• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Index of titles
 Index of the music
 Index of first lines
 Introduction
 The child's book of song and...
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine














Group Title: The child's book of song and praise : including 34 pieces of music, with pianoforte accompaniments, and upwards of two hundred and fifty illustrations
Title: The child's book of song and praise
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085432/00001
 Material Information
Title: The child's book of song and praise including 34 pieces of music, with pianoforte accompaniments, and upwards of two hundred and fifty illustrations
Physical Description: vi, 264, 8 p., 6 leaves of plates : ill., music ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Cassell, Petter & Galpin ( Publisher )
Publisher: Cassell, Petter, and Galpin
Place of Publication: London ;
New York
Publication Date: [1896?]
 Subjects
Subject: Glory of God -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's songs   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Religious poetry, English   ( lcsh )
Hymns -- 1896   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry -- 1896   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1896   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre: Hymns   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: With indexes of titles, music and first lines.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00085432
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223119
notis - ALG3367
oclc - 234189815

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Index of titles
        Page iii
    Index of the music
        Page iv
    Index of first lines
        Page v
        Page vi
    Introduction
        Page vii
    The child's book of song and praise
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
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        Page 264
    Advertising
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text




































































The Baldwin Library
University
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AT HOME.

"In the sweet shade of leaf and bough he hides :
And in the fastnesses of solitude abides."









THIE


CHILD'S BOOK- OF


SONG AND PRAISE.


INCLUDING


34 PIECES OF MUSIC,


3mIitt (anoforte accomnipairnttt.,

AND


UPWARDS OF TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY ILLUSTRATIONS.


LONDON:
CASSELL, BETTER, AND -GALPIN;
AND 596, BROADWAY, NEW YORK. '
t


(I
---------











INDEX OF -TITLES.


PAGE
A CHILD'S PRAYER 86
A. CHILD'S WISH, 124
A SONG FORBABY .. 127
A HYMN OF P SE 140
A WELCOME TO A BUTTERFLY 150
,A SUMMER SONG 196
A HYMN BY COWPER, FOR SUNDAY-SCHOOL
AT OLNEY 20
ALL THINGS BRIGHT AND BEAUTIFUL 20
AUTUMN 81
ANOTHER CHILD'S PRAYER 129
AGAINST UNWORTHY PRIDE 193
BABY. 10
BABY FREDDIE .. 14
BLESS MY BOY : 159
BRIGHTEST AND BEST .. 220
BROTHERS AND SISTERS 243
BUTTERCUPS AND DAISIES 258
BEAUTIFUL ZION 260
CHRISTMAS-A HYMN 39
DANCING TO THE SEA .. 158
EARLY DEVOTION TO GOD 54
EVENING HYMN 9
EVENING 153
EVENING-A CHILD'S HOUGHTS 166
EVENING SONG 252
FROM SMALL BEGINNINGS. .. 55
FATHER' WILLIAM 78
FROM GREENLAND'S ICY MOUNTAINS 84
FAIR SPRING .. 183
FOOTSTEPS OF ANGELS 217
FLOWERS 257
GOD IN NATURE ... 249
GOD PROVIDETH .. 163
GOD'S GOODNESS TO ME .25
GOD' MERCIE 59
GOD'S WORD 69
GoD's LOVE FOR THE LITTLE ONES 99
GOD'S CARE FOR US 123
GOD'S WITNESSES .. 174
GENTLE JESUS .. 68
GOING HOME 28
GOOD RESOLUTIONS .. 97
GOOD DAVID 241
GOOD NIGHT, PAPA 264
GRANDFATHER'S CHAIR 31
HAPPY FRED .. 3. 38
How THE LITTLE ONES HALP 55
"HEAR US, GOOD LORD!" .73
HOME, SWEET HOME 100
HOLY BIBLE, BOOK DIVINE 116
HYMN OF EVE 164
How ALL THINGS PRAISE THE LORD 247
INNOCENT PLAY 19
"IT I" 118
IF JESUS WERE HERE! 214
JESUS AT THE DOOR 194
LADY MOON 22
LET CHILDREN COME 36
LIzEI 58
LUCY GRAY. 65
LOVE FOR MAMMA 91
'LILIAN .. -*. 111


PAGE
LIFE IN THE COUNTRY 169
LORD, Loox UPON A LITTLE CHILD .212
MORNING HYMN 8
MORNING SON .. .. 95
MORNING 102
MY CANARY 105
MY SHEPHERD 139
MARY'S PET 151
MAKE ME UNDERSTAND THY WOD 162
MUSIC EVERYWHERE -. 180
MR. OWL'AND MRS. BAT 185
MY MOTHER 215
MINNIE TO HER DOLLY 218
MY GARDEN 225
ONE OF OUR PETS 18
OUR FATHER'S CARE .
ONLY I BABY 76
OUR FATHER 130
OUR SONNY 144
OUR OLD WASHERWOMAN 222
OUR GOD 251
PRESENT AND FUTURE 60
PRAYER FOR ORPHANS 75
PEACEFUL, SLUMBERING ON THE OCEAN 92
PROTECT THE LITTLE'ONES 135
PUSSY'S FATE: A CAUTION TO THE CURIOUS 198
OBIN REDBREAST 119
SUMMER EVENING 71
SWALLOWS. 131
SONG OF SPRING 148
SUNDAY "- 168
"SEARCH THE SCRIPTURES" .182
SONG TO THE OLD AND NEW YEAR ,... 188
SUMMER 190
THERE'S NOT A TINT 833
TWINKLE, TWINKLE, LITTLE STAR 52
TIME AND ETERNITY. 74
THE CHILDREN'S INVOCATION' 1
THE SKYLARK 2
THE LITTLE GIRL AND THE ROSE .
THE SWEET STORY OF OLD 4
THE VILLAGE GREEN .
THE BRIGHT LAND. 11-
THE LITTLE BUSY BEE .* '
THE BLIND BOY .
THE NEW DOLL .
THE KIND SHEPHERD 15
THE CHILDHOOD OF CHRIST 2
THE HAPPY LAND 24
THE SEASONS .
THE LOSS OF THE ROYAL GEORGE 4
THE ROE 43
THE CHILD'S CHOICE 44
-THE SHEPHERD'S HOME 48
THE PET LAMB. 49
THE SECOND BIRTHDAY 62
THE JACDAW 63
- THE FAITHFUL BIRD 0
THE COUNCIL OF HORSES 82
THE RAINBOW 87
STHE SLEEP OF YOUTH .87
THE CUCOO 89
THE SNAKE AND THE KITTINS 103









iv INDEX OF THE MUSIC.


INDEX OF TITLES-continued.


PAGE
THE SNAIL 110
THE ALMIGHTY POWER OF GOD 121
THE SWALLOW 126
THE PRAISES OF MY TONGUE 132
THE POET, OYSTER, AND SENSITIVE PLANT 142
THE WIND 145
THE GREAT EXAMPLE 147
THE MOTHER'S RETURN 154
THE PARROT 171
THE LAST ROSE OF SUMMER 172
THE FISHERMAN'S WELCOME HOME 177
THE NIGHTINGALE AND THE GLOW-WORM 178
THE SEED AND THE FLOWER 186
THE DRUM 200
THE OLD WATER MILL .. 201
THE CONCEITED Bor PUNISHED .202'
THE LITTLE CHILD AND THE FLOWERS 204
THE DOG AND THE WATER LILY 206
THE WOODS IN SUMMER 232, 233
THE CONVICT SHIP 234
THE DAISY'S WEDDING 236
THE OLD YEAR. 239
THE SAVIOUR'S CALL 246


THE HOUR OF PRAYER
THE LARK AND NIGHTINGALE
THE GLORY OF GOD .
THE USE OF FLOWERS '
THE BETTER' LAND .
THERE IS A HEAVEN .
THnY HOUSE, 0 LORD .
THY WILL BE DONE .
TIMES AND TIDES
TO-DAY AND TO-MORROW
TRUST IN GOD .
THOSE EVENING BELLS
TOM'S PRACTICAL LESSON ON CRUELTY
To THE ROBIN .
WINTER
WRITTEN IN MARCH .
WE GIVE THEE THANKS, 0 LORD,
WE ARE SEVEN. .
WHEN THE ROSY MORN APPEALING
WHO MADE ALL THINGS ?..
WHAT GOD DOES FOR US .
YOUTHFUL ZEAL
YOUNG AND HAPPY .


INDEX OF THE MUSIC.


THE SWEET STORY OF OLD
THE LITTLE BUSY BEE -
ALL THINGS BRIGHT AND BEAUTIFUL

GOING HOME -
LET CHILDREN COME -
THE CHILD'S CHOICE -
TWINKLE, TWINKLE, LITTLE STAR -
PRESENT AND FUTURE -
GENTLE JESUS
ONLY A BABY -
FROM GREENLAND'S ICY MOUNTAINS
PEACEFUL, SLUMBERING -
HOME, SWEET HOME -
THY WILL BE DONE -
HOLY BIBLE, BOOK DIVINE
A CHILD'S WISH -
THE PRAISES OF MY TONGUE -
A HYMN OF PRAISE
SONG OF SPRING -
WHEN THE ROSY MORN APPEARING
HYMN OF EVE -
THE LAST ROSE OF SUMMER -
MUSIC EVERYWHERE -
SONG TO THE OLD AND NEW YEAR

A SUMMER SONG -
THE LITTLE CHILD AND THE FLOWERS
LORD, LOOK UPON A LITTLE CHILD
BRIGHTEST AND BEST -
THOSE EVENING BELLS -
THE DAISY'S WEDDING -
To THE ROBIN -
EVENING SONG -
BEAUTIFUL ZION -


Arranged for this Work by FRANK BRAIkE .

Composed for this Work by the Rev. Sir FREDERI9K A.
GORE OUSELEY, Bart., Mus. Doc.
Composed fof this Work by-FRANK BRATNE
; Rev. T. HELMORE, M.A.
H. G. B. HUNT
Arranged ,, FRANK BRAIN .

From Weber by ,,
Composed for this Work by ,,
Arranged ,,
,, from Storace by
Sfor this Work by
Composed for this Work by T. CHAMPTON
Arranged ,, FRANK BRAIN
Composed ,, T. CRAMPTOIT
,, FRANK BRAIN .

T. CRAMPTON
Arranged ,, FRANK BRAINE
,, from Dr. Arne by ,,
for this Work by

Words, and Music by SYBIL,. FLORENCE, and MARY'
AMHURST .
Composed for this Work by FRANK BRAINE .
SM. S. SKEFFINGTON
Arranged from Carey for this Work by FRANK BEAINE .
,, from Mendelssohn ,
Sfor this Work by FRANK BRAINE
Composed for this Work by T. CRAMPTON
,, M. S. SKEFFINGTON
,,, T. CRAMPTbN
GEORGE COSBY .


PAGE
254
S256
S258
262
S263
94
95
S108
S209
S106
S226
S228
. 230
. 244
S41
S79
. 107
S113
S156
S210
. 238
. 137
S175


- --
















INDEX OF FIRST LINES.


PAGE
A country life is sweet Old Song 169
A grain of .orn an infant's hand Montgomery 55
A month, sweet little ones, is Friend of 154
past ) Wordsworth
A nightingale, that all day long Cowper 178
A parrot, from the Spanish main Caitmpbell 171
A simple child, dear brother Jim Wordsworth 113
Abroad in the meadows to see Watts 19
the young lambs -
All the little flowers I see -. S. R. A. 166
All things bright and beautiful Mrs.Alexander 20
Almighty God, Thygword is cast Cawood 69
An oyster, cast upon the shore Cowper 142

Baby Freddie is plump and fair H.G.B. Hunt 134
Beautiful Zion, built above -- 260
Bless God, who makes the sky Bennett 27
so blue 3
Blessed Jesus, Thee I pray J. B. Manson. 86
Blue shoes, long ringlets, the Bennett 15
pinkest of frocks- -
Brightest and best of the sons Heber 220
of the morning -
Brothers knd sisters are a gift Mrs.Sigourney 243
Buttercups and daisies Mary Howitt 258
By cool Siloam's shady rill Reber -, 2

Child, amidst the flowers at play Hemans 254
Close by the threshold of door p 10
nailed fas owper- 103
Come, Robin Redbreast Beynett 119
"Come unto me," cried the Hodder 246
voice of the Saviour
Commit thou all thy griefs John Wesley- 226
Cousin Jack, the sailor lad Barr 151


Darling little Rosie
Dear Lady Moon, so
and bright -
Dearest Ma mind -


Rosie'sPapa 18
yellow Bennett 22
Bennett 91


Eight little blue-be s grew Tom Hood 236
under a stone -
Every morning the red sun Mrs.Alexander 11

Fair Spring o'er. Nature held Scott 183
her gentlest sway ctt 1
Flowers will not cease to Apeak T. T. Lynch- 257
For all the mercies of the day E. Hodder 107
Fritz came from school the A.M -202
first half year n mo H 202
From Greenland's icy mountains Heber 84


Gentle Jesus, meek and mild Anon. -
Glory to 'Thee, my God, this Ken
night -
Go with us to Thy house, O Lord F. Hodd
God bless the little orphans G. Fostti
God might have bade the Mary H
earth bring forth -
God of mercy, deign to hear us -
God of the morning, at whose Watts -
voice -


-68
9
er 95
75
witt 262
73
102


-PAG
Good David,whose psalms have Taylor 241
so often been sung 2
Great God, with wonder and Watts 174
with praise -

Hail, beauteous stranger of Bruce 89
the grove B
Happy, happy we should be E. Hodder 214
Have you heard the thrush Barr 210
He sendeth sun, he sendeth da- -108
-shower Ad 108
Hear, Lord, the song of praise C r 03
and prayer -. Cope 203
Here we suffer grief and pain Anon. 60
Holy Bible, book divine Burton 116
How came you here ? tell me, enet
beautiful rose Bennett 3
How cheerful along the gay mead 164
How dear, when the summer 196
looks over the hills -
How doth the little busy bee Watts 12
How fair is the rose! what a ),. 43
beautiful flower Watts 4
How fine has the day been!) Wt -
how bright was the sun- Watts- 71
How often when the sun went Hoddr 194
down -
How proud we are, how fond Tts -. 193
to show -

I comd, I come, ye have called 4 148
me long- -
I have a garden of my own 225
I hear thee speak of the better Heans 263
land -j
I know a little maiden fair E. C. 111
I love, when the evenings are 31
balmy and still -
I must not tease my mother Mrs Sigourney 215
I sing the almighty power of God Watts 121
I think when I read that sweet Mrs. Luke 4
story of old rsLue 4
I'd choose to be a daisy J. T. 44
I've watched you now a short Wordsworth- 150
Wordsworth- 150
half-hour -
If I had my wish, now GeorgeBennett 124
In every little flower- E. Hodder 123
In the time of our youth T. T. Lynch- 137

Lark, lark, singing so high Bennett 2
Let children come T. T. Lynch- 36
Let us with a gladsome mind Milton- 59
Little flowers of pink and bnue Barr 204
Little Lizzie Bar 58
Little raindrops feed the rill Mrs.Sigourney 55
Lo, the lilies of the field' Heber 163
Look at the swallows, my Ba -131
pretty dears' Bar 131
Lord, a little band and lowly Mrs. Shelley 1
Lord, I would own Thy tender no. 42
care -:
Lord, look upon a little child Anon. A22


__


I _









INDEX OF. FIRST LINES.


INDEX OF FIRST LINES-continued.


PAGE
Mamma,I've often heardyou say A. M. 186
'Mid pleasures and palaces Payne 100
Morn on the waters! and) Ievey- -234
purple and bright J
Mother, guide his little steps Barr 144
Mr. Owl and Mrs. Bat Barr 185
Music in the valley- 180
My banks, they are furnished Shenstone 48
with bees -
My God, who makes the sun) Watt 95
to know -
My heart leaps up when I behold Wordsworth- 87
My Shepherd will supply myneed Watts 139
My soul, repeat His praise Watts 238
O baby, He loved pretty things T. T. Lynch- 10
O Father, Thou hast heard my 8
prayer -
O little stream, below the mill H. G.B. Hunt 201
O say, what is that thing called I Cibber -14
light )
Oft I had heard of Lucy Gray Wordsworth- 65
Oh, blessed day, which rest to -168
labour brings- I
Oh, that I, like Timothy Wesley- 162
"Oh, where can it come from Br -
-that wonderful sound? arr -
On the cheerful village green Taylor- 7
Only a baby small Barr -76
Our Father, what a maze is here E. Hodder 130


Peace be around thee, wher-
ever thou rov'st -
Peaceful, slumb'ring on the )
ocean -


Moore ,

Cobb


Saviour, now the day is ended Barr -
Saviour, who thy flock art Anon.-
feeding -
Search the Scriptures,- theyI E. Hodde
impart E o
See the kind Shepherd, Jesus, Doddridge
stands -
See the tide as advancing it T. T. ync
breaks on the shingle T. Lync
Shepherds all, and maidensI Fletchr
fair 5
Sing; that is right Bnnett
Sleep well, my dear; sleep safe Jacobi -
and free -
Softer than zephyrs, borne on H. T. Cool
the breeze -
Softly the day declining -
Spirit of beauty T. TLyr


- 159

- 92

- 129
- 135

- 182

- 15

h 209

- 153
- 105
- 87

- 217
- 252
h,
QO 000


Q, 00
Sun, moon, and stars, by day )
and night ontgomery 247
Sweet baby, sleep! what ails Wither 127
my dear -

Tell me. little Freddy, pray Rarr 38
Tie bird that soars on highest
wing Mongomery- 256
The rock is crying Wordsworth 79
The dew was falling fast Wordsworth 49


The flowers are blooming Gilman
everywhere -
The greenhouse is my summer Cowper
seat p
The howling storm has gone H G. B. Hu
with the night -
The leaves we've seen ; Bennett
The Lord is rich and merciful T, T. Lync
The night was wild, and E. Hodder
stormy winds -
The noon was shady, and .soft ) Co er
airs I I -
SThe praises of my tongue Watts -
The Saviour loves all children E. Hodder
The spacious firmament on high Addison
The swallow is here -, Bennett
The year is past and over Amhurst
There is a bird, who, by his coat Cowper
There is a happy land Young -
There is a heaven, the Scrip-)
tures tell )
There lives and works a soul I Cowper
in all things p
There's not a tint that paints Heber
-the rose Heber -
Those evening bells, those Moore-
evening bells )
Thou' dost-not dream, my little Mrs.Sigour
one I -
Though I'm now in younger Wa ls
days -
.Time is swiftly flying E. Hqdder
'Tis the last rose of summer Moore -
To grass, or leaf, or fruit, or Boune
wall J
Toll for the brave! Cowper
To-morrow, Lord, is thine Doddridge
Tom sat at the parlour window Barr -
Tune every heart, wake every
tongue = -
'Twas on a lofty vase's side Gray -
Twinkle, twinkle, little star -


PAGE
190

70

nt 177
- 81
' 251
- 118

- 206
- 132
- 99
- 258
- 126
- 188
- 63
- 24
- 94

- 249

- 33

- 28

rney 62

- 97
- 74
- 172
- 110
- 34
- 106
- 230
- 140
- 198
-52


Upon a time a neighing steed Gay 82
Washing, rinsing out the linen E.C. 222
Wave, come and go Bennett 158
Welcome, welcome,little stranger Montgomery- 244
Well! Alice, my dolly A. M. 218
What way does the'wind come ? Friend 145
)i Wordsworth-
Whene'er I take my walks Watts 25
.abroad Watts 25
When .Tesus left His Father's Montgomery- 147
throne Montgomery- 147
When the rosy morn appearing 156
Whenwedevote ouryouthtoGod Watts 54
While shepherds watched their ate 30
flocks by night 3
Will you come with me, -my 28
pretty one? T 28
Winter's here, the autumn leaves Bennett 41
Winter's old age is creeping on H. G. B. Hunt 239
" You are old, Father William" Southey 78
Young and happy while thou art 175


I










INTRODUCTION.

-E know the immeasurable influence that hymns
or songs learned in childhood have upon the
whole, life. They come- back in seasons of
S sorrow and of trial, like the echoes of holy,
happy sounds heard in the bright morning of 'life;
they bring in after years sweet and sacred memories,.
to purify our thoughts and cheer our hearts. With
a deep conviction of this, I hope I have admitted into
these pages-no song or-:poem-which will not help to
teach the little ones some sacred lesson; to give them-
some holy, happy thoughts; to kindle in their tender
hearts the pure flame of love for things that are
good and true; to make them love God, and all things
that the good God has made. I hope that around
these pages will be often gathered in many homes a
crowd of bright, happy little faces, spelling out the
language of verse which children always love. I trust
that many little voices which join in singing these
hymns on earth will hereafter unite'in the endless service
of praise in heaven.
THE EDITOR.

\* My thanks for permission to use Copyright Peems are due
to the following:-Messrs. BLACKWOOD & SONs, EDWIN HODDER, MARY
HOW1TT, the late Rev. T. T. LYNCH, M1rs. SIGOURNEY, "A. M.,"
"E. C.," and "J. T.;" also to Mr. MASTERS for permitting an
arrangement whereby two of Mrs. ALEXANDER'S Poems are included.
























THE CHILDREN'S INVOCATION,
-4-
LORD, a little band and lowly,
We are come to sing to Thee;
Thou art great, and high, and holy:
Oh, how solemn we should be.
May Thy Spirit
Teach us how to worship Thee.

Fill our hearts with thoughts of Jesus,
And of heaven, where He is gone.;
And let nothing ever please us
He would grieve to look upon.
May we ever
Live to Him and Him alone.

May our sins be all forgiven,
Make us fear whatever is wrong;
Lead us in the way to heaven,
There to sing a nobler song.
Praise and glory
To the Lord our God belong.







2 THE CZILD's BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


THE SKYLARK.


LARK, lark, singing so high,
Lost in the sun, up, up in the sky,
You I can hear, but you I can't see;
Lark, lark, where can you be ?
Ah! now I see you, happy up there,
R ight in the white clouds, up in the air.
Lark, lark, why, oh, now why
Cannot I go up like-you to the sky ?
Up to the blue sky, up to the sun,
S Over the white clouds, one after one ?
S Ah but that were the dearest thing
Ever so high to fly and to sing!
Lark, lark, I shall have wings;
1 Each little angel flies and sings;
Wings some day will to me be given,
When I'm so good that I go to heaven;
When I shall sing with angels on high,
Praising God, up, right up in the sky!


--


P,







STHE LITTLE GIRL AND THE RosE. 3


THE LITTLE GIRL AND THE ROSE.

SOW came you here, tell me, beautiful rose?"
I My flower from out of a little bud grows."
And how does the bud come ? that tell me about."
From the end of my branches the sun draws it out."
"And then all your branches, how do you get them ?"
The warm sun draws them too out of my green stem."
"And your stem that gives branches ?" "That comes up to light
From roots in the dark earth, down out of our sight."
" And, pretty rose, do you eat dinners and teas,
And drink just like little girls, tell me that, please ?" --
"Yes, I eat and drink up earth, and sunshine, and
showers ;
Else how could I grow big, and give out nice
flowers ?" N-'
"And what do you eat with and drink with,tell me?" .
"I have mouths in my roots and my leaves you
can't see."
"And who made you, dear rose, and taught you to
grow ?"
"The good God that made you to question me so."
" How good He is, rose dear, to make you to live,
And to us little girls great red flowers to give."
"Now talk to your dolly, the great bee is coming;
He'll sing me to sleep in the sun with his humming."
"I'll tell doll about you; she'll like it so, ah !
Papa perhaps don't know it, so I'll tell papa !"


F-W -


~~s--- h


--,-








4 THE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


THE SWEET STORY OF OLD.


GREEK AIR.


1. I think when I


read that sweet sto ry


of old, When


E7I- E


Je sus was here a-mong men,

. .. ._ -i "


HowHe called lit tie


lambs to His fold, I should like to have been


-0-


with them then.


~zz4~~il


]a


I wish that His hands had been .plac'd on my head, That His
/ S-----------.. ... ..____________________


S ~


I i-- -


_W -t


KR _-_ '- : t- - -' -- --


VOICE.




PIANO.O


chil-dren as


~i~i~E~(


li


A,-" I


- I


I -


'










THE SWEET STORY OF OLD. 5


IT


"LET THE LITTLE ONES COME UNTO ML"


look when He said, "Let the


-is ----- -----l------- -II


lit tie ones come un to


me."


_ ii~i


w I------h -


'"







6 THE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.








THE SWEET STORY OF OLD.

STHINK, when I read that sweet story of old,
When Jesus was here among men,
How He called little children, as lambs to His fold,
I should like to have been with them then.
S I wish that His hands had been placed on my head,
That His arm had been thrown around me,
And that I might have seen His kind look when He said,
Let the little ones come unto me."

Yet still to His footstool in prayer I may go,
And ask for a share in His love;
And if I thus earnestly seek Him below,
I shall see Him and hear Him above,
In that beautiful place He has gone to prepare
For all who are washed and forgiven;
And many dear children are gathering there,
"For of such is the kingdom of heaven."

But thousands and thousands, who wander and fall,
Never heard of that heavenly home;
I should like them to know there is room for them all,
And that Jesus has bid them to come.
I long for that blessed and glorious time,
The fairest, and brightest, and best,
When the dear little children of every clime
Shall crowd to His arms and be blest.






THzE VILLAGE GEEN. 7


THE VILLAGE GREEN.


ON the cheerful village green,
Skirted round with houses small,
All the boys and girls are seen
Playing there with hoop and ball.

Now they frolic hand in hand, .
Making many a merry chain;
Then they form a warlike band,
Marching o'er the level plain.

Now ascends the worsted ball,
High it rises in the air,
Or against the cottage wall,
Up and down it bounces there.

Then the hoop, with even pace,
Runs before the merry crowd;
Joy is seen in every face,
Joy is heard in clamours loud.

Rich array and mansions proud,
Gilded toys and costly fare,
Would not make the little crowd
Half so happy as they are.
Then contented with my state,
Let me envy not the great,
Since true pleasure may be seen
On a cheerful village green.


-3ih~Bi~







8 THE CHzLD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


























MORNING HYMN.

FATHER, Thou hast heard my prayer,
And I own m thy tender care;
For, by Thee in safety kept,
I have laid me down and slept.
Teach me now my heart to raise
In a morning hymn of praise;
And for Jesus' sake, I pray,
Bless and keep me through the day.







EVENING HYMN. 9


EVENING HYMN.

( LORY to Thee, my God, this night,
SFor all the blessings of the light!
Keep me, oh, keep me, King of kings,
Under Thine own almighty wings !
Teach me to live, that I may dread
- The grave as little as my bed;
.- Teach me to die, that so I may
Rise glorious at the awful day,
Oh, may my soul on Thee repose,
And may sweet sleep mine eyelids close;
Sleep that shall me more vigorous make
To serve my God when I awake.







10 THE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


BABY.

SBABY, He loved pretty things;
"Consider the lilies," said He;
Thy mother, she sighs or she sings,
But still she's considering thee.
Oh, baby, He loved little birds;
"Not one is forgotten," said He ;
Thy mother remembers His words,
And comforts herself about thee,
In graces, thy mother hath pray'd,
* Since daily her baby she dress'd,
Thou mayst like the flower be array'd
Which Jesus admired and bless'd.


O Dove, from the heavens
that shine,
Whose home is His merci-
ful breast;
Come, visit this baby of mine,
MVy new little bird in its
nest,


n~- F~
i4 "YI' i~. 8~










TirE BRIGHT LAND. 11


THE BRIGHT LAND.


I ,VERY morning the red sun
S Rises warm and bright,
But the evening cometh on,
S And the dark, cold night.
There's a bright land far away,
Where 'tis never-ending day.


Every spring the sweet young flowers
Open bright and gay,
Till the chilly autumn hours
Wither them away.
There's a land we have not seen,
Where the trees are always green.


Little birds sing songs of praise
All the summer long;
But in colder., shorter days
They forget their song.
There's a place where angels sing
Ceaseless praises to their King.


Christ our Lord is ever near
Those who follow Him;
But we cannot see Him here,
For our eyes are dim.
There is a most happy place,
Where men always see His face.


Who shall go to that bright land ?
All who do the right:
Holy children there shall stand,
In their robes of white;
For that heaven, so bright and blest,
Is our everlasting rest.


_ I


THE BRIGHT LAND.


11




























THE
LITTLE BUSY BEE.

------OW doth the little
busy bee.
VImprove each shining
hour;
And gather honey all the
2 day,
From every opening
LIflower .






-=~-~







THE LITTLE BUSY BEE. 13


THE LITTLE BUSY BEE.
OLD ENGLISH Am.


1. How doth the lit-tle bu sy bee Im-prove each shi-ning hour; And



-] ;


How skilfully she builds her cell;
How neat she spreads the wax;
And labours hard to store it well
With the sweet food she makes.


In works of labour or of skill
I would be busy too;'
For Satan finds some mischief still
For idle hands to do.


In books, or work, or healthful play,
Let my first years be pass'd;
That I may give for every day
Some good account at last.


VOICE.




PIANO.


~s;
i~ ii







14 THE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.



THE BLIND BOY.


SSAY, what is that thing called Light,
Which I must ne'er enjoy?
What are the blessings of the sight ?
^'! Oh, tell your poor blind boy I


You talk of wondrous things you see,
You say the sun shines bright;
I feel him warm, but how can he
Or make it day or night ?

My day or night myself I make,
Whene'er I sleep or play;
And could I ever keep awake,
With me 'twere always day.

With heavy sighs I often hear
You mourn my hapless woe;
But sure with patience I can bear
A loss I ne'er can know.

Then let not that I cannot have
My cheer of mind destroy:
Whilst thus I sing, I am a king,
Although a poor blind boy.


2AV


__






THE KIND SHEPHERD. 15


THE NEW DOLL.

~ LUE shoes, long ringlets, the pinkest of frocks,
That's my sweet dolly; my own golden locks;
Look at her silkiest dear flaxen curls,
Just like the real ones on real little girls;
What a pink forehead, and what pretty cheeks
What a red mouth, too, just like'one that speaks
Largest of dear blue eyes, open so wide,
Looking right forward and never aside;
Nose like our own mamma's, pretty and straight-
Noses are sometimes so ugly and great;
Lips-mamma's, too, are exactly like these,
Two that seem saying, '" Oh, do kiss us, please !"
Turn her round sideways-yes, that's how I mean;
See, her dear ears through her hair can be seen;
And what a neck-look, all smooth, round, and white;
Baby's is like it, when just wash'd at night.
Mind how you hold her, please Oh, care do take,
Aunt says it is wax, and you know wax dolls break.

------- i =.0=--;-=* .

THE KIND SHEPHERD.

.EE the kind Shepherd, Jesus, stands,
i' And calls His sheep by name,
Gathers the feeble in His arms,
And feeds each tender lamb.

He leads them to the gentle stream
Where living water flows,
And guides them to the verdant fields
Where sweetest herbage grows.







THE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


9N\:~


When, wandering from the peaceful fold,
We leave the narrow way,
Our faithful Shepherd still is near,
To seek us when we stray,

The weakest lamb amid the flock
Shall be its Shepherd's care;
While folded in the Saviour's arms,
We're safe from every snare.


16







ONE OF OUR PETS.


" I say, little Rosie, what would Pussy do,
If she saw, so cosy, Tinker and you ?"






THE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG ANAD PRAISE.


ONE OF OUR PETS.


ARLING little Rosie,
SRomping in the lane;
0 Gathering a posy,
K As pretty as her name,
STo pleasePapa when he comes home
at evening.

Wicked little Tinker,
Underneath her arm,
Who always seems to think her
The mistress of the farm;
And would rather do and die than aught should hurt her.

I say, little Rosie,
What would Pussy do,
If she saw, so cosy,
Tinker and you ?
Would she understand your love for both ?

Well, my little treasure,
Ma and Pa both pray
That you may, in full measure,
As you go on your way,
Find friends as kind and true as Puss and Tinker.







INNOCENT PLAY. 19


INNOCENT


PLAY.


BROAD in the meadows to see the
young lambs
Run sporting about by the side of
their dams,
4. With fleeces so clean and so white;
Or a nest of young doves, in a large open cage,
When they play all in love, without anger and
rage;
How much we may learn from the sight!

If we had been ducks, we might dabble in mud;
Or dogs, we might play till it ended in blood;
So foul and so fierce are their natures:
But Thomas, and William, and such pretty
names,
Should be cleanly and harmless as doves or as
lambs,
Those lovely, sweet, innocent creatures.

_/ 4


.i~.;..








20 THE CHILD S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


ALL THINGS BRIGHT AND BEAUTIFUL.
t to Music for this .Work by THE REV. Sm FREDERICK A. GORE OUSELEY, BART., Mus. Doe.
:br----- ',~~^ -----------2- -s----- --,- ---

I id
1. All things bright and beau ti-ful, All crea-tures great and small,
2. Each little flow'rthat o pens, Each little bird that sings,



3. The rich man in his cas tle, The poor man at his gate,


V ll d


Verses
1 2.



Verses
3 to 7.




PIANO.{


--- --- -- -------- ---------







ALL THINGS BRIGHT AND BEAUTIFUL. 21


"THE RICH MAN IN HIS CASTLE, THE POOR. MAN AT HIS GATE."


The purple-headed mountain,
The river running by,
The sunset, and the morning,
That brightens up the sky ;


5.
The cold wind in the winter,
The pleasant summer sun,
The ripe fruits in the garden,
He made them every one.


6.
The tall trees in the greenwood,
The meadows where we play,
The rushes by the water,
We gather every day.;-


He gave us eyes to see them,
And lips that we might tell
How great is God Almighty,
Who has made all things well.


- --


:.aiBrAr







22 THE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


LADY MOON.


EAR Lady Moon, so yellow and bright,
Do you love me with your golden light ?

SDo you love all things on which you shine,
All with your fingers you make so fine ?

Do you love all the rivers you touch,
All the white houses you brighten so much ?

Is it to say to them, "Moon loves you,"
Your white fingers to them such wonders do ?

Moon, I see you; do you see me,
Etty, this little girl-me, do you see ?

Always I see you at me looking down;
Always so kindly, and you never frown.

Love me, I love you; I'm going up stairs;
Peep in my window, and see me say. prayers.

When I'm in bed, and they've put out the light,
Shine in, dear Moon, on me through the dark night.


I I -







THE CHILDHOOD OF CHRIST. 23


THE .
CHILDHOOD OF CHRIST. 6

TY cool Siloam's shady rill,
How sweet the lily grows;
How sweet the breath beneath the hill
Of Sharon's dewy rose:
Lo such the child, whose early feet
The path of peace have trod;
Whose sacred heart, with influence sweet,
Is lifted up to God.

By cool Siloam's shady rill,
The lily must decay;
The rose that blooms beneath the hill
Must shortly fade away;
And soon, too soon, the wintry hour
Of man's maturer age
Will shake the soul with Sorrow's power,
And stormy Passion's rage.

O Thou, whose infant feet were found
Within Thy Father's shrine;
Whose years, with changeless virtue crown'd,
Were all alike divine;
Dependent on Thy bounteous breath,
We seek Thy grace alone,
In childhood, manhood, age, and death,
To keep us still Thine own.







THE CHILD'S BooK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


THE HAPPY LAND.


HERE is a happy land,
Far, far away,
Where saints in glory stand,
Bright, bright as day.
SOh, how they sweetly sing,
Worthy is our Saviour King;
Loud let his praises ring;
Praise, praise for aye.

Come to this happy land,
Come, come away;
Why will ye doubting stand ?
Why still delay ?
t Oh, we shall happy be,
When from sin and sorrow free,
Lord, we shall live with Thee!
Blest, blest for aye.

Bright in that happy land
Beams every eye;
Kept by a Father's hand,
Love cannot die.
On,-then, to glory run;
Be a crown and kingdom won;
And bright above the sun
Reign, reign for aye.







GOD'S GOODNESS TO ME. 25






















GOD'S GOODNESS TO ME.


SHENE'ER I take my walks abroad,
How. many poor I see !
S What shall I render to my God
For all His gifts to me?

Not more thanmothers I deserve,
Yet God hath given me more :
For I have food while others starve,
Or beg from door to door.

How many children in the street
Half naked I behold !
While I am clothed from head to feet,
And cover'd from the cold.






26 TIE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


While some poor wretches scarce can tell
Where they may lay their head,
I have a home wherein to dwell,
And rest upon my bed.

While others early learn to swear,
And curse, and lie, and steal;
Lord, I am taught Thy name to fear,
And do Thy holy will.

Are these Thy favours, day by day,
To me above the rest?
Then let me love Thee more than they,
And try to serve Thee best.




















u*


















































































SUMMER-TIME.

HAY-MAKING AND PLAY-MAKING.







THE SEASONS. 27


THE SEASONS.


LESS God, who makes the sky so blue!
Bless God, who makes the fields so
green
Who makes to us so pleasant, too,
The colours that in both are seen !
His loving-kindness makes us love
The green below, the blue above,

How can we doubt He means that we,
If we obey Him, shall be blest,
When all around our eyes can see
But what for all who live is best-
When all we see unto our sight
Gives always beauty and delight ?

Oh, bless Him for the glad green Spring !
Oh, bless Him for the Summer's flowers !
Bless Him for Autumn's harvesting!
Bless Him for Winter's frosty hours !
Bless Him who makes them all to give
Gladness, how great! to all who live.









28 THE CHILD's BooK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


G 0 I N G If 0 M E. j music composed expresslyfor tis
Work by FRANK BRAINE.
P


LI -~----


come witl. nie and ga other flow'rs?" Shp look'd at me and smil'd; Then,












in low- wee-ge-- te tone, he id,-I-- c--n--- otcome----- -; I
in ,a low, sweet, ge tie tone, She said, "I can not come; I



_o-


2/


2~ 1- 'I ii


mt~---L---L--I~--I~-----


m









GOING HOME.


ores.


ritard.


29


Repeatfor verses 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.


must. not leave this nar row path, For 1, am go ing home."



.j --- _




At the end of verse 6.


she turn'd her ra diant face, Once more to bid me come, I


-- -- ----I j I--





ores. _.f FINE.


heard a cho- rus of glad songs, A burst of "Wel-come home."



Cres. *FINE.


"But will you not ?" I ask'd again;
The sun is shining bright,
And you might twine a lily wreath
To carry home at night.
And I could show you pleasant things
If you would only come."
But still she answered as before,
"No; I am going home."







30 THE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.








= r.- =-=~~ ~~~~~ -- -- _--2.-- -_----: ,



-t








But look, my child; the fields are green,
And, neathh the leafy trees,
Children are playing merrily,
Or resting at their ease.
Does it not hurt your tender feet,
This stony path to tread ?"
Sometimes; but I am going home,"
Once more she sweetly said.

My Father bade me keep this path,
Nor ever turn aside;
The road which leads away from Him
Is very smooth and wide.
The fields are fresh, and cool, and green,
Pleasant the shady trees;
But those around my own sweet home
Are lovelier far than these.







GRANDFATHER'S CHAIR. 31


I must not linger on the road,
For I' have far to go,
And I should like to reach the door
Before the sun gets low.
I must not stay, but will you not,
Oh, will you not come, too ?
My home is very beautiful,
And there is room for you."

I took her little hand in mine,
Together we went on;
Brighter-and brighter o'er our path
The blessed sunbeams shone.
At length we saw the distant towers ;
But ere we reached the gate,
The child outstripp'd my lingering feet,
Too overjoy'd to wait.

And as she turn'd her radiant face
Once more to bid me come,
I heard a chorus of glad songs,
A burst of "Welcome home !"


---**^-----


GRANDFATHER'S CHAIR.


SLOVE, when the evenings are balmy and still,
And Summer is smiling on valley and hill,
To see in the garden the little ones there,
All happy and smiling round Grandfather's chair.







THE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


Such stories he tells them-such tales of delight-
Such wonders to dream of by day and by night;
It's little they're singing of sorrow and care,
Their bright faces beaming round Grandfather's chair.

And words, too, of wisdom fall off from his tongue,
Dear lessons to cherish and treasure while young;
Bright things to remember when white is their hair,
And-some of them sit in a Grandfather's chair.

Ah! little ones, love him, be kind while you may,
For swiftly the moments are speeding away;
Not long the kind looks and the love you may share,
That beam on you now from a Grandfather's chair.






THERE'S NOT A TINT.


THERE'S NOT A TINT.


S HERE'S not a tint that paints
'- the rose,
Or decks the lily fair,
SOr streaks the humblest flower
that grows,
But God has placed it there.


There's not of grass a single blade,
Or leaf of loveliest green,
Where heavenly skill is not displayed,
And heavenly wisdom seen.

There's not a star whose twinkling light
Illumes the spreading earth,
And cheers the silent gloom of night,
But mercy gave it birth.

There's not a place on earth's vast round,
In ocean deep, or air,
Where skill and wisdom are not found
For God is everywhere.


- --


33


7


J







34 THE CHLD 's BooR OF SONG AND PRAISE.


Around, beneath, below, above,
Wherever space extends,
There God displays His boundless love,
And power with mercy blends.

f-~








THE LOSS OF THE "ROYAL GEORGE."*


OLL for the brave t
The brave that are no more !
All sunk beneath the wave,
Fast by their native shore !

Eight hundred of the brave;
Whose courage well was tried,
Had made the vessel heel,
And laid her on her side.

A land breeze shook the shrouds,
And she was overset;
Down went the Royal George,
With all her crew complete.


0 The Royal George, a man-of-war, carrying 108 guns, was overset on the 29th of August,
1782, by a sudden gust of wind, while undergoing some repairs off Spithead. Many of the guns
had to be moved during the progress of these repairs, so that the ship was heavier on one side
than the other, and this was the chief cause of the disaster. Kempenfelt was the name of the
rear-admiral on board the ship.







'THE Loss oF THE "ROYAL GEORGE."


Toll for the brave !
Brave Kempenfelt is gone;
His last sea-fight is fought,
His work of glory done.

It was not in the battle;
No tempest gave the shock:
She sprang no fatal leak;
She ran upon no rock.

His sword was in its sheath;
His fingers held the pen,
When Kempenfelt went down,
With twice four hundred men.

Weigh the vessel up,
Once dreaded by our foes !
And mingle with our cup
The tear that England owes.

Her timbers yet are sound,
And she may float again,
Full charged with England's thunder,
And plough the distant main.

But Kempenfelt is gone,
His victories are o er,
And he and his eight hundred
Shall plough the wave no more.


_ __


---


35







36 THE CHILD S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


"LET CHILDREN COME."
Composed for this work by THE rEV. THOMAS HELMORE, M.A.


Fa-ther's arms, How strong they are! how stea dy 'Tis He that







LET CHILDREN COME. 37















Let children come;
To each heart so tender,
iDrops as from heaven,
Their blessing soft shall render;
Dear budding plant,
Thy God for thine unfolding
His love will grant,
Our love for thee beholding.

Let children come;
This our love God gave us,
Who gave His Son,
From hate and fear to save us;
For all life's-thirst
Of' water He's the river,
Who from the first
Of pure life is the Giver.











A.WVoN







38 THE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


"A/ HAPPY FRED.

ELL me, little Freddy, pray,
What has pleased your heart to-day,
That you skip, and leap, and sing,
SPleased -with every little thing ?"

S ': Mother, you remember Dick;
o He that's lame and has a stick;
Cripple Dick, with naked feet,
Crossing-sweeper in our street ?
Well, I passed the other day.
And he look'd as if to say,
'Little sir, a penny give;
I am poor, and I must live,
Please to give a lad a brown I'
So I popp'd a half-a-crown
In his hat, and pass'd along,
Mingling with the busy throng.
But to-day, would you believe ?
As I cross'd, he touched my sleeve;
And he said, when he could speak,.
For the tears roll'd down his cheek,
'Mother sends her blessing, sir;
Thanks for what you've done for her.
When you pass'd me in the street,
That day we had nought to eat.
Oh, the joy we both did feel,
When that night we had a meal !
Blessings on you for the same,
Luck and honour to your name !'
That's what's filled my heart with joy,
That's what's pleased your little boy."







A Hyi~'iv. 39


A HYMN.


fHILE shepherds watch'd their
flocks by night,
All seated on the ground,
The angel of the Lord came down,
And glory shone around.

"Fear not," said he (for mighty
dread
Had seized their troubled mind);
' Glad tidings of great joy I. bring
To you and all mankind,

" To you, in David's town, this day
Is born, of David's line,
The Saviour, who is Christ the
Lord;
And this shall be the sign:

: The heavenly babe you there shall
find
To human view displayed,
All meanly wrapped in swathing
bands,
And in a manger laid."'


I _


A HYMN.


39


39







40 THE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


Thus spake the seraph, and
forthwith
Appeared a shining throng
Of angels, praising God, and thus
'Address'd their joyful song:


"All glory be to God on high,
And to the earth be peace ;
Good-will henceforth from
heaven to men
Begin, and never cease."


-------~ I















































































" WELCOME FIRE ; THE WINTER'S HERE !" See Page 41.







WINTER. 41


INTER'S here; the Autumn leaves
All have fallen, red'and sere;
SGone are flowers and gone are
sheaves;
SWelcome fires; the Winter's here !

Now the robin sings alone
See, the little'redbreast comes;
Ah! be-pity to him shown,
Throw the little bird some crumbs.

Look, how gloomy are the skies;
All the fields are still and bare;
Not a sweet flower meets our eyes;
Thick and misty is the air.

Down will come the dancing snow,
Hiding all the ground from sight;
Ah! how nice 'twill be to go .
SOn the paths, so crisp and white!


5-.


MY E I-R.







42 THE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


OUR FATHER'S CARE.


ORD, I would own Thy tender care,
And all Thy love to me:
The food I eat, the clothes I wear,
Are all bestow'd by Thee.

'Tis thou preservest me from death
And dangers every hour;
I cannot draw another breath
Unless Thou give me power.

My health, and friends, and parents dear,
To me by God are given;
I have not any blessing here,
But what is sent from heaven.

Such goodness, Lord, and constant care,
A child can ne'er repay;
But may it be my daily prayer
To love Thee and obey.


- --







THE ROSE.


wfB

Bu


-y Ye
Above
When its
Still ho


THE ROSE.


air is the rose What a beautiful flower !
The glory of April and May;
it the leaves are beginning to fade in an hour,
And they wither and die in a day.

t the rose has one powerful virtue to boast,
all the flowers of the field:
leaves are all dead, and fine colours are lost,
w sweet a perfume it will yield!


So trail are the youth and the beauty or man,
- Though they bloom and look gay, like a rose;
But all our fond care to preserve them is vain,'
Time kills them as fast as he goes.

Then I'll not be proud of my
youth or my beauty,
Since both of them wither and'
fade,
But gain a good name by well
doing my duty;
SThis will scent like a rose when
I'm dead. Ji


N' n* e"I $1







44 THE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


THE CHILD'S CHOICE.

Set to music expresslyfor this work.


I'd choose to be a dai sy, If I might be a


j ?- -) 1 ^ --
I r .], 1


flow'r: os ing my pe tals soft ly At twi-light's qui et



.. I -





hour. And wak -ing in the morn ing, .When falls the ear ly



4 ". i



ritard.


dew, To welcome heav'n's bright sun- shine, And heav'n's bright tear-drops too.
colla voce_

collar voce
--- ( --- --- ^- fL ^ -- ---- -- ---- ^ --- ----- ----------
fli1


VOICE.




PIANO.







THE CHILD'S CHOICE. 45


" I love the gentle lily,
It is so meek and fair;
But I love daisies better,
For they grow everywhere.
Lilies droop always sadly,
In sunshine and in shower;
But daisies still look upward,
However dark the hour.


" I'd choose to be a sky-lark,
If I might be a bird;
My song should be the loudest
The sun has ever heard:
I'd wander through the cloudland,
Far, far above the moon,
And reach that land of glory,
Where it is always noon.






46 THE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


"I love the swallow coming
With spring-tide o'er the sea;
I love the robin redbreast,
It trusts so lovingly ;-
But I love the sky-lark better,
With its untiring song,
Making its track an echo
Of music, all along.

"And yet I think I'd rather
Be changed into a lamb,
SIf Jesus had not made me
The little child I am;
Because the Bible tells us,
That, in his loving arms,
The shepherd gently folds them,
When anything alarms

"And lambs are types of Jesus;
Sweet mother, are they not ?
You told me very long since-
And I have not forgot-
How, meek and uncomplaining,
As to the slaughter led,
He shed His blood for sinners,
And bow'd His sacred head."

"-Nay, wish not, dearest Gerald.
To change thy happier lot
For a flower's brief existence
In some deep-shelter'd spot;
And envy not the sky-lark
His glad flight through the air,
Nor yet the lamb its shelter
Beneath the shepherd's care:







THE CHILD'S CHOICE. 47


"Far richer, greater blessings
Than theirs are given to thee;
They die and are forgotten-
Thou shalt not cease to be.
Thou hast a soul, my Gerald,
Bought with a Saviour's blood;
Oh, seek his grace, and yield it
Now, in thy youth, to God!

"Dear child thy mother hath not
A holier prayer for thee,
Than that the lamb-like spirit
Of Christ may be in thee.
Then, carried in His bosom,
It shall be thine to*share,
In every time of danger,
A Shepherd's tender care.

"And ever, like the daisy,
Look up in sun.and shower;
For none shall ever pluck thee
From His almighty power;
Till, higher than the sky-lark,
Borne upon angel's wing,
It shall be thine to enter
The city of our King."


- zp_






48. THE CHILD's BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


THE SHEPHERD'S HOME.

Y banks they are furnished with bees,
SwI .Whose murmur invites one to sleep;
U My grottoes are shaded with trees,
SAnd my hills are white over with sheep.
+ I seldom have met with a loss,
Such health do my fountains bestow;
My fountains all bordered with moss,
SWhere the harebells and violets blow.

Not a pine in the grove is there seen,
But with tendrils of woodbine is bound;
Not a beech's more beautiful green,
But a sweet-briar entwines it around.
Not my fields in the prime of the year,
More charms than my cattle unfold;
Not a brook that is limpid and clear,
But it glitters with fishes of gold.

I have found out a gift for my fair,
I have found where the wood-pigeons breed;
But let me such plunder forbear,
She will say 'twas a barbarous deed;
For he ne'er could be true, she averred,
Who would rob a poor bird of its young;
And I loved her the more when I heard
Such tenderness fall from her tongue.


." ..., '. .. ,|l,., ... .. .


- czz=.


~Bg~-Z`







THE PET LAMB. 49


THE PET LAMB.


E dew was falling fast, the stars began to
blink;
I heard a voice; it said, "Drink, pretty
creature, drink!"
And, looking o'er the hedge, before me I
espied
A snow-white mountain lamb, with a maiden
at its side.


No other sheep were near, the lamb was all
alone,
And by a slender' cord was tether'd to a
stone:
With one knee on the grass did the little
maiden kneel,
While to that mountain lamb she gave its
evening meal.

The lamb, while from her hand he thus his
supper took,
Seem'd to feast with head and ears; and his
tail with pleasure shook.
"Drink, pretty creature, drink," she said in
such a tone,
That I almost received her heart into my
own.

'Twas little Barbara Lewthwaite, a child of beauty rare;
I watch'd them with delight; they were a lovely pair.
Now with her empty can the maiden turn'd away;
But ere ten yards were gone, her footsteps did she stay.







50 THE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.

Towards the lamb she look'd; and from that shady place,
I, unobserved, could see the workings of her face;
If Nature to her tongue could measured numbers bring,
Thus, thought I, to her lamb that little maid might sing:-

"What ails thee, young one ? What ? Why pull so at thy
cord ?
Is it not well with thee-well both for bed and board ?
Thy plot of grass is soft, and green as grass can be;
-- i Rest, little young one, rest; what is 't that aileth thee ?

S-"v What is it thou wouldst seek ? What is wanting to thy
heart ?
Thy limbs, are they not strong? And beautiful thou art:
This grass is tender grass; these flowers they have no peers;
And that green corn all day is rustling in thy ears.

"If the sun be shining hot, do but stretch thy woollen chain,
This beech is standing by, its covert thou canst gain;
For rain and mountain storms,the like thou need'st not fear;-
The rain and storm are. things which scarcely can come here.

"Rest, little young one, rest; thou hast forgot the day
When my father found thee first in places far away;
Many flocks were on the hills, but thou wert own'd by none;
And thy mother from thy side for evermore was gone.

He took thee in his arms, and in pity brought thee home :
,A blessed day for thee then whither wouldst thou roam ?
A faithful nurse thou hast; the dam that did thee yean
Upon the mountain-tops no kinder could have been.







THE PET LAMB. 51


"Thou know'st that twice a day I have brought.thee in this can
Fresh water from the brook, as clear as ever ran;
And twice in the day, when the ground is wet with dew,
I bring thee draughts of milk, warm milk it is, and new.

Thy limbs will shortly be twice as stout as they are now,
Then I'll yoke thee to my cart like a pony in the plough;
My playmate thou shalt be; and when the wind is cold,
Our hearth shall be thy bed, our house shall be thy fold.

"It will not, will not rest !-poor creature can it be
That 'tis thy mother's heart which is working so in thee ?
Things that I know not of belike to thee are dear,
And dreams of things which thou canst neither see nor hear.

"Alas! the mountain-tops that look so green and fair,
I've heard of fearful winds and darkness that come there;
The little brooks that seem all pastime and all play,
When they are angry, roar like lions for their prey.

"Here thou need'st not dread the raven in the sky;
Night and day thou art safe,-our cottage is hard by.
Why bleat so after me ? Why pull so at thy chain ?
Sleep, and at break of day I will come to thee again."

As homeward through the lane I went with lazy feet,
This song to myself did I oftentimes repeat;
And it seem'd, as I retraced the ballad line, by line,
That but half of it was hers, and one half of it was mine.

Again and once again did I repeat the song;
"Nay," said I, '' more than half to the damsel must belong,
For she look'd with such-a look, and she spake with such a tone,
That I almost received her heart into my own."







52 THE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.



TWINKLE, TWINKLE, LITTLE STAR,


VOICE.




PIANO.





J


1. Twin kle, twin kle, lit tie star, How I won der



5 I ----



L 1 "


what you are! Up a above the world so high,




lgj=-E _---r _^ __= ^ -






Like a dia mond in the sky,. Twin kle, twin kle




-


^7 ~ ~ ------t------ ---- _-' -----------



lit tle star, How I "won der what you are!



r' --'--- _


I- -






TWINKLE, TWINKLE, LITTLE STAR. 53


"HOW I WONDER WHAT YOU ARE."


When the blazing sun is gone,
When he nothing shines upon,
Then you show your little light,
Twinkle, twinkle, all the night.


Then the traveller in the dark
Thanks you for your tiny spark;
He could not tell which way
to go
If you did not twinkle so.


In the dark blue sky you keep,
And often through my curtains
peep;
For you never shut your eye
Till the sun is in the sky.


As your bright and tiny spark
Lights the traveller in the dark,
Though I know not what you are,
.Twinkle, twinkle, little star.






54 THE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.
















EARLY DEVOTION TO GOD.


HEN we devote our youth to God,
'Tis pleasing in His eyes;
iA flower when offered in the bud
Is-no mean sacrifice.

'Tis easier work if we begin
To serve the Lord betimes,.
While sinners that grow old in sin
Are hardened in their crimes.

'Twill save us from a thousand snares
To mind religion young:
Grace will preserve our following years,
And make our virtues strong.

Let the sweet work of prayer and praise
Employ my youngest breath;
Thus 'm prepared for longer days,
-Or fit for early death.






FRiOM SMALL BEGINNINGS. 55


HOW THE LITTLE ONES HELP.


SITTLE rain-drops feed the rill;
Rills to meet the brooklet glide :
Brooks the broader rivers fill;
Rivers swell the ocean's tide,

So the little gathered here,
"P Mites from childhood's willing hand,
,Go some aching heart to cheer
In a dark and distant land.

Wilt Thou, Lord, this offering use,
And Thy blessing on it pour ?
S And. Thy glorious word diffuse,
E'ea to earth's remotest shore ?








FROM SMALL BEGINNINGS.

^ -4---
GRAIN of corn an infant's hand
SMay sow upon an inch of land,
Whence twenty stalks may rise and
yield
SEnough to crop a little field.






56 THE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


The harvest of that field may then
Si Be multiplied by ten times ten,
Which, sown thrice more, would furnish bread
Wherewith an army might be fed.

A penny is a little thing,
Which e'en a poor man's child may fling-
SInto the treasury of heaven,.
And make it.worth as much as seven.

SAs seven !-nay, worth its weight in gold,
And that increased a million-fold ;
SFor mark-a penny tract, if well
Applied, may save a soul from hell.

That soul could scarce be saved alone;
Its bliss, I trust, it would make known;
Come," it would say, "and you shall see
What great things God has done for me."

IHundreds the joyful sound might hear-
Hear with the heart as well as ear;
And these to hundreds more proclaim
Salvation through the only Name.

That only Name, above, below,
Let Jews, and Turks, and pagans know,
That every tongue and tribe may call
On Jesus Christ as Lord of all.







LITTLE LIZZIE. 57


N.i





















Little Lizzie
Is always busy.







58 THE CHILD'S BOOK oI SONG AND PRAISE.








6 ,r-




LIZZI E.


LITTLE Lizzle
Is always busy.
She's never a moment still;
And kind is she,
For she makes the tea
When poor dear Father is ill.
And she sits at night,
By the candle-light,
In a chair beside his bed,
And tries to cheer
His. heart, the dear!
With some story she has read.







GoD's MERcIEs. 59


GOD'S MERCIES.


TET us with a gladsome mind
Praise the Lord, for He is
kind,
For His mercies shall
endure
Ever faithful, ever sure.

All things living He doth feed:
His full hand supplies their need :
For His mercies shall endure
Ever faithful, ever sure.

He hath with a pitying eye
Look'd upon our misery;
For His mercies shall endure
Ever faithful, ever sure.

Let us then with gladsome mind
Praise the Lord, for He is kind;
For His mercies shall endure
Ever faithful, ever sure.


--







60 THE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


PRESENT AND FUTURE.


S-:4 -z------r--4


1. Here we suf fer grief and pain, Here we meet to

---------- vj I


!I~ fr


part a gain, In heav'n to part no more.
sk-










0 that will be joy ful, joy fu, joy- ful, joy ful,











O that wil be joy ful, When we meet to part no more.


I -
el We e me to part no more._______


VOICE.


1~ I i. I


J


I







AND FUTURE. 61


All who love the Lord below,
When they die to heaven will go,
And sing with saints above.
Oh, that will be joyful, &c.

Little children will be there,
Who have sought the Lord by prayer,
From every Sabbath-school.
Oh, that will be joyful, &c.

Teachers, too, shall meet above,
And our pastors, whom we love,
Shall meet to part no more.
Oh, that will be joyful, &c.

There we all shall sing with joy,
And eternity employ
In praising Christ the Lord.
Oh, that will be joyful, &c.


PR.ESE~v A.,D FUTURF-


- 61






62 THE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.












THE SECOND BIRTHDAY.


_nou dost not dream, my little one,
How great the change must be,
These two years, since the morning sun
SFirst shed his beams on thee;
SThy little hands did helpless fall,
As with a stranger's fear,
l And a faint wailing cry was all
That met thy mother's ear.

But now the dictates of thy will
Thine active feet obey,
And, pleased, thy busy fingers still
Among thy playthings stray;
And thy full eyes delighted rove
The pictured page along,
And, lisping to the heart of love,
Thy thousand wishes throng.

Fair boy the wanderings of thy way
It is not mine to trace,
Through buoyant youth's exulting day,
Or manhood's bolder race:







THE 7ACKDAW. 63


What discipline thy heart may need,
What clouds may veil thy sun,
The eye of God alone can read-
And let His will be done.

Yet might a mother's prayer of love
Thy destiny control,
SThose boasted gifts that often prove.
The ruin of the soul,
Beauty and fortune, wit and fame,
For thee it would not crave,
But tearful urge a fervent claim
To joys beyond the grave.

Oh, be thy wealth an upright heart,
SThy strength the sufferer's stay,
Thine early choice, that better part
Which cannot fade away;
Thy zeal for Christ a quenchless fire,
Thy friends the men of peace,
Thy heritage an angel's lyre,
When earthly changes cease.
*



THE JACKDAW.


HERE is a bird, who, by his coat,
o And by the hoarseness of his note,
Might be supposed a crow:
eo A great frequenter of the church,
9 Where, bishop-like, he finds a perch
And dormitory too.







64 THE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


Above the steeple shines a plate,
That turns and turns to indicate
From what point blows the weather:
Look up, your brains begin to swim ;
'Tis in the clouds that pleases him;
He chooses it the rather.

You think, perhaps, he sits and muses
On future broken bones and bruises,
If he should chance to fall;
But not a single thought like that
Employs his philosophic pate,
Or troubles it at all.

Thrice happy bird! I too have seen
Much of the vanities of men;
And, sick of having seen 'em,
Would cheerfully these limbs resign
For such a pair of wings as thine,
And such a head between 'em.


--- ,I,







Lucy GRAY. 65










LUCY GRAY.


jLL/ rFT I had heard of Lucy Gray:
And when I cross'd the wild,
I chanced to see at break of day
The solitary child.

No mate, no comrade, Lucy knew;
'7 She dwelt on a wide moor-
The sweetest thing that ever grew
S t .... J'.- Beside a human door

You yet may spy the fawn at play,
The hare upon the green;
But the sweet face of Lucy Gray
Will never more be seen.

"To-night will be a stormy night--
You to the town must go;
And take a lantern, child, to light
Your mother through the snow."

"That, father, will I gladly do !
'Tis scarcely afternoon-
The minster-clock has just struck two,
And yonder is the moon."







66


THE CHILD'S Boo0K OP SONG AND PRAISE.


At this the father raised his hook,
And snapped a faggot band;
He plied his work; and Lucy took
The lantern in her hand.

Not blither is the mountain roe:
With many a wanton stroke
Her feet disperse the powdery snow,
That rises up like smoke.

The storm came on before its time:
She wander'd up and down,
And many a hill did Lucy climb,
But never reached the town.

The wretched parents all that night
Went shouting far and wide;
But there was neither sound nor sight
To serve them for a guide.

At daybreak on a hill they stood
That overlooked the moor ;
And thence they saw the bridge of wood,
A furlong from their door.

And, turning homeward, now they cried,
"In heaven we all shall meet !"
When in the snow the mother spied
The print of Lucy's feet.






LUCy GRAY. 67


Then downward from the steep hill's edge
They track'd the footmarks small;
And through the broken hawthorn hedge,
And by the long stone wall:

And then an open field they cross'd:
The marks were still the same;
They track'd them. on, nor ever. lost;
And to the bridge they came.

They followed from the snowy bank
The footmarks one by one,
Into the middle of the plank;
And further there were none

S Yet some maintain that to this day
She is a living child;
SThat you may see sweet Lucy Gray
Upon the lonesome wild.

O'er rough and smooth she trips along,
And never looks behind;
And sings a solitary song .
That whistles in the wind.


* 7 '1*








68 THE CHILD'S BOoK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


GENTLE JESUS.


0rom WEBER.


Gen tie Je sus, meek and mild, Look up on a lit- tie child;


-<- *- -f- b -o- -S- -r- g-i- -
W;- -------I-- .,- ,--- ----- -,i --- -----t-----i:-- -- --..--T.-i------r ;*,-- --- $---


Pi ty my- im pli ci ty, Suf for me 'to come to Thee.




" ___ g 1 -_-
, *:" r I i i


Fain I would to Thee be brought
Gracious God, forbid it not:
In the kingdom of Thy grace
Give a little child a place.


Oh, supply my every want!
Feed the young and tender plant:
Day and night my keeper be;
Every moment watch round me.


VOICE.




PIANO.







GOD'S 'WORD.


GOD'S WORD


MIGHTY GOD! Thy word is
cast
Like seed upon the ground:
Oh! may it grow in humble
hearts,
And righteous fruits abound.

Let not the foe of Christ and man
This holy seed remove;
But give it root in praying souls,
To bring forth fruits of love.

Let not the world's deceitful cares
The rising plant destroy,
But may it in converted minds
Produce the fruits of joy.

Let not Thy word, so kindly sent
To raise us to Thy throne,
Return to Thee, and sadly tell
That we reject Thy Son :

Great God! come down, and on Thy
word
Thy mighty power bestow;
That all who hear the joyful sound
Thy saving grace may know.


~






70 THE CHILD'S BOOk F. SONG AND PRAISE.


THE FAITHFUL BIRD.

HE greenhouse is my summer seat;
My shrubs displaced from that retreat
Enjoy'd the open air;
STwo goldfinches, whose sprightly song
Had been their mutual solace long,
Lived happy prisoners there.

They sang as blithe as finches sing,
.. That flutter loose on golden wing,
S _And frolic where they list;
llf Strangers to liberty, 'tis true,
But that delight they never knew,
And therefore never missed.

But Nature works in every breast,
With force not easily suppress'd ;
And Dick felt some desires,
That, after many an effort vain,
Instructed him at length to gain
A pass between his wires.

The open windows seem'd to invite
-The freeman to a farewell flight;
But Tom was still confined;
And Dick, although his way was clear,
Was much too generous and sincere
To leave his friend behind:


--`-~










































































SUMMER NIGHT.

"There is a beautiful spirit breathing now
Its mellow richness on the clustered trees."-IONGFELLOW.







SUMMER EVENTIVNG. 71

So settling on his cage, by play,
And chirp, and. kiss, he seem'd to say,
"You must not live alone "
Nor would he quit that chosen stand
Till I, with slow and cautious hand,
Return'd him to his own.

Oh, ye who never taste the joys
Of friendship, satisfied with noise,
Fandango, ball, and rout !
Blush, when I tell you how a bird
A prison with a friend preferred
To liberty without.



SUMMER EVENING.

ow fine has the day been! How bright was the sun:
How lovely and joyful the course that he run,
Though he rose in a mist when his race he begun,
And there followed some droppings of rain
But now the fair traveller comes to the west,
His rays are all gold, and his beauties are best;
He paints the sky gay as he sinks to his rest,
And foretells a bright rising again.

Just such is the Christian : his course he begins
Like the sun in a mist, while he mourns for his sins,
And melts into tears; then he breaks out and shines,
And travels his heavenly way :
But when he comes nearer to finish his race,
Like a fine setting sun, he looks richer in grace,
And gives a sure hope at the end of his days
Of rising in brighter array.







72 THE CHILD'S BOOK oF SONG AND PRAISE.


"His rays are all gold, and his beauties are best;
He paints the sky gay as he sinks to his rest."







HEAR us, GOOD LORD 7


HEAR US,; GOOD LORD!


OD of Mercy deign to hear us,
As our humble notes we raise ;
SThou-hast promised to be near us
S When we meet to sing Thy praise.

Send Thy Spirit to direct us
In the straight and narrow way;
We are sinners Lord, protect us,
Lest our wandering feet should stray.

Snares and dangers will beset us
Ere we reach our journey's end;
But, though all the world forget us,
'-Jesus still will be our Friend.

Earthly friendships may deceive us;
Short, at best, their day must be;
Thou hast said Thou wilt not leave us,.
If we put our trust in Thee.

Lord of Hosts we bow before Thee !
Saviour take us for thine own !
After death may we adore Thee
With the saints around Thy throne.


"Rt'/E~V


tuP


. A







74 THE CHI.D'S BOOK- OF SONG, AND PRAISE.




TIME AND ETERNITY.


IMEJis swiftly flying,
Thousand tongues are crying
S Loudly to the dying,
', Be careful, be prayerful;
Christ died for thee.


Earthly hopes are fading;
Heavenly strength in aiding
SComes without upbraiding :
Be heedful, 'tis needful;
Christ died for thee.


b Never then be scorning
SHeaven's cloudless morning, .
Brighter worlds are dawning:
S Be grateful, be faithful;
S- Christ lives for thee.-







PRA YER FOR-ORPHANS. 75


PRAYER FOR ORPHANS.


OD bless the little orphans,
Supply their every need,
; And in the paths of duty
,Their feeble footsteps lead.

By Thy almighty power
These helpless ones defend
From every sin and danger
That o'er their lives impend.


By Thy eternal mercy
Their sorrows drive away,
And in this world of darkness
Do Thou their fears allay.

And by Thy love undying,
In all men's hearts incite
An interest for their welfare,
To make bereavement light.


.JAl








76 THE CHILD'S BOOK o SONG AND PRAISE.


ONLY A BABY.
Set to Music for thi
INTRODUCTION.


PIANO.
---'-d -- fw f -
fm. o .... -
t. _


s Work, by FRANK BRAIN.



, C-,L--


On ly a ba by small, Dropt from the skies,


On yaluh-igfc,__Tw__o_ un -"l ...






On ly a laugh ing face, Two sun ny eyes.



3.







ONLz :A BABY. -77


Only two cherry lips,
One chubby nose;
Only two little hands,
Ten little toes;

Only a golden head,
Curly and soft;
Only a tongue that wags,
Loudly and oft;

Only a little brain,
Empty of thought ;
Only a little heart,
Troubled with nought;

. Only. a tender flower,
Sent us to rear;
Only a life to love,
While we are here.







78 THE CHILD'S BOOK OF 'SON AND PRAISE.-



FATHER WILLIAM.


ou are old, Father William," the young man cried,
'" The few locks which are left you are grey;
You are hale, Father William, a hearty old man,
Now tell me the reason, I pray."

"In the days of my youth," Father William replied,
"I remembered that youth would fly fast,.
And abused not my health and my vigour at first,
That I never'might need them at last."

"You are old, Father William,"'- the young man cried,
"And pleasures with youth pass away;
And yet you lament not the days that are gone,
Now tell me the reason, I pray.".

"In- the- days of my youth," Father William replied,
"I remembered that youth could not last;
I thought of the future, whatever I did,
That I never might grieve for the past.",.

"You are old, Father William," the young man cried,
"And life must be hastening away;
'You are cheerful, and love to converse upon death,
Now tell me the reason, I pray."

"I am cheerful, young man," Father William replied,
"Ilet the cause thy attention engage;
In the days of my youth I remembered my God,
And He hath not forgotten my age."






WRITTN_-,.N MARCH.- 7(


WRITTEN IN MARCH.'


HE cock is rowing,
The stream is flowing,
The small birds twitter,
The lake doth glitter,
The green field.sleeps in the sun;
The oldest and youngest
Are at work with the strongest;
The cattle are grading,
Their heads never raising;
There are forty feeding like one!

Like an- army defeated
The snow hath retreated,
And now doth fare ill
On the top of the bare hill;
The plough-boy is whooping anon, anon.
There's joy in the mountains;
There's life in the- fountains ;
Small clouds are sailing,
Blue sky prevailing;
The rain is over and gone !







8() THE CHILD'S BOOK" OF SONG AND PRAISE.






































There's joy in the mountains; Small clouds are sailing,
There's life in the fountains; Blue sky prevailing.












































































The brown leaves leave
The boughs awhile all bare."-See Page 81






A AUTUMN. 81


AUTU i M N

SHE leaves we've seen
In Spring so green,
In Autumn now are brown
Wish as we may,
That they should stay,
T To earth they'll flutter down.
Yet, never fear,
When Spring is here,
We'll look for them in vain;
With April showers,
And primrose flowers,
The leaves will come again.

So shall we grieve
The brown leaves leave
The boughs awhile all bare ?
They only go
Awhile to show
How God for us takes care;
He takes them now,
That each brown bough
A time may bare remain,.
That brightlier green
It may be seen
When new leaves come again.


11






THE CHILD'S BOOK OF SONG AND PRAISE.


THE COUNCIL -OF HORSES.

PON a time a neighing steed,
Who graz'd among a numerous breed,
With mutiny had fired the train,
And spread dissension through the plain.
On matters that concerned the state,
The council met in grand debate;
A colt, whose eyeballs flamed with ire,
Elate with strength and youthful fire,
In haste stept forth before the rest,
And thus the listening throng addressed:
Goodness, how abject is our race,
Condemn'd to slavery and disgrace !
Shall we our servitude retain,
Because our sires have borne the chain ?.
Consider, friends your strength and might;
'Tis conquest to assert your right.
How cumbrous is the gilled coach !-
The pride of man is our reproach.
Were we designed for daily toil,
To drag the ploughshare through the soil,
To sweat in harness through the road,
To groan beneath the carrier's load?
How feeble are the two-legg'd,kind !.
What force is in our nerves combined !
Shall then our nobler jaws submit
To foam and champ the galling bit ?
Shall haughty man my back bestride ?
Shall the sharp spur provoke my side ?
Forbid it, heavens reject the rein;
Your shame, your infamy, disdain.
Let him the lion first control,
And still the tiger's famish'd growl.
Let us, like them, our freedom claim,
And make him tremble at our name."


------ I







THE COUNCIL OF HORSEs. 83


A general nod approved the.cause,
And all the circle neigh'd applause.
When, lo! with grave and solemn pace,
A steed advanced before the race,
With age and long experience wise;
Around he cast his thoughtful eyes,
And, to the murmurs of the train,
Thus spoke the Nestor of the plain:
When I had health and strength like you,
The toils of servitude I knew;
Now grateful man rewards my pains,
And gives me all these wide domains.
At will I crop the year's increase;
My latter life is rest and peace.
I grant, to man we lend our pains,
And aid him to correct the plains;
But doth not he divide the care,
Through all the labours of the year ?
How many thousand structures rise,
To fence us from inclement skies!
For us he bears the sultry day,
And stores up all our winter's hay.
He sows, he reaps the harvest's gain;
We share the toil and share the grain.
Since every creature was decreed
To aid each other's mutual need,
Appease your discotented mind,
And act the part by Heaven assigned."
The tumult ceased, the colt submitted,
And, like his ancestors, was bitted


\ p


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*78~92
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84 THE CHILD'S BOOK op SONG AND PRAISE.



FROM GREENLAND'S ICY MOUNTAINS.

VOICE.
From Green-land's&. i cy moun tains, From In dia's cor al
,~C I I ___I


t "=-- i ----I


-I -


Strand, Where A fric's sun ny foun tains Roll down their gold en



-' I I----f- --; J-
*---





sand; From many an an- cient ri ver, roin many a palm y










plain, They call us to' de li ver Their land from er-ror's chain.



S--I iP-j


PIANO.







FRoiM GREENLAND'S ICY MOUNTAINS. 85


Can we, whose souls are lighted
with wisdom from on high;
Can we, to lands benighted, the
lamp of life deny ?
Salvation! oh, salvation! the joyful
sound proclaim,
Till earth's remotest nation has
learned Messiah's name.
Waft, waft, ye winds, His story;
and you, ye waters roll,
Till, like a sea of glory, it spreads
from pole to pole;
Till o'er our ransom'd nature the
Lamb for sinners slain,
Redeemer, King, Creator, in bliss
S returns to reign.




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