eroded spot

Slida or slip (tips point upslope)


Stony tpot. very stony spot 0 w

RECOMMENDED AD HOC SOIL SYMBOLS


n


~I _____ __ ___II___


~_____~~~I


DE


~,~

.. ,



























I-






















j PQ
'2DD-98









z
2o



o "1


I
1




"| I I
-

1110











116












I
'122


PQ
2DD-.134


inn


24




A2,6h


ITI-. A -





swam



Ut IT









0 IX '
VA c
PQ PQ del--
IDD-266 lDD- 19 2,-- r- -= "




1DD 154:1

MANAGEME
~'U~--II It r- IT



10




ITI
'48 0I 1 ~ ~ c~Y K l~
PQUI
58n


61 '202




'2041



252






212




1214


146

i0

144




-142



-J140


To,


N


16 PQ PQ-.~ -m.P
m3D -1,9-r-DD-JO. 2DD- 72'h

64T.-


76 2 i8-t~i

76,
1.22


l2DI
, 77
24





2DD- 28- ~u
""5 6~ 7 2?

!30






521F



50


C,


lDD- 28
10 -? DD






9 2



.1






-20






102




~106






11


RISE15


| RI.E


RISEE


~ ~


1


.R. cI!






INDEX TO AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHS


COLUMBIA COUNTY

FLORIDA

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE
GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA
1 0 1 2 3 4 MILES
APPROX.SCALE
1:190o,os


4- --,--T


:A


Ll


.124






121:



)l 2


I IT


4CL


I


PQ
DD-- 8


'/
'f-
s


77


I


244
216-



242('1'2



i240 .%220








'238. 222



fI E


1.

















































































ii




1

r


























-r r).
itliy;'


I r


K -'


P,


c __ R:L a
T4S J,(

"U4 .. -
Vb : I~


- t;r E-
~C


4i


6A8
F^J^S 5


I. "


-.q


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE
COOPERATING WITH
STATE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION


APPROX. SCALE 4 =1 MILE
USDA-SCS-FORT WORTH TEXAS 1976
11/79


SOIL SURVEY FIELD SHEET
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
ADVANCE COPY SUBJECT TO CHANGE
SURVEY HAS NOT BEEN COMPILED NOA CORRELATED. NAMES
MAY BE CHANGED AND AREAS MAY BE COMBINED.


"'t T .4.


,-
ittI


Ir~r


^:-
^.^ *


1"'
J


jM


.. i. jLiL.


11b t


~i;~r~(


~wsi


~a;









(r'z


I', ,



'a~e
I1sl



I ,,
3* I



"^7%



1 ^ ''c ^
j 1 ^
'-5"Th


4;


CO d..o stCo. j I R.


lob


. .


T jB


., J0


=-.


It:


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE
COOPERATING WITH
STATE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION


APPROX. SCALE 4" = 1 MILE
USDA-SCS-FORT WORTH. TEXAS 1976
-16 111, 11/79


SOIL SURVEY FIELD SHEET
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
ADVANCE COPY SUBJECT TO CHANGE
SURVEY HAS NOT BEEN COMPILED NOR CORRELATED. NAMES
MAY BE CHANGED AND AREAS MAY BE COMBINED.


4~J


3RIE E


51/

I'


2B


I
,^.


-Ui
(9 IIJPs,


. A


~~t

~tl~~


gj'~k`"


I




























p


~J


X-o


z


v
T t.


A
.


V.


V.-


*
I .:


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE
COOPERATING WITH
STATE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION


APPROX. SCALE 4 = 1 MILE
USDA-SCS-FORT WORTH. TEXAS 1976
U 11/79


SOIL SURVEY FIELD SHEET
COLUMBIA COUNTY, .FLORIDA.
ADVANCE COPY SUBJECT TO CHANGE
SURVEY HAS NOT BEEN COMPILED NOR CORRELATED. NAMES
MAY BE CHANGED AND AREAS MAY BE COMBINED.


ft?


P Y
a :~


P
a


i`4,


~I
~


i ;UVt ", *I
JIMfl+, co l . f- .- A
.il i ^.
44,,,,s uR
a c


2-r
















Skv *'* !i'Mi


RF..
'^ ** .' *****
A 4 *i
-^0-~f
fsnH


9


I q
Nor


So.


,4 b


A.3
4"


'a


-a


K *'&'s I


S ;


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE
COOPERATING WITH
STATE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION


APPROX. SCALE 4 = 1 MILE
SUSDA-SCS FORT WORTH TEXAS 1976
11/79


SOIL SURVEY FIELD SHEET
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
ADVANCE COPY SUBJECT TO CHANGE
SURVEY HAS NOT BEEN COMPILED NOR CORRELATED. NAMES
MAY BE CHANGED AND AREAS MAY BE COMBINED.


'4'


SA'.'


~'h


:g J3i


-7~;
A' *
9,.


L- 1 pytu,


~iatTi~ 68
rrrl
i c.
Y.;


Br l
5


""


Lw~
I.Ir


I


-- -j 2.p *


c~6i/e~


*- L, ,


5
'4
-
3


s6 :1


-1:


Kes r011-


. ,,! ;
, ~~ cPc.I, ,


~ *
Ji~r~















, t I


%TiF~


, ~
I'
1~


U F,'ey* i-


F~~ j


-r-i-
'7 ilpi -
~~
u ~_
''
~-'ti,~C:


A **~3~ i.~


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE
COOPERATING WITH
STATE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION


APPROX. SCALE 4 =1 MILE
USDA-SCS-FORT WORTH. TEXAS 1976
11/79


SOIL SURVEY FIELD SHEET
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
ADVANCE COPY SUBJECT TO CHANGE
SURVEY HAS NOT BEEN COMPILED NOR CORRELATED. NAMES
MAY BE CHANGED AND AREAS MAY BE COMBINED.


4-^..


'r.i 5/


Ls~:


i


Ir'


*In
a -
S'. wl'


~E~Y~fh


~6~f~u
~E( 5
~~~ ~


A


g *-:'. : ^
g .. *" *. *-
Sf s . *si;
S"
*-



26,/%a<
7-! .-
2- .1 M-Mi.


a (~ 'Irg

!Ir ,


J~
~ ci
r:

C;




















Al

'I.I p-9
' IV\


A*



07,


r4S






'P '


VC;~


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE
COOPERATING WITH
STATE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION


APPROX. SCALE 4 = 1 MILE
_.u USDA-SCS-FORT WORTH, TEXAS 1976
11/79


SOIL SURVEY FIELD SHEET
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
ADVANCE COPY SUBJECT TO CHANGE
SURVEY HAS NOT BEEN COMPILED NOR CORRELATED. NAMES
MAY BE CHANGED AND AREAS MAY BE COMBINED,


tc


*' a
PPINGV6 ACRES
1, ip m


>7?


a8


A


I p


4


1)S6


a -,~p


/,.1



t,.


..


~'















IL *

-,Lo:, 4


W? ,Rj

5


R17E


(7~*.


P'.Y
4t^-


A'L~L' ~
4SW.l


bT


1f. P.
' ' '*


I


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE
COOPERATING WITH
STATE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION


APPROX. SCALE 4 =1 MILE
USDA-SCS-FORT WORTH. TEXAS 1976
11/79


SOIL SURVEY FIELD SHEET
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
ADVANCE COPY SUBJECT TO CHANGE
SURVEY HAS NOT BEEN COMPILED NOR CORRELATED. NAMES
MAY BE CHANGED AND AREAS MAY BE COMBINED.


A
U


.,


\:k


I

.. r '+


FS~.lq 17j~'~~r /L


! -71i
i l,- elleD,, ; ". **-i
-.r"_:


~lroa\+















6i


J.
r


Ar


. I


Fw38


nB1


Ifr*


12)


msI'
I -Ji>


4>-


~i i Z
1jr d
a j~.


S~LwiE


---U.,


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE
COOPERATING WITH
STATE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION


APPROX. SCALE 4 1 MILE
SUSDA-SCS-FORT WORTH. TEXAS 1976
S11/79


SOIL SURVEY FIELD SHEET
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
ADVANCE COPY SUBJECT TO CHANGE
SURVEY HAS NOT BEEN COMPILED NOR CORRELATED. NAMES
MAY BE CHANGED AND AREAS MAY BE COMBINED.


-4 -



Ilk rw

I~


1,'''l
iVs


Z: ;i..jt-


nr ~III~ rrwr*~
yI


" i















'p.3


. -.-
-* m ",


l.' T.. ; .
'a.
rii


2r

.r7j'r '4 d' I

I- -



*'^~& '.- ^ L i^
-f ld c
W-lC~r ~ s


' -.- 1'


V


I I,


-^


j'I


3 I
m..g,4J7


- 4-41

i r

a -


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE
COOPERATING WITH
STATE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION


APPROX. SCALE 4 = 1 MILE
USDA-SCS-FORT WORTH. TEXAS 1976
U ~ 11/79


SOIL SURVEY FIELD SHEET
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
ADVANCE COPY SUBJECT TO CHANGE
SURVEY HAS NOT BEEN COMPILED NOR CORRELATED. NAMES
MAY BE CHANGED AND AREAS MAY BE COMBINED.


:;i
?~ r5


"~-.., ',
Y :'
i~ht~i~Fs;ii~,~"~r"~..
~74'f;~u;SL~ .


. 1 0 4






















6 IuAJ


'4L). j.
.1'7i~


~LJs:n~~yi


,. *'


* 4.11i


N9


,*9: 1


V

-,'~u It


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE
COOPERATING WITH
STATE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION


APPROX. SCALE 4 = 1 MILE
USDA-SCS.FORT WORTH. TEXAS 1976
11/79


0 I -kv el









SOIL SURVEY FIELD SHEET
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
ADVANCE COPY SUBJECT TO CHANGE
SURVEY HAS NOT BEEN COMPILED NOR CORRELATED. NAMES
MAY BE CHANGED AND AREAS MAY BE COMBINED.


NC'


OF-

,I
AUl


C~ II
,~V.


'a'


1.,

















al
''
I
~-. C.
r

II
~-


\Zh 43
ij~16,Jr?


a: "0i:,'
.w' r""A *. T






lLall


''A


2"- 2'.1-
cak* ;


-1. ,


33 -,-
*:.%


*''


r 'r.


r, \ -r:,



.r
58''
r
i'p. r-
.)-
: r.~
I
'*''~
~c:
R~~ v'


i'7


' 33


Jj.:


~K1


' r~ri"


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE
COOPERATING WITH
STATE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION


APPROX. SCALE 4 = 1 MILE

USDA-SCS-FORT WORTH. TEXAS 1976
11/79


SOIL SURVEY FIELD SHEET
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
ADVANCE COPY SUBJECT TO CHANGE
SURVEY HAS NOT BEEN COMPILED NOR CORRELATED. NAMES
MAY BE CHANGED AND AREAS MAY BE COMBINED.


,,VIp~~F F

BIa


.- 5 A



r^ ^~

>^3|


1 i f.V' -*
A".7.. t.^ii/.- i
.^*'




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