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 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Rhymes and songs for my little...
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Title: Rhymes and songs for my little ones
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085405/00001
 Material Information
Title: Rhymes and songs for my little ones
Physical Description: 74 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Hingst, Adolphine Charlotte
Ruskay, Esther J ( Author )
Picknell, G. W ( George W. ), 1864-1943 ( Illustrator )
Lothrop Publishing Company ( Publisher )
C.J. Peters & Son ( Printer )
Publisher: Lothrop Publishing Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Manufacturer: C.J. Peters & Son
Publication Date: c1896
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1896   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre: Children's poetry
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Adolphine Charlotte Hingst and Esther J. Ruskay ; illustrations by George W. Picknell.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00085405
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223788
notis - ALG4040
oclc - 39744231

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 1a
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Rhymes and songs for my little ones
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
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    Back Cover
        Page 75
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    Spine
        Page 77
Full Text



















































The Baldwin Library
University
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COUNTRY LIFE.









RHYMES AND SONGS

FOR


MY LITTLE ONES



BY
ADOLPHINE CHARLOTTE HINGST AND ESTHER J. RUSKAY




ILLUSTRATIONS BY GEORGE W. PICKNEiLL









BOSTON


LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY






















































COPYRIGHT, IS96,

BY

LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY.


TYPOGRAPHIIY BY C. J. PETERS & SON,
BUOSTON.













m L, Op DotN


THE BUTTERFLY AND THE BEE .
MOTHER'S EYES . .
THE SEA SHORE . .
PEBBLES . .
THE BROWN MARE AND HER COLT
THE CATERPILLAR . .
BABY'S BREAKFAST ....
MY DOLLY'S PARTY . ...
THE CANARY BIRD IN THE FOREST .
THE SUN AND THE CLOUDS .
DISAPPOINTMENT . .
THE COW AND CALF . .
THE WEE BIRDS IN THE NEST. .
THE CAT WITH HER PUSSIES .
How MONEY GREW . .
MARY GOES TO SCHOOL ..
THE FIREFLIES . .
S WHAT MY BOY HAS . ...
THE BALL . . .
THE HEN WITH HER BROOD .
I CANT! .
COUNTRY LIFE . .
THE BLACK CRICKET . ..
iMAMMA'S SONG . ..
WHAT THE MOON SEES .. ..
THE DOG AND HER PUPPIES .
THE SECRET . .
WHAT CAN MY LITTLE MAN DO? .
STEN LITTLE BABIES .
BABY'S BATH .....
S WHERE THE FAIRIES DWELl .
THE FIRST TROUSERS . ..


PA(E.
9
* II

S '13
* 14
* I5
S t16


PAGE.
'7
. 18
. 719
. 19
S 21
S 22
23
24
25
26
27
I 28
29
30
31


i


I





PAGE.
S 32
33
S 34
S 37
S 38
S 39
S 40
41
42
43
S. 44
S 45


-^*^'*'^


I I


I I I I










6 CONTENTS.

PAGE.
LITTLE MISS FRISBY .. . . . . 46
OUR BABY'S BOOK . . . . . 46
THE BEACH .. .. . .. .. .. ... 47
THE DANDELION . . . . . 48
THE CANARY BIRD IN CAPTIVITY. ...... . .. . 49
LITTLE MISS FILKINS . . . . . 50
WINTER .. . . ...................... 51
PLAYING H OUSE . . . .. . . 53
HER BABY . . . . . 54
MOTHER PIG AND HER LITTLE ONES . . . . 55
A TOADSTOOL. ... . . .................. 56
MOTHER'S FACE . . . . . 57
THE DAISY'S QUESTION. ..... ... . . 58
PAPA'S SONG . . .. . . . 59
THE LANGUAGE OF FLOWERS ... . ......... 6
BABY'S CARRIAGE . .. .... . 63
LITTLE FLOWERS. . . . ..... 64
TWILIGHT HOUR .. . . 65
A WOMAN IN THE MOON ...... .. . .....66
PLAYING IN THE PARLOR. ... . . . 67
THE LITTLE LADY . . . . . 68
BIRDS IN WVINTER ... . .. 69
GOOD NIGHT . . . . * * 71
MOLLIE'S QUESTIONS ... . * ..... 72
THE SANDMAN .. . . . . 73
OUR BABY . . . . . .. 74
GOOD NIGHT . . . . . 74





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A l, xtt,.v l ankd la e "
-- \- 1" I

Tlih l, a bl-,,ming patch they see,
And m,(et on 1 I ltgraTnt clI\'vr.

The bee, with angry glance,
Buzzed at the other rover:
"Now, how came you to chance
On this tossing head of clover?


"5~'
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RHYMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES.

"This blossom leave to me;
To my hive its sweets I'll carry.
What you do, I can't see!
But there! I must not tarry."

(And the butterfly said)

"Why, how you buzz, little bee,
In your pride and self-content;
But I will never agree
That my life is vainly spent.

"From flower to flower I 'light,
And gladden the hours so sunny,
To men I bring delight-
Let others make their honey."





























On mother's knee sits little Will,
Rocking slowly to and fro;
His eyes with sudden wonder fill;
Now, they large and larger grow.

"Why, mamma, dear, I'm in your eyes;
I see myself, quite plain and clear!"
11






RHYMES AND SONGS FOR iMY LITTLE ONES.


And Willie, with soft, eager cries,
Draws closer to the face so dear.

"Yes, yes, my boy; indeed you do -
In mother's eyes yourself you see;
Your eyes reflect my image, too;
I am in you, and you in me.

"So, while you dwell beneath this roof,
Your mother's love her boy enfolds;
And, in my eyes, you see the proof
How strong on me your young life holds.

"And when you're grown quite big and tall,
And far from home your feet must stray,
Still shall you be your mother's all-
In dreams by night, in thoughts by day.

"And when you're coming home again,
To tell of men and distant skies,
A deeper meaning will be then
For you to find in mother's eyes."
























































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RHYMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES.


Rolling in blocks,
They come dashing, dashing;
On the black rocks,
They fall crashing, crashing.

Birdlike and free,
Ships pass, hailing, hailing;
Far out to sea
They go sailing, sailing.





PEBBLES.

Pebbles, pebbles, in the clear brook;
You gleam so white in a shady nook,-
Do you wish the stream wouldn't hurry so fast?
Do you wish the summer would always last?

Dear little fishes, darting about,
Under the white stones in and out;
Do you wish that a boy, with a pin and a hook,
Would never come near this beautiful brook?




















M'OiW NTioSw LN1\ b 0, COLT


STo her baby colt the brown mare savs: '
' "Don't jump too much when you're
playing tag;
It will tire you out, and shorten your days-
And a lame old horse is a useless
; / nag.

"Here come the boys and the girls
from school,
They bring you sugar and bits of
bread;
15






RHYMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES.


When they have gone, we'll drink from the pool;
But now you must let them pat your
head.
Oh! do not rear in that naughty way;-- ,'-''
Just bow your thanks, alid gently neigh."



CATERPILLAR.

Fuzzy red caterpillar, fuzzy red caterpillar,
Are you going to turn into a great moth-miller?
Perhaps you have notions more lofty and high---
You're going to turn into a big butterfly.



': i .r



Shake off your red coat; go hang yourself up;
Take nothing to eat-not even a sup;
Don't open the door of your house until spring,
And then you'll come out such a beautiful thing!




















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! ( Come,
Oatn
S Take y
And


eat your porridge, baby mine,
ieal, with milk and sugar sweet.
our spoon of silver fine,
sit up straight in your little seat.


Do not watch the kitty play,
Let her roll the ball away.
Eat your breakfast, little man-
Nice sweet milk, fresh from the can,
Which the milkman left for you,
While the grass was wet with dew.






RHYMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES.

See how neatly sister dips
Her milk and bread from out the bowl;
Not a drop falls from her lips,
Nor does to chair or carpet roll.
That's my baby! Careful; so!
You can feed yourself, I know.














That Dolly lost her bonnet new,
And split her lovely leather shoe.
SI-
.- W;'A-\ ..













They sat around the table
And told a funny fable;
MY DOLLY'S PARTY.
My dolly gave a party
Where they laughed so very hearty
That Dolly lost her bonnet new,
And split her lovely leather shoe.

They sat around the table
And told a funny fable;
Then they ate the sugar 'kisses,
And washed up the supper dishes.






















From isles in the midst of the' .i
sea, ,
Where are forests of fragrance
and bloom;
This bird comes, to you and to me,
To sing for us, here in our
room.


In some orange, or
myrtle tree,
In its bright island


green

home


( was its nest;
S And it soared and it sang, blithe
1 and free,
Where the ocean was never at rest.


_-k -(






20 RHYMES AND SONGS FOR /1MY LITTLE ONES.

Like a golden and fluttering star,
With pinions unfettered and strong,
It glittered and glistened afar,
Singing its tunefulest song.







--_ ---








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~$-lThrouh Ils ia he muSt
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H~is ray1\w Sofl e-arthl t-:)~ r


"Once 1,t Ie ielrCe the-Se CIlou-S,"

Ilei shine

The hilulrein gay Il lmy beamsrlS
\viiil )1- dI,
Fl'OI-r-ttUI () thle Stormf."


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RHYMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES.

"No, no," the hurrying clouds reply;
Our rule it is to-day;
We send soft rain that will help the grain;-
No time have we for play."

Fruits fine and good for children's food,
By gentle showers are fed;
Let children play at home to-day,
Or do some work instead.

-------- ---- I' I-.' ----


DISAPPOINTMENT.
A whiff and a puff!
She's off in a huff-
A dear little pink lady-slipper,
Oh, what has happened to miff her?

To-night there's a ball
In the fairies' big hall,
And the beautiful queen-
Her foot was too small
For the pink lady-slipper!
I've told you it all.












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| Down here in th
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meadow,
In the fresh gr


ee


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grass,
You may lie in the
shadow,
While the noon hours


) .


pass.
Do not fret for your
food,
You will get all you need.
\ Little calves must be good,


Till themselves they can feed.
The fence is not there
To put your head through,


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24 RHYMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES.

No, no; do not stare,
Nor hang out your tongue,-moo-o-o !
No, do not frisk, now, little calfie, I pray;
Just lie still and dream the noon hours away."



/


--~ -_ --.




THE WEE BIRDS IN THE NEST.
Oh, the flutter and clutter and clatter and chatter
Of wee baby birds in the nest;
Oh, the mothering and hovering,
With soft wings a-covering
The wee baby birds in the nest.
Now the shadows are hieing,
And daylight is dying
Out of the gay painted west.
Hark! they are trilling songs, the air filling,
To wee baby birds in the nest.
Oh, lull them; oh, lull them to rest.





















Drink the sweet milk from i
1 the brim of the dish,
Put your tongue out to lap
p it: like this!
When you've enough, use each little paw
To clean your mouths gently, and smooth down your fur.
Kittens, you know, should always be clean.
(They live in the house, where
they're petted and seen.)
,.-. When you grow up, you must learn to catch
/ / mice
Sly, naughty beasts, that gnaw up
what's nice!
25






RHYMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES.


HOW MONEY GREW.

SA dear little toddler, just three years
old,
Came carrying home a bag of gold
Done up in her apron of hol-
land brown
; That covered her dainty blue-
checked gown.

Yellow curls tossing about
her face-
Ah! she is coming at suc/i
a pace.
Carrying a bag of shining
Countless treasures, my
darling told.


Here they are lying at mamma's feet,
Heads of dandelions clipped so neat!
"Some golden dollars, all for you-
Guess you didn't know that Money grew!"




















Little Mary goes to school
--- To learn to read and write;
-- ., rThen all her tasks, by word
and rule,
She studies every night.

The more she knows, the more
she learns,
The more she'll wish to
know.
An eager mind for knowledge
K rJO1 QO0 TO -0h0 yearns,
S-And students wiser grow.





RHYMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES.


Some day, perhaps, she'll teach wee Will,
To read, and cipher, too;
She'll wisely train his mind, until
All school tasks he can do.

Oh, happy boy and happy girl!
Oh, happy tasks, well done!
How sweet the spoils of schoolday toils -
But mother sits alone!





THE FIREFLIES.
" I've found out at last," said my dear little Bess,
" What the fireflies are; mamma, can you guess
Why they flicker and flutter about in the grass,
And twinkle and shine wherever they pass?

"They're the steeds of the fairies, who ride them at
night,
And of course, to be careful, they carry a light;
A cute little lantern to show them the track,
For each little fairy he gallops bareback."







WHAT MY BOY HAS.

Two eyes, nmy child,
15 So clear in sight,
Are yours to see
What's good and
bright.

As? Two ears are yours,
To listen well
To sorrow's tale,
That men may
tell.

Two tiny hands
That now may
play;
But, when they're
strong,
Must work each day.


Two little feet
That quickly run;
More slow their gait
Ere life is done.


One mouth, to speak
Of joy or pain
That moves the heart
And fills the brain.






RHYMES AND SONGS FOR lIMY LITTLE ONES.


Heed well, my child!
The words you say
Must glow with truth
And love, always.



THE BALL.
The Man in the Moon once gave a ball-
He asked Mrs. Night and her children all.
The stars, they marched with torches bright,
And a long-tailed comet hove in sight.

The katydid flew by the side of the bat,
After them followed the owl and the cat.
The cricket invited the nightingale,
And a glow-worm came from her home in the vale.

The frog, all dressed in his coat so green,
By the side of a big horned-toad was seen.
A moth, a midge, and a june-bug great,
And a lone, lorn whippoorwill got there late.

The will-'o-the-wisp with his lantern gay
Announced each guest in the proper way.
They danced all night in the moon's great hall,
And then all went home from this jolly ball.


















J0 bMVvTH


My little ones, though you have feathers,
Your wings will never let you fly high;
Neither must you be out in all weathers,
So take my advice and keep yourselves dry.
Be careful, too! there are foes about:
The cat and fox, the dog and
the hawks;
They all like chicks, I warn you.
Look out!
Keep always near, and don't
stray in
your
walks.






RHYiMES AND SONGS FOR lMY LITTLE ONAES.


There is plenty of food in the yard,
Barley, and bread, and corn the year round
Don't swallow stones that go down too hard,
You will spoil your stomachs, that now are sound.
This water is never allowed to grow stale,
So drink often and freely from out the wide pail.





"I CAN'T!"

A little black ant, once said "I can't!"
And sat down to mope and to cry.
When up rose his sisters and cousins and aunts,
They said-" You must do it, or die!"

If there's one thing an ant won't abide, 'tis I can't!"
They never say aught, but try;
"So you'd best not shirk, but just fall to work
And make yourself nimble and spry."











By field and hedge the chil- "1
dren run,
Fanned by wind and warmed
by sun;
Never still, their restless feet;
They hear the white lambs
baa and bleat,
And to the chickens throw '
their food.
They watch the turkey with
her brood; j










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RHYMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES.


And learn to harness horse to coach;
Nor do they fear the cow's approach.
They long to catch the birds that fly,
So they may mount into the sky;-
But if the children sought to roam
Up in the clouds far off from home?
Why! what would Towser's puppies do?
And pussy's kittens-how they'd mew!
No!-No!- quite satisfied are they
To run about the farm all day.

----^I-^----

THE BLACK CRICKET.
In a green thicket, there lived a black cricket,
Singing chirkety-chirrrrr!
He looked like a fright, for he sang all night
Chirkety-chirkety-chirrrrr!

When good people slept, such a racket he kept
With his chirkety-chirrrrr!
That they cut down the thicket where lived the
black cricket
Singing his chirkety-chirrrrr !








RHYMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES. 35












MAMMA'S SONG.


No thing of life so small,
But has its mother dear;
Perhaps, on tree-tops tall,
In field or ocean clear. -

The little birdies stay
At home to sleep and rest,
SWhile mother flies away
To bring food to her nest.

The eaglet soaring high;
The little busy bee;
S The brilliant butterfly;
The fish that swims the sea;
37


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RHI'YMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES.


The mouse that squeaks and gnaws;
The frog and turtle, too;
%' All things with wings and paws,
And babies just like you -
Each has a mother, fond and good,
Who loves and shields her little brood.




WHAT THE MOON SEES.
Big, yellow moon,
What you looking at?
Don't you think our baby's
Getting pretty fat?

Little twinkling stars,
Shining up aloft,
Don't you think our baby's
Eyes are blue and soft?

See his little white legs
Kicking on the rug;
Moonlight and starlight,
Isn't our baby snug?
















Or, Icannot you see









Nor growl at them all;
Don't bite baby, in play, .,
.. ,. > .. _,. .- .

Nor tear Tommy's ball;



B Stay here with me nor wok to
u mWhere'tis snud and warm; a
SOr, cannot you see
You will come to harm?
Don't get in folks' way, j .(
Nor growl at them all;
Don't bite baby, in play, "'
Nor tear Tommy's ball;
But, since you've no duty, nor work to plan,
You may play and may bark just as loud as you can.






IRHYIMES AND SONGS FOR MIY LITTLE ONES.


TIE SECRET.
Who loves the thistle? Not I, not I,-
The prickly thistle so green.
Every which way, its leaves they turn;
Everywhere, thorns are seen.
If you but touch it, it stings, it stings!
Who loves the thistle? Not I-
Growing so tall by the orchard wall,
With its blossoms of purple dye.

But the thistle has one true love, oh, yes,
The yellow-bird, dainty and light,
Who swings and sways on the purple bloom,
And flashes his wings so bright.

They have a secret between them, I know-
The thistle and yellow-birds gay;
The thistle won't sting, if the yellow-birds sing,
T/is is their secret, I say.

























t;cJ '~


What can my little man do?
He can crow like the cock: Ku-ku-ru-u-u! "
He can low like the cow: "Mou-mou!"
He can bark like a dog: "W'ow-wow!"
He can purr like a cat: "Porr-porr!"
He can bleat like a sheep: "Baa-baa!"-
But he cannot fly like a bird, in the air.


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RHYMES AND SONGS FOR M1Y LITTLE ONES.


TEN LITTLE BABIES.

Ten little babies, beginning to whine,
One fell asleep-then there were nine.
Nine little babies, playing first-rate,
One got cross-then there were eight.
Eight little babies to ride 'till eleven,
One bumped his nose-then there were seven.
Seven little babies, all in a mix,
One crawled out-then there were six.
Six little babies for a sugar-plum strive,
One ate it up-then there were five.
Five little babies all on the floor,
One crawled in my lap-then there were four.
Four little babies smiling at me,
One got to crying-then there were three.
Three little babies, in red, white, and blue,
One went home-then there were two.
Two little babies trying to run,
One of them fell down-then there was one.
One little baby sucking her thumb,
She goes to bed-now there is none.





















"4t, -


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Now my little one must go

Into her nice, warm bath;

How she'll kick, and splash, and crow;

How she'll coo and laugh!

Then, when baby's clean and sweet

From curly head to wee pink feet-

And has on all her nice clean clothes,

Down to papa his baby goes;

And then, without warning,

. She'll kiss him "Good morning !"
U 43


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RHYMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES.


WHERE THE FAIRIES DWELL.
If I knew where the fairies dwell,
I wouldn't tell;
Though you looked at me with your soft, blue eyes,
I wouldn't tell.

Just where their tiny hollow is,
Safe in the green old wood,
Though you plead with me, and begged to see-
I wouldn't tell, if I could.

There's a ring of violets round a throne
Fashioned of soft green moss;
And dainty bells in the fairy dells
Jingle and ring and toss.

The wild flowers know the secret well,
But they won't tell;
And the rusty squirrel sees them dance,
But /e won't tell;

Nor I, nor I, where the fairies dwell;
For, safe in the dear old wood,
They may dance and shake their gossamer wings-
I couldn't tell, if I would.














I r












To-day is such a great, great day!
Baby is a boy! Baby is a boy!
Trousers he wears! Just see, I pray:
How big he's grown; and what a joy
To have a jacket with buttons of steel;
And to clank the floor with boot and heel.
Baby? No baby to-day is he;
He's a boy, and soon a man will be!
45






RHYMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES.

LITTLE MISS FRISBY.
Little Miss Frisby,
Dressed all in white,
Went to a children's
Ball one night.

Ten little lads and
Ten little misses,
Lots of good fun
And sweet sugar kisses.

Little Miss Frisby led on the dance;
Nine little lads began to prance;
Ten little girls to smile and simper;
One little boy began to whimper.



OUR BABY'S BOOK.
One little baby just falling asleep;
One little baby just learning to creep;
One little baby so smiling at dawn;
One little baby beginning to yawn;
Two little babies quite angry and cross-
Give one a kiss, and the other a toss.














ft


-^,.^",, ^ c..-- -" ^_j _.T.

SO! here is the place to play in the sand, y
With your little bare feet, till the day is done;
You can dig big canals, and race, and run
For pebbles and shells along the strand,
Where the waves creep-creep--till your toes
they reach,
As you dare them to come to you, there on the
beach.


.>-^.tp-._


4
^k
-iT %
-. (''-






RHYMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES

DANDELION.
Tall, gray-headed dandelion,
Never more, Sir, shall you shine
Round and yellow in the grass.
All the little winds that pass
Shall blow and shake and shake;
Each a tiny hair shall take,
Until, poor Mr. Dandelion,
Bald your pate there in the grass.-
Cruel little winds that pass!

Comes a lad with hair so curly;
(Ah, he gets up very early,)
Spies an ancient dandelion -
And his blue eyes, how they shine!
Turns he to the West, and mutters,
Turns he to the East, and utters:
"Tell me truly, dandelion,
Does she want me, mother mine?"
Then his rosy lips he purses
Twice, the little rhyme rehearses,
Blows among thy thin gray hair,
Leaves thee bald and leaves thee bare-
Poor old Mr. Dandelion!























hrI Every n


This little bird in his cage night and day
Gladdens our hearts with his sweet
roundelay.
ew day he trills his sweet note,


SPouring forth song from his wonderful throat.

i Now the wee house of our pet we must clean,
Make it the neatest that ever was seen;
Water to bathe in, and fresh sand, beside-
These we must give him, and much more provide.

Greens for the cage-bars, some apple and seed,
Sugar to nibble-all these things he'll need;
Then, when each feather is shining and bright,
Warbling sweetly, he'll send us delight.






RHYMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES.


LITTLE MISS FILKINS.
Little Miss Filkins lives all alone
Under a toad-stool close by a stone;
Her carriage is formed of a big acorn-cup,
Her steeds are two grasshoppers all harnessed up.

All she eats is a slice of pink mushroom or two;
With the tiniest of brooms she sweeps up the dew,
And drinks it each day from a lily-cup white
Dainty enough for an elf-queen's delight.

She has a grand lover, Miss Filkins, they say,
Who comes out to see her, a very long way;
He rides a big rabbit, so stately and white;
To see him pass by, is a beautiful sight.

He carries a mandrake leaf over his head,
They're going to be married quite soon it is said,-
Of little Miss Filkins we'll then see the last,
For Jack-in-the-Pulpit will tie the knot fast.

Then perched on the rabbit, her -husband beside,
Like a queen, into fairyland far she will ride;
And a big ugly spider, who looks like a gnome,
Will have the great nerve to inhabit her home.







7i7i


It winter; d LN te I- VOLI s. f
A ll th,- n v al talinl
clown ?"

Hc-:itr the shl-MLt't anul m1- \rr'

Of tlhe schIoolbl, s from the
tO 1\\1l

Fair Earth wars her ermine
d rISS,
\lra)ps up in it, close andC
wLt al ;t
Later, all the plants will bless


These black clouds that
bring the storm.


I
^9-
f-

,'
/


s-

--~sph


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52 RHYMES AND SONGS FOR iMY LITTLE ONES.

When you grow quite strong and tall,
Two big boots Papa will buy;
Then you'll roll a big snowball,
Reaching far up toward the sky.

Auntie, too, will buy a sled
That will hold both you and Flo;
If you give the reins to Ned,
Out you'll tumble in the snow.






/.^__ -______________--- _V^",iQ^



SA little girl and a little boy
(Her name was Madge, and '
Shlls nam,.e -11- Roy'


V
P


SBuilt them a tinI\- house, to hold
Thlir toys anld 1Ikee themselves
furl (C'old.

The--c hadl a littl-e ardeilCn, too,
In I which the ilt i ers c gaily :ec\\:;
withini n the porch they drank
their tea,
As IiCC adi(l proper as could


be.


VdS~


4]-.r
'p


~ssi~iilRSI


I
1


-


I'
b~' ~ r.,
::~~;gL I:L~f:
o~- iT


L-






RHYMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES.

At "Hide and Seek" or "tag" they played,
And through the paths and bushes strayed,
Or, in the yard that stretched without,
Raised chickens, ducks, and turkeys stout;
With garden stuff they tilled the ground,
And kept this house the whole year round.



HER BABY.
He stood at the Western window,
My fair-haired little son-
To watch the stars that blossom
After the day is done.

He saw the new moon dropping
Down to her shadowy bed:
"Mamma," he called out, gravely,
"Say! is the old moon dead?"

"Why, that is a funny question,"
I said, as I patted his head;
"Well, I doesn't see her nowhere,
A-puttin' her baby to bed."






















-*S'i)T -(A .. .-"U- )'. .,; .- '
N)j)
'',j
^ *^-


squeal! But


Why! a hogshead


of milk would


For wasteful piggies, who wallow and play;


Just watch me, now. I'll show you the way:
See how I drink-sl-u-p! with my mouth;
and you


Well-behaved piggies should do


S, so, too."


5_4 j,


sl>


c


yr.


1..~







RHYMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES.


A TOADSTOOL.
Ugly green toad, with your great bulgy eyes,
What do you want of a stool ?
Can't you sit down on the end of a stone,
Or sleep near the edge of a pool ?

Only just look at this beautiful thing,
All covered with cream-colored silk,
All lined with shirred satin of delicate tint,
On a column that's whiter than milk.

To call it a toadstool, is really
a shame!
'Tis, rather, a fairy's quaint
tent;
Or a parasol, maybe, to keep
e off the rain--
-- iAnd that is the reason 'tis
bent.

So under a stone, you may live all alone,
As long as you please, ugly toad;
For what's in a name, though of long-standing fame:
A toadstool is not your abode.



























My little ones cannot yet read books,
But they can read their mother's looks.
i W When her face is sad,
At once they know
They have been bad;
Then, straight they go
To ask. for pardon, and to say,
They will be good the livelong day.
57






RHYMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES.


To read her smile
They all begin,
By gentle ways
Her heart to win.
But, when she calls with shining eyes,
Quick to her lap each birdling flies.



THE DAISY'S QUESTION.
If I were a daisy out in the field,
Flaunting my white gown, nod-
.. ,.-. ding my yellow head,
SWhile the wind shook me and
S' tossed me and danced me
In my great billowy bed-?

And if you were a dear little lassie-
And your sweet eyes should hap-
pen to see 'i,.
This daisy so joyous, so glad to be
living, '
Would you have the heart to pick
me?




,1' ~;


'ii l' 11 1
There was an ass with long, long ears,










-tears 'I
St w t s





There was an ass with long, lon ears,
With large, wide mouth, and dullest
eyes;
He seemed to say, "I could shed
tears,
But will not, since I am so
wise.

Dark gray was he from head to tail;
Hard words and blows were oft his


part;





RHYMES AND SONGS FOR 2MY LITTLE ONES.


But yet no moan, nor slightest wail,
Gave sign how sad and sore his heart.

Given to meditation deep,
With movements heavy, dull, and slow,
Laden with bags, up hillsides steep,
With corn to the mill he'd often go.

"Say, Long Ears," cried the naughty boys,
"What carry you inside those bags?
Are they candies sweet or toys,
Or just brown paper and old rags?"

"Books, books, books, I bear,
Books that naughty boys do tear."
"And what is in those books? Oh, say!
What's in them; tell us, Long Ears, pray?"

"In this load of books I carry,
Are loveliest songs from near and far."
"Then sing, old Long Ears; with us tarry."
He opened his mouth and sang: "Yak-Yakh!"





















orr PrM

SFull of speech are flowers gay,
-'- '", ', Though they do not speak our
Sway;
- Yet their perfume, color, show,
''' Breathe a lanuae, we well know

..-,. .' Snowdrop fair, whose drooping
^), 1 ,head
.'/ --''I:. Seeks escape from Winter's bed,
S ; Whispers shy and low, Cling, cling;
SSee, I usher in the Spring."






RHYMES AND SONGS FOR 7MY LITTLE ONES.

Violet of deepest hue,
Modest flower rich with dew,
Full and sweet, its dear perfume
Asks to fill the shady room.

So these tiny, star-like gems,
Standing upright on their stems,
Lightest blue, with golden dot,
Plead with us: "Forget-me-not!"

Says the graceful, queenly rose,
'Neath whose budding leaves there glows
Such a wealth of rapturous love:
"Kiss me, if my heart you'd prove."

And the lily tall and fair,
Lifts her head into the air:
"Child, I here would teach to thee
White and spotless purity."

But the tiger lily, free,
Shakes her proud head saucily:
"Look at me-but not too close,
Or you'll get a yellow nose!"




~-l
:' ~x
s;s ~


Now to the park! The
weather's fine;
Here's your carriage, sweetheart mine;
Papa pushes it alone,
He's horse and coachman, all in one.
Away we go,
To see the trees grow,
To find the sweet flowers
And sit in the bowers,
To watch the doves fond,
And the swans on the pond.
So come! let's away,
On this beautiful day.


3"





RHYMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES.

LITTLE FLOWERS.
Little flowers, little flowers,
Out in the wood,
It isn't hard work
For you to be good.

You haven't long curls
To get in a tangle
So, when they're combed,
There's a terrible wrangle!

You haven't to wear
Such a very white frock
That, when it gets dirty--
'Tis always a shock

To your own mamma dear
Who has dressed you so clean-
You aren't "the worst girl
That ever was seen!"

You have nothing to do
But to live in the wood.
If I were like you
I should always be good.





L-


-~i f~:-: -L*





I Wi :) ii9\i5S


be..I



(:


At twilight hush comes tfncv's
hl() LI I,
When mother weaves h1r won-
(1rOLs tales
Of children o:o(d, ot wislnom's


Of tairies and enchanted sails.
Come, rest in mother's lap, as slow
The golden sun go:es on his


The lands he visits now. you know,
Are strange, with life and
col ) rs oa\-


'U'~


1.


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RHYMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES.


The skies, the winds, the birds, the flowers,
The men, the customs, and the wars,
Are not those of this land of ours-
Our land of peace and Freedom's laws.
See! Now the sun is lost to sight;
The evening's mantle falls without;
The moon's rays bathe the earth in light,
And now the golden stars gleam out!
Good night, my children; have no fear;
The sun is gone, but God is near


A WOMAN IN THE MOON.
'Tis certainly queer and so funny, my dear,
If you look through a glass you can see her quite clear.
There is her eye and there is her ear,
There's her mouth and her nose and her chin.
You mustn't gaze out when the moon is too thin;
But when it is full, and so jolly and round
'Tis then that the lady is sure to be found.
There, close to the right, her profile you'll see:
A woman's as plainly as ever can be.
Now, would you have thought it ? The lovesick old spoon!
He's up and got married-the man in the moon!
























Come, my little people, play,
With your horses and jf
your cows;
Teach your dolls, so they
will say
"Pa-pa," Ma-ma," and make '
bows.
The dog will bark, the bird will fly; _
The cat will purr, the cock will crow. '
While here mamma will sit, and try
Baby's frock and skirt to sew.






RHYMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES.


THE LITTLE LADY.
From a land called "Quaint Arcady,"
Once, there came a little lady,
Dressed in a robe of pink-like gossamer.

And she rode a little pony,
Caparisoned so tony,
For the saddle was of silver and the bridle was of
gold.

When she passed them, all the people
Rang the bells in their church steeple;
And saluted till their faces touched the ground.

Lo! a parson with a sermon,
And a prince in royal ermine,
Fought a duel for this little lady's hand.

But the maid from quaint Arcady-
This funny little lady,
\WVould have naught of all the suitors in the land,

l Till she met a boy tow-headed;
Ah! she smiled, and they were wedded:
Back to quaint Arcady, rode the lad and little lady.



















i*-, _. '


,) The air is bleak, the north-
S. winds blow\\
The \inter comes with sleet


Our s-n- --birIds all have taken
fliht.
T'-> trill their notes of gay delight
'\Iicst suinn. i clime and blos-
soming plain,
Till Spring and they return


again.






RHYMES AND SONGS FOR M1Y LITTLE ONES.


Yet, see, we are not quite alone;
The twittering sparrows have not flown;
They still remain, our lot to share,
Though earth, and trees, and fields are bare.
Just listen to their voices shrill,
As they come near our window-sill.

Now watch we, as the birds draw near,
And all the soft crumbs disappear.
Each morning thus we feed the birds,
Who need no nod, nor beck, nor words.
One tells the other: "In there live
Kind children, who nice food will give:

"Crumbs of bread so sweet and nice
That you'll eat them in a trice."
So the sparrows cry: "Twit, Twit,"
And eat until 'tis time to quit;
Then, jostling each other in birdlike pranks,
They fly away with "Thanks, dears, thanks!"



























GOOD NIGHT.
Boys and girls who jump, and play,
And race about the livelong day,
Should know, when falls the evening light
And sunset fades, that it is night.
As birdies fly to perch and nest,
So children, too, should seek their rest.
71






RHYMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES.


MOLLIE'S QUESTIONS.
Thistle-down, thistle-down, airy and light,
When are you going to take your flight?
Are you the steed of some quaint little fairy,
Just dainty enough for you to carry ?

Woodpecker, woodpecker, on the green tree,
You work pretty hard, it seems to me,
A-pecking away at a piece of hard wood-
What are you doing? I'd tell if I could.

Rat, tat, goes your hammer the whole of the day,
Bob, bob, goes your head with its crown so gay.
Perhaps you are hired to drill all the holes,
So the fairies can set up their telegraph poles.

Little red chipmunk on the stone wall,
You run so fast, I'm afraid you'll fall;
Your tail is so bushy, your eyes are so bright,
Where are you going to sleep to-night?

Leaves, leaves, on the tall tree,
Tell me now, can you really see
The great world stretching so far away,
And the sun going down at close of day?






















,-. I ..


B.$
i


With laughing eyes, and merry
lips,
The Sandman starts upon his
trips.


A tricksy little fellow, he,
Whose shining boots slide noiselessly
Into the room at eventide-
Where, waiting, he his time doth bide.
The bag he carries in his hand
Is filled with wondrous silver sand;
Some glittering grains on Baby's eyes
Make heavy eyelids droop and rise,
Then droop again, till tight they close-
And off to Dreamland Baby goes.






RHYMES AND SONGS FOR MY LITTLE ONES.


OUR BABY.
Heigh-ho, what do you think,
Here's our baby, sweet as a pink,
Dressed all up in a very white gown-
Guess our baby is going to town!

Trot, trot, trot, the village is near;
Trot, trot, trot, the town is here.
Buy him a crown, and let it be gold,
For baby to-day is six months old.

GOOD NIGHT.
Go to sleep, babies, my stories are done,
I'll tell you some more at the peep of the sun.
Come, little dreams, on your gauzy white wings,
Tell to the babies some wonderful things;
Thoughts out of elf-land flit through their heads,
As they lie all asleep in their neat cosey beds.







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