Group Title: Ex. doc. 35th Congress, 1st session, House of Representatives
Title: Nicaragua--seizure of General Walker
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 Material Information
Title: Nicaragua--seizure of General Walker message of the president of the United States, relative to the seizure of General William Walker and his followers in Nicaragua
Series Title: Ex. doc. 35th Congress, 1st session, House of Representatives
Physical Description: 82 p. : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- President (1857-1861 : Buchanan)
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Washington D.C
Publication Date: 1858
 Subjects
Subject: Politics and government -- Nicaragua -- 1838-1909   ( lcsh )
Foreign relations -- Nicaragua -- United States   ( lcsh )
Foreign relations -- United States -- Nicaragua   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Nicaragua
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General Note: Title from caption.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00085441
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 65092172

Full Text


35TH CONGRESS, HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. Ex. Doc.
1st Session. No. 24.






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.



MESSAGE
FROM THE

PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES,
RELATIVE TO

The seizure of General William Walker and his followers in Nicaragua.

JANSAIY 12, 1858.-Resolved, That the President's message and accompanying documents
be printed and referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs, except so much thereof as
relates to the conduct of Commodore Paulding, or other officers of the navy, having
reference to the Navy Department, and concerning the construction and obedience of
the orders of the said department by the said officers; which is referred to the Com-
mittee on Naval Affairs.

To the House of Representaives :
I herewith transmit to the House of Representatives the reports of
the Secretaries of State, of the Treasury, of the Navy, and of the
Attorney General, with the accompanying documents, containing the
information called for by the resolution of the House of the 4th in-
stant concerning "the late seizure of General William Walker and
his followers in Nicaragua," &c., &c.
JAMES BUCHANAN.
WASHINGTON, January 11, 1858.


DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, January 7, 1858.
The Secretary of State, to whom was referred the resolution of the
House of Representatives of the 4th instant, requesting the President
to communicate to that House, if not incompatible with the public
interest, all the information in his possession in relation to the late
seizure of General William Walker and his followers in Nicaragua,
together with such instructions as may have been given to our naval
officers and other officials pertaining to the subject;" and "the facts
and information which rendered it probable that William Walker was
engaged, during the past summer and fall, in preparing, within the
limits of the United States, in violation of the act of Congress of the





NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


20th of April, 1818, the means for a military enterprise against the
people and territory of Nicaragua ; also, copies of all instructions,
orders, and letters addressed by and to the various officers of the gov-
ernment in relation thereto, together with such other measures as
may have been adopted by the government to arrest such unlawful
enterprise, and to execute in good faith the provisions of the neutral-
ity laws, embracing the instructions, if any, under the authority of
which Captain Paulding demanded and enforced within the territorial
limits of Nicaragua the surrender of Walker and his command, to-
gether with any letters, orders, and instructions since the surrender
of Walker, showing how far and to what extent the use of our naval
force for this purpose by Captain Paulding has been approved or dis-
avowed by the government of the United States; and, further, to
communicate to this House whether, prior to said arrest, the govern-
ment of the United States had undertaken by treaty or other arrange-
ment with the existing government of Nicaragua to protect said
government in. the peaceable enjoyment of the transit route through
Nicaragua, between the Carribean sea andt he Pacific ocean, or otherwise
to assume the protectorate over said route by the arms of the United
States, if necessary ;" has the honor to lay before the President the
papers specified in the subjoined list, which Are all those on record or
on file in this department called for by the resolution ; and to report
that no treaty between the United States and the republic of Nicar-
agua has yet been ratified by the parties, and that there is no in-
formation on that subject in possession of this department which it
would be consistent with the public interest at this time to commu-
nicate.
Respectfully submitted.
LEWIS CASS.
To the PRESIDENT.




List of papers accompanying the report of the Secretary of State to the.
President of January 7, 1858.

"'No. 1. Messrs. Yrisarri and Molina to Mr. Cass, September 14,
1857.
No. 2. Circular to attorneys, marshals, and collectors, September
18, 1857.
No. 3. Mr. Sanford to Mr. Cass, September 28, 1857.
No. 4. Mr. William Walker to Mr. Cass, September 29, 1857.
No. 5. Mr. Kennedy to Mr. Cass, September 30, 1857.
No. 6. Mr. Hatch to Mr. Cass, October 1, 1857.
No. 7. Mr. Yrisarri to Mr. Cass, October 8, 1857. (Translation.)
No. 8. Mr. Cass to Mr. Clack, October 8, 1857.
No. 9. Mr. Toucey to Mr. Cass, October 13, 1857.
No. 10. Mr. Childress to Mr. Cass, October 30, 1857.






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


No. 11. Mr. Yrisarri to Mr. Cass, November 10, 1857, with enclo-
sure. (Translation.)
No. 12. Mr. Conner to Mr. Cass, November 10, 1857.
No. 13. Mr. Hatch to Mr. Cass, November 11, 1857. (By tele-
graph.)
No. 14. Mr. Clack to Mr. Cass, November 12, 1857. (By tele-
graph.)
No. 15. Mr. Cass to Mr. Hatch, November 12, 1857. (By tele-
graph.)
No. 16. Mr. Henningsen to Mr. Cass, November 12, 1857.
No. 17. Mr. Hatch to Mr. Cass, November 13, 1857. (By tele-
graph.)
No. 18. Mr. Cass to Mr. Kennedy, November 13, 1857. (By tele-
graph.)
No. 19. Mr. Cass to Mr. Clack, November 13, 1857. (By tele-
graph.)
No. 20. Mr. Cass to Mr. Hatch, November 14, 1857. (By tele-
graph.)
No. 21. Mr. Conner to Mr. Cass, November 16, 1857. (By tele-
graph.)
No. 22. Mr. Requier to Mr. Cass, November 16, 1857.
No. 23. Mr. Cass to Mr. Conner, November 16, 1857.
No. 24. Mr. Hatch to Mr. Cass, November 18, 1857.
No. 25. Mr. Cass to Mr. Clack, November 19, 1857.
No. 26. Mr. Clack to Mr. Cass, November 23, 1857.
.No. 27. Mr. Hatch to Mr. Cass, November 28, 1857. (By tele-
graph.)
No. 28. Mr. Cotrell to Mr. Cass, November 30, 1857.
No. 29. Mr. Clack to Mr. Cass, December 1, 1857.
No. 30. Mr. Cass to Mr. Sanford, December 2, 1857. (By tele-
graph.)
No. 31. Mr. Conner to Mr. Cass, December 7, 1857. (Enclosure.)
No. 32. Same to same, December 10, 1857.
No. 33. Mr. Cotrell to Mr. Cass, December 11, 1857.
No. 34. Mr. Cass to Mr. Conner, December 11, 1857.
No. 35. Mr. Yrisarri to Mr. Cass, December 13, 1857.
No. 36. Mr. Stebbins to Mr. Cass, December 14, 1857.
No. 37. Mr. Cass to Mr. Semmes, December 14, 1857. (Telegraph.)
No. 38. Mr. Clack to Mr. Cass, December 16, 1857.
No. 39. Mr. Cass to Mr. Semmes and others, December 16, 1857.
No. 40. Mr. Cass to Mr. Requier, December 18, 1857.
No. 41. Mr. Hatch to Mr. Cass, December 24, 1857.
No. 42. Mr. Yrisarri to Mr. Cass, December 30, 1857.
No. 43. To collectors of customs at New Orleans and Mobile, and
United States attorneys at same places, January 2, 1858. (Telegraph.)
No. 44. Extract from a letter from a gentleman at Panama to the
Secretary of State, July 18, 1857.
No. 45. Extract from a letter dated at La Union, San Salvador, to
the United States consul at Panama, August 29, 1857.





NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


No. 1.] Messrs. Yrisarri and Molina to Mr. Cass.

NEW YORK, September 14, 1857.
The undersigned, minister plenipotentiary of the republics of Gau-
temala and of Salvador, and the charge d'affaires of the republic of
Costa Rica, have the honor of bringing to the knowledge of his ex-
cellency the Secretary of State that there is no doubt as to the fact
that there is now in course of preparation, in the southern section of
the United States, an expedition under the orders of Walker, the
adventurer; which expedition, according to the notices published in
the public journals, will sail about the middle of this month, or the
beginning of the next, bound for Bocas del Toro, where it will take
the armament, which, now ready in the port of New York, is to be
transferred to that point. It is probable that the collecting of the
members of the expedition and of the armament, at that point, have
for their object the entrance of these new invaders into Nicaragua
through the port of San Juan del Norte, since they can have no other
point from which they could effect such entrance.
The undersigned hope that the government of the United States,
though they may not be able to prevent the embarkation of this ex-
pedition, like former ones, so publicly and shamelessly proclaimed,
will direct that a vessel of war of the United States shall prevent the
debarkation of these aggressors in Bocas del Toro, and give formal
orders to the United States vessel that may be stationed at San Juan
del Sur to repel, also, the landing of the expedition along that coast,
and to turn them back to the United States as violators of their laws
and as disturbers of the peace and security of friendly nations.
With the highest consideration, the undersigned have the honor of
subscribing themselves the respectful and obedient servants of the
honorable the Secretary of State of the United States.
A. F. IRISARRI.
LUIS MOLINA.
The SECRETARY OF STATE
Of the United States, &c., &c., &c.


[Circular.

No. 2.] DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, September 18, 1857.
SIR: From information received at this department, there is reason
to believe that lawless persons are now engaged within the limits of
the United States in setting on foot and preparing the means for mili-
tary expeditions to be carried on against the territories of Mexico,
Nicaragua, and Costa Rica, republics with whom the United States
are at peace, in direct violation of the sixth section of the act of Con-
gress approved 20th April, 1818. And under the eighth section of
said act it is made lawful for the President, or such person as he shall
empower, to employ the land and naval forces of the United States,







NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


and the militia thereof, for the purpose of preventing the carrying
on of any such expedition or enterprise from the territories or juris-
diction of the United States." I am, therefore, directed by the Presi-
dent to call your attention to the subject, and to urge you to use all
due diligence, and to avail yourself of all legitimate means at your
command, to enforce these and all other provisions of the said act of
20th April, 1818, against those who may be found to be engaged in
setting on foot or preparing military expeditions against the territo-
ries of Mexico,-Costa Rica, and Nicaragua, so manifestly prejudicial
to the national character, and so injurious to the national interest.
And you are also hereby instructed promptly to communicate to this
department the earliest information you may receive relative to such
expeditions.
I am, sir, &c.,
LEWIS CASS.

The foregoing circular was sent to the following attorneys, marshals,
and collectors:


Attorneys.


Maine.
Massachusetts.
S. D. New York.
E. D. Pennsylvania.
Maryland.
E. D. Virginia.
South Carolina.
Georgia.
S. D. Florida.
S. D. Alabama.
E. D. Louisiana.
E. D. Texas.
S. D. Mississippi.
S. D. Ohio.
N. D. California.
E D. Missouii.
Rhode Island.
Kentucky.
M. D. Tennessee.


No. 3.]


Marshals.


E. D. Texas.
E. & W. D. Louisiana.
S. D. Florida.
Georgia.
South Carolina.
Rhode Island.
W. D. Pennsylvania.
Maryland.
S. D. New York.
Massachusetts.
N. D. Alabama.
Mississippi.
Kr +t -1


Collectors.


New York.
Philadelphia.
Baltimore.
Richmond.
Norfolk.
Charleston.
Savannah.
Pensacola.
Mobile.
New Orleans.
Galveston.


M. D. Tennessee.






Mr. Sanford to Mr. Cass.
COLLECTOR'S OFFICE, MOBILE,
September 28, 1857.


SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your instruc-
tions, under date of September 18, 1857, to intercept any unlawful
expedition departing from this district for foreign countries, and, as
far as may be, to interrupt the incipiency of such expeditions.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,
T. SANFORD, Collector.
Per W. SMITH, Deputy Collector.
Hon. LEWIS CASS,
Secretary of State.






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


No. 4.] Mr. William Walker to Mr. Cass.

SEPTEMBER 29, 1857.
SIR: It is correctly reported that the ministers of Costa Rica and
Guatemala have asked for the active interposition of the United States
for the purpose of preventing me and my companions from returning
to Nicaragua. This request, it is further said, is based on the as-
sumption that I have violated, or intend to violate, the neutrality
laws of the United States.
The want of all official intercourse between the government of the
United States and that of Nicaragua will, I hope, be a sufficient ex-
cuse for my addressing you on the faith of a public report. But the
rumor comes in such a form that I am satisfied the ministers of Costa
Rica and Guatemala have attempted to dishonor the republic of Nica-
ragua in the eyes of the United States; and I am further convinced
of this fact by a decree of President Mora, dated at San Jos5, on the
7th of August last, and ordered to be communicated to the diplomatic
corps generally.
The ministers of Costa Rica and Guatemala attempt to humiliate
Nicaragua by presenting themselves to the United States as her pro-
tectors and guardians. In behalf of the republic of which I claim to
be rightful and lawful chief executive, I protest most earnestly against
this assumption on the part of Costa Rica and Guatemala, and ask
that the government of the United States will not permit itself to be
influenced by such pretensions on the part of these two Central Ameri-
can powers. On the contrary, it is to be hoped that the United
States will, by its conduct, assert and vindicate the independence of
its sister republic, the sovereign State of Nicaragua.
It is my duty further to say, that the people of Nicaragua have not
consented to the military authority at present exercised over them by
the agents of Costa Rica and Guatemala, and that they, therefore,
cannot be held responsible for any interference of these latter States
in the administration of the municipal laws of your government.
Conceiving that the ministers of Costa Rica and Guatemala cannot
justify any suggestions they make to the United States concerning the
execution of its own acts of Congress, I desire to relieve Nicaragua
from any responsibility for such officious and intermeddling- sugges-
tions.
So far as any violation on my part of the acts of Congress is con-
cerned, I deny the charge with scorn and indignation. Having
been received in the United States when forced for a time to leave
Nicaragua, I have in all respects been obedient to its laws. And
permit me to assure you that I shall not so far forget my duty as an
officer of Nicaragua as to violate the laws of the United States while
enjoying the rights of hospitality within its limits.
I have the honor to be your obedient servant,
WM. WALKER.
Hon. Lmvis CASS,
Secretary of State for the U. S. of North America.






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


1Mr. Kennedy to Mr. Cass.

No. 5.] UNITED STATES MARSHAL'S OFFICE,
New Orleans, September 30, 1857.
SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your commu-
nication of the 18th instant in reference to the setting on foot within
the limits of the United States, and preparing the means for military
expeditions to be carried on against the territories of Mexico, Nicara-
gua, and Costa Rica," and will, in all respects, conform to the direc-
tions therein contained.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JOS. M. KENNEDY,
United States Marshal, Eastern District, Louisiana.
Hon. LEWIS CASS,
Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.



No. 6.] Mr. Hatch to Mr. Cass.

CUSTOM-HOUSE, NEW ORLEANS,
Collector's office, October 1, 1857.
SIR : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of
the 18th instant. I will promptly communicate to you the informa-
tion requested, and I shall use all the means at my command to en-
force the law against any persons who may be found to be engaged in
preparing or setting on foot any such expedition as those referred to
in your letter.
I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,
F. H. HATCH,
Collector.
Hon. LEWIS CASS,
Secretary of State, TPashington, D. C.



No. 7.] Mr. Irisarri to Mr. Cass.
[Translation.]
WASHINGTON, October 8, 1857.
SIR: It is the solemn duty of every independent State to maintain
its national dignity as well as to preserve its sovereign rights; but
there are such crises in the affairs of nations that some of the usual
forms of diplomacy, some of those mere points of etiquette, may well
be dispensed with. In such circumstances the necessity of the case
furnishes the proper rule. Such a condition of things now exists in
the affairs of Nicaragua and the relations between that republic and
this.


m_ _ _I __ _I





NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


Nicaragua, unhappily, has been the scene of frequent and sudden
revolutions. Her internal dissensions and strifes have produced her
national weakness and invited the attacks of the corrupt and the
wicked. From such an attack upon her sovereignty and national
rights she has just been freed. But scarcely had the last one of these
miserable fillibusters been expelled from her territory, when we find
the same contemptible leader-who only has ability enough to perpe-
trate crime-ready again to invade our shores and repeat the same
outrages so lately enacted by him. Can the United States govern-
ment prevent this new invasion? It can. But not by means of the
neutrality laws, for these are too weak, as experience has repeatedly
proved, to restrain anybody, much less to restrain the defiant and
mad enterprises of fillibusterism, that scandal of the age. But this
government has the power sufficient to prevent the projected invasion
by the performance of an act of simple justice and comity towards a
weak but friendly and confiding people. It has only to receive the
duly appointed minister of Nicaragua in his official character, enter
into a treaty of friendship and commerce, and to protect the property of
its own citizens, securing to them the transit across the isthmus with-
out interruption, and fillibusterism is destroyed, and a people that
expects to have their offers accepted by the United States would
enjoy peace and security. This simple act, so just, so politic, and so
proper, would restore hope and confidence to my country, content-
ment and happiness to the people, and at the same time secure the
most lasting benefits and advantages to the citizens of the United
States. Will this government continue to refuse to accept this boon?
The great interests which are involved in this question, as well for
the one party as the other, has made me waive the usual forms of
etiquette, and address myself to you, for the last time, with all the
frankness and clearness which the subject demands. If I cannot be
placed in the proper position to carry out the strong desires and
friendly purposes of my government, I shall be compelled to leave
this city on Monday of next week, with feelings of the deepest regret
for having failed to secure the object of my continued exertions.
I am, with the highest consideration, your obedient servant,
ANTONIO I. DE IRISARRI.
Hon. LEWIS CASS,
Secretary of State of the United States, &c., Washington.




No. 8.] Mr. Cass to Mr. Clack.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, October 8, 1857.
SIR: Your letter of the 29th ultimo has been received. In answer
to that part of it which inquires whether it was intended to authorize
you to require the collector or any person in charge of the land or
naval forces of the United States to employ them for the purpose of


_II______L__ _____ ~






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


preventing unlawful expeditions against Nicaragua or Costa Rica,
I have to state that as a circular to the same effect as that ad-
dressed to you was also addressed to certain other officers of the
United States-civil, military, and naval-it was expected that your
mere co-operation with them would be sufficient for the purpose.
The attention of the Secretary of the Navy has been invited to that
part of your letter in which you represent that there is not in your
vicinity a naval force adequate to the object designed.
I am, &c.,
LEWIS CASS.
FRANKLIN H. CLACK, Esq.,
Attorney of the United Statesfor the
Eastern District of Louisiana, New Orleans.



No. 9.] Mr. Toucey to Air. Cass.

NAVY DEPARTMENT, October 13, 1857.
SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your commu-
nication of the 9th instant, with copy of a letter of the 29th ultimo
addressed to the Department of State by the attorney of the United
States for the eastern district of Louisiana, representing the incom-
petency of the naval force of the United States in that quarter for the
purpose of arresting unlawful expeditions against Nicaragua and
Costa Rica," and to which the particular attention of this department
is invited.
In reply, I respectfully state that the United States steamer Fulton,
about to sail from Washington, has been directed to touch at Mobile
and New Orleans, en route for Central America.
The department suggests that the revenue cutters at New Orleans
and Mobile might be advantageously employed.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
ISAAC TOUCEY.
Hon. LEWIS CASS.
Secretary of State.



No. 10.] Mr. Childress to Mr. Cass.

MIDDLE DISTRICT OF TENNESSEE,
United States Attorney's Oice,
Nashville, October 30, 1857.
SIR : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of
the 18th ult., upon the subject of the enforcement of the act of Con-
gress approved April 20, 1818, chapter 88.
Since the reception of your letter, I have caused to appear before the
grand jury, and there rigidly examined upon the subject of the viola-






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


tion of provisions of said act, such persons as were supposed to possess
any information upon the subject, and particularly the generally
acknowledged friends of General Walker here. Although sufficient
information was not elicited to authorize the filing of an indictment
against any person, yet, from the testimony there elicited, there can
be no doubt that there has recently been on foot here a system of en-
listments for General Walker. The enlistments have been, however,
ostensibly as emigrants to Nicaragua. According to the testimony
elicited, the 15th of the present month was the time fixed for the de-
parture of the emigrants; and the persons going were to receive 250
or 300 acres of land in Nicaragua, twenty-eight dollars per month,
and have their passage paid from New Orleans to Nicaragua. It
appears, however, that the rolls have been destroyed, and the object
of the enlistments entirely abandoned.
In case any steps are taken here with the view of fitting out expedi-
tions in violation of said act, and the same be brought to my know-
ledge, I shall at once communicate with you upon the subject.
I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant.
T. B. CHILDRESS,
UniHoted States Attorney.
Hon. LEWIS CASS,
Secretary of State of the United States,
1Washington City D. C.



No. 11.1 Mr. Yrisarri to Mr. Cass.
[Translation.]
WASHINGTON, November 10, 1857.
The undersigned, minister plenipotentiary of the republics of
Guatemala and of Salvador, has the honor of imparting to the Hon.
Secretary of State of the United States that he has seen, in the public
papers printed in these States, a letter addressed to his excellency,
and said to be written by the Sonora and Nicaragua adventurer,
William Walker, who has unduly arrogated the name of president of
Nicaragua, by which he has never been recognized in the States of
Central America, in any of the Spanish American republics, in this
government of the United States, or in any other government of the
world, and who never could have been president of that republic,
because the Nicaraguan constitution excludes any one not a native of
Central America from the exercise of the executive power of that
State.
Under the assumption that the letter alluded to has actually been
addressed by said Walker to the honorable Secretary of State of the
United States, it is the duty of the undersigned to contradict the
assertions by which the writer has endeavored to mislead this govern-
ment and to continue deceiving the people of the United States.
Truly astonishing is the impudence with which this adventurer,
expelled from Nicaragua by her forces and those of all the Central






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


Americans, attempts to constitute himself the champion of Nicaragua.
The man, whose course in that country was an exclusive one of
assassination of the defenders of that country-the burner of whole
villages, the spoiler of national property, the trampler on all rights,
the plunderer of churches, the leader of the foreign stipendiaries
which he gathered under his own banner-alone could have alleged
his right of citizenship in Nicaragua, and thereby held as dunces all
men else on earth.
This same man, without bitter insult on the common sense of man-
kind, could not have contrived a more absurd pretext under which to
carry into effect the expedition, which he has levied to recover a
treacherously usurped authority, than this claim, that his expedition
is not one hostile to the country, but a peaceful colonizing enterprise!
He himself has, time and again, and with characteristic impudence,
published that his projected expedition looks to a recuperation of
power in that country ; whilst in the very letter attributed to him, and
addressed to the honorable Secretary of the United States, he claims
for himself the title of "Lawful Executive Power of Nicaragua."
This is ample to prove that the expedition, composed of spurious
colonists, is, in reality, one of soldiers moving with the design of sup-
porting this dream-begotten legitimate executive power of the country.
But whatever may be the character of this colonizer and of those col-
onists, under a new patent, they cannot set foot on the territory which
they are about to invade, nor be there received, save as real pirates;
because, in Nicaragua and in Costa Rica, as well as in the other re-
publics of Spanish America, Walker is held in no other light than
that of a traitor to the party which he went to serve in Nicaragua, of
an usurper of the sovereignty of that country, of a blood-shedder, whose
object was to destroy the defenders of their country ; whilst his satel-
lites were nothing else than accomplices of his crimes. In proof of
this I transmit to the Secretary of State the decree of the 31st of Au-
gust last, officially communicated to me by the minister of foreign
relations of Nicaragua, by which it will be clearly seen that the expe-
dition which Walker intends to lead into that county, under the ap-
pellation of colonists, will be received as an expedition of pirates ; in
view of which communication through the isthmus has been ordered
to be foreclosed.
Neither in Nicaragua, nor in any republic of Central America, is
any colony desired, formed by Walker, or by any other adventurer,
who, like him, has dreamed of mastery over its lands, to divide them
among his foreign followers. Experience amply teaches there, as well
as here, that the thousands of individuals shipped as colonists for
Nicaragua from New York and New Orleans during the course
of the last two years went there with the exclusive aim of waging
war against the natives of the land, under the command of an intru-
sive usurper. And if, with miserable cunning, they can baffle the
laws of the United States, which forbid the citizens of those States to
disturb the peace of friendly nations, they will certainly not deceive
now, as they never have been able to deceive, the Central Americans;
and they must not complain of the fate that may befall them, however
hard it may appear to them. Natural law imposes on the Central






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


Americans the duty of making an example of the incorrigible violators
of the laws of all the nations.
Walker never was, nor can he ever be, president of Nicaragua, or a
citizen of that republic, from the time that he was declared to be a
traitor to it; nor can any men that may be led by him, or any one
else in his name, fail to be received and treated in any other manner
than that due to bandits and pirates, by whatever name they may be
known, or from whatever quarter they may come. This is a fact
which grows out of authentic documents from the true executive power,
national, and not foreign, of Nicaragua ; and to this should the citi-
zens of the United States rivet their attention, so that they may not
venture to follow the private banner of the adventurer of Sonora and
of Nicaragua.
It is of world-wide notoriety that Walker was not elected president
of Nicaragua, save by a foreign soldiery, which backed him in the usur-
pation of the supreme power which could not be vested; and wonder-
ful, I repeat it, is the impudence of the man who pretends to vindi-
cate, as a right, that which bears no other character than that of the
worst imaginable outrage.
The undersigned, as minister plenipotentiary of*Guatemala anl of
Salvador, and in his appointed capacity by the government of Nicara-
gua to represent her in the United States, cannot but protest against
the contemplated expedition of colonization and peace to Nicaragua
under the leadership of Walker ; declaring that, as it cannot be re-
ceived in that republic save as a hostile expedition, it shall be treated
by the three States, Guatemala, Salvador, and Nicaragua, as one of
real pirates. This the undersigned has deemed it his duty to bring
to the knowledge of the government of the United States.
The undersigned improves this opportunity to tender to the Hon.
Secretary of State renewed assurances of his very high consideration.
A. I. DE IRISARRI.
Hon. L. CASS,
Secretary of State of the United States.




ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENT OF THE SUPREME GOVERNMENT OF
THE REPUBLIC OF NICARAGUA.
GOD UNION LIBERTY !
MANAGUA, August 31, 1857.
No. 100.-The Prefect of the Department of-
The supreme executive power has been pleased to issue the follow-
ing decree:
The supreme government of the republic of Nicaragua to its in-
habitants:
Whereas, the Atlantic and Pacific Maritime Canal Company are
about to commence the reestablishment of the line of transit from





NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER. 13

one sea to the other, from San Juan del Norte to San Juan del Sur,
and vice versa, as it is stipulated in the agreement of the 22d of Sep-
tember, 1849, the supplementary one of the 11th of April, 1850, and
in the last of the 19th of June of the present year, which resolves
the conditions of article 30 of the original contract; and-
Whereas, said establishment is of the highest interest to the United
States of North America, and for the nations of the world in general,
which advantages the government of Nicaragua protects, so long as
the freebooters shall not make attempts against the independence of
this republic, and that of the other States of Central America:

DECREES.
ARTICLE 1. The republic of Nicaragua protests against all and what-
ever attempts which freebooters and pirates, of any denomination or
from any quarter, may make against her independence, or against
that of any other of the States.
ART. 2. From the moment that such freebooters may make their
appearance, and that it shall be known that they are preparing a new
invasion, ,or that in effect they intend such against the republic or
against the other States of Central America, the transit shall be sus-
pended, as all the effects of the agreement entered into with the Mari-
time Canal Company on the 19th of June.
ART. 3. Should such an attempt or invasion take place after the
re-establishment of the transit by said company, and the latter have
complied strictly with the conditions of the contract relative to assist-
ance to Nicaragua in defending her independence, her sovereignty over
the isthmus, and the neutrality of the same ; or should said company,
before the restoration of the transit, lend efficient aid and co-opera-
tion in said defence, it will, in the former case, continue in operation,
and in the latter, the transit shall not be closed, nor will any change
be allowed in the exercise of the rights stipulated for the company in
said contract.
ART. 4. Let this be communicated to the minister plenipotentiary
in Washington, to the president of the company, and to the ministers
on the diplomatic list.
Given at Managua, on the 31st of August, 1857.
TOMAS MARTINEZ,
MAXIMO XEREZ.
And by their supreme order I communicate this to you for your in-
formation, its publication and circulation through the department
under your charge.
CORTES.

No. 12.] Mr. Conner to Mr. Cass.
OFFICE OF UNITED STATES DISTRICT ATTORNEY,
Charleston, November 10, 1857.
SIR : In obedience to circular of the Department of State, of date
September 18, I beg to say, that about a week ago I received infor-
mation that one Mackey, formerly a captain in Walker's army, was





14 NICARAGUA- SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.

engaged in recruiting men in this State to go to Nicaragua. On
quietly investigating the matter I find that Mackey is commissioned
by Walker ; that he has enlisted or procured one hundred men,
chiefly from the upper part of the State, to go to Nicaragua, ostensibly
as emigrants. As far as I can learn no arms or warlike implements
are to be carried out by the party. They will rendezvous here, and
go by steamer to Savannah, there be joined by another party and
proceed thence to the Balize. Such is all that I have been able to
learn. Mackey is here; the remainder of the party will arrive about
the 15th or 20th instant.
I have taken no proceedings as yet, having only been able last
night to procure definite information ; nor even now have I testimony
sufficient to obtain conviction, if arrest were made. Under these cir-
cumstances it seemed to me advisable to wait until the rendezvous is
made, and then arrest all whom I can discover to be connected with
the expedition. To arrest Mackey now would only be to give the
alarm. I will perfect the testimony as rapidly as possible, and in the
meantime take due care that Mackey does not escape.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JAMES CONNER,
United States Attorney, South Carolina.
Hon. LEWIS CASS,
Secretary of State, Washington.



[By Telegraph.]
No. 13.] NEW ORLEANS, November 11, 1857.
SIR: I have caused General Wm. Walker to be arrested under the
provisions of the sixth section of the act of Congress of eighteen hun-
dred and eighteen, (1818.)
F. H. HATCH, Collector.
Hon. LEWIS CASS,
Secretary of State.


[By Telegraph.]

No. 14.] NEW ORLEANS, November 12, 1857.
General Walker left here yesterday, supposed for some island
between here and Mobile, with about three hundred (300) men.
Nothing can be done without a steamer to watch the supposed rendez-
vous between here andMobile, and neighborhood off Berwick's bay;
-hip island and Round island are both spoken of as the rendezvous.
There can be no doubt of early departure of expedition. A steamer
sent without delay would probably prevent departure.
FRANKLIN H. CLACK,
United States Attorney.
Hon. LEWIS CASS.





NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


[By Telegraph.]
No. 15.] DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, November 12, 1857.
I know of no evidence in the department which can be useful in the
examination of Walker. With the proof already in your possession,
you must proceed according to your best discretion. If desirable,
however, I can send the original of Walker's recently published letter
to the Department of State.
LEWIS CASS.
F. H. HATCH,
Collector of CLstoms, New Orleans.



No. 16.] Mr. Henningsen to Mr. Cass.

WASHINGTON, November 12, 1857.
SIR: On the 1st of May last, in Nicaragua, I was charged by Presi-
dent Walker with negotiating, drafting and subsequently carrying
into execution the convention of Rivas. That negotiation was en-
tered into and the capitulation was made solely with a United States
officer, Captain Davis, of the United States ship of war St. Mary's,
under the guaranty of the United States flag that certain terms
would be observed by the besiegers.
One of the most important stipulations referred to the native
Nicaraguans who had faithfully served with us and who were to be
left in the country. All the terms of that capitulation have been in a
greater or a lesser degree violated, but most flagrantly has the clause
referring to those natives.
That agreement substantially provides that they shall be permitted
to reside unmolested wherever they please in Nicaragua. I have
since learned at various times with deep reget that these men have
been forced to carry arms, coerced to labor, and persecuted in various
ways. I am now informed, on unquestionable authority, that one of
them, General Pineda, is now working in chains on the Segovia
road.
General Pineda, the brother of a former president of Nicaragua, is
a brave and chivalrous gentleman, whose long record of public service
is without blemish, whose political and military consistency and
fidelity make him a bright example to the Spanish race on this conti-
nent, and would render him an honor to any country.
General Pineda regarded General Walker as the legitimate presi-
dent of Nicaragua. General Walker, without any possibility of in-
fluencing the ballot, was elected by a larger majority than any presi-
dent ever received before or probably will ever receive again in
Nicaragua, because the only classes who labor or produce had wit-
nessed under his auspices the abolition of forced military service, and
saw in his election for the first time in their generation the prospect





16 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.

of not being coerced by ambitious factionists to fight through inter-
minable revolutions for a cause in which they took no interest. When
the pressure of internal treachery, foreign invasion and extraneous
influence prevented him from protecting them from conscription, they
came to regard this as an illusion, and resigned themselves, as they
had done from time immemorial, to be dragged from their peaceful
avocations and driven to slaughter by leaders whom it was never my
fortune to see or hear of in the front of battle. It is difficult for any
one acquainted with facts not to have regarded, with General Pineda,
or not to continue to regard General Walker as the legitimate presi-
dent of Nicaragua, since no valid election can take place as long as
the Costa Rican foreign force occupies any part of the territory of that
republic. It is worth observing that, besides being still dejure president,
General Walker was de facto president of Nicaragua far beyond the
average term. In the fifteen changes of government that have taken
place in this respect within six years, there is only Chamorro, whose
term of power exceeded by one month, and President Pineda, by fous
months, General Walker's actual exercise of that office.
To that legitimate president's government, when president de jure
and de facto, General Pineda took oath. He adhered to it faithfully
and valiantly, in good and evil fortune, and this, sir, is the crime for
which this man, whose word, through a long career, has been invio-
late, is persecuted by native and foreign leaders, whose antecedents
are one tissue of perjury and deceit.
I had urged him to accompany us to the United States, fearing not
a violation of the capitulation guarantied by the United States flag,
but possible assassination. Captain Davis, however, particularly un-
dertook to provide for his safety, and that he should pass to his home
without molestation; whereupon General Pineda expressed his determi-
nation to remain, and evinced the same confidence in the protection of
the flag of the American Union which he had always shown in the Amer-
icans who had identified themselves with the cause of his country.
Now, sir, so great was the solicitude of President Walker with re-
gard to our Nicaraguan fellow soldiers in Rivas, and so strong was
generally the feeling of their American companions in arms, that I
am only expressing the common sentiment when I emphatically de-
clare, that if ever circumstances could have driven us to capitulate
with the Central American invaders or insurgents, I would have run
all risks of dying sword in hand sooner than have surrendered these
good and true men on any guarantee less strong than the obligation
of our opponents towards a powerful nation.
They naturally looked to the Americans in Rivas efficiently to guar-
antee their safety. President Walker, who entrusted me with the de-
tails of that negotiation, and my companions in arms who knew that
I was therewith intrusted, look to me, andI, sir, have the flag of the
American Union to look to. My duty towards the sufferers, and my
honor as a soldier oblige me, therefore, respectfully to appeal for re-
dress of this great wrong to the chief magistrate of this republic, whom
I believe it is proper that I should address through you.
I feel compelled, in connexion with this matter, to call your attention
to certain facts relating to that capitulation of Rivas which have been






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


much misrepresented. It had been my intention some day to have set
them in their true light, if no one else undertook to do so. But I had
deferred the task till that auspicious settlement of the Nicaraguan
question, when American institutions and civilization will predomi-
nate on the very spot which was the scene of unmerited American dis-
aster; a result I look upon as eventually inevitable, and which your
own recorded opinions assure me, General, that you sympathize with
me in desiring. I am aware that, as you so eloquently state in your
letter of the 21st May, 1856, you are not to be deterred from the ex-
pression of these feelings by sneers or reproaches, or hard words."
It is, however, necessary that I should advert to those facts in this
communication, because they tend to fix even more strongly the re-
sponsibility of redress on the government of the United States than
appears in the face of the capitulation.
An attempt has been made to create the impression that the Nicara-
guan army at Rivas was in an utterly desperate position, from which
it was relieved by the intervention of Captain Davis, whose inter-
ference is pretended to have been only officious, dictated solely by mo-
tives of humanity and undertaken on his own responsibility.
Now, sir, though I do not wish to impugn the motives of Captain
Davis, and though we have never done the cabinet at Washington the
injustice to believe that he acted either upon its instructions or in con-
formity with its intentions, I must remark firstly, that Captain Davis, as
commanding the only United States forces there, represented for us the
United States ; secondly, that in as far as our position was desperate,
it was rendered so by his own act; and thirdly, that after the com-
mission of that act, our situation was not desperate enough for us to
have trusted our wounded, or our native companions in arms to the
mercy of our opponents without a better guarantee than the word they
had so often violated.
We could not have done so, remembering that in the spring of 1856
President Mora had preached a crusade of which the avowed object
was the extermination of all North Americans who took any part in
the affairs of a (to him) foreign country; that in March of that year
he shot all the stragglers and wounded who fell into his hands after
the disaster of Santa Rosa; that in the following April he put to
death peaceable American citizens in Virgin Bay; and that, being
attacked in Rivas, in Nicaragua, which he was invading, by President
Walker, he (President Mora) fled back to Costa Rica with his brother,
General Mora, leaving General Canas to bring back his shattered
forces; that General Canas was obliged to abandon his sick and
wounded Costa Ricans to General Walker's mercy, who had them
tended with the same care as his own. We could not have done so,
remembering that after this, in the following October, peaceful citi-
zens were massacred at Granada, amongst others a minister of the
gospel, the Rev. Mr. Wheeler, and Mr. Lawless, a merchant long
resident in the country, and the neutrality of both of whom was beyond
cavil' or dispute.
We could not have done so even if treating with the only invading
or insurgent leaders whose personal character entitled them to any
confidence or respect-Generals Canas and Zavala-because the one,
H. Ex. Doc. 24-2






18 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.

General Canas, was subordinate to the Moras, his brothers-in-law,
who, according to the common report of the country, jealous of his
popularity at home, kept him abroad to bear the brunt of danger with
the same intent as David when he sent Uriah forth to battle. Because
the other, Zavala, a Guatemalian general, had evidently not influence
enough to restrain his colleagues. At least, after a letter written by
him in October, 1856, proposing to humanize the war, and requesting
the liberation of a favorite bugler, (a request with which President
Walker immediately complied,) Colonel Laine, a Cuban in the Nicar-
aguan army, taken prisoner by Zavala's forces, was shot by order of
the allied and insurgent leaders-an act in which I am loth to believe
that General Zavala either participated or had the power of pre-
venting.
As to the condition of the Nicaraguan army under President Walker,
in Rivas, the attempt to besiege that city began on the 27th of Janu-
ary, 1857, he being at that time cut off from all communication with
the Atlantic States by the unlawful seizure of the transit steamers.
By repeated and vigorous attacks-once at Obraje, four times at San
Jorge, on the 29th of January, 3d and 11th of February, and the 16th
of March, by sweeping the transit road, and by various skirmishes,
the invaders and insurgents were for seven weeks prevented from in-
vesting Rivas. For the remaining six weeks, up to the 1st of May,
Rivas was more or less closely invested by means of four strongly
entrenched camps with connecting lines. During the whole of this
siege, and indeed for nearly five months preceding the 1st of May,
1857, we had received only 135 men reinforcement. The besiegers,
who reached Obraje, according to their own report, with 2,160 men,
had been during this time reinforced by 5,000 men, making the total
force brought against us over 7,000. After the investment two
attempts were made to carry the place by surprise and storm, viz : on
the 23d of March and llth of April. On the 23d the besiegers took
possession of all the houses outside of our works, but by two o'clock
p. m. were driven out of them back to their lines with great loss, leav-
ing in our hands one cannon and thirty prisoners, including a colonel
of artillery.
On the llth of April, 1857, led in by a deserter, they succeeded in
capturing one side of the lower plaza, and attempted to storm on other
sides. In two hours they were again driven back with great slaughter,
leaving in our hands nearly 100 prisoners, all those who got within
our works being killed or compelled to surrender. Their loss on that
occasion has been since ascertained to have exceeded 800.
From that time to the 1st of May they made no further attack and
received no reinforcement of any consequence. They had none what-
ever to expect, except one corps of Salvadorians, whose advent and
fidelity was doubtful and unimportant, and whose leader shortly after
attempted a revolution. Up to the 11th of April the besiegers had
been under the impression that they could capture Rivas if they could
enter it. They were then eager to get in. The result of the llth
destroyed this illusion, and they were equally anxious to keep out.
On the morning of the 1st of May the position of the besieged and
of the besiegers was as follows :





NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


Of the 7,000 men brought by the allied foreign invaders and insur-
gents against Rivas (two-thirds of which force had consisted of foreign
invaders) there remained 600 allies, and from 1,000 to 1,200 Nicara-
guan insurgents. Their entrenched camps had been much strength-
ened, but they could no longer, with this reduced force, man effectively
the connecting lines, which were over two miles in extent, and the
besieged sent scouts and messengers through them, who almost always
returned in safety. The besiegers were, besides, short of powder, and
threatened with cholera and the rainy season, both of which had set
in a fortnight earlier the year preceding.
The besieged, on the other hand, were straitened for provisions and
encumbered with wounded. For a month they had been living on
horse and mule meat, sugar and chocolate. They had been much
weakened by desertion, but desertion had nearly done its worst. Their
force consisted of 260 Americans and 40 natives capable of bearing
arms. They had still left on the 1st of May two or three days' provi-
sions, viz : two oxen, two mules, three horses, and 1,000 pounds of
sugar. They were well supplied with ammunition, half their store
being in Rivas. In the harbor of San Juan del Sur they had the war
schooner Granada, which contained the other half of their ammuni-
tion, besides several hundred stand of small arms.
President Walker had remained thus long in Rivas, apprehending
that Colonel Lockridge might march round by Chontales, and because
there was every reason to believe that shortly after the action of the
11th April the enemy would be obliged to raise the siege. It was his
intention, after ordering the schooner Granada to sail for Realejo or
some point northward, to evacuate Rivas when he came to his last
day's provision. He had no doubt, by a night attack, of being able
to force his way through their now weakened lines ; no thought of the
besiegers attempting to pursue him till after daybreak, nor fear of
being easily able to rout their vanguard with his rear if they did.
There was then nothing to impede his march to Realejo, or other points
where the schooner Granada with the ammunition and spare arms
would have met him. In the adjoining districts, where but for the
necessity of protecting the transit he long since' would have carried
on the war, his native friends were anxiously awaiting either till the
besiegers exhausted their strength on Rivas, or till we appeared
amongst them. It is true that the besieged would have had to de-
stroy the ammunition and heavier pieces at Rivas, and would have
been compelled to leave their wounded behind them, but they would
have carried with them the substantial guarantee of 100 prisoners as
hostages.
If it be doubted whether the besieged were strong enough to break
through the lines of the besiegers, I have only to refer to many ex-
amples in the war, where, with a smaller force, greater obstacles
were overcome. I will cite only three: On the 11th of November,
1856, with 265 men and one gun, President Walker carried the en-
trenched camp and all the barricades on the transit route, held by
General Canas,with 800 Costa Ricans, and at least four times stronger
than the lines of investment at Rivas. On the 17th of the same
month, with 260 men and three guns, he forced his way into Mas-






20 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.

saya, defended by 2,000 men, captured half the city, held it for three
days, and was hourly gaining ground, though ninety of his small
force were killed and wounded. Onthe night of the 11th of Novem-
ber, 160 men, landed by him three miles from Granada, carried suc-
cessively four lines of barricades, and reported to me at daybreak on
the 12th at the Gaudaloupe church.
To the schooner Granada, in the harbor of San Juan, there was no
difficulty in communicating orders. Its immense importance at this
juncture to the besieged is apparent, both as a magazine and as a
means of conveying material of war, which they had no other means
of transporting.
Now, sir, just at this critical juncture, and before the question of
capitulation had been discussed, Captain Davis formally declared to
me, on the night of the 30th of April, that he had embargoed the
schooner by leaving orders with the United States force, which he
commanded, to prevent her from leaving the harbor of San Juan, and
he expressed his unalterable determination to take possession of her
before he left the harbor. It was this act of intervention on the part
of a United States officer which alone caused President Walker to en-
tertain the proposed terms of capitulation. For the act-that is to
say, the order to prevent the Nicaraguan schooner of war from leav-
ing the harbor had already been given before he declared his inten-
tion of seizing her.
The schooner Granada, (whose commander, Fayssoux, had fought
her through as gallant an action as any living officer in any navy in
the world has fought,) had been lying for many weeks next to the St.
Mary's, their officers interchanging courtesies. There could be no
reason or pretext for preventing her leaving the port or taking pos-
session of her on the 1st of May, which had not existed for many
weeks previously. There could be no motive for so doing, except that
the besieged in Rivas had never before been reduced to depend on her
possession, a motive so base that if Captain Davis endeavored thereby
to justify the change in his conduct from professed friendship to active
hostility, which I cannot believe, I am sure that neither the American
people nor its Executive would hold this a justification.
The only explanation of Captain Davis' conduct is in the supposi-
tion that he had already pledged himself to give up the Granada to
the besiegers, and, in fact, we afterwards learned that when he first
announced his action and future determination with regard to the
schooner Granada, and proposed the outline of a capitulation to the
besieged, he had for many days been negotiating it with the enemy,
a fact of which the besieged were utterly ignorant, and which ex-
plained the unaccountable perseverance of the besiegers in continuing
the siege, or their ability to keep their forces together through the
end of April, they naturally concluding that these propositions were
made with our knowledge and concurrence. By embargoing the Gra-
nada he constrained President Walker into the acceptance of terms
which otherwise he would never have thought of. But even after
Captain Davis had thereby rendered our position so precarious, Presi-
dent Walker would sooner have run the last hazard of war than have
trusted his men, his wounded, or his native fellow-citizens to the faith






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER. 21
of the invading or insurgent leaders without some such solid guaran-
tee as either hostages or the flag of some powerful and civilized nation.
Under circumstances more desperate than Captain Davis had rendered
ours in Rivas we persistently refused to do so. On the retreat from
Granada, there were in Granada, or between Granada and the lake,
419 souls. Of these 73 were wounded men, 70 women and children.
Of the 276 men capable of bearing arms, 47 were cut off within ten
minutes of the first attack. Of the remaining 229, 75 were subse-
quently killed or wounded, besides those who died of cholera and ty-
phus, (amounting to 120 of all sexes and ages.) They were exposed
without shelter, night and day, to rain and sunshine for seventeen
days, living on horse and mule meat, short of ammunition, inces-
santly fighting, and surrounded by a force larger than remained to
beleaguer us in Rivas on the first of May-yet surrender or capitula-
tion was never contemplated. At Rivas, the responsibility of the
United States flag was held to be sufficient security for the safety of
those whom we were bound to protect at every sacrifice. Captain
Davis put into execution his threat of seizing the schooner Granada
after we had carried out, on our part, the terms of the capitulation,
in which that vessel was not mentioned.
He caused her to be seized by his first lieutenant, who sprung upon
her the broadside of the St. Mary's, and started a hundred men in
boats to board her. Captain Fayssoux, with his crew, (then of seven-
teen men,) prepared for action, and only surrendered her on the writ-
ten order of President Walker, who ordered him to yield to this
demonstration of overwhelming force.
After taking possession of her, Captain Davis handed over this
Nicaraguan schooner, not to the Nicaraguan insurgents, but to the
Costa Ricans, who had no claim to her, and who could never have
taken her, for the simple reason that they had already lost in the
attempt their only man-of-war, the brig Onse de Abril, which, of the
burden of 225 tons, with four nine-pounders and a crew of 118 men,
was destroyed after a desperate action by the little schooner Granada,
of seventy-five tons, with two sixes and twenty-eight men crew. Her
gallant captain had the mortification of seeing her given up by Cap-
tain Davis to a Costa Rica captain, a Jamaica negro, who had for-
merly been servant to an American officer. After this step, the two
vessels which constituted the Guatemala navy, and to which the
Granada had vainly offered battle, put to sea, and thereby obtained
the opportunity of recently murdering, for the sake of his cargo,
Christopher Lilly, an American neutral, trading on the coast.
Since, therefore, General, the fact and manner of the interference of
a United States officer probably alone prevented the raising of the
siege of Rivas, and reversed the issue of that campaign; since his un-
doubted act at a critical moment, the embargoing of the schooner
Granada, decisively altered our position; and since it was to the
guarantee of a United States officer in command of a United States
force that we entrusted the fate of our native born fellow soldiers, I
am sure that you will not fail to perceive how directly responsibility
attaches in this matter to the government of the United States; and
I venture to indulge the confident hope that I am making now an






22 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.

effectual appeal for redress, through such means as the wisdom of the
President and his cabinet will suggest, and not merely placing upon
record a solemn protest.
I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,
C. F. HENNINGSEN.
Hon. LEWIS CASS, Secretary of State.


[ By Telegraph.]
No. 17.] NEW ORLEANS, November 13, 1857.
SIR: I think it would be well to transmit Walker's letter, though
it is believed that he has left for Nicaragua from some of the islands
on the coast of Mississippi. I have some hope of intercepting him
with the cutter.
F. H. HATCH. Collector.
Hon. LEWIS CASS.

[By Telegraph.]
No. 18.] DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, November 13, 1857.
Carry into effect the instructions which may be given you by the
district attorney in reference to the pursuit of those engaged in un-
lawful military expeditions.
LEWIS CASS.
JOSEPH M. KENNEDY,
U. S. Marshal, New Orleans.

[By Telegraph.]
No. 19.] DEPARTMENT 0OF STATE,
VWashington, November 13, 1857.
Your despatch is received. Take all proper measures under the
law and your instructions to arrest the parties to the expedition. If
necessary, you are authorized to employ a steamer for this purpose,
and to place on board the marshal with a sufficient posse.
LEWIS CASS.
FRANKLIN H. CLACK,
U. S. Attorney, New Orleans.


[ By Telegraph.]
No. 20.] DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, November 14, 1857.
The letter has been sent by mail. Instructions were sent yesterday
to the district attorney, which have doubtless been shown to you. It
is expected that the officers of the United States will act unitedly and
use their best efforts, under the law and their instructions, to arrest
the expedition.
LEWIS CASS.
F. H. HATCH, Collector, New Orleans.






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER. 23

[By Telegraph.]

No. 21.] CHARLESTON, November 16, 1857.
I refer to my letter of the 10th to you. Shall I arrest the party indi-
cated ?
JAMES CONNER,
United States Attorney.
Hon. LEWIS CASS,
Secretary of State.



No. 22.] Mr. Requier to Mr. Cass.
OFFICE OF UNITED STATES ATTORNEY,
Mobile, November 16, 1857.
SIR: Shortly after the receipt at this office of your general instruc-
tions respecting anticipated violations of the neutrality laws, I com-
municated with General Smith, the deputy collector, in relation
thereto, and, at his suggestion, several times with the inspector, who
seemed mainly charged with the business in question.
On Thursday morning, the 12th instant, I received a letter from
the district attorney at New Orleans advising me to have the steam-
ship Fashion closely watched, in the event she should be released from
then seizure in New Orleans, and should come to this port, which he
thought likely, it being strongly suspected that she was engaged in
the Nicaragua expedition, and that Mobile or its vicinity was the con-
templated point of departure.
Relying, as I do, entirely upon the officers of the customs for the
means of such precautionary vigilance, this letter was immediately
placed, during a personal interview, before the collector of the port.
He told me specific instructions would at once be sent to the revenue
cutter.
I heard nothing more of the matter until the next day, (Saturday,)
when Mr. Sanford called upon me at my office, at six minutes of
twelve o'clock, and informed me the Fashion had arrived the evening
before, some miles below the city; that his most efficient inspector
was sent to inspect her that morning at sunrise, who had recently re-
turned and reported that there were 270 passengers on board, ap-
parently lawful emigrants, &c., and that when he left her (several
hours before) she was getting up steam to depart. It was therefore too
late to consider whether the circumstances called for official action
from me.
I am apprised this morning, for the first lime, by Mr. Sanford, of
a suspicion that General Walker is one of the passengers on said vessel.
I am, sir, with great respect, your humble servant,
A. J. REQUIER,
United States Attorney, Southern District of Alabama.
Hon. LEWIS CASS,
Secretary of State, Washington.





NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


No. 23.] Mr. Cass to Mr. Conner.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, November 16, 1857.
Sir: Your letter of the 10th instant has been received. The de-
prtament is gratified with the diligence and discretion which you have
shown in carrying into effect its instructions upon the subject of illegal
expeditions against Nicaragua, and trusts that you will persevere in
your efforts towards detecting offenders.
I am, sir, &c.,
LEWIS CASS.
JAMES CONNER, Esq.,
Attorney of the United States
for the District of South Carolina, Charleston.


No. 24.] Ir. Hatch to Mr Cass.

CUSTOM-HOUSE, NEW ORLEANS,
Collector's Ofice, November 18, 1857.
SIR: Referring to my communication of the 13th instant, reporting
such steps as I had deemed it my duty to take in obedience to your in-
structions under date of 18th September, 1857, to prevent the departure
of military expeditions which it was rumored were in active prepara-
tion, I have the honor to report the following additional facts:
Your telegraphic despatch of the 13th instant, addressed to Franklin
H. Clack, esq., authorizing him to employ a steamer, if necessary,
was sent to my office, in error, on the 14th instant, at 10 a. m., but
was immediately called for by an agent of the telegraphic office. At
2- p. m. on the 14th instant, I received your despatch of that date,
and proceeded forthwith, in person, in search of the United States
district attorney and United States marshal, with whom I was able to
procure a joint meeting at 3 p. m. That was the first moment the
United States district attorney had been apprised of the contents of
your despatch to him of the 13th instant.
I had already despatched several energetic and efficient officers to
the tow-boat companies and the other owners and agents of steamers
at this port, and it was ascertained that no good sea steamer could be
procured before the morning of Monday the 16th instant. On Sun-
day morning the 15th instant, officer Murphy ascertained, from reli-
able authority, that the steamer Fashion had cleared from Mobile on
the 13th instant, with General Walker and his men on board, and pro-
ceeded directly to Nicaragua. This was immediately reported to me,
but the telegraphic wires being down, I was unable to ascertain the
fact with certainty until to-day. But at a meeting with the district
attorney and United States marshal, the result of our deliberations
was the conclusion that the responsibility and expense of employing
a steamer to start on the morning of the 16th instant should not be
incurred until it should be ascertained, by authentic information, tha





NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


the said vessel had not cleared at Mobile on the 13th instant, and that
it would be unnecessary and futile to attempt to follow her two and a
half or three days after her departure, if she had so cleared. To-day
I received, by telegraph, the following answer to my despatch to the
collector at. Mobile.
F. H. HATCH, Collector.
H. G. Humphries purchased the steamer Fashion at New Orleans,
5th November ; changed papers at this office, and took a register in
Humphries' name on the 13th; same day cleared for Greytown, with
cargo of merchandise and two hundred and seventy passengers;
General Walker among them; went to sea forthwith.
T. SANFORD, Collector.
If in the mean time I had continued to regard it as at all probable
that the Fashion, after her departure from New Orleans, had pro-
ceeded to some island or other point of rendezvous, as at one time
supposed, I should certainly have advised the district attorney to em-
ploy and despatch a steamer at the earliest possible moment.
Yesterday at 10 a. m. was the time fixed for the examination of
General Walker, whom I had caused to be arrested as reported in my
letter of the 13th instant, but I am informed by a communication
from the United States district attorney that General Walker failed
to appear, and that the argument for the forfeiture of his bond is
fixed for the 27th instant.
I have only to add, that the officers whom I have detailed on de-
tective service have reported the existence of small bodies of men
scattered through the city, supposed to be destined for Nicaragua;
but I have learned nothing on which to base any official action.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
F. H. HATCH, Collector.
Hon. LEWIS CASS,
Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.


No. 25.1 Mr. Cass to Mr. Clack.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
WVashington, November 19, 1857.
SIR: Your letter of the 11th instant, informing the department of
the arrest of General Walker and the detention of the steamer
"Fashion," has been received.
The course of the collector and yourself in causing these arrests to
be made is approved, but I regret to observe that the expedition, not-
withstanding your efforts, appears to have escaped.
The President will be glad to receive any further information on the
subject which it may be in your power to communicate.
I am, &c.,
LEWIS CASS.
FRANKLIN H. CLACK, Esq.,
U. S. District Attorney, New Orleans.






26 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF "GENERAL WALKER.

No. 26.] Mr. Clack to Mr. Cass.
U. S. ATTORNEY'S OFFICE, EASTERN DISTRICT LOUISIANA,
New Orleans, November 23, 1857.
SIR: Your despatch of the 13th instant was received on the 15th.
I deemed it unnecessary to take any action under it, as the collector
at this port having, at my request, telegraphed to the collector at
Mobile, received intelligence that on the 13th instant the Fashion"
"cleared for Greytown, with a cargo of merchandise and two hundred
and seventy passengers, General Walker among them, and went to
sea on the fourteenth." It was almost impossible, up to this time, to
receive any definite and reliable information, and it was therefore I
had telegraphed you that it was rumored, and I was so led to believe,
that a rendezvous was established or intended between here and Mobile.
The history of the action of the officers of the government here is
simply this : I was requested by the collector at 6 p. m. of the 10th
instant to meet him at his office, the presence of the United States
district judge having been obtained after some delay; on the affidavit
by three of the officers of the customs, from information received, a
warrant was issued by the judge to arrest General William Walker,
under section 6, act of April 20, 1818. The steamship "Fashion,"
then lying at the levee, having been designated as the vessel intended
for the expedition, I instructed the collector to seize, detain, and ex-
amine her, under section 11 of the same act, and detailed a marshal's
force for that purpose. The arrest and seizure were made simulta-
neously about 11 p. m. of the 10th instant. General Walker, at his
request, was taken before the United States judge, and admitted to
bail in the sum of two thousand dollars. He appeared next morning
before the court, and though I requested the court to raise the amount
of bail, the request was denied, and he was discharged on the same
bail to appear on the 19th instant for examination.
That afternoon, as I have been informed, General Walker left this
city by the Mobile mail boat at 4 p. m., with a large number of persons;
and I have also been informed these are the same who left Mobile on
the Fashion."
My instructions to the collector were to make a thorough examina-
tion of the Fashion," to ascertain whether anything could be
found on board that would justify her detention, under the eleventh
section of the act referred to, and report to me. I have been since
informed by him, verbally, that, after a very strict and thorough ex-
amination, on the 11th, nothing suspicious could be detected, and he
had released her, and that she had left the same night for Mobile.
I am not aware of any further facts that I can communicate that
would throw any light on the occurrences referred to. I have delayed
writing, trusting I might be able to communicate some more definite
information relative to this expedition, but I must say that, notwith-
standing the most strenuous exertions, very little information beyond
public rumor can be obtained.
General Walker, of course, did not appear on the 19th instant to an-
swer his bond, and I moved for a forfeiture ; the security appeared,
and the counsel for General Walker, Mr. Sould, claimed the right to






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


have the examination proceed, even in the absence of General Walker,
stating that he, as his counsel, had the right to represent him. I, of
course, resisted, and claimed the forfeiture; the court assigned the
27th instant for the argument on the forfeiture.
I desire to be informed whether it be the desireof the government that
I should present an indictment to the grand jury, which is now in
session, against General Walker, under the sixth section of the act
of 1818. I shall take no further steps in the matter until I hear from
you.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
FRANKLIN H. CLACK, United States Attorney.
Hon. LEWIS CAss, Secretary of State, Washington city.


[By telegraph.]

No. 27.] NEW ORLEANS, November 28, 1857.
SIR: I have just been informed by the United States marshal, that
he has information upon which he relies, that the steamer Fashion is
expected to arrive at the port of Mobile or at Mobile Point within a
few days, for the purpose of taking on additional men and proceeding to
Nicaragua, touching at the mouth of the Atchafalaya, and receiving a
detachment at that point.
F. H. HATCH, Collector.
Hon. LEWIS CAS,, Secretary of State.


2r. Cotrell to Mr. Caoss.
No. 28.] COMMERCIAL AGI-;ECY U. S. or AMERICA.
San Juan del Norte, November 30. 1857.
SIR: I have to intoirm you that General William Walker, with
about two hundred men, arrived off this harbor on the 24th instant,
and, after landing forty men at the mouth of the river Colorado, some
twenty miles from this port, returned and entered the bay, anchoring
near the company's buildings at Punta Arenas.
Walker and his men are occupying some huts belonging to Indians,
and two or three other buildings, the property of white men. The
Nicaragua flag is kept flying at the "Punta," and Walker announces
himself as president of Nicaragua. Three other vessels (Walker came
in the steamer Fashion, from Mobile) are daily expected with men for
Walker. The steamer Fashion showed her register. clearance, &c.,
all in proper order, from the custom-house at Mobile.
From the interior there is no late news; the mail from Costa Rica
has not yet arrived, though two days over due.
The United States ship Saratoga is at anchor in our harbor.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
B. SQUIRE COTRELL,
United States Commercial Agent.
Hon. LEWIS CASS,
Secretary of Slate, WUaslingtton, D. C.





28 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


No. 29.] Mr. Clack to Mr. Cass.

UNITED STATES ATTORNEY'S OFFICE,
EASTERN DISTRICT, LOUISIANA,
New Orleans, December 1, 1857.
SIR: Your letter of the 19th instant, acknowledging mine of the
11th instant, was duly received.
In answer to your suggestion that the President will be glad to
receive any further information on the subject (of General Walker's
military expedition) which it may be in my power to communicate,"
I would reply that I have no further information than what is con-
tained in my letter of the 23d instant. Should any thing further
transpire I will instantly communicate it to you.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
FRANKLIN H. CLACK,
United States Attorney.
Hon. LEWIS CASS,
Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.


[By telegraph.]
No. 30.] DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, December 2, 1857.
The steamer Fashion may soon again be at Mobile or Mobile Point.
It is expected that, on her arrival, you will take measures towards
having her prosecuted for any past misdemeanor, and towards pre-
venting her from committing any other in violation of the laws.
LEWIS CASS.
To THE COLLECTOR OF THE CUSTOMS, _Mobile.


No. 31.] Mr. Conner to IMr. Cass.

OFFICE OF UNITED STATES DISTRICT ATTORNEY,
Charleston, December 7, 1857.
SIR : Referring to my letter of the 10th ultimo, I have the honor
now to inform you of what has subsequently been done.
I laid information before Commissioner Gilchrist, and Captain
Mackey was arrested on the 25th ultimo. I was then in attendance
on the United States court at Columbia, and the examination was
postponed until my return. On the 3d instant the examination was
had, and I enclose you a copy of the testimony of the material wit-
ness, who is a young man of high character and intelligence. Upon
that evidence Mackey was committed to stand trial at the January
term of the district court. He has sued out a habeas corpus, and will
be heard before Judge Magrath on Wednesday next.
I expect, through the facts developed on the examination, to pro-
cure other and more material witnesses prior to the trial.






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


The chief difficulty in the prosecution is to show that the expedi-
tion was of a military character. There is no difficulty in proving
that it was an expedition in aid of, and in co-operation with Walker
and if I can obtain competent evidence showing the character of
Walker's expedition, it will establish the intent of this expedition. I,
therefore, respectfully request to be furnished with such evidence, or
the means of obtaining it, if in the power of the department to do so.
The evidence may probably be had from New Orleans.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JAMES CONNER,
United States Attorney, South Carolina.
Hon. LEWIS CASS,
Secretary of State, Washington.





THE UNITED STATES
vs. Violation of the neutrality laws.
CAPTAIN T. J. MACKEY.
Douglas B. DeSaussure sworn, says: About a month ago Captain
Mackey was in Columbia, when there was a rumor that he was organ-
izing an expedition, either of a civil or military character, to co-operate
with General Walker against Nicaragua. I had one or two conversa-
tions with him on the subject, and partially engaged to go with him.
A circumstance, however, changed my intention, and I notified Cap-
tain Mackey in Charleston that I had abandoned my design of going
with him. Captain Mackey spoke to me as one commissioned by
General Walker; he did not show his commission. The expedition
was of a military character. Captain Mackey told me that there was
a rendezvous appointed. He told me that he had about one hundred
men who had embarked with him in the expedition. He used this
language : That there were about one hundred men who were under
his control or command." He said that he was in command. They
were to go as a body together ; but I do not know if it was his inten-
tion to organize the company in the United States. Indeed I know
that it was not. There were sub-officers; Mr. Bellinger was one lieu-
tenant and I was another. I cannot undertake to say whether the
payment was to be in advance or not. I think that it was in the
hands of Captain Mackey. If the expenses were paid by each indi-
vidual they were to be refunded to him by the heads of the expedition.
The enlistment was not for any specified time; I was to go for the
whole war ; that is, until we had accomplished the object of the expe-
dition. The ultimate object of the expedition, as I understood it, was
the taking possession of Nicaragua. I have a paper in writing from
Captain Mackey offering me the first lieutenancy in a company of
which he was to be the captain. The paper is now in my possession,
.nd will be produced when required.






30 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.

Cross-examination.

It was about a month ago that Captain Mackey was in Columbia.
I called on him in consequence of the rumor in Columbia. He did not
require me to be armed or to have any equipment as part of the con-
dition. He did not propose to me that I should take any part in
organizing the company ; he appeared to have the company all formed;
that is, that the officers were distributed, the men numbered, and that
we were to meet at a certain place before embarking. The idea left
on my mind was that it was to be a military expedition, covered os-
tensibly with the appearance of a pacific character. We were to meet
either at Savannah or this place; indeed I know that Savannah was
to be the point of embarkation. We had three or four conversations.
I saw no commission. He said that he was appointed by General
Walker. I recognized him as the agent of General Walker. The
paper he gave me was to the effect as follows: By virtue of the
authority invested in me by General Walker I now offer you the post of
second officer in the corps under my command." My impression is that
this was signed simply as T. J. Mackey." If I had considered that
there was anything wrong I do not know that I would have embarked
in the expedition. Whether it was or was not against the neutrality
laws of the United States, under existing circumstances, I had made
up my mind to go. But, however, I declined the position assigned
me. I understood that I, as an officer of this company, would have,
in the line of my duty, when ordered and when necessary, performed
military service. It was at the suggestion of Captain Mackey, after I
had one interview with him, that I wrote the letter soliciting the ap-
pointment. In justice to Captain Mackey, I would state that the
paper he gave me spoke of the expedition as a body of emigrants."
The intention was to go to Nicaragua, and to fight only if it became
necessary. I had reason to believe, from my conversation with Cap-
tain Mackey, that it was a fine country, and presented a fine field for
Anglo-American enterprise. He mentioned that Walker was at that
time the defacto president of Nicaragua, and had not been expelled
by the inhabitants of that country; that they were in favor of
.Walker, and were inclined to acquiesce in Walker's rule. I do not
remember any conversation in relation to Castillon. He mentioned
also that the transit route was over Nicaragua, and that, therefore,
it was a place of vast importance to the commerce of this country.
He said that there was a necessity for a stronger power than that
in the neighborhood of that country to keep the route open and
protect commerce. I believe that he mentioned that the Costa Ricans
had expelled Walker, and the object of this enterprise was to reinstate
Walker in that position, to which he had a right; that he had been
elected president by a large majority ; that a deputation of influential
citizens had waited on Walker in California, and had invited him to
assume the government of that country. I have seen in the Nicar-
aguan papers invitations to emigrants to come over and settle in that
country. Whether there was a government in Nicaragua or not,
Walker was going there to regain his lost position. Captain Mackey
did not regard Nicaragua as being under any government at all. In.





NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


speaking of this expedition, Captain Mackey used the expression,
"body of emigrants." They were not to be armed in the United
States. We were to be armed, in order to be prepared for any emer-
gency, before we went to Nicaragua-at the place of rendezvous, per-
haps. I am in ignorance whether there were any arms in the United
States for the use of the expedition or not.
In reply by district attorney:
The privates were to receive two hundred and fifty acres of land,
and the officers in proportion. I was to receive besides this the post
of lieutenant, and the chance to rise in my profession or in the army.
The privates were, in addition, to receive $30 a month, and the officers
in proportion. The expression, body of emigrants," occurred in the
letter of appointment. I received one other letter from him.
By defendant's attorney:
I do not know whether Captain Mackey said privates" or not.
The impression left on my mind was, those who were not officers.
The officers had never met the men. I had never seen one of them.
I had received the offer of the appointment of the second post in the
company, which I did not accept, and therefore I was not an officer.
I came here by the process of the court, and it is at great personal in-
convenience to myself and reluctance also.
D. B. DE SAUSSURE.
Sworn to before me, this 3d of December, 1857.
R. C. GILCHRIST,
United States Commissioner.
I, Robert C. Gilchrist, United States commissioner for the district
of South Carolina, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true copy
of the deposition of Douglas B. De Saussure, taken before me in the
preliminary investigation for the commitment of Thomas J. Mackey
for violating the neutrality laws of the United States of America.
Given under my hand, at my office in the city of Charleston, district
aforesaid, this fourth day of December, A. D. eighteen hundred and
fifty-seven.
R. C. GILCHRIST,
United States Commissioner.

No. 32.] 3'. Conner to M1r. Cass.
OFFICE OF UNITED STATES DISTRICT ATTORNEY,
Charleston, December 10, 1857.
SIR: I regret to say that Mackey has escaped. The examination
before the commissioner was commenced on the 3d instant and closed
on the 7th, when I moved the commitment of Mackey and argued the
motion, which was granted on the testimony I had adduced to support
the charge. Subsequently, as I learn, the commissioner consented to
take bail in $3,000 for Mackey's appearance before the court, in Jan-
uary, and permitted Mackey to leave his office to procure the sureties
to the bond. Mackey availed himself of the opportunity and escaped.
On learning of his escape, I immediately telegraphed to the United
States marshal at Savannah and Mobile to arrest him, but as yet have






32 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.

heard nothing. I have also notified the sureties to Mackey's exami-
nation bond that I will institute legal proceedings against them on
that clause of the bond which stipulates that Mackey "shall not de-
part the district without license." It was probably on the faith of
that clause in the bond that the commissioner permitted Mackey to
leave his office to procure bail.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JAMES CONNER,
U. S. Attorney, South Carolina.
Hon. LEWIS CASS,
Secretary of State, Washington.

No. 33.

lMr. Cotrell to Mr. Cass.
COMMERCIAL AGENCY UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
San Juan del Norte, December 11, 1857.
SIR: I have the honor to inform you that on the 6th instant Com-
modore Paulding arrived at this port in the United States flag ship
Wabash, and that the United States steamer Fulton reached.here on
the day following. On the 8th instant, all things being ready, Com-
modore Paulding took General William Walker and all his followers
at Punta Arenas, except about fifty men, who had penetrated into the
interior as far as Castillo Rapids, which point being occupied by some
eighty Costa Rican soldiers, under the command of Colonel Alvarado,
most of whom were sick or unfit for duty, fell into their hands. No
resistance was offered by the Costa Ricans, notwithstanding which, as
I learn from an American physician holding a passport signed by the
late Hon. Wi. L. Marcy, and who was employed by the Costa Rican
government as surgeon, the hospital was fired into, and two men, who
were too feeble to effect their escape, were killed. The party to whom
Castillo surrendered was commanded by Colonel Frank Anderson and
a man called Commodore De Brissot, who, since the surrender of
Walker at Rivas, has been staying in this town, much to the disgust
of the inhabitants generally. The arms, ammunition, provisions, &c.,
taken with Walker, as well as a steamer called the '"Charles Morgan,"
captured at Castillo, and brought down the river by De Brissot, have
all been disposed according to the orders of Commodore Paulding.
The steamer was formerly the property of the 'I Nicaragua Transit
Company," and has been placed in my charge until it shall be deter-
mined to whom she rightfully belongs. The United States ship
Saratoga, I am informed, is to take Walker and his men to the
United States, and is now getting ready for sea.
The United States ships Wabash, Saratoga, and Fulton, and her
Britannic Majesty's frigate Brunswick, are now at this port.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
B. SQUIRE COTRELL,
United States Commercial Agent.
Hon. LEWIS OASS,
Secretary of State, TWashington.






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER. 33

No. 34.
Mr. Cass to M1ir. Conner.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, December 11, 1857.
SIR: Your letter of the 7th instant has been received, and your
proceedings, to which it refers, are approved. This department has
no legal proof of the military character of the expedition to Nicara-
gua under General Walker. It is possible, however, that, by cor-
responding with the United States attorneys and collectors of the
customs at New Orleans and Mobile, you may obtain sufficient evi-
dence for the conviction of Captain Mackey.
I am, sir, &c.,
LEWIS CASS.
JAMES CONNER, Esq.,
Attorney of U. S~. for District of South Carolina, Charleston.


No. 35.
Mr. Yrisarri to Mr. Cass.
[Translation.]
LEGATION OF NICARAGUA,
Brooklyn, December 13, 1857.
EXCELLENT SIR: After giving notice to your excellency, by the
telegraph, of the landing of Walker's hostile expedition on Punta
Arenas, without the prevention of such landing by the armed vessels
of the United States, or even the overhauling of the Fashion, laden
with men and arms, I have deemed it proper to call your excellency's
attention to the fact, already long announced, that another expedi-
tion is now ready at Mobile, and about to sail thence to reinforce that
which has succeeded in landing on the territory of Nicaragua; and
that the person called General Henningsen has lately gone from New
York to New Orleans to accompany this reinforcement.
I trust that the government of the United States will take all such
measures as may be necessary, to the end that this reinforcing expe-
dition, as also all others which it may be intended to set forward,
whether from California, or from any other point of the Union, may
be detained and not be allowed to continue baffling the measures of
the Executive power. I further trust that proceedings will be in-
stituted against the violators of the laws of neutrality with that
rigor which is required for the maintenance of peace and of fair un-
derstanding between friendly and neutral nations.
With very high consideration, I reiterate the assurance to your
excellency of my being your very respectful and obedient servant,
A. J. DE YRISARRI.
Hon. SECRETARY OF STATE
Of the United States, &'c., &c., &c.
H. Ex. Doc. 24-3






34 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.

No. 36.

Mr. Stebbins to r,. Cass.

NEW YORK, December 14, 1857.
DEAR SIR: The American Atlantic and Pacific Ship Canal Com-
pany, of which I am the president, have heard with great concern
that William Walker has landed with his band of fillibusters" at
Punta Arenas, in Nicaragua.
We were about sending three steamers from New Orleans for the
lake of Nicaragua and the river San Juan ; and, unless we send a tele-
graphic despatch to our agent countermanding our order, these boats
will be on their way to San Juan within a few days.
Will you be kind enough to inform us whether they will be pro-
tected from General Walker in the harbor of San Juan, if we permit
them to go? Without them we cannot properly open the transit
across the isthmus, and we have advertised one of our steamers to
leave San Francisco on the 20th of January next. Another will leave
New York on the same day for San Juan.
Unless we are interrupted by fillibusters, the entire line between
this city and California, via Nicaragua, will be established in about
thirty days. Such interruption we believe we have reason to fear,
from the lawless character of Walker, unless our government inter-
feres efficiently for our protection.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
H. G. STEBBINS,
President A. A. and P. C. Company.
Hon. LEWIS CASS,
Secretary of State, &c.



No. 37.
[By Telegraph.]
DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Vashington, December 14, 1657.
Be vigilant in your endeavors to prevent illegal expeditions against
Central America, and in prosecuting offenders. Look out for the
steamer Fashion, and proceed against her if there should be proof to
warrant it.
LEWIS CASS.
THOMAS J. SEMMES,
U. S. Attorney, New Orleans.
[Same to the collector of customs at New Orleans and Mobile, and
United States attorney, Mobile.]






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


No. 38.
Mr. Clack to 1Mr. Cass.
UNITED STATES ATTORNEY'S OFFICE,
Eastern District of Louisiana,
New Orleans, December 16, 1857.
SIR: In my letter of the 23d ultimo I informed you that the argu-
ment on the question of the forfeiture of the bond given by General
Walker was fixed for the 27th ultimo. On that day the court was oc-
cupied with the trial of a criminal case; it was continued until the
4th instant, on which day the court continued it until the 11th instant,
and it was finally argued and submitted to the court on the 14th in-
stant, and was taken under consideration. As soon as a decision is
had I will inform you. In the meantime I await an answer to the
query contained in my letter of the 23d ultimo, which, I presume, has
been received (though I have no acknowledgment of it,) as to whether
I shall present an indictment against General Walker.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
FRANKLIN H. CLACK,
United States Attorney.
Hon. LEWIS CASS,
Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.

No. 39.
DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, December 16, 1857.
SIR: On the 14th instant I addressed a telegraphic despatch to you,
directing you to be vigilant in your endeavors to prevent illegal expe-
ditions against Central America, in prosecuting offenders, and also
ordering proceedings against the steamer Fashion if she should re-
turn to your district, and the proof within your reach should warrant
this course. This despatch was occasioned by intelligence of the ar-
rival of the Fashion at San Juan del Norte, and of the landing of
persons from her at Punta Arenas for hostile purposes. The Presi-
dent's views in regard to illegal military expeditions against countries
with which the United States are at peace are fully set forth in the
circular of this department of the 18th September and in his message
to Congress at the opening of the present session.
He expects that all officers of the United States, civil, military and
naval, will cordially and zealously co-operate towards carrying out
the policy thus indicated, with a view to a due execution of the law,
and to avoid occasion for any reproach of delinquency in this respect
against this government.
I am, sir, &c., LEWIS CASS.
THOMAS J. SEJMMES, Esq.,
Attorney of the U. S. for the Eastern District of Louisiana.
[The same to Thaddeus Sanford, collector of customs, Mobile;
Francis H. Hatch, collector of customs, New Orleans ; and A. J.
Requier, United States attorney for the southern district of Ala-
bama, Mobile.]






36 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.

No. 40.

Mr. Cass to Mr. Requier.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, December 18, 1857.
SIR: Referring to my previous communications upon the subject of
hostile expeditions against Central America, I herewith transmit a
copy of a document forwarded to the department by the late district
attorney for the southern district of New York.
I am, sir, &c.,
LEWIS CASS.
A. J. REQUIER, Esq.,
District Attorney of the United States, Mobile.


No. 41.

Mr. Hatch to Mr. Cass.

CUSTOM-HOUSE, NEW ORLEANS,
Collector's Office, December 24, 1857.
SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of
16th instant, referring to your despatch by telegraph under date of
14th instant, directing me to be vigilant in the endeavor to prevent
"illegal expeditions against Central America, in preventing prose-
cuting offenders, and ordering proceedings against the steamer Fash-
ion, should she return to the district, &c."
In reply, I would respectfully refer to my letter of the 17th instant,
acknowledging the receipt of said despatch, and, in addition, state that
I have furnished a copy of this despatch to the naval officer and sur-
veyor of this port, and also to Captain J. G. Brushwood, the com-
mander of the revenue cutter Lewis Cass, now stationed at the head
of the passes of the Mississppi river. I have also enjoined vigilance
on the part of inspectors employed in detective service, and shall con-
tinue the careful examination of all vessels to which the slightest
suspicion may attach, as well as the reconnaissance of the city in order
to detect the presence of any armed organizations contemplating an
expedition against Nicaragua or Central America.
These precautions, and all others within my power, shall be used to
comply strictly with and accomplish the wishes and instructions of
the President, as conveyed in the circular from your department dated
the 18th September, 1857.
Should the steamer Fashion return to this district, I shall use every
effort to procure sufficient evidence to institute the proper legal pro-
ceedings against her.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
F. H. HATCH, Collector.
Hon. LEWIS CASS,
Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


No. 42.

Mr. Yrisarri to Mr. Cass.

BROOKLYN, December 30, 1857.
The undersigned, minister plenipotentiary of the republic of
Nicaragua, has the honor of communicating to his excellency the
Secretary of State of the United States that, on the 15th of last
month, the authority of the republic of Nicaragua was assumed by
General Martinez, elected to the presidency by an immense majority
of votes, and that one of the first acts of the inew head of that
republic was to confirm the appointment made in the person of the
undersigned by former national governments as envoy extraordinary
and minister plenipotentiary to the government of the United States.
The undersigned deems it also to be his duty to inform his excel-
lency the Secretary of State that the constituent assembly of Nicaragua
has approved and confirmed the contract made by the undersigned
with the American Atlantic and Pacific Ship Canal Company, the
only one vested with the privilege of carrying across the isthmus-as
the only one, also, which, for the present and so long as the govern-
ment will not have otherwise disposed, has the right to carry
emigrants to that country, under such conditions as have been imposed
on said company. All other emigrants or colonizers whatsoever that
may be conveyed to that country will be refused admission, and com-
pelled to depart from the territory of the republic; or they will be
dealt with as enemies of the republic, should they appear there in the
character borne by those lately introduced by the incorrigible adven-
turer William Walker.
The undersigned, in the name of the three governments which he
represents, returns thanks to the government of the United States for
having taken away the adventurer William Walker and his invading
band from the point of which they had taken possession on the coast
of Nicaragua; thus freeing those friendly countries from the evils
with which they would have been visited had these disturbers of the
peace of nations been allowed the possibility of increasing their forces
by new recruits. Those who, in the service which the government of
the United States has rendered to its friend, the republic of Nicaragua,
would seek for a warrant to say that the Nicaraguan territory has
been violated, will hardly find it, from the moment that the world
will have learned that the government of Nicaragua, far from com-
plaining of a violation of her territory, looks upon that act as an
assistance, directed in behalf of its inviolability, which was wounded,
in effect, by certain adventurers from the United States ; and that it
considers such assistance, extended by this government, as a conse-
quence of the measures which, by his note of the 14th of September
last, the undersigned had asked this government to adopt, giving
orders to the navy of the United States to capture the violators of the
laws of neutrality.
The point from which Commodore Paulding forced away those






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


bandits, the violators of the laws of all nations, and, as such, justly
assimilated, by the law of nations, to pirates and foes of mankind,
is an almost desert one, on which there exists no Nicaraguan
authorities that could have managed the apprehension of those felons.
Nicaragua, therefore, considers that the proceedings of Commodore
Paulding against Walker and his horde were entirely justifiable
for, as a man-of-war of any nation may take up pirates from a desert
island, or one so thinly peopled that they can assert their dominion
over it, although that island might belong to another sovereign
nation, just so can bandits be apprehended, as enemies of the human,
race, by the armed vessels of a friendly nation, on a point of a foreign
coast, which may be placed under circumstances like to those of the
island mentioned by way of illustration.
Considering it highly important that the tenor of this note-espe-
cially the portion touching emigration to Nicaragua-should be made
public, the undersigned would entertain the hope that the Secretary
of State will find no objection to have its contents published.
The undersigned, with highest consideration, has the honor of
tendering to the Secretary of State the renewed assurance that he is
his respectful servant.
A. J. DE YRISARRI.
Hon. LEWIS CASS,
Secretary of State, &c., dc., &c.


No. 43.
[By Telegraph.]
DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, January 2, 1858.
You will not relax your vigilance, but will employ your best exer-
tions, under your instructions, to prevent a violation of the neutrality
act, by the setting on foot of any illegal expedition against a country
with which we are at peace.
LEWIS CASS.
To the COLLECTOR OF THE CUSTOMS,
New Orleans.

[Same to the collector of customs at Mobile, and United States Attor-
neys at Mobile and New Orleans.]


No. 44.

Extract from a communication dated July 18, 1857, received at the
Department of State from a gentleman at Panama.

General Jerez was the prime mover and chief of the forces that
revolutionized the country, and was one of Rivas' secretaries for a short
time during the Walker-Rivas government, which office he resigned






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


on the ground that Walker's policy was distasteful to the people of
Nicaragua. After the separation of Rivas and Walker he was named
general-in-chief of the Nicaraguan forces before Granada."




No. 45.

Extract from a letter dated at La Union, addressed to the United States
Consul at Panama, August 29, 1857.

"No order has been issued as yet for the election, and probably
will not be for some time. A formal proposition has been made by
the government of Costa Rica to that of Nicaragua, to unite the two
States under one government, with a president named by the people.
This matter was in discussion while ]. was in Nicaragua. The idea
seemed to be received with favor by the proprietors of the country.
In fact all the people of property are disposed to agree to an arrange-
ment that presents a prospect of successful resistance to fillibusterism,
of which they have the greatest fear and abhorrence."


TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
January 7, 1858.
SIR: In obedience to the resolution of the House of Representa-
tives of the 4th instant, I have the honor to communicate herewith
copies of all the correspondence between this department and its
officers upon the subject of the military enterprise of William Walker
against the people and territory of Nicaragua, marked from A to G,
inclusive.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully,
HOWELL COBB,
Secretary of the Treasury.
The PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.


A.
COLLECTOR'S OFFICE,
Mobile, November 14, 1857.
SIR: The clearance from this port of the steamer Fashion for Grey-
town, and her departure for that place with a full freight and a large
number of passengers, in view of your circular instructions of the
18th September, makes necessary an explanation of the facts that
controlled my actions as collector in granting the clearance and in
permitting the departure of the vessel.
A few days ago Mr. H. B. Humpkins, a wealthy merchant of this
place, mentioned to me that he was about to despatch a steamer, which
he had recently purchased, to Greytown, with an assorted cargo and





NICARAGUA- SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


such passengers as might choose to visit Central America; and he de-
sired to know whether there would be any objection to his enterprise
on the part of the government or its officers. To these inquiries I
replied by referring him to the rumors that were rife in regard to the
movement of General Walker, to the revenue and neutrality laws,
and to the circular instructions of the State Department. I assured
him that the laws of the country and those instructions would guide
my conduct, and that no infraction of them would be permitted.
A day or two subsequent to this conversation he brought to my
office invoices, manifests, and bills of lading for a large cargo, and
asked that his vessel might be cleared for Greytown. I subjected his
invoices to a very scrutinizing examination, but found nothing in
them to which exception could be taken. The shipment consisted of
barrels of pork, beef, flour, and sugar, household goods, hardware,
farming utensils, domestic cotton goods, crockery, medicine, &c., &c.,
of several thousand dollars value. With the papers were his instruc-
tions to his supercargo, on his arrival at Greytown, to offer the ship-
ment in that market for cash, or to exchange it, or any part of it, for
the products of the country, at his discretion. Whatever might have
been my private impressions in regard to the true object of the voyage,
I could find nothing that would lawfully justify a detention of the
vessel. I therefore granted the necessary papers yesterday. She went
to sea this morning.
After I had issued the clearance, however, apprehending the possi-
bility that arms and munitions of war might be taken on board from
some point below the city, I despatched one of my most intelligent
and reliable officers, with written instructions, to repair on board of
the steamer, and examine thoroughly her cargo and equipment, and,
in the event of his discovering any irregularity, to report forthwith
to me. I enclose a copy of this order, and a copy of the officer's
return. The number of passengers was larger than I had been led to
suppose, and I have reason to believe that Walker was among them.
Mr. Humpkins informs me that it is his intention to establish a re-
gular line of steam communication between this port and Greytown,
and I understand that another steamer is expected soon to follow the
Fashion in the same business and with the same objects, whatever
they may be.
I trust that my action in this matter may be approved by the gov-
ernment, and that if I am expected hereafter to pursue a different
course, I may receive its specific instructions.
I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient
servant,
T. SANFORD, Collector.
Hon. LEWIS CASS,
Secretary of State, Washington.






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


CUSTOM-HOUSE, MOBILE,
Nov. 14, 1857.
SIR: Agreeably to your instructions delivered to me last night,
dated Nov. 13, I repaired on board the steamer Fashion, lying about
six miles below town, at daybreak this morning, and examined her
cargo and equipment with special reference to the rumors current
that she is engaged in an unlawful voyage, and in derogation of the
neutrality laws of the United States.
In my examination I did not discover any arms or munitions of
war, nor did I observe any indication of organization among the
passengers. In fact, to the best of my knowledge, everything on
board agrees with the manifest deposited in the custom-house by the
captain in clearing the vessel. There were on board about 270
passengers, professing, as I learned from conversation, to be emi-
grants.
I delayed the examination to the last moment in order to be sure of
no further communication with the shore from the vessel, and when I
left steam was up, and she ready to depart on the return of the boat
which the captain despatched to land me ; every facility was afforded
by those on board for examination. It is hardly necessary to add,
that the revenue cutter was in the bay, and available in case of need.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
MELANOTHON SMITH,
Inspector.
TIIADDEUS SANFORD, Esq.,
Collector of Customs, Mobile.


COLLECTOR'S OFFICE,
Mobile, November 13, 1857.
SIR: You are hereby authorized and requested to repair on board of
the steamer Fashion, Captain Cochran, now lying in this bay, and
under clearance for San Juan de Nicaragua, (Greytown,) and examine
her cargo and equipment with special reference to the rumors current
that she is engaged in an unlawful voyage, and in derogation of the
neutrality laws of the United States. Should you discover any tangi-
ble evidence of an intention to violate these laws, you will report
forthwith to this office.
T. SANFORD, Collector.
Mr. MELANCTHON SMITH,
Inspector of Customs.


B.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
November 27, 1857.
SIR: Your letter of the 14th instant to the State Department has
been, by direction of the President, referred to this department.
From your letter it appears that the steamer Fashion was permitted
by you to leave your port under the following circumstances:






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


She had on board an unusual number of passengers, so unusual as
to leave no reasonable doubt that she was engaged in the rumored
expedition against the government of Nicaragua. Among her pas-
sengers was General Walker, who was known to the country as its
recognized leader. The character of her freight, though not com-
posed of warlike implements, was in keeping with the published pro-
gramme of this expedition. The destination of the vessel was the
very country against which the expedition was known to be fitted out.
These facts, in connexion with the familiar and well known rumors
in the country, seem to have left no room for doubt on the subject;
and I infer from your letter that such were your private impres-
sions," but, unfortunately, your official acts have not corresponded
with these well founded private impressions."
I am instructed by the President to say to you that your conduct in
this matter does not meet his approval. In avowing to the world his
purpose, if possible, to arrest this illegal expedition, undertaken in
defiance of the laws of the United States, and in disregard of their
honor and good faith, the President felt that he was discharging a
duty no less demanded by the requirements of the law than by every
consideration which affects the national honor. He expected the cor-
dial co-operation of all the officers of the government, and regrets to
find that his reasonable expectations in this regard have been disap-
pointed.
As you intimate in your letter that it is proposed to make similar
efforts at your port in aid of this expedition, I have been directed to
communicate these views to you that your official action hereafter
may be in strict conformity to them. Upon a recurrence of a similar
state of things, you will cause the vessel to be detained.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
HOWELL COBB,
Secretary of the Treasury.
TIIADDEUS SANFORD, Esq.,
Collector of Customs, Mobile, Ala.


C.
COLLECTOR'S OFFICE,
iMobile, December 7, 1857.
SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your commu-
nication of the 27th ultimo, and hasten to inform you that, in com-
pliance with the instructions therein contained, as well as the terms
of a telegraphic despatch upon the same subject, previously trans-
mitted me by the State Department, I have directed the commander
of the cutter in my charge to proceed at once to Mobile Point, where
the Fashion is hourly expected to arrive, and immediately thereupon
to seize and bring her into port. This course would seem to be indi-
cated equally by the language of the despatch alluded to, which ex-
pressly affirms the liability of said vessel for past misdemeanors, and
the general tenor of your communication, wherein blame is imputed
to me, upon the ground that the facts attending the former depar-






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER


ture, which could only have been established by subsequent prosecu-
tion, clearly warranted her detention on my part. I have also apprised
the district attorney of the fact that these orders have been extended
to the cutter, and requested him to hold himself in readiness to take
such action in the case as the laws of the country require.
This statement will, I trust, sufficiently attest my anxiety to exe-
cute, with all practicable diligence, the instructions forwarded me by
the State Department and your own, according to my best apprehen-
sion of them. But it is due to the claims of truth, and to my own
sense of personal and official integrity, that the state of facts pre-
sented in your letter, as authorizing the rebuke which is therein
administered, should be corrected.
The allegation is, that, from.my letter to the State Department of
the 14th ultimo, the following facts appear to have been within my
knowledge at the time when the Fashion was permitted to leave the
port, to wit:
1st. That she had an unusual number of passengers on board.
2d. That General Walker was one of them.
3d. That the character of the freight was in keeping with the pub-
lished programme of her suspected expedition.
4th. That her destination was Greytown.
A single glance at these specifications will suffice to show that
their main elements as data for the conclusions deduced from them
are embraced in the 1st and 2d specifications ; fbr it will not be
seriously maintained that a cargo of assorted merchandise, and a
destination for Greytown, were, when connected with "familiar and
-well known rumors in the country," constitute "probable cause"
for so grave an act of official interference as the forcible seizure and
detention of a vessel against the will of her owners. Nor must it be
forgotten that associated with these circumstances was the vivid recol-
lection, on my part, of the fact that two years ago I had seized the
barque Magnolia for a similar offence, and under similar instructions;
that after an investigation thereof, so convincing in the extent and
minuteness of its disclosures, that a hostile expedition against the
island of Cuba was not even denied in discussing them ; yet I saw
that vessel heavily laden with cannon, rifles, fixed ammunition, and
all the appliances for a military campaign, not only successively dis-
charged by two different federal tribunals upon the admitted in-
effectuality of the neutrality laws to reach such a state of facts when
proven, but I saw the judgment of those courts confirmed by the re-
fusal of your predecessor to direct an appeal from their decision.
Unless it does appear, therefore, (as it is mistakenly alleged,) from
my letter of the 14th ult., that the facts set forth in the foregoing
first and second specifications were within my knowledge at the time
of the steamer's departure, the strictures on my conduct must be ad-
mitted to be unmerited, being based upon a statement of facts of
which the only important ones are unsustained by the document cited
to support them. Now, I most respectfully, but emphatically, deny
that my letter of the 14th, written hastily, and in the frankness of
conscious integrity, warrants the conclusion that I knew, or even
suspected, either the unusual number of the passengers by the
Fashion, or that Walker was one of them, at the time of the vessel's






44 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.

departure. On the contrary, it is therein distinctly stated that I was
not apprised of the one or the other until the return of the officer
who was specially detailed to examine her, and when the vessel had
finally departed; nor did I, even then, have any knowledge of the
latter fact, beyond a mere suspicion of it, communicated by him, and
which had not been verified by his examination. It would seem from
the circumstances, and what has since transpired, that Walker had
been carefully secreted in the city, and was thus enabled clandestinely
to embark upon the vessel.
The only facts, then, which appear from my letter of the 14th as
having been within my knowledge at the period mentioned, and which
could consequently alone have influenced my official conduct, are those
which I have already shown could not furnish a reasonable ground
for the detention of a vessel. By these facts, I respectfully submit, it
is my right to be judged-not by others which I did not know, and
which, therefore, could not possibly have affected my action.
And now, permit me to say, if I write earnestly it is because I feel
keenly the rebuke contained in your letter. It has been the ambition
of my life to sustain the honor of the country and to give efficiency to
its laws. Neither by word nor deed have I ever encouraged, sustained,
or justified the fillibustering spirit so prevalent in this part of the
Union. On the contrary, my voice and pen have ever been employed
in discountenancing it. If, in my official action, [ have not been able
to suppress it, the reason is to be found not in any want of disposition
on my part, but on the lack of evidence and the inefficiency of the
laws.
I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
T. SANFORD, Collector.
Hon. HOWELL COBn,
Secretary of the Treasury, Washington.


D.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
December 16, 1857.
SIR: I acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 7th instant, in
reply to mine of the 27th ultimo. Upon a more careful reading of
your letter of the 14th ultimo, I am not surprised that the impression
should have been made upon my mind which led to my letter of the
27th ultimo. I am gratified, however, to learn that the facts upon
which I thought you should have detained the Fashion were not in
your possession until it was too late for such action on your part;
such I understand your present statement to be. This places the
matter in a different light, and, taken in connexion with the expres-
sions of your earnest desire to carry out the policy of the President in
reference to this illegal expedition, gives to the department the
assurance that you will exert your best energies to prevent a similar
violation ot the law. You will learn from the President's message
his firm purpose to have the laws executed faithfully and energetically
in this particular, and he directs me to say to you that he fully
approves the steps you have taken for the arrest and prosecution of





NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


the Fashion, and shall look with confidence for your future cordial
co-operation in carrying out this purpose.
I am, very respectfully, HOWELL COBB,
Secretary of the Treasury.
T. SANFORD, Esq.,
Collector of the Customs, Mobile, Alabama.


E.
COLLECTOR'S O1ICE,
Mobile, December 16, 1857.
SIR: Application was made to me yesterday by Mr. H. B. Hum-
phries, the owner of the steamer Fashion, for a clearance of the
schooner Queen of the South" for the port of Greytown, laden with
coal and general merchandise, and as the movement can be regarded
in no other light than a supplement to the enterprise of the Fashion,
in obedience to the instructions contained in your letter of the 27th
ultimo, I "detained the vessel" by refusing her a clearance. To
place me entirely at ease in my position, I now respectfully ask the
special endorsement of my action in this matter by the department.
Similar applications will doubtless be made to me by other parties,
and the only means at my command, by which I can detain a vessel
about to engage in this Walker enterprise, is to withhold a clearance.
It would greatly relieve me to receive instructions that may meet
specifically the cases anticipated.
The Queen of the South" cannot be libelled, for she has done
nothing to authorize a libel, though I have no doubt that had she
been permitted to go to sea, her decks would have been covered by
armed men ere her arrival at Greytown. I have no evidence that
she contemplated taking a single passenger, but it is reported that a
band of emigrants arrived in this vicinity a few days ago waiting an
opportunity to embark for Greytown. Not one of them will now be
heard of as claiming any connexion with this vessel. The popular
sentiment in this city is strongly in favor of Walker. This was indi-
cated last night by a public meeting of citizens, presided over by
ex-Governor Winston, and addressed by several of the leading men of
the State. The policy of the government was vehemently criticized,
and the action of its officers earnestly deprecated. I mention those
facts to show you how difficult it is to procure information in regard
to the particular movements of Walker's sympathizers. I addressed
a telegraphic despatch to the department yesterday, stating my refusal
to clear the Queen of the South," and asking its approval of my
action. In addition to this request, I have now respectfully to solicit
special instructions as much in detail as to meet the embarrassment
of my position.
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
T. SANFORD, Collector.
Hon. HOWELL COBB, Secretary of the Treasury.
Mr. Humphries informs me that the Fashion is detained at Aspin-
wall for want of coal.


45






46 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER


F.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, December 23, 1857.
SIR: I acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 16th instant,
informing the department of your action in refusing to grant a clear-
ance to the schooner Queen of the South." The circumstances un-
der which you refused the clearance fully justify your course, and the
department unhesitatingly approves it. In my former letters I have
expressed to you the determination of the President to execute our
neutrality laws, and you may rest assured that you will be fully sus-
tained in every proper and legal effort you may make to carry out that
determination. It is a duty we owe not only to the countries with
which we are on terms of peace, but to our national honor, to enforce
our laws; and no good citizen will complain of an honest officer faith-
fully discharging his duty, and no faithful officer will regard com-
plaints which proceed alone from popular prejudice and feeling. It
is impossible to give specific instructions, but your prompt action in
the case of the "Queen of the South" satisfies the department that
your own judgment may be relied upon to govern your future action
under the general instructions you have already received.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
HOWELL COBB,
Secretary of the Treasury.
T. SANFORD, Esq.,
Collector, Mobile, Alabama.


G.
TREASURY DEPART.IRNT, December 26, 1857.
SIR: It having been intimated to the department that parties are
being raised and organized at New Orleans and elsewhere for the in-
vasion of Central America, and intended to depart from your port in
the steamer Fashion," or other vessel, I am directed by the Presi-
dent to say that he expects that all the officers of the government in
your district will rigidly enforce the laws of the United States appli-
cable to such expeditions.
I am, very respectfully,
HOWELL COBB,
Secretary of the Treasury.
H. STUART, Esq.,
Collector, &c., Galveston, Texas.


NAVY DEPARTMENT, January 11, 1858.
The Secretary of the Navy, to whom has been referred the resolu-
tion of the House of Representatives of the 4th of January, 1858,
which requests the President "to communicate to this House, if not
incompatible with the public interest, all the information in his pos-





NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


session in relation to the late seizure of General Win. Walker and his
followers in Nicaragua, together with such instructions," &c., has the
honor to transmit to the President the accompanying copies of papers,
which contain all the information filed in this department upon the
subject-matter of the resolution.
ISAAC TOUCEY.
The PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.


List of Documents accompanying the letter of the Secretary of the
Navy to the President.
No. 1.-Secretary of the Navy to Commander Chatard, commanding
the United States sloop Saratoga; Commander Thatcher, com-
manding United States sloop Decatur, and the commandants of
the several navy yards ; enclosing copy of circular from the State
Department in relation to unlawful military expeditions from the
United States against Mexico, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica.
No. 2.-Secretary of the Navy to Lieutenant Almy, commanding
United States steamer Fulton, at Washington, on the same sub-
ject, and ordering him to Chiriqui.
No. 3.-Secretary of the Navy toFlag Officer Paulding, commanding
home squadron, on the same subject.
No. 4.-Lieutenant Almy to Secretary of the Navy, acknowledging
receipt of instructions to proceed to Chiriqui, &c.
No. 5.-Lieutenant Almy to Secretary of the Navy, desiring answers
to certain questions in connexion with the circular from the State
Department.
No. 6.-Secretary of the Navy to Lieutenant Almy, in reply to No. 5.
No. 7.-Lieutenant Almy to Secretary of the Navy, reporting the
Fulton about to depart for Mobile and New Orleans, en route to
Chiriqui.
No. 8.-Flag Officer Paulding to Secretary of the Navy, acknowledging
receipt of No. 3, about unlawful military expeditions, &, &c.,c.
and complaining because the Fulton was not sent direct to him.
No. 9.-Lieutenant Almy to Secretary of the Navy, reporting arrival
of the Fulton at Mobile.
No. 10.-Lieutenant Almy to Secretary of the Navy, reporting arrival
of the Fulton at New Orleans, and giving an account of his inter-
views with the United States district attorney at Mobile on the
subject of the fitting out of unlawful military expeditions.
No. 10-.-Lieutenant Almy to Secretary of the Navy, giving an ac-
count of his interviews with the United States district attorney
and collector of customs at New Orleans in relation to the fitting
out of unlawful military expeditions.
No. 11.-Secretary of the Navy to Flag Officer Paulding, in reply to
No. 8, about the Fulton.
No. 12.--Secretary of the Navy to Captain Sands, commanding the
United States steam frigate Susquehanna, in relation to the fitting
out of unlawful expeditions, and ordering that vessel to San
Juan del Norte.






48 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.

No. 13.-Flag Officer Paulding to Secretary of the Navy, reporting
the Fulton's arrival at Boco del Toro; and making suggestions
touching the anticipated arrival of Walker, and the best steps to
provide against his landing.
No. 14.-Flag Officer Paulding to Secretary of the Navy, reporting
arrival of the English mail steamer Dee" at Aspinwall, with
information of the landing of Walker and his followers at Point
Arenas, the particulars of which are given in the enclosures:
A.-Commander Chatard to Flag Officer Paulding.
C.-General Walker to Flag Officer Paulding.
D.-Samuel S. Wood to Flag Officer Paulding.
No. 15.-Flag Officer Paulding to Secretary of the Navy, reporting
his arrival at San Juan del Norte, and the surrender and embarka-
tion of General Walker and his followers ; and enclosing copies of
letters, marked-
A.-From General Walker to Flag Officer Paulding, in rela-
tion to the conduct of Commander Chatard.
B.-From Flag Officer Paulding to General Walker, demand-
ing his surrender.
C.-From Flag Officer Paulding to the marshal of the southern
district of New York, consigning General Walker to his
custody. And
D.-From Commander Chatard to Flag Officer Paulding, en-
closing copies of his letters to General Walker.
No. 16.-Flag Officer Paulding to Secretary of the Navy, reporting
departure of the Saratoga from San Juan for Norfolk, with one
hundred and fifty of General Walker's followers, and that Gen-
eral Walker will sail in next steamer for New York.
No. 17.-Flag Officer Paulding to Secretary of the Navy, giving his
reasons for having arrested General Walker and his party and
sent them to the United States.
No. 18.-Flag Officer Paulding to Secretary of the Navy, stating that
he had taken the steamer Morgan," seized by Walker's party,
and liberated about forty prisoners.
No. 19.-Flag Officer Paulding to Secretary of the Navy, describing
the landing of the naval forces at Point Arenas for the arrest of
General Walker, and speaking in high terms of the skill and
ability displayed by the officers, and the fine bearing of the men,
on the occasion.
No. 20.-Flag Officer Paulding to Secretary of the Navy, enclosing
list of articles found in Walker's camp and embarked in the
Wabash and Saratoga.
No. 21.-Flag OfficerPaulding to Secretary of the Navy, reporting ar-
rival of the Susquehanna at San Juan del Norte, and enclosing
copy of his instructions to Captain Sands.
No. 22.-Secretary of the Navy to Flag Officer Paulding, acknowledg-
ing receipt of despatches, and enjoining upon him particular vigi-
lance in carrying out the instructions heretofore given him in re-
lation to unlawful expeditions; also, directing the suspension of
Commander Chatard from his command.
No. 23.-Secretary of the Navy to Commander Kennedy, command-
ing United States sloop Jamestown, at Philadelphia, ordering






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


him to proceed with her to San Juan del Norte, as a part of the
home squadron, and instructing him in regard to unlawful mili-
tary expeditions from the United States against Mexico, Nica-
ragua, and Costa Rica.
No. 24.-Commander Chatard to Secretary of the Navy, reporting ar-
rival of the Saratoga at Norfolk with General Walker's party,
and enclosing list of their names, and of the stores received on
board the Saratoga belonging to them.
No. 25.-Extract of letter from Secretary of the Navy to the Com-
mandant of the Norfolk navy yard, directing him to permit
Walker's men to leave the Saratoga, the government having no
authority to detain them.

No. 1.] NAVY DEPARTMENT, October 2, 1857.
SIR: I am directed by the President to transmit to you, for your
guidance, the accompanying circular, which he has caused to be issued
from the State Department to various civil officers.
You will regard the instructions contained in it as addressed to
yourself.
I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,
ISAAC TOUCEY.
Commander FREDERICK CHATARD,
Commanding U. S. sloop Saratoga, Aspinwall, N. G.
[A similar letter to the above was addressed to Commander Thatcher,
commanding United States sloop Decatur, Panama, N. G., and to the
commandants of the navy yards at Portsmouth, N. H., New York,
Boston, Philadelphia, Norfolk, Pensacola, and San Francisco.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, September 18, 1857.
SIR: From information received at this department, there is reason
to believe that lawless persons are now engaged within the limits of
the United States in setting on foot and preparing the means for
military expeditions to be carried on against the territories of Mexico,
Nicaragua and Costa Rica, republics with whom the United States are
at peace, in direct violation of the sixth section of the act of Congress,
approved 20th April, 1818. And under the eighth section of the said
act it is made lawful for the President, or such person as he shall em-
power, to employ the land and naval forces of the United States, and
the militia thereof, "for the purpose of preventing the carrying on
of any such expedition or enterprise from the territories or jurisdiction
of the United States." I am, therefore, directed by the President to
call your attention to the subject, and to urge you to use all due dili-
gence to avail- yourself of all legitimate means at your command to
enforce these and all other provisions of the said act of 20th April,
1818, against those who may be found to be engaged in setting on
foot or preparing military expeditions against the territories of Mexico,
Costa Rica, and Nicaragua, so manifestly prejudicial to the national
character, and so injurious to the national interest. And you are also
H. Ex. Dec. 24- 4





50 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.

hereby instructed promptly to communicate to this department the
earliest information you may receive relative to such expeditions.
I am, sir, your obedient servant,
L. CASS.

No. 2.] NAVY DEPARTMENT, October 3, 1857.
SIR: There is reason to believe that unlawful military expeditions
are preparing in certain ports of the United States against the ter-
ritories of Mexico, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica; and that they may
rendezvous in the harbor of Chiriqui or Bocas del Toro, on the coast
of Costa Rica.
The President directs me to instruct you to proceed in the Fulton,
under your command, at the earliest practicable moment to that point;
and to transmit to you, for. your guidance, the accompanying copy of
a circular which he has caused to be issued from the State Department
to various civil officers-the instructions contained in which you will
consider as addressed to yourself.
You will await at Chiriqui further orders, and will report by letter
on your arrival there to Flag Officer Paulding, as forming a part of
the squadron under his command.
I am, respectfully, &c.,
ISAAC TOUCEY
Lieutenant JOHN J. ALMY,
Commanding U. S. Steamer Fulton, Washington, D. C.


No. 3.] NAVY DEPARTMENT, October 3, 1857.
SIR: I am directed by the President to transmit to you for your
guidance the accompanying circular, which he has caused to be issued
from the State Department to various civil officers. You will regard
the instructions contained in it as addressed to yourself. A copy has
also been sent to Commander Chatard, at San Juan del Norte, with
similar instructions.
The department has directed Lieutenant Almy, commanding the
Fulton, to proceed to Chiriqui, and report from there by letter to you
as forming a part of the squadron under your command. Transmit-
ted herewith for your information is a copy of his instructions.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
ISAAC TOUCEY.
Flag Officer H. PAULDING, U. S. N.,
Commanding Home Squadron, Aspinwall, New Granada.


No. 4.
UNITED STATES STEAMER FULTON,
Washington, October 6, 1857.
SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your instruc-
tions, dated the 3d instant, directing me to proceed with this vessel,
under my command, as soon as practicable, to the harbor of Chiriqui,





NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


or Bocas del Toro, on the coast of Costa Rica, with which I shall com-
ply accordingly.
These instructions are accompanied by a circular from the State De-
partment, and I shall use my best exertions to execute the spirit and
views of both these papers to the satisfaction of the Navy Department
and of the government.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JOHN J. ALMY, U. S. N.,
Lieutenant Commanding.
Hon. ISAAC TOUCEY, Secretary of the Navy.

No. 5.
UNITED STATES STEAMER FULTON,
Washington, October 7, 1847.
SIR: In regard to the instructions received by me from the Navy
Department, dated the 3d instant, I am there referred for my guidance
to the law enacted by Congress, approved April 20, 1818, entitled
"An act for the punishment of certain crimes against the United
States," and am also referred to a circular issued by the State De-
partment, dated September 18, 1857, addressed to various civil officers
of the United States.
These directions to preserve the neutrality of the country are very
plain for the government of officers where they are required to act in
the ports of, or in the jurisdiction of, the United States ; but I must
confess that I might find myself embarrassed when required to act in
a foreign and neutral port. Therefore, I must be pardoned for solicit-
ing from the honorable Secretary of the Navy answers to certain
questions, and more specific instructions in the premises.
Suppose, for instance, that, while lying in a port of Central Ame-
rica, an American steamer should enter having on board a large num-
ber of men whom I suspect of being filibusters"--people intending
to land for the purpose of obtaining possession of the country, and of
forming a government there. Must I seize this vessel and bring her
into a port of the United States, or merely use the force placed at my
command to prevent their landing ?
It is generally conceded that American citizens have a right to tra-
vel and go where they please. Suppose that this suspicious body of
men inform me that they are going to travel-that their intention is
to cross the isthmus, or intend to settle peaceably in the country for
the purpose of developing its agricultural resources ; indeed, that they
have been invited to come and settle there ?
These and other delicate points and kindred questions which may
suggest themselves to the honorable Secretary of the Navy, I deem it
necessary to be enlightened upon in order that I may not compromise
the government, and at the same time be enabled to assert and exer-
cise the power entrusted to my hands with due spirit, dignity, and
justice.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JOHN J. ALMY,
Lieutenant Commanding.
Hon. ISAAc TOUCEY, Secretary of the Yavy.





NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


No. 6.
NAVY DEPARTMENT, October 12, 1857.
SIR: In reply to your letter of the 7th instant, it is true that Amer-
ican citizens have a right to travel and to go where they please, when
engaged in lawful pursuit, but not to violate the laws of their own or
of any other country. They have a right to expatriate and to become
citizens of any country which is willing to receive them, but not to
make that right a mere cloak and cover for a warlike expedition
against it or its government. Your instructions do not authorize you
to act arbitrarily, or upon mere suspicion. You will not sieze an
American vessel, or bring her into port, or use the force under your
command to prevent her landing her passengers upon mere suspicion.
You will be careful not to interfere with lawful commerce. But where
you find that an American vessel is manifestly engaged in carrying
on an expedition or enterprise from the territories or jurisdiction of
the United States against the territories of Mexico, Nicaragua, or
Costa Rica, contrary to the 6th section of the act of Congress of April
20, 1818, already referred to, you will use the force under your com-
mand to prevent it, and will not permit the men or arms engaged in
it, or destined for it, to be landed in any part of Mexico or Central
America.
En route for Chiriqui you will touch at Mobile and New Orleans,
and communicate with the United States district attorney at each of
those ports.
I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,
IbAAC TOUCEY.
Lieutenant JOHN J. ALMY,
Commanding U. S. Steamer Fulton, Washington, D. C.


No. 7.
UNITED STATES STEAMER FULTON,
Off the Navy Yard, Washington, D. C.,
Wednesday, October 14, 1857.
SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your commu-
nication of the 12th instant, in reply to mine of the 7th instant.
To this is added instructions for me to touch at Mobile and New
Orleans en route to Chiriqui, for the purpose of communicating with
the United States district attorneys at those ports.
. The Fulton is all ready, and I shall accordingly take my departure
to-day for the nearest mentioned port, which is Mobile; then to New
Orleans, and then to Chiriqui, reporting the movements of the vessel
to the Navy Department, or to the flag officer of the home squadron,
according to circumstances.
With great respect, your obedient servant,
JOHN J. ALMY.
Lieutenant Commcanding.
Hon. ISAAC TOUCEY,
Secretary of the Nacy.






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER. 53

No. 8.

FLAG-SHIP "WABASH," OFF ASPINWALL,
[No. 133.] October 20, 1857.
SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch
of the 5th instant, accompanying a copy of the sailing orders of Com-
mander Almy, of the "' Fulton," and a circular order from the State
Department, in relation to our neutrality laws.
The department will not fail to observe that my feelings, as com-
mander-in-chief of this squadron, must be very much wounded, when
I say that the service of the government could have been better per-
formed if Commander Almy had been sent to me, and some discretion
had been given me by the department for employing the force nomi-
nally under my command, instead of its being assigned to duties at a
distance from home by the government, whom it is impossible should
so well understand the localities and the most proper measures to be
taken for a given purpose.
Now, sir, how would it look if the Secretary of War should direct
a general in the field to place himself on a certain point and remain
there; then detach the subordinates and their commands, and locate
them at points near him without the means of communication. (It is
an impassable wilderness between this and Chiriqui.) Could a battle
be gained, the commander-in-chief be respected, or the interest of our
country in any manner advanced? No, sir; and this is a parallel
case; and, in my judgment, it would be better for the department to
supercede an officer whenever it wants confidence in his capacity for
command.
It is not only in this instance, but others, that I feel called upon to
present to the notice of the department irregularities which the de-
partment can alone redress. In the first place, the "Cyane" has been
absent from here at the north for more than three months without my
having received a report or an official notice in regard to her. It is
the same with the "Roanoke."
If the "Fulton" has taken one of the "passages," as she should
have done, her course for "Chiriqui" was in the direction of Aspin-
wall, and without a material deviation she could have passed within
sight of my flag. From this, it will be apparent to the department
that I must feel that my prerogatives, as commander-in-chief of the
squadron, are turned aside with but little consideration, and that my
presence here can have but a slight appreciation.
Without presuming to intrude discourteously upon the department,
it is proper that 1 should present my views, and, in doing so to say that
the duties of this command cannot be discharged in a manner due to
the good order and efficiency of the naval service unless the depart-
ment shall be observant and exact of the officers a strict conformity
to its military character.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
H. PAULDING,
Flag Oflicer, Commanding Home Squadron.
Hon. ISAAC TOUCEY,
Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.







54 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.

No. 9.
UNITED STATES STEAMER "FULTON,"
Mobile Bay, Alabama,
Monday evening, October 26, 1857.
SIR: I hereby report the arrival here of this steamer, under my
command, in nine days from the Capes of the Chesapeake, and am
about to proceed up to the city to communicate with the United States
district attorney, in compliance with your instructions. Should I
learn anything of importance from him in regard to the fitting out of
' unlawful military expeditions," I will communicate it to the depart-
ment, in another despatch, previous to leaving for New Orleans.
*
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant.
JOHN J. ALMY, Lieutenant Commanding.
Hon. ISAAC TOUCEY, Secretary of the Navy.

No. 10.
UNITED STATES STEAMER FULTON,
New Orleans, October 29, 1857.
SIR : In my last communication to you, dated on the evening of the
26th instant, below Mobile, I announced the arrival of this vessel in
nine days from the Capes of Virginia ; and that, in compliance with
your instructions, I was about to proceed up to the city to confer with
the United States district attorney, A. J. Requier, esq.
This I did, having two quite lengthy and separate interviews with
him. After the first interview, he called upon the collector and other
officers connected with the custom-house. with whom, previously, he
had been in constant communication ; and he stated to me that beyond
floating rumor there was nothing tangible-nothing which would
warrant or authorize government officers to act, or to commence a
prosecution in regard to the fitting out of "unlawful military expedi-
tions against territories with whom the United States are at peace.
But still, he said, that lie could not but help expressing the opinion
that public sentiment in Mobile was in favor of these expeditions to
Central America ; that it was a -,. p1ii:i' theme of conversation on
'change in the streets, and at the hotels: and further, that there
seemed to be an idea prevailing in this part of the country that the
cabinet at Washington rather winked at the fitting out and departure
of these expeditions than to be seriously disposed to prevent them:
but that he, and other government officers, had endeavored to correct
public opinion upon that point. Being just from Washington, I stated
that I knew that the government was utterly opposed to any such ex-
peditions, and had most decidedly set its face against them,
The non-recognition of the new minister from Nicaragua has given
a feeling of encouragement to these people, as they view it that the
United States do not look upon and acknowledge Nicaragua as an
independent republic. They speak of this as in the highest degree
encouraging to prospective operations, as there seems to have been no
explanation in the public prints why this minister was not received.
Another point which they make and lay great stress upon is, as






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


they allege, that General Cass, upon one occasion, most explicitly
said that "American citizens when they emigrate have a right, at
all times, to take their arms with them."
Although the feeling is generally rife here in regard to this matter,
as it has been for a few years past, yet it seems to be considered that
these contemplated expeditions are not only embarrassed but crippled
for the want of funds, owing to the financial pressure existing through-
out the country.
I have just arrived at the anchorage here, and am about to proceed
to the city to communicate with the United States district-attorney in
regard to these matters, and will inform the department of the result
of my visit to this place.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JOHN J. ALMY, U. S. N., Lieutenant Commanding.
Hon. ISAAC TOUCEY, Secretary of the Navy.

No. 10.
UNITED STATES STEAMER FULTON,
TNew Orleans, November 1, 1857.
SIR : In compliance with your directions, I have communicated with
the United States district attorney (Franklin H. Clack, esq.,) at this
place, and had long conversations with him in regard to fitting out
of "unlawful military expeditions." I also had a long interview
with the collector of customs (F. H. Hatch, esq.) These gentlemen
seem to be well informed in regard to movements, matters, and public
sentiment upon this point, and they assure me that the feeling has very
much subsided of late, owing to the great financial pressure throughout
the country, and which is very severely felt here. They don't think
that the worst times have yet come for New Orleans. The sinews of
war" are not only now wanting, but will be for a long time to come.
General Walker is now in this city, and comparatively quiet at
present. There has been no expedition that has sailed either from
here, Mobile, or any part on the coast of Texas for Central America;
and the prevailing opinion in New Orleans now is, that it will be
quite impossible for an expedition to get off for a year to come. There
are still some violent filibusters-violent with the tongue and pen-
in this part of the country and in Texas, who talk loud and boast,
and those seem to be the ones who get their names in the public prints
and are the cause of the excitement consequently produced at Wash-
ington and the north generally.
There being nothing further for me to do here, I shall proceed at
once to Chiriqui, in obedience to your orders.
It is considered by the officials at Mobile and New Orleans that the
visit of the Fulton to these places has had a good effect, conveying
the idea that the government is in earnest, and exercising a watchful
eye over these reported expeditions; that it will have the effect to
make the filibusters extremely cautious in their proceedings.
5f :- -5 -i; i '
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JOHN J. ALMY, Lieutenant Commanding.
Hon. ISAAC TOUCEY, Secretary of the Navy.






56 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


No. 11.

NAVY DEPARTMENT, November 6, 1857.
SIR: I am in possession of your despatch No. 133.
It was not the intention of the department to intimate any doubt
of your knowledge or capacity, or of your disposition promptly to
discharge any duty assigned to you. But the department will reserve
to itself the right, under the immediate direction of the President, to
dispatch a vessel to any point, upon any emergency, under specific
instructions directing its commanding officer to report to the flag
officer of any squadron subject to those instructions. In the present
instance the Fulton was dispatched from this port by order of the
President, to serve the purposes of the government, upon a state of
facts of which, from the nature of the case, you could not probably
have the slightest knowledge.
If the commanding officer of the Roanoke or of the Cyane has
failed to make to you the proper reports, you are well aware of the
course that may be taken.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
ISAAC TOUCEY.
Flag Officer HIRAM PAULDING,
Commanding U. S. Home Squadron, Aspinwall, New Granada.


No. 12.

NAVY DEPARTMENT,
November 16, 1857.
SIR: There is reason to believe that unlawful military expeditions
are preparing in certain parts of the United States against the territo-
ries of Mexico, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica ; and the President has
received information that a party under William Walker has recently
left New Orleans, as it is supposed, to unite with other parties at
some appointed place without the United States for the above purpose.
The President directs me to transmit for your guidance the accom-
panying circular (copy) which he has caused to be issued from the
State Department to various civil officers ; the instructions contained
in which you will consider as addressed to yourself. To carry them
out you will immediately upon the receipt of this fill up with coal,
and, if necessary, proceed to Pensacola for provisions, and then shape
your course to Cape Gracios, Honduras, skirting along the coast,
looking in at the mouth of Bluefield Inlet; thence to San Juan del
Norte, Nicaragua, where you will remain until further orders.
The sloop of war Saratoga will leave San Juan and proceed to Nor-
folk, Virginia, immediately on your arrival there.
I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,
ISAAC TOUCEY.
Captain JosHUA R. SANDS,
Commanding U. S. Steam Frigate Susquehanna,
Key West, Florida.






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


P. S. You will report, by letter, from San Juan to Flag Officer
Paulding at Aspinwall, as forming a portion of the home squadron,
enclosing him a copy of these instructions.
ISAAC TOUCEY.



No. 13.

[No. 137.] FLAG-SHIP TABASH,
Of Aspinwall, November 17, 1857.
SIR : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your commu-
nication of October 26.
The Northern Light" arrived here two days since with twelve
hundred passengers; about twice as many as I presume she is allowed
by law to carry. This violation of law is repeated in the case of every
steamer arriving from New York and departing from here, and it is
a rational presumption that neither the inspecting officers nor the
superintendent of mail steamers are sufficiently vigilant in the per-
formance of their duties.
Lieutenant Commanding Almy arrived at Boca del Toro on the 10th
instant. I have instructed him, by means of a canoe that brought
his letter, to explore the shores of Chiriqui, and ascertain from the
inhabitants whether it is possible for an invading force to reach Costa
Rica from that point.
From the information I have received of an intelligent person that
has resided there and traded with the natives four years, there is no
other access to Costa Rica from Chiriqui but by an obscure and diffi-
cult foot-path through the mountains, requiring the aid of an expe-
rienced guide to trace it, and that it would be impossible to convey
munitions of war. Intermediate between Chiriqui and San del Juan
Norte is a small river called Moyen, or Salt creek, which passes
through a populous country, and from whence San Jos6 is but sixty
miles and easy of access. This would be the point at which Walker
would land should he design to invade Costa Rica, and did not ascend
the San Juan for that purpose.
Lieutenant Almy has communicated to the department that an
attempted invasion is not likely to take place at this time. That we
may have all the necessary information, I would respectfully suggest
that the orders of the department be so far modified as to enable me
to have a full examination of the coast from Chriqui to San Juan del
Norte.
The "Fulton" requires some repairs. I have deemed it proper to
leave her at Chiriqui until I hear from the department in respect to
her.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
H. PAULDING,
Flag Oficer, Commanding Home Squadron.
Hon. ISAAC TOUCEY,
Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.






58 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


No. 14.

[No. 139.] FLAG-SHIP "WABASH,"
Off Aspinwall, December 3, 1857.
SIR: Yesterday the English mail steamer Dee arrived here from
San Juan del Norte, with information that Walker and his followers
had landed and taken possession of Point Arenas. They entered the
harbor in the steamer Fashion," passed the Saratoga," at anchor,
and were permitted to land the men and stores.
Herewith I enclose an official letter from Captain Chatard, marked
"A," a private letter, marked B," a letter from Walker, marked
C," and a letter from an American citizen, named Samuel S. Wood,
marked D," which, together, will explain the transaction.
The steamer Fashion," in which Walker and his followers were
conveyed, arrived here yesterday.
I shall get underway this afternoon and proceed to San Juan, and
take such measures as may seem best, under the circumstances, that
may exist there.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
H. PAULDING,
Flag Qficer, Commanding Home Squadron.
Hon. ISAAC TOUCEY,
Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.


"A."

UNITED STATES SHIIP '"S ARATOG!A,"
San Juan del Norte, November 27, 1857.
Sin : I have the honor to inform you that on the 24th instant,
about 2 p. m., a steamer appeared off the harbor, and then stood off
to the eastward, down the coast. She came into the harbor next
morning about 7 o'clock. Her conduct of the day before made me
suspect her; but my suspicions were entirely lulled when she was
standing into the harbor: not more than fifteen or twenty men appeared
on her deck. I expected her to anchor ; but instead of that, with a
full head of steam, she ran right up for the wharf of Scott's build-
ings. I, as well as the first lieutenant, thought it was a party sent
to open the transit route. I immediately sent a boat, with a lieuten-
ant, to board her, and to see what she was, and to examine her
papers. When he returned, he informed me that it was the steamer
"Fashion," from Mobile; papers all right, proper clearance, cargo,
&c., and a number of passengers marked on the bills. The passen-
gers proved to be Walker, with one hundred and fifty men, who all
landed immediately, before my boat got to them. Once landed, I felt
I could do nothing; and even if I so determined, the vessel's papers
were all right. She had been pronounced all right by the American
custom-house officers, and those people appeared as passengers. My
position was one of much embarrassment. The circular did not afford






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER. 59

me any ease of mind, for as the case stood I did not feel authorized to
proceed to extremities. I had an interview with Walker on board of
my ship, and told him, positively, he must not occupy Scott's build-
ings, which I considered American property. So he has established
himself above Scott's line. He landed fifty men or more at the
mouth of the Colorado before he came here; they went up in boats
to surprise Castillo, and to try and take possession of the steamboats
there. I have hauled my ship close up to Scott's buildings. The
steamer I have caused to haul off from the wharf. The day he came
in I had twenty-five on the sick list, and you know how short my
crew is, besides the debilitated state in which the rest generally are
from frequent relapses.
I would be glad, indeed, if you would come here, and you could
judge for yourself. We are informed by the officers of the filibusters
that several more vessels are cleared from the United States, and that
daily we may look for arrivals ; they say that from 1,500 to 2,000 are
expected.
My crew, as I told you, I consider too inefficient to do anything
but use the big guns. I might blow steamers and all to pieces, but I
do not feel the circular gives me the authority; it is too obscure in its
directions to admit of my proceeding to such an extreme-the only
way in which I could interfere. The vessels come properly cleared
for Greytown, and pronounced all right before sailing from the United
States, and I cannot, in my opinion, pronounce them wrong and
legally act against them.
This seems to be the place designed for their landing, and no doubt
Walker will direct them to do so, as the cargo of the Fashion has
all been landed on shore, making a depot of provisions, &c. He has
hoisted his flag above and below Scott's grounds. The soil he is on
is not under my jurisdiction ; but I have given him to understand,
very plainly, that any outrage by him on American property at that
place or at Greytown will call from me immediate punishment, which
I would not hesitate to inflict, because that would be a clear case. I
trust sincerely I will see you very soon. If any vessel comes in with
irregular papers, I will detain cargo and passengers on board till your
arrival; but I do not see the authority even to bring a ship too, with
shot and shell, in a foreign port at the risk of destroying life and
property. However, I will do the best I can. Mr. Cottrell, immedi-
ately on his arrival here, re-examined the Fashion's papers, and
having found them to be correct, has cleared her for New Orleans,
and she leaves to day. *
I have the honor to remain, with high respect, y our obedient
servant,
FRED'K CHATARD, Commander.
Flag Officer H. PAULLDING,
Com'g Home Squadron2, friijie TWabash, AFpi)woll, N. G.

Respectfully forwarded to the honorable Secretary of the Navy.
By your obedient servant,
H. PAULDING.
Flag 0 .' C, .... ; ",.' Home Squadron.






60 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


C.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY OF NICARAGUA,
Punta Arenas, November 30, 1857.
SIR: I have the honor to inform you that I landed at this port, on
Wednesday last, from the steamer Fashion, bearing the United States
flag and sailing from the port of Mobile, Alabama. Accompanying
me were a number of officers belonging to the Nicaraguan service, and
some emigrants from the United States who desired to become natu-
ralized citizens of this republic. The steamer was regularly cleared
at Mobile for the port of San Juan de Nicaragua, and it was acknow-
ledged that her voyage was a legal one. I need not add that the
President and government of the United States were fully advised of
my intention to return to Nicaragua.
We had scarcely, however, disembarked, when the commander of
the United States sloop "Saratoga" sent a lieutenant to inform me
I must evacuate certain property, now held by one Joseph N. Scott as
the pretended agent of the Nicaragua Transportation Company. The
"Fashion," too, had hauled alongside the schooner Chase," for-
metly sailed under the United States flg, but now without papers, as
she was transferred to me by act before the commercial agent for the
United States ; nevertheless, the captain of the "Fashion was or-
dered to haul away from the Chase," and not to land any stores for
me from the ship until I had complied with the order to evacuate the
buildings now held by Scott. I was informed by the commander of
the "Saratoga"' that these orders were given because Mr. Scott
claimed protection for the property as being American. In all this,
Commander Chatard acted ex parte, receiving Scott's statements as
true, and announcing a decision on the matter without hearing what
I had to say.
Now, I beg leave to inform you that Mr. Scott holds all the prop-
erty on the point from the government of Nicaragua, and under an
order from me as president of the republic. Furthermore he holds
the schooner Chase" as my trustee, and he is now protected in
fraudulently withholding her from me by an officer of the United
States navy. Scott also holds other property, consisting of military
and other stores belonging to this government ; and these he wrong-
fully and illegally retains by the aid of the guns of the "Saratoga."
Notwithstanding the injustice of the commander, I was obliged to
yield to the orders of the Saratoga. But this did not relieve me
from what I cannot but style the impertinence of Commander Chatard.
Without alleging that there had been any interference on my part
with American property, he sent a lieutenant to inform me that if I
molested such property he would regard my force as hostile and pre-
vent it, by shot and shell, from leaving the point.
Nor did this end the injustice of Commander Chatard. This morn-
ing I received a note, under seal of H. B. M. consul general of Mos-
quito, couched in the following terms:





NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


"UNITED STATES SLOOP SARATOGA,
Off Greytown, November 30, 1857.
SIR: I have been informed, through Mr. Green, H. B. M's. con-
sul, that you meditate seizing the English mail from Costa Rica, with
American, English and letters of merchants of other nations, besides
there may be money. Now 1 warn you not to touch it, and to allow
it to come safely at hand here. If you do not, I will proceed against
you without hesitation in the manner I sent you word the other day.
In a few days the American as well as the English commodores will
be here, and all your acts of violence will then be more particularly
noticed.
"Yours, respectfully,
"FRED. CHATARD, Commander."

I have the honor to report these facts to you, and to request that you
wil cause Commander Chatard to cease this unjust and illegal conduct.
As a native of the United States, engaged in what your government
admits to be a lawful undertaking, and asserting rights which cannot
but commend themselves to the sense of justice of all civilized nations,
I claim as my due that you shall not permit the sovereignty of Nica-
ragua to be violated by the commander of the Saratoga for the pur-
pose of gratifying his opinions or his prejudices. With full confi-
dence I ask from your hands that justice which it is the proud boast
of your government to award to all.
I have the honer to be your obedient servant,
WM. WALKER,
Comnmanding-in-chief Army of Nicaragua.
Commodore H. PAULDING,
United States Navy.
Respectfully forwarded to Hon. Secretary of the Navy by your
obedient servant,
H. PAULDING,
Flag Qfficer, Commanding Home Squadron.


D.
SAN JLAN, November 30, 1857.
DEAR SIR: I regret to inform you that a steamer passed San Juan
at mid-day on the 24th instant, and landed some of her soldiers at
the mouth of Colorado river, and went up with some boats and men.
The next day, early in the morning, she entered the harbor of San
Juan with Walker, Hornsby, Rogers, and others, mostly the same
persons who were connected with him before, and landed his men at
the Transit Company office. This was on the 25th day of November-
a day memorable to the United States, when the British evacuated
the city of New York; when all hearts rejoiced, and gave true thanks
unto Almighty God. What a difference there is here, on the same
day of the month, in the poverty stricken inhabitants on the arrival
of Walker, who are calling upon God to save and deliver them from





62 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.

the bloody hands and footsteps of Walker and his confederates, from
the natives and citizens of every clime. I, the same day, asked pro-
tection from Captain Chatard, of the sloop-of-war Saratoga, for my
life and property against Walker, who had plundered us of our goods,
destroyed our houses in Nicaragua, and put my son' in prison, and a
sentinel at our door. We have a house here. I am waiting to get a
fair price from some person to enable us to pay our creditors, which
is all we have left to them. Sir, we are American merchants here,
father and son, and were doing a large and extensive business, and
had two stores in the city of San Juan, a store and goods at Virgin
bay, and a hotel in Granada city, and one at Castillo .rapids, with a
largeamount of furniture and provisions, which was burnt at both the
places by Walker. My family and children still reside at Peekskill,
where your brother George, who was alderman in the city of New
York, introduced you to myself and family there many years ago.
Sir, the steamer leaves here for Aspinwall. I hope you will come
here without delay. We are all waiting in suspense to see what is
to be done with Walker. Trade is entirely destroyed. Captain Cha-
tard has assured me he will protect me and our property at all
hazards.
Your old friend, with great respect,
SAMUEL S. WOOD.
Commodore PAULDING,
Of the Wabash steam frigate.
Sir, the agent, Mr. Scott, has protested against Walker's landing
at the Company's buildings; and the Saratoga has hauled close to
them and their steamer, which has no name. To-day, the 27th, the
American consul will arrive from Aspinwall, and I hope he will not
let Walker go on his bloody course again. The captain of the Sara-
toga has ordered General Walker from the Company's buildings,
where they were located. I have just heard from a person from down
the river that Walker's men are as far as the senpike, and are going
into Costa Rica as soon as they can.


No. 15.
FLAG-SHIP WABASH,
[No. 140.] Off San Juan del Norte, December 11, 1857.
SIR: I arrived here on the 6th instant, and on the 8th, with a force
from the squadron that could not be resisted by General Walker, de-
manded the surrender of his arms and the embarkation of himself
and followers from Point Arenas.
The officers and men of his organization, together with such stores
as could be received, are on board the Saratoga, and she will sail this
evening or tomorrow morning for Norfolk. I shall direct Captain
Chatard to report to the department for instructions.
In the course I have pursued I have acted from my judgment, and
trust it may meet the approbation of the President.
I inclose a copy of a letter from General Walker, dated on the 2d





* NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


of December, marked A; a copy of my letter demanding his surren-
der, marked B ; the copy of a letter to the United States marshal for
the southern district of New York, marked C, and a letter from Cap-
tain Chatard, with copies of letters addressed by him to Walker,
marked D.
As soon as the Saratoga sails, I shall leave for Aspinwall.
On hearing of the landing of Walker, the Fulton left Boca del
Toro, and arrived here on the evening of the 7th. She will remain
here until further orders.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
H. PAULDING,
Flag Officer, Commanding Home Squadron.
Hon. ISAAC TOUCEY,
Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.


A.
HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY OF NICARAGUA,
Punta Arenas, December 2, 1857.
SIn: Since addressing you on the 30th ultimo, other events have
transpired to which I am constrained to call your attention.
On the afternoon of the 30th, a brig bearing Sardinian colors, and
having the Nicaraguan flag at the fore, entered this harbor. Soon
after she rounded the point, a number of armed boats pulled off' from
the Saratoga towards the brig and an officer boarded her. Thus, you
perceive the Saratoga attempts to maintain the police of this port in
derogation of the territorial rights of Nicaragua, treating vessels in
our harbor precisely as if they were on the high seas. I cannot think
that your government authorizes such palpable wrong and injustice.
The same day several officers from the Saratoga, not in uniform,
came into my camp regardless of the hail of the sentinel and with-
out permission from the officer of the day. They were informed that
should they do so again, the sentry would be instructed to fire on
them. On the following morning, I was surprised to receive by the
hands of Lieutenant Cilley, the following communication:
UNITED STATES SHIP SARATOGA,
San Juan del Norte, December 1, 1857.
SIR: Lieutenant Cilley, the bearer of this, is one of the officers to
whom you offered yesterday the gross indignity of threatening to
shoot them. Now, such an insult to officers of the United States
navy is a national offence. You certainly act with very little policy,
for surely if you were to dare to touch one of my officers, I would feel
justified to retaliate in the extreme, and would not hesitate to do so.
I will lay the matter before the commodore when he arrives, and no
doubt he will feel the insult more deeply than myself. I received
your despatch, and will forward it to him.
Respectfully,
"FREDERICK CHATARD,
Commander.
"Gen. WM WALKER."






64 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.

A few hours after this note was sent, several boats filled with
armed men, and with a boat howitzer in one of them, were seen pull-
ing from the Saratoga to the upper portion of the point where a com-
pany of my men were quartered. The United States officer in charge
of the boats immediately began, without notice, to practice his men
in firing, whilst the Nicaraguan officer deployed his command as
skirmishers to resist any encroachment upon his camp. Under such
circumstances a chance shot might have brought about a collision be-
tween the two forces. Seeing from the conduct of the commander of
the Saratoga that he was criminally seeking to produce a collision, I
deemed it prudent to order the company near where his boats landed
into my main camp. I can assure you it is only by constant watch-
fulness and caution on my part that an actual conflict has been pre-
vented.
Although I had treated the previous notes of Commander Chatard
with the contempt they merited, by refusing to answer them, he sent
me this morning, by the hand of an officer, another communication,
of which the following is a copy :

"U. S. SLOOP SARATOGA, December 2, 1857.
Si: As I am entirely opposed to harming any one, unless I know
I have full right and very good reasons to do so, I wish to notify you
in time that your men on the Point are in the way of any shot I may
have to fire to bring vessels to; for I am determined to bring all
vessels to that I may fully inquire into their character. Of course I
do not admit your claim to that soil, nor can you yourself, in earnest,
imagine that any nation in the civilized world can do so either.
"Respectfully,
"FREDERICK CHATARD,
Commander.
"Gen. WM. WALKER."

You will see that this note re-asserts the right of a United States
vessel to maintain the police of this port. The commander, too, after
having admitted my claim to exercise the functions of government, by
accusing me of offering an indignity to the United States, now denies
our right to the soil of Nicaragua. But it is useless to call your
attention to the childish follies of these notes, as they are apparent to
the most casual observer. Were they not signed by an United States
officer they should not be dignified by notice on my part.
With consideration, I have the honor to remain your obedient
servant.
WILLIAM WALKER,
Commanding-in-c'hief Army of icaragua.
Commodore H. PAULDING,
United States Nhavy.

I certify the above to be a true copy.
T. PAULDING,
Commodore's Secretary.






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER. 65


B.

UNITED STATES FLAG-SHIP WABASH,
QOf San Juan del Norte, December 7, 1857.
SIR: Your letter of November 30 was received at Aspinwall and
sent with my despatches to the government. That of December 2
came to my hands yesterday.
These letters surprised me with their tone of audacity and falsifi-
cation of facts.
Your rude discourtesy in speaking of Captain Chatard, of the Sar-
atoga, I pass without comment. The mistake he made was in not
driving you from the Point Arenas when you landed there in defiance
of his guns.
In occupying the Point Arenas, and assuming it to be the head-
quarters of the army of Nicaragua, and you its commander-in-chief,
you and your associates being lawless adventurers, you deceive no one
by the absurdity.
Lieutenant Cilley, of the Saratoga, informs me that he was in uni-
form, and you say he was in plain clothes, when you threatened to
shoot him.
Whilst you use such threats, it may be of some importance for you
to know, that if any person belonging to my command shall receive
injury from your lawless violence, the penalty to you shall be a tribute
to humanity.
Now, sir, you and your followers are here in violation of the laws
of the United States, and greatly to its dishonor ; making war upon
a people with whom we are at peace ; and for the sake of humanity,
public and private justice, as well as what is due to the honor and in-
tegrity of the government of the United States, I command you, and
the people associated here with you, to surrender your arms without
delay, and embark in such vessels as I may provide for that purpose.
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
H. PAULDING,
Flag Oficer, Com'g U. S. Home Squadron.
Gen. WM.1 WALKER,
Punta Arenas.

I certify the above to be a true copy.
T. PAULDING,
Commodore's Secretary.


C.

UNITED STATES FLAG-SHIP WABASH,
Off San Juan del Norte, December 11, 1857.
SIR: This will be handed to you by General William Walker, who
has given me his parole of honor that he will present it to you in
person. 7I
H. Ex. Doc. 24- 5






66 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.

With the naval force of this squadron I arrested General Walker
on Punta Arenas, on the 8th instant, for a violation of the neutrality
laws of the United States, he having set on foot in the United States
an unlawful military organization to make war upon a people with
whom we are at peace, and was, at the time of his arrest, at the head
of said organization in the act of making war, as above stated.
As marshal for the southern district of New York, I consign him
to your custody.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
H. PAULDING,
Flag Oficer, Com'g U. S. Home Squadron.
ISAIAH RYNDERS, Esq.,
U. S. Marshal for the Southern District of New York.



UNITED STATES STEAM FRIGATE WABASH,
Off San Juan del Norte, December 11, 1857.
The option being given me to go to the United States in the Saratoga,
or take passage at my own expense from Aspinwall to New York,
I have preferred to return by way of Aspinwall, and will deliver this
communication, in person, to the marshal for the southern district of
New York.
WM. WALKER.

I certify the above to be a true copy.
T. PAULDING,
Commodore's Secretary.


D.

UNITED STATES SLOOP SARATOGA,
San Juan del Norte, December 4, 1857.
SIR: I have the honor to transmit to you my different communica-
tions with Walker since he has been on shore at Punta Arenas. In
the first place, by letter to you of the 30th ult., you saw that I noti-
fied him to leave Scott's property, and in no way to interfere with
anything under his agency, all of which I considered American pro-
perty, and, also, that I would protect the people of Greytown.
On the 27th ult., some fears having been expressed to me by Mr.
Wood, an American citizen on shore at Greytown, that supposed em-
issaries from Walker were trying to dispossess him of a printing press
he had, and also that he conceived his person in jeopardy, I sent my
first Lieutenant to Walker to say to him that if he interfered with
said Wood, or the property of any American citizen in Greytown, or
grossly outraged the people there, that I would open upon him with
shot and shell. The following are the subsequent written messages






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


to him, to all of which he gave verbal answers, disavowing the charges
in the best way he could imagine.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
FRED. CHATARD,
Commander.
Flag Officer HIRAM PAULDING,
Comd'g Home Squadron, Frigate Wabash.



U. S. SLOOP SARATOGA,
Off Greytown, November 30, 1857.
SIR: I have been informed through Mr. Green, her Britannic Ma-
jesty's consul, that you meditate seizing the English mail from Costa
Rica, with letters of American, English, and of merchants of other
nations; besides, there may be money. Now I warn you not to touch
it, and to allow it to come safely to hand here. If you do not, I will
proceed against you in the manner I spoke of the other day. In a few
days the American, as well as English, commodores will be here, and
all your acts of violence will be more particularly noticed.
Respectfully,
F. CHATARD,
Commander.
General WALKER.


UNITED STATES SLOOP SARATOGA,
Off Greytown, December 1, 1857.
SIR: Lieutenant Cilley, the bearer of this, is one of the officers to
whom you offered yesterday the gross indignity of threatening to
shoot them. Now such an insult to officers of the United States
navy is a national offence. You certainly act with very little policy,
for surely if you were to dare to touch one of my officers I would feel
myself justified to retaliate in the extreme, and would not hesitate to
do so. I will lay the matter before the commodore when he arrives,
and no doubt he will feel the insult more deeply than myself.
I received your despatch and will forward it to him"
I am, &c.,
FRED'K CHATARD,
Commander.
General WALKER, Present.


UNITED STATES SLOOP SARATOGA,
Greytown, December 2, 1857.
SIR: As I am entirely opposed to harming any one, unless I know
I have full right and very good reason to do so, I wish to notify you
in time that your men on the Point are in the way of any shot I may
have to fire to bring vessels to; for I am determined to bring all ves-






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


sels to, so that I may enquire into their character. Of course I do not
admit your claim to that soil, nor can you yourself, in earnest,
imagine that any nation in the civilized world can do so either.
I am, respectfully,
FRED'K CHATARD,
Commander.
General WALKER, Present.
I certify the above to be a true copy.
L. PAULDING.
Commodore's Secretary.


No. 16.
[No. 141.] FLAG-SHIP WABASH,
Qf Aspinwall, Dec. 14, 1857.
Sir: I arrived here this morning, and the steamer Fashion is about
to sail for New Orleans, leaving me but just time to inform the depart-
ment that the Saratoga sailed from San Juan del Norte on the 12th inst.
for Norfolk, Virginia, having on board one hundred and fifty of the
followers of General Walker, arrested at Punta Arenas on the 8th.
General Walker came here in the Wabash, and will embark in the
next steamer for New York.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
H. PAULDING,
Flag Officer, Commanding Home Squadron.
Hon. ISAAC TOUCEY,
Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.
Original by steamer Fashion to New Orleans, Dec. 14.


No. 17.
FLAG-SHIP WABASH,
[No. 142.] Of Aspinwall, December 15, 1857.
SIR: My letter of the 12th [11th] instant informed the depart-
ment that I had broken up the camp of General Walker, at Punta
Arenas, disarmed his lawless followers, and sent them to Norfolk in
the "Saratoga." The general came here with me, and will take
passage in one of the steamers for New York, where he will present
himself to the marshal of the district.
The department being in possession of all the facts in relation to
Walker's escape with his followers from the United States, as well as
the letters of Captain Chatard and Walker to me after he landed at
Point Arenas, the merits of the whole question will, I presume, be
fully comprehended.
I could not regard Walker and his followers in any other light than
as outlaws who had escaped from the vigilance of the officers of the
government, and left our shores for the purpose of rapine and murder,






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER. 69

and I saw no other way to vindicate the law and redeem the honor of
our country than by disarming and sending them home.
In doing so I am sensible of the responsibility that I have incurred,
and confidently look to the government for my justification.
Regarded in its true light, the case appears to me a clear one, the
points few and strong.
Walker came to Point Arenas from the United States, having, in
violation of law, set on foot a military organization to make war upon
a people with whom we are at peace. He landed there with armed
men and munitions of war, in defiance of the guns of a ship-of-war
placed there to prevent his landing.
With nothing to show that he acted by authority, he formed a
camp, hoisted the Nicaraguan flag, called it the headquarters of the
army of Nicaragua," and signed himself the commander-in-chief.
With this pretension he claimed the right of a lawful general over
all persons and things within sight of his flag. Without right or
authority he landed fifty men at the mouth of the river Colorado,
seized the fort of Castillo, on the San Juan, captured steamers and
the goods of merchants in transit to the interior, killed men, and
made prisoners of the peaceful inhabitants, sending to the harbor of
San Juan del Norte some thirty or forty men, women, and children
in the steamer Morgan."
In doing these things without the show of authority, they were
guilty of rapine and murder, and must be regarded as outlaws and
pirates. They can have no claim to be regarded in any other light.
Humanity, as well as law and justice, and national honor, de-
manded the dispersion of these lawless men.
The remnant of the miserable beings who surrendered at Rivas
were conveyed in this ship last summer to New York, and their suffer-
ings are yet fresh in the memory of all on board.
Besides the sufferings that would necessarily be inflicted upon an
innocent and unoffending people, these lawless followers of General
Walker, misguided and deceived into a career of crime, would doubt-
less have perished in Central America, or their mutilated and fester-
ing bodies have been brought back to their friends at the expense of
their country.
For the above reasons, which appear to my mind quite sufficient, I
have disarmed and sent to the United States General William Walker
and his outlawed and piratical followers for trial, or for whatever
action the government in its wisdom may think proper to pursue.
Captain Ommanny, of H. B. M. ship "Brunswick," offered to
co-operate with me in removing the party from Point Arenas, but as
they were my countrymen I deemed it proper to decline the participa-
tion of a foreign flag.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
H. PAULDING,
Flag Oficer, Commanding Home Squadron.
Hon. ISAAC TOUCEY,
Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.






70 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.

No. 18.

[No. 143.] FLAG-SHIP WABASH,"
Of Aspinwall, December 18, 1857.
SIR: The steamer Morgan" arrived in the port of San Juan Del
Norte from Castillo, on the San Juan river, on the day of the dis-
arming of General Walker.
The steamer had been seized by the party of Walker that went up
the Colorado, and the captain, agent and others employed on board,
had been placed in their positions by the authority of General Walker.
She had on board about forty prisoners, men, women, and children,
and a person whom I was informed was condemned to death.
I caused them all to be sent on shore at liberty, and placed the
steamer in the hands of Mr. Cotrell, our commercial agent until she
should be claimed by the owner.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
H. PAULDING,
Flag Oficer, Commanding Home Squadron.
Hon. ISAAC TOUCEY,
Secretary of the Navy. WJashington, D. C.



No. 19.

[No. 144.] FLAG-SHIP WABASH,
Off Aspinwall, December 18, 1857.
SIR: I have ordered Captain Engle to proceed to Washington and
place in your hands the despatches I have entrusted to his care. Any
information that I may have omitted can be communicated by him.
I have the honor to commend Captain Engle to your high consider-
ation as an officer who has no superior in the navy for skill and intel-
ligence in the command of his ship.
The admirable discipline of the crew of the Wabash is creditable to
him and the navy.
The marines and seamen were landed at Point Arenas under cir-
cumstances of great difficulty, whilst the ship, in a heavy sea-way, was
rolling her scuppers to the water.
The work of getting out the boats and arming was attended with
great labor and almost insuperable difficulty, yet everything was done
in so seamanlike and skillful a manner, that it was accomplished in
the shortest possible time without loss or accident.
Lieutenant Sinclair, to whom Captain Engle and myself are much
indebted for his untiring zeal and industry, superintended the general
duty of the ship, and when the marines and seamen were embarked
in the Fulton," took command and direction of the howitzer barges
and deployed them in their position in the harbor on the left of
Walker's camp.
The marines of the squadron, commanded by Lieutenants Lewis and






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


Payne, and three divisions of seamen from the Wabash, with small
arms, and commanded by Lieutenants Fairfax, Beaumont and Paulding,
landed and displayed in order of battle on the right and rear, all
exhibiting the skill and tactics of practiced troops-amounting in
number to about three hundred and fifty.
When these arrangements had been made and the broadside of the
Saratoga sprung to bear on the front, there was no chance of suc-
cessful resistance.
Captain Engle proceeded to the camp, and in person presented my
letter to General Walker, demanding the surrender of his arms and
his embarkation with his followers, and saw the flag hauled down.
To the excellent discipline and fine bearing of the officers and men
I am indebted, in the performance of this most unpleasant service, for
the exemption of all casualty or accident. There was no one injured,
and no loss of any kind sustained.
No commanding officer was ever supported by a body of officers
and men in a manner more highly to command his admiration and
respect.
Lieutenant Commanding Almy, of the Fulton, performed his part
of the service exceedingly well, as I am assured he will do at all
times and under all circumstances.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
H. PAULDING,
Flag QOicer, Commanding Home Squadron.
Hon. ISAAC TOUCEY,
Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.


No. 20.
[No. 145.] FLAG-SHIP WABASH,"
Off Aspinwall, December 18, 1857.
SI : Enclosed herewith is a list of such articles found in Walker's
camp, at Point Arenas, as were embarked in the Saratoga ;" also,
a list of those embarked on board the Wabash."
I request that the department will be pleased to imform me what
disposition shall be made of that portion on board the "Wabash."
I presume Captain Chatard will be instructed in regard to that por-
tion of the camp stores conveyed in the "Saratoga."
There are yet fifty of Walker's party at Castillo, on the San Juan
river, they having landed at the mouth of the Colorado, and ascended
the San Juan from thence.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
H. PAULDING,
Flag Qgicer, Commanding Home Squadron.
Hon. ISAAC TOUCEY,
Secretary of the Navy, Washing!on, D. C.
P. S.-I enclose, also, a copy of the report made me by Lieutenant
Cilley of an indignity offered him by Walker, which I have omitted
to forward with my former despatches. H. P.






72 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


List of provisions, &c., belonging to General William Walker's forces,
nozo on board of the United States ship Saratoga."


barrels bread
barrels beef
barrels pork
barrels beans
barrels flour
barrels rice
barrel sugar
barrels vinegar
barrel salt
bag salt


Approved.


17 boxes soap
6 boxes candles
2 bags coffee
60 blankets
89 tin pots
68 tin plates
72 tin spoons
68 knives
48 forks
17 mess kettles.


GEO. H. RITCHIE,
Purser United States Sloop Saratoga."


Inventory of arms, ammunition, ordnance stores, and provisions, be-
longing to Walker's" party, received on board United States ship
Wabash," at San Juan del Norte, December 12, 1858.


Case.
1 containing
2 "c
3 "
4 "
5 "
6 "
7 cc


8 "
Si


It
9 "


10 "

11 "


12 "


174 bayonet scabbards and belts
163 cartridge boxes
173 do do
85 do do
33 do do
77 do do
27 cavalry pistols
27 cartridge boxes
7 bayonet scabbards
122 single bullet moulds
2 Minie do do
9 worms
38 screw drivers
1 pair clippers
20 muskets
24 bayonets
4 cavalry sabres
24 muskets
53 bayonets
18 muskets
18 bayonets
7 cavalry sabres
29 rifles
1 cavalry sabre






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


Case.
13 containing 28 rifles
14 bayonets
14 25 rifles
15 28 rifles
FFF 15 kegs rifle powder
18 1 box Minie balls and gun-flints
3,256 ball cartriges
19, 20,21 77,650 percussion caps
17 quires cartridge paper
6 kegs and 1 box lead
36 spades
42 pick-axes
24 axes
24 axe helves
29 pickaxe shelves
3 kegs nails
16 20 flint muskets, altered to percussion
17 20 flint muskets, altered to percussion
1 barrel salt
2 barrels whiskey
2 barrels pork
1 barrel beef
'7,300 pounds bread.


UNITED STATES STEAM FRIGATE WABASH,
December 17, 1857.
We hereby certify that the articles enumerated in the foregoing in-
ventory were received and packed in our presence.
E. MELLACH,
Purser's Cleric.
WM. H. HAMILTON,
Gunner.
RECAPITULATION.


bayonet scabbards and belts.
cartridge boxes.
cavalry pistols.
muskets.
rifles.
bayonets.
swords, (cavalry sabres.)


UNITED STATES SLOOP SARATOGA,
Greytown, December 6, 1857.
SIR: In obedience to your order of this date, I respectfully submit
the following statement:
On November 30th, ultimo, between meridian and 1 p. m., Mid-






74 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.

shipmen Mathews, Porter, and myself, all in uniform, left the ship in
a canoe and paddled to Mr. Craig's landing, on Point Arenas. On
nearing the wharf a sentry hailed us and ordered us not to land there.
I replied that we were American officers, and that we would land there,
which we did, securing our canoe to the wharf, and then entered Mr.
Craig's store. He was not in, but a Mr. Mills, who lives with him, an
American citizen, I think, supplied his place. A desultory conversation
ensued between us. About ten or fifteen minutes after entering the store,
a person with a sword came in and addressed me, stating that General
Walker said we must leave, and not land there without a pass from him.
I told him I did not recognize General Walker's right to order us away
from there, and that I had permission from the executive officer of our
ship to land, and should not leave without I was forcibly expelled, or
if the order was reiterated I would consider it equivalent to a forci-
ble expulsion, as General Walker had the force on the spot, and could
compel us to leave. He left me, and in a few minutes returned, saying
it was General Walker's order for us to leave, and if we attempted to
land again without a pass from him we would be fired into. I told
him that he had the force on the spot and could compel us to leave,
and that I protested, and would report the matter to the commander
of the Saratoga, and called upon our officers to bear witness and re-
member the remarks that had been made. I returned to the ship and
reported the matter to Mr. Bryson, the commander being absent. I
was despatched forthwith to make my report to Commander Chatard,
who was on board the R. M. ship Dee. I made my report to him and
returned to the ship.
I would state that Mr. Craig keeps a public store and bar, and he
allows Walker to keep some of his stores there, the storage being paid.
We did not leave Mr. Craig's store, or put our feet on the ground,
and neither of us possessed a weapon of any description.
The following morning I received orders from Captain Chatard to
take charge of the 4th cutter, and deliver a document to General
Walker.
About 8h. 30m. a. m., I left in the boat Midshipman Porter and
the boat's crew being fully armed. On approaching Craig's wharf
we were hailed by a sentry and told to keep off and not to land. I
told him "I was ordered to land and would," and kept on in the boat
until alongside the wharf; the sentry approached nearer to the boat,
bringing his piece to a ready, and cocking it, and said keep the boat
off or he would fire. I told him if he fired a shot I would fire a vol-
ley at him ; that I had a document for General Walker and would
deliver it, and jumped on the wharf, giving orders to the boat's crew
to cock their pieces and be ready to fire. Two officers hurried from
General Walker's quarters, and one approached me as I reached the
head of the wharf, saying I had General Walker's permission to land.
I told him it was unasked, and that I wished to be shown to General
Walker's quarters, as I had a document to place in his hands. He
conducted me to his quarters, and I entered and delivered the docu-
ment to General Walker. He inquired my name; I gave it to him,
and said that it would be found in the letter.
After perusing it, he turned to me and said : I meant no personal






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


indignity to you, Lieutenant Cilley, in ordering you away yesterday."
I replied, that I did not consider it a personal indignity, and that he
could not offer me one while in my uniform, and that I viewed it en-
tirely as an official indignity.
General Walker then said : As regards the indignity offered to
the United States, I am ready to account for it to the Commodore."
I left, returned to the ship, and reported the matter to the com-
mander.
To the best of my recollection, the foregoing is all that ensued rel-
ative to the indignities offered me.
I am. very respectfully, your obedient servant,
GREENLEAF CILLEY,
Lieutenant United States Navy.
Commander FREDERICK CHATARD.


No. 21.

[No. 146.] FLAG SHIP "WABASH,"
Of Aspinwall, December 18, 1857.
SIR: I am informed of the arrival, at San Juan del Norte, of the
steamer "Susquehanna," on the 13th instant.
The following is an extract from Captain Sands' report to me:
"I have also, as required, reported to the department from 'Key
West.' I have further to state my compliance with the orders to
shape my course to Cape Gracios, Honduras, having looked into
Bluefield this morning, where I heard of Walker's being here.
"Supposing you anxious for the arrival of this ship, I did not put
into Pensacola for provisions, as we have nearly four months of every-
thing required on board.'
I have the honor herewith to enclose a copy of my letter to Captain
Sands, dated on the 12th.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
H. PAULDING,
Flag Qfficer. Commanding Home Squadron.
Hon. ISAAC TOLCEY,
Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.



FLAG SHIP WABASII,
Qf' San Juan del Norte, December 12, 1857.
SIR: On your arrival here, if it be within two weeks from this date,
it may be of importance that the Fulton" should cruise at the mouth
of the Colorado river for a short time, sufficiently long to leave no
apprehension of any further filibuster enterprises, which, I suppose,
will cease with a knowledge of Walker's discomfiture. When you
shall consider that she can be dispensed with off the Colorado, send
her to Aspinwall, touching at Boca del Toro. Captain Almy has






76 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.

been instructed to furnish you with a copy of his last instructions from
the department.
Almy can tell you what has occurred here better than I can write
it in the hurry of my affairs.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
H. PAULDING,
Flag OQicer, Com'g Home Squadro2n.
Captain JOSHUA R. SANDS,
Comr'g U. S. S. Frigate Susquehanna, San Juan del Norte.



No. 22.

NAVY DEPARTMENT, December 18, 1857.
SIR: Your despatches, (Nos. 134, 135, 137, 138, and 139,) not here-
tofore acknowledged, have been received.
The department enjoins upon you particular vigilance in carrying
out the instructions heretofore given you in relation to unlawful ex-
peditions. In doing so you will be careful not to interfere with law-
ful commerce. But where you find that an American vessel is mani-
festly engaged in carrying on an expedition or enterprise from the
territories or jurisdiction of the United States against the territories
of Mexico, Nicaragua, or Costa Rica, contrary to the 6th section of
the act of Congress of April 20, 1818, already referred to, you will
cause the force under your command to prevent it, and will not per-
mit the men or arms engaged in it, or destined for it, to be landed in
any part of Mexico or Central America.
The three points which it is most important to guard are, Aspin-
wall, Chiriqui, and San Juan del Norte, and with this view you will
dispose of the forces under your command to the best advantage. The
President directs me to inform you that he considers it all-important
that you should not leave the neighborhood of these points until fur-
ther instructions by the department, which you are hereby ordered
not to do under any circumstances.
Should the Saratoga not have left before you receive this, you will
suspend Commander Chatard from his command and order him to
return to the United States, to await the further action of the depart-
ment. You will then place Lieutenant George T. Sinclair in com-
mand of the Saratoga, with directions to carry out the instructions to
Commander Chatard of the 16th ultimo, to proceed to Norfolk.
The Jamestown, Commander Kennedy, will leave Philadelphia
early next week to join you at San Juan.
I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,
ISAAC TOUCEY.
Flag Officer H. PAULDING,
Com'g U. S. Home Squadron, San Juan del Norte.





NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


No. 23.

NAVY DEPARTMENT, December 22, 1857.
SI : When the Jamestown, under your command, is ready for sea,
you will proceed with her to San Juan del Norte, Nicaragua, and
report to Flag Officer Paulding, should he be there, as a part of the
squadron under his command. In his absence you will report to any
senior officer, should one be present, and by letter to Flag Officer
Paulding.
In view of the illegal expeditions that have been, or may be, set on
foot in this country against Mexico, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica, and
the possible absence of an American man-of-war from San Juan upon
your arrival there, I deem it proper to transmit for your guidance a
copy of a circular upon the subject from the State Department, the
instructions contained in which you will regard as addressed to your-
self, and in carrying out which the department enjoins upon you par-
ticular vigilance.
In doing so you will be careful not to interfere with lawful com-
merce. But when you find that an American vessel is manifestly
engaged in carrying on an expedition or enterprise from the territo-
ries or jurisdiction of the United States against the territories of
Mexico, Nicaragua, or Costa Rica, contrary to the 6th section of the
act of Congress of April 20, 1818, already referred to, you will cause
the force under your command to prevent it, and will not permit the
men or arms engaged in it, or destined for it, to be landed in any
part of Mexico or Central America.
It is desirable that you proceed to sea at the earliest practicable
period.
I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,
ISAAC TOUCEY.
Commander CHARLEs H. A. H. KENNEDY,
Commanding U. S. Sloop-of-war Jamcestown, Philcdelplhia.


No. 24.

U. S. SHIP SARATOGA, January 1, 1858.
Sm : I have the honor to report my arrival at the earliest moment
by order of Commodore Paulding. I am nineteen days from Grey-
town, having on board General Walker's party; of the circumstances
of their capture, &c., Commodore Paulding's despatches, borne by
Lieutenant Ghirardi, will acquaint you. Herewith enclosed is a list
of their names, and also a list of stores taken on board belonging to
that party, of which I expended as much as necessary to aid in sub-
sisting them ; parts of the ration I was obliged to expend from the
ship. Liquor I did not allow to any of them. The whole party are
very destitute of means and clothing ; much of what they have on
was given by the officers and crew of the ship ; they belong generally
to the southern States-many are quite young. It is very painful for






78 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.

us to know their wants, and to see their total inability to leave this
place. If they are not to be set at liberty immediately, I respectfully
suggest that they may be removed to the Pennsylvania," where
they will be more comfortable; no stoves being on this ship they
must suffer much from cold.
*
[The part of the despatch here omitted relates to the officers, crew,
and condition of the ship.]
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
FREDERICK CHATARD,
Commander.
Hon. ISAAC TOUCEY,
Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.



List of arms and ammunition belonging to General Walker's followers
now on board the United States sloop-of-war Saratoga."
20 Mississippi rifles.
5 Minnie muskets.
11 United States muskets.
5 United States rifles.
6 sabres.
4 bayonets.
12 cartridge-boxes.
150 lbs. musket powder.
ball-cartridges.
percussion caps.
4 U. S. pistols.
2 Minnie rifles.


List of provisions, &c., received on board U. S. S.
longing to General Walker's forces.


48 barrels bread.
12 barrels beef.
36 barrels pork.
7 barrels beans.
5 barrels flour.
2 barrels rice.
1 barrel sugar.
2 barrels vinegar.
1 barrel salt.
1 bag salt.


"Saratoga," be-


17 boxes soap.
6 boxes candles.
2 bags coffee.
60 blankets.
89 tin pots.
68 tin plates.
72 spoons.
68 knives.
48 forks.
17 mess-kettles.
FRED'K CHATARD,
Commander,






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


Prisoners on board the United States sloop Saratoga."


OFFICERS.

Capt. Fayssoux, (navy,)
Col. B. V. Katzmer,
Col. Swingle,
Col. T. S. Tucker,
Col. Thos, Henry,
Major J. V. Hoof,
Capt. S. D. M. Chesney,
Capt. W. A. Rhea,
Capt. H. C. Cook,
Capt. R. G. Stokeley,
Capt. B. F. Whittier,
Lieut. D. D. Waters,
Lieut. McMullen,
Lieut. Haskins,


2d. Lieut. Grilky,
2d. Lieut. West,
2d. Lieut. Carroll,
2d. Lieut. Hunter,
2d. Lieut. Yates,
2d. Lieut. Byles,
Surgeon James Kellum,
Surgeon Thum,
Assist. surgeon Greenles,
Assist. surgeon Holt,
Dr. Jackson,
Mr. J. 3M. West,
Genl. Hornsby,
Capt. Brady,
Capt. Buttrick,
Mrs. Buttrick and 3 children-33


PRIVATES.


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10-
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
V 28.
29.


Wm. Kennon,
G. F. Buckingham,
J. T. Green,
S. A. Miller,
W. J. Harris,
Geo. Secor,
A. M. Browning,
J. C. Jones,
J. M. Bowen,
A. Barders,
John Rutter,
D. Burford,
O. J. Watson,
D. A. Burns,
J. Thomas,
W. H. Cooper,
A. Donaldson,
H. Richards,
C. Kavanagh,
R. E. Harrison,
R. H. Chim,
C. Prickett,
S. A. Adams,
W. J. Maguire,
A. C. Craig,
Jas. H. Hawkins,
L. B. Clements,
L. E. Vorhies,
O. C. Davidson,


John Owens.
Saml. Wardlow,
Ed. Stiff,
Gus. Cini,
P. S. Bowen,
C. D. Turner,
F. H. Wilson,
G. C. Murray,
A. M. Banks,
Chas. Brogan,
Geo. Walker,
Lewis Johnson,
Wm. Yates,
Wm. Moore, 1st.,
Geo. W. Forrester,
E. W. Strange,
Peter Barker,
Geo. Clarke,
F. Rhodes,
J. M. White,
H. Smith,
M. Gastorfor,
E. D. Callaway,
And. Mack,
Jas. Marvins,
Geo. Solomans,
David Buckhardt,
J. C. Taylor,
J. Dexter,
Rich'd. Rock,
Phila. Dei,






NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


Wm. M. Thomas, 95. Wm. Moore,
J. D. Hogg, 96. Thos. Donoho,
Max Allpritcht, 97. John Tabor,
Chris. Carn, 98. Crawford,
Chas. Schneider, 99. Lindsay,
Simon Schnat. 100. L. B. Moore,
E. P. Gaines, 101. E. Ellery,
Herman Hausecheldt, 102. Birden,
John C. Posey, 103. S. H. Jackson,
Smith A. Barker, 104. J. Davis,
Lewis Wicks, 105. J. Chair,
Henry Schneider, 106. Bronsell,
Newton Lovelace, 107. Dewitt,
Peter Hanman, 108. Redennef,
Wm. Page. 109. Hankers,
Geo. Welskey. 110. H. P. Johnson,
F. M. Harney, 111. J. Peirce,
Jas. W. Bean, 112. W. Kidd.
Thos. E. Smith, 113. Ariell,
F. M. Whitemore, 114. Gillon,
Josh. Lynch, 115. J. Quinn,
J. J. Campbell, 116. Cohoon,
Peter Oakes,* 117. Keeyson,
R. P. McIntyre, 118. Gilbrath,
Jno. Lynch, 119. Northrope.
J. F. Conroy, 120. Jules Kay,
Wm. H. Daniels, 121. J. Cox,
Mark Devlin. 122. Garacina.
Michl. Lamb, Officers, &c ...................
Wm. Gibbs, Privates, &c.. ............... 1
E. M. Griswold,
A. J. Alexander, 1
John Crocks,
C. W. Eckhardt,
Very respectfully, &c.,
GEO H. RITCHIE, Purser.


33
22

55


No. 25.


Extract from a letter dated January 4, 1858, addressed by the Secretary
of the Navy to Captain T. A. Dornin, commandant of the navy-
yard, Portsmouth, Virginia.

In relation to the men of Walker's expedition, who have been
brought to Norfolk in the Saratoga, you will permit them to leave the
vessel, as the government has no authority to detain them."


* Died on the 15th.







NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER. 81


ATTORNEY GENERAL'S OFFICE,
January 11, 1858.
SIR: In compliance with the resolution of the House of Representa-
tives of the 4th instant, I herewith transmit the annexed copies of
letters from the marshal of the eastern district of Louisiana, numbered,
respectively, 1 and 2, and dated on the 25th and 30th of November last.
V These letters contain all the information on file in this office, or in the
possession thereof, relating to the subject of the resolution.
Most respectfully, yours &c.
J. S. BLACK.
To the PRESIDENT.



UNITED STATES MARSHAL'S OFFICE,
New Orleans, November 25, 1857.
SI : I hasten to reply to your letter of the 15th instant, which I
received by yesterday's mail.
A telegraphic despatch from New York, published in our papers on
the 9th or 10th instant, stating that Walker was expected to leave
this city in the course of that week, with fifteen hundred -men, for
Nicaragua, was what first turned the public attention towards that
individual. Up to that time, I verily believe that it was known but
to few persons that he was in New Orleans.
On the evening of the 10th of November I met, in consultation, the
collector of the port, the United States attorney, and the naval officer.
A warrant of arrest for Walker, based upon an affidavit made by cer-
tain officers of the customs, was placed in my hands at about 10
o'clock that night, and before twelve he was brought before the judge
of the United States district court, and gave bond for his appearance
the next morning. He appeared accordingly, when his recognizance
was renewed, and a period fixed for his examination. On that very
day, as I afterwards was informed, he took the mail boat for Mobile,
not by the Pontchartrain railroad, which is that universally chosen
by persons travelling east, but by a circuitous route.
The steamer Fashion, then in port, was the only vessel to which
anything like suspicion seemed to attach. I went with a custom-
house officer, despatched by the collector, to seize that vessel, under
the act of Congress in such case made and provided, taking with me
a sufficient number of men to render him efficient aid in case of re-
sistance. So far from that, however, the captain accompanied us,
without hesitation, to the collector on the night in question, and ex-
hibited his clearance for Mobile, which, with the other papers usually
taken out on such occasions, were found to be in due form. After this
the vessel was thoroughly examined by some of the officers of the
S customs, who, by order of the collector, released her from seizure,
S having found on board a regular cargo, and nothing like arms or
munitions of war. She was subsequently overhauled at the passes by
Captain Brushwood, of the revenue cutter, who reported a precisely
H. Ex. Doc. 24- 6







82 NICARAGUA-SEIZURE OF GENERAL WALKER.


similar state of things to the United States attorney. It appears that
at Mobile she took out a clearance for Greytown.
With reference to the men who went from here with Walker, they
are said to have proceeded to the Mobile steamer by various routes, in
order to attract no attention. Their number is said to have been
small, his principal force having met him at some point on Mobile
bay. In this matter particularly, after receiving a despatch from the
Secretary of State directing me to carry out whatever instructions I
might receive from the district attorney," I looked upon myself as a
mere instrument to accomplish, as far as I could, the views of the ad-
ministration, communicated through the proper officer. I beg you to
be assured, sir, that had any such instructions been given to me, they
would have been executed, if within the range of practicability.
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JOSEPH M. KENNEDY,
United States Marshal Eastern District of Lousisiana.
Hon. J. S. BLACK,
Attorney General of the United States.



UNITED STATES MARSHAL'S OFFICE,
New Orleans, November 30, 1857.
SIR: I learn from Captain Brus4wood, of the revenue cutter, with
whom I have just had a conversation, that the United States attorney
was misinformed with reference to an examination said to have been
made by him of the steamer Fashion,"' as communicated to you in
my letter of the 25th instant, he (the captain) merely having reported
that from information derived from the shipping master, it appeared
that said steamer had left this port with a crew barely sufficient to
take her to Mobile.
I do not know that this correction is a matter of any great im-
portance, but I prefer that the exact state of the case should be laid
before you.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JOS. M. KENNEDY,
United States Marshal.
Hon. J. S. BLACK,
Attorney General United States, Washington, D. C.




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