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Title: Report of the Regional Round Table for the Establishment of a Technical Cooperation Network of Institutions and Agencies in Support of Rural Women
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Title: Report of the Regional Round Table for the Establishment of a Technical Cooperation Network of Institutions and Agencies in Support of Rural Women
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Language: English
Creator: FAO Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean
Publisher: FAO Regional Offi e for Latin America and the Caribbean
Place of Publication: Santiago
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Publication Date: 1991
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Introduction and development of agenda
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Synthesis of agreements reached at the round table
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    List of participants
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Inaugural statements
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Agenda
        Page 35
        Page 36
    FAO's proposal for the establishment and operation of a technical cooperation network of intitutions and agencies in support of women
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Other documents in this series
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
Full Text



FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGAN IZATION
OF THE UNITED NATIONS


REPORT OF THE REGIONAL ROUND TABLE
FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF
A TECHNICAL COOPERATION NETWORK
OF INSTITUTIONS AND AGENCIES
IN SUPPORT OF RURAL WOMEN



San Salvador, El Salvador
19 and 20 September, 1991






DERU-40


FAO REGIONAL OFFICE
FOR LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

Santiago, Chile


1991







FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION
OF THE UNITED NATIONS










REPORT OF THE REGIONAL ROUND TABLE
FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF
A TECHNICAL COOPERATION NETWORK
OF INSTITUTIONS AND AGENCIES
IN SUPPORT OF RURAL WOMEN





San Salvador, El Salvador
19 and 20 September, 1991







RLAC/91/38 DERU-40



FAO REGIONAL OFFICE
FOR .LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN


Santiago, Chile


1991








TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

1. INTRODUCTION .................................................... 5


2. DEVELOPMENT OF THE AGENDA ........................................ 5

2.1 Introductory Aspects and Working Methodology .............. 5

2.1.1 The Technical Cooperation Networks of the
FAO Regional Office for Latin America and
the Caribbean ....................................... 5
2.1.2 Operation of the Technical Cooperation
Networks in El Salvador ............................. 6
2.1.3 Purposes, objectives and methodology of the
Round Table .......... .............................. 7

2.2 Presentation of the FAO Proposal for the Establishment
and Operation of a Technical Cooperation Network of
Institutions and Agencies in Support of Rural Women ....... 8

2.3 Working Groups ........................................... 8

2.3.1 First Session ....................................... 9
A. Proposed objectives ............................. 9
B. Priority subjects for the action of the Network.. 9
C. Criteria for participation in the Network ....... 10
D. Coordination mechanisms of the Network and
its connection with the national networks ....... 11
2.3.2 Second Session ..................................... 13
A. Phase I. National level ........................ 13
B. Phase II. Regional and subregional levels ....... 14


3. SYNTHESIS OF AGREEMENTS REACHED AT THE ROUND TABLE .............. 15



ANNEXES

I. LIST OF PARTICIPANTS ........................................... 19

II. INAUGURAL STATEMENTS ............. .............................. 29

III. AGENDA .......................................................... 35

IV. FAO PROPOSAL FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT AND OPERATION OF A
TECHNICAL COOPERATION NETWORK OF INSTITUTIONS AND
AGENCIES IN SUPPORT OF RURAL WOMEN .............................. 37








1. INTRODUCTION


1. The Regional Round Table for the Establishment of a Technical
Cooperation Network of Institutions and Agencies in Support of Rural Women was
held in compliance with the FAO Programme of Work for the Integration of Women
in Agriculture and Rural Development in Latin America and the Caribbean, and
in accordance with the Plan of Action for this subject, prepared by the
Organization upon the request made by its member countries.

2. The Round Table was held immediately after the Subregional Workshops on
the Implementation of the FAO Plan of Action for the Integration of Women in
Development, which gathered participants from 27 countries of South America,
Mesoamerica and the Caribbean, as well as national observers from El Salvador
and Mexico, and from international agencies (see List of Participants in Annex
I). Invitations to attend the Subregional Workshops and the Round Table were
extended by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO),
through the pertinent authorities.

3. The Round Table was inaugurated on Monday 16 September, together with
the Subregional Workshops, with an opening statement by Mr. Jos6 Tubino, FAO
Representative in El Salvador, who spoke on behalf of Mr. E. Saouma, Director-
General of FAO, and of Mr. Rafael Moreno, Assistant Director-General and
Regional Representative for Latin America and the Caribbean. Subsequently, the
events were officially inaugurated by Eng. Antonio Cabrales, Minister of
Agriculture and Livestock of El Salvador. The inaugural ceremony was attended
by Mr. Francisco Merino, Acting President of the Republic of El Salvador,
representatives of the Diplomatic Corps and of International Agencies,
officials of the Government and of Salvadorian development institutions, as
well as journalists, in addition to the participants in the events and FAO
staff. The statements by Mr. Tubino and Eng. Cabrales are included in Annex
II.



2 DEVELOPMENT OF THE AGENDA


2.1 INTRODUCTORY ASPECTS AND WORKING METHODOLOGY

4. Work was initiated in line with the Agenda (see Annex III). At the first
plenary session of the Round Table, the results of the three Subregional
Workshops on the Implementation of the Plan of Action for the Integration of
Women in Agriculture were presented. After this, the background and general
information on the Round Table were explained to the participants.

2.1.1 The Technical Cooperation Networks of the FAO Regional Office for Latin
America and the Caribbean

5. Ms. Virginia Lattes, Regional Home Economics and Social Programmes
Officer, gave an account of the technical cooperation networks (TCNs)
sponsored by FAO in Latin America and the Caribbean. In this respect, she
explained that they had originated in the concept of cooperation among
developing countries, as an alternative to traditional technical assistance,
an idea that was supported by the United Nations Conference on the subject,
held in Buenos Aires in 1978. This Conference formally recognized the






potential of the horizontal transfer of technologies and experiences for the
development of the Latin American and Caribbean countries.

6. Since 1979, and within this framework, FAO, through its Regional Office,
has promoted the formation of Technical Cooperation Networks among national
institutions of its member countries. At present there are 22 networks
operating in the Region, in which over 400 national institutions from 33
countries participate, covering a great variety of technical areas. The TCNs
utilize various mechanisms for exchange and transfer among the participating
institutions.

7. Ms. Lattes highlighted that this is a joint effort between FAO and the
interested national institutions. FAO provides the technical secretariat;
maintains updated information on the facilities of some institutions to offer
technologies and on the requirements of others as regards training of their
technical cadres; contributes limited financial support for the organization
of technical events, in-service training, study tours and other activities;
provides bibliographic information and technical documentation of interest to
the networks; and supports their regional or subregional coordination. In
turn, the national institutions provide the services of their technicians, at
no cost, to advise other institutions, as well as their facilities and
equipment for technical events, study tours and in-service training; make
available to other institutions the results of their progress in matters of
common interest; support FAO in the preparation of technical documentation;
carry out the regional or subregional coordination of the network; and other
actions, as deemed necessary.

8. Ms. Lattes concluded this part of her presentation indicating that,
although the issues of rural development and integration of women in
development are far more complex that the other subjects dealt with by
existing networks, FAO has considered it very important to initiate networks
on each of these subjects in 1991. In a joint effort with the Human Resources,
Institutions and Agrarian Reform Division of Headquarters in Rome, the present
Round Table was convened for this purpose, during which the participants from
the countries will discuss the possibility of establishing the network and its
characteristics. The Technical Cooperation Network on Rural Development was to
be established at a similar event, to be held in Cochabamba, Bolivia, on 10
and 11 October 1991.

2.1.2 Operation of the TCNs in El Salvador

9. Subsequently, a statement was made by Lic. Jorge Amaya, who, as official
of the Ministry of Planning of El Salvador, was in charge of coordinating, at
the national level, the various networks which the country has subscribed to.
Lic. Amaya presented the existing experience in the operation of the networks
at the country level, and highlighted the following points which he considered
of particular importance to ensure the success of a Network:

a) In each country, a careful selection should be made of the national
institution that will coordinate the network, as well as of the person
who will be responsible for it. He emphasized that the dynamism of the
coordinator (male or female) is essential for its success.

b) National groups for support to the operation of the network (national
networks) should be established in each country.







c) Each country should'define precisely what it expects to achieve through
the network.

d) As regards the role of the National Coordinator, he indicated that
he/she is responsible for integrating the national groups, identifying
the most suitable institutions for this purpose.

e) In relation to activities subsequent to the establishment of the
Network, he mentioned the following: i) prepare a work plan for the
national group within the framework of the network, making adequate use
of available resources; and ii) disseminate the existence of the network
in the countries, requesting support from the FAO or UNDP Representative
in order to involve other institutions.

2.1.3 Purpose, objectives and methodology of the Round Table

10. Ms. Lattes informed on the purposes of the Round Table, which had
already been specified in the Technical Background Note which was sent to all
participants, and on the methodology that would be used in its development. In
this respect, she pointed out that the Round Table was convened for the
purpose of establishing a Technical Cooperation Network of Institutions and
Agencies in Support of Rural Women in the Latin American and Caribbean Region.

11. Among the specific objectives of the Round Table, the following had been
established:

a) Define the priority subjects that would be dealt with by the Network in
its initial phase.

b) Establish criteria for the incorporation of institutions into the
Network.

c) Determine the operational structure of the Network.

d) Prepare a work programme for the first year of activities.

e) Select the coordinating institutions of the Network at the regional and
subregional levels.

f) Establish communication and exchange mechanisms among the members of the
Network (or subnetworks) and assign responsibilities for the fulfillment
of the established work programme.
g) Identify coordination mechanisms of the regional Network with the
corresponding national networks.

12. The working methodology would include plenary sessions in order to
discuss FAO's proposal for the establishment of the Network, present and
discuss the results of the working groups on the items of the Agenda, and
adopt final decisions regarding the constitution and characteristics of the
Network. The purpose of the two working group sessions would be to determine
the objectives of the Network, define priority subjects to be dealt with,
decide on possible Network members, establish a structure and coordination
mechanism for the Network and prepare a work plan for its constitution and
initial phase of operation.

13. The Round Table elected the participants from Argentina, Mexico and
Saint Christopher and Nevis as coordinators of the plenary sessions.







2.2 PRESENTATION OF THE FAO PROPOSAL FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT
AND OPERATION OF A TECHNICAL COOPERATION NETWORK OF
INSTITUTIONS AND AGENCIES IN SUPPORT OF RURAL WOMEN

14. Subsequently, FAO's proposal was presented by Ms. Fabiola Campillo,
Programme Officer, Women in Agricultural Production and Rural Development
Service of FAO Headquarters in Rome. Among the background information, the
proposal included the objectives of the Technical Cooperation Networks that
operate in the Region, and references to the FAO Plan of Action for the
Integration of Women in Rural Development.

15. In relation to the Technical Cooperation Network of Institutions and
Agencies in Support of Rural Women, its justification in relation to FAO's
interests and to the needs of the countries was presented; short and long-term
objectives were proposed; and suggestions were made on three priority fields
of action of the Network, namely: i) organization of women of the rural
sector; ii) access of women to technologies in the productive and reproductive
(domestic) areas; and iii) training at all levels, including planners,
officials and peasants (male and female). The proposal also included details
of operational elements and instruments of the Network, as well as the
progressive stages for its launching and initial phase. Likewise, it referred
to the ways in which FAO, through the Regional Office for Latin America and
the Caribbean, can provide support to the Network. The complete version of the
proposal is included as Annex IV.

16. During the ensuing discussions, some international agencies informed on
the existence of other networks that are operating in the Region or in
subregions, such as the Network on Women and Communications in Central America
and the Regional Literacy Network. Some operational mechanisms of the latter
were pointed out.

17. Some countries expressed their interest in the fact that FAO, and the
countries themselves, should expedite processes to achieve a ratification or
officialization of the Network. It was also pointed out that the best option
on the matter could be the establishment of a regional network with
subregional coordinations, with only one work programme that can be adapted to
the different realities by means of subprogrammes.


2.3 WORKING GROUPS

18. Three working groups which operated with their respective facilitators
from the Technical Secretariat were established and designated their
Coordinators and Rapporteurs. Group 1 was constituted by the eight English-
speaking Caribbean countries represented in the event, while the other two
groups were formed by the Spanish-speaking countries and Haiti. In the first
working session, Group 2 was constituted by the participants from Brazil,
Chile, Colombia, Cuba, El Salvador, Guatemala, Paraguay, Peru and Panama;
Group 3, in turn, was constituted by the participants from Argentina, Bolivia,
Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Honduras, Haiti, Mexico, Uruguay and
Venezuela.

19. In the second working session, these groups were constituted by
subregions: English-speaking Caribbean countries, South America and
Mesoamerica, which included the Latin Caribbean countries, Central America,
Mexico and Panama.






2.3.1 First Session


20. At the first session, the three groups worked on the definition of
several crucial aspects for the operation of the Network: its objectives, the
priority subjects it would work on, who could belong to the Network, what
coordination mechanisms could be established for the Regional Network and how
it would be linked to the national networks that may be established in the
future. The results of this work are detailed below.

A. Proposed objectives

21. Immediate: To achieve the formalization of a technical cooperation
network among the countries of the Region, with a Regional Coordinator and
three Subregional Coordinators, constituted both by the governmental and non-
governmental agencies that have programmes oriented towards rural women, as
well as by representatives of peasant organizations.

22. Medium-term: i) To strengthen the capabilities of the institutions,
agencies and organizations that work with and for rural women in the Region;
and ii) to create national networks of institutions, agencies and
organizations that work in the promotion and development of rural women.

23. Long-term: i) To contribute to an exchange and coordination among
governmental institutions, non-governmental agencies and peasant organizations
of the countries of the Region, in relation to the fundamental problems that
affect rural women; and ii) to encourage the formulation of governmental
policies in favour of peasant women, based on the action of the State,
experiences of NGOs and the demands of peasant organizations.

B. Priority subjects for the action of the Network

24. The working groups defined the following priority subjects on which the
efforts of the Network should be centered, at least during its first year of
operation: organization, technology, training, legislation, policy analysis,
statistics and exchange of experiences in productive projects, The greatest
coincidence was evidenced in the subjects of training, organization and
technologies.

25. In the field of training, sensitization of staff was considered of
fundamental importance, to make them aware of the importance of activities
carried out by rural women and, therefore, recognize the need to include them
in the development plans, programmes and projects of the institutions. The
Network can not only play an important role in this sensitization process but
also in the contribution of instruments and techniques required to include
gender issues in the design, execution, follow-up and evaluation of
agricultural and rural development programmes and projects. In addition, the
Network can organize activities oriented towards the different groups of rural
women, in order to train them on subjects linked to productive, domestic,
administrative and organizational aspects, which, in turn, can strengthen
achievements in respect of sensitization and self-valuation of women.

26. As regards organization, they pointed out that the Network would be very
useful for carrying out an even greater effort in the promotion of associative
and organizational actions for rural women, oriented towards improving their
access to public services and increasing opportunities for their participation
in economic, political and social activities, in equal conditions to those of
men. Also, the Network can carry out activities aimed at overcoming the







weaknesses that normally occur within rural women's organizations, by means of
technical training, personal development and formation of leaders.

27. In the sphere of technology, they indicated that the Network can make an
important contribution to the systematization of data on who does the work in
.farming and what it consists of at present; how men and women take part in the
production of each crop; and how decisions are taken on the use of
technological inputs in the peasant productive units. Likewise, the Network
will be useful in the exchange of experiences oriented towards institutional
reforms that are required to improve research on specific technological needs
of rural women, and to guarantee their access to this technology.

28. The group from the English-speaking Caribbean countries considered that
the fields and subject-matter areas that require cooperation, as indicated by
the countries during the recently held Subregional Workshops on the
Implementation of the Plan of Action for the Integration of Women in
Agriculture, could be dealt with through the Network, for example, through
exchange of staff and technical assistance in the field of production
technologies. In addition, the group underscored the work that can be carried
out by the Network in order to exchange certain experiences among the Latin
American and Caribbean countries, such as the recent experience of Honduras in
training on gender analysis and that of other countries in data.management.

C. Criteria for participation in the Network 1

29. The working groups proposed several criteria to determine who could
participate in the Network, such as:

1) A firm commitment of the governments to the concept and operation of the
regional technical cooperation networks.

2) The institutions and organizations must express their will to provide
and receive technical exchange and assistance among the countries of the
Region.

3) Institutions that participate in the Network must be involved in
activities related with women of the rural sector, especially in
relation to agricultural and rural development; in addition, they must
count with experiences and resources in order to share, or identify,
needs that can be met through the mechanism of a regional network.

4) Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) that meet these criteria must be
encouraged to participate in the National Network, sharing the
objectives and operational guidelines of the Regional Network.





1 The general guidelines for the operation of the TCNs stipulate that: "The rule is that only
one institution represents a country in each network. This institution coordinates the
Network's activities at the national level, and must ensure an adequate participation of the
other institutions interested in benefitting from and cooperating in its action".
"Frequently, National Networks are established, within which an institution is designated to
represent the others at the international level". "The national coordinating institutions
must be endorsed by the corresponding Government authorities".
Source: FAO. REGIONAL OFFICE FOR LATIN AIERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN. 1987. General guidelines
for the Technical Cooperation Networks. Santiago, Chile, FAO/RLAC. (RLAC/87/61-RECO-9).







5) In cases where other networks exist in this field, they must be invited
to join the Regional Network. NGOs that are individual members should
preferably operate through this collective membership.

30. Institutions, agencies and organizations that can integrate the Network
would be: i) institutions working specifically with rural women and peasant
development, either governmental or private; ii) institutions that deal with
planning and design of policies; iii) institutions for the formation of human
resources and research in the field of agricultural and rural development; and
iv) representative organizations of the rural population, either mixed or
specifically for women.

D. Coordination mechanisms of the Network and
its connection with the national networks

31. The Working Groups recommended the establishment of one Network only for
Latin America and the Caribbean, of a regional nature, which would include
three subregions: South America, English-speaking Caribbean countries and
Mesoamerica.

32. Three alternative coordination mechanisms were proposed: i) a regional
coordination and three subregional coordinations; ii) three subregional
coordinations; and iii) one regional coordination only.

33. The Caribbean group that proposed alternative (ii) suggested that three
Governments (one from each subregion) be invited to establish the Network and
to determine the institutions that would become the subregional coordination
units.

34. It was suggested that a work plan, of a global nature, be prepared,
involving all the countries of the Region, together with more specific work
plans for each one of the subregions.

35. The regional coordinator would be in charge of coordinating, in
consultation with the subregional coordinators, the activities indicated in
the work plans, both regional and subregional.

36. It would be necessary to count on coordinators at the national level,
who would be the focal points in the countries and would also be responsible
for convening and coordinating other members, in order to constitute a Network
of a national nature.

37. The regional coordination should be elected by the national
coordinators. It was suggested that, for the time being, the national
coordinators be the participants in the Round Table, until the endorsement of
the governments is received.

38. Following the guidelines for the operation of the networks, included in
document RECO-9, it was confirmed that the duration of appointments is two
years.

39. It was suggested that coordination be established with other networks
operating in the Region.

40. The working groups observed that their recommendations and suggestions
are subject to the approval and endorsement of their respective governments.








41. As an immediate working strategy, it was suggested that the potential
supply and demand of technical cooperation of the institutions and agencies of
each country should be identified and presented to the countries. A draft form
to be used by FAO for gathering the necessary information, was handed to the
Secretariat.

42. During the discussions that followed the presentations of the first
session of the working groups, it was observed that they strengthen the
elements that are common to the countries of the Region.

43. As regards the functions 6f the Network, the need to differentiate them
was pointed out, as exchange of experiences is a function of any technical
cooperation network. It was suggested that one of the functions should be to
follow-up on agreements adopted at various meetings on "Women and
Development", and should include support to the Network member institutions in
project management.

44. In relation to the priority subjects for the Network's action, it was
pointed out that, after defining the functions of the Network, the work plan
could be prepared, including specific needs that could eventually vary in
time. It was also indicated that the Network cannot absorb all the subjects
included among the cooperation requirements of the countries at the
Subregional Workshops on the Implementation of the FAO Plan of Action for the
Integration of Women in Development. Therefore, priority should be assigned to
some of them, particularly selecting those for which experiences exist and can
be transferred, and those which can be extended to all the constituents of
the Network.

45. On the other hand, there are subjects of interest for all the Region and
others that are only important for a group of countries; their definition
pertains to the operation of the Network and is not a task of the Round Table.
For example, it was suggested that this would be the case of productive
technologies, as these depend largely on the production items involved.

46. Reference was made to the interest of some specific countries in
subjects such as organization and establishment of databases. Concerning the
latter, it was suggested that, being a very complex subject, it would be more
realistic to carry out an exchange of experiences in design of methodologies
and progresses achieved in the incorporation of the gender variable in data on
the rural sector.

47. On the other hand, it was considered that the subjects proposed by the
three groups were sufficient and that the approach in dealing with them could
vary, in line with the needs of the countries.

48. In relation to the possible Network members, the coincidence of the
three groups in proposing that it be open to the three sectors mentioned in
this report was highlighted.

49. As regards the coordination mechanisms proposed by the three groups,
consensus was reached in the sense of establishing a Regional Network, with a
Regional Coordination and three Subregional Coordinations.








2.3.2 Second Session


50. During the Second Session, the three groups worked on the preparation of
a work plan for the establishment and launching of the Network, and submitted
their reports at a plenary session.

51. One of the groups (Mesoamerica) estimated that the work plan of the
Network should have a basically regional orientation, in order to strengthen
the integration of all the countries of the Region in the common task of'
inserting rural women effectively in Latin American and Caribbean development.
The group proposed that, at the subregional level, only guidelines that
distinguish the specificity of the different groups of countries should be
elaborated.

52. Furthermore, it warned on the impossibility of elaborating a detailed
work plan during the short time available at the Round Table, and suggested
that a meeting be held for the purpose among the Subregional Coordinators, the
Regional Coordinator and FAO, in March 1992. This meeting would be held at the
FAO Regional Office in Santiago, Chile. The same suggestion was made by the
Caribbean group, which also recommended carrying out a subregional workshop to
prepare the programme of work. The workshop should be preceded by a
programming mission in order to determine the links between the Network
members in this subregion.

53. In order to advance in the formation of the Network, the groups proposed
several activities, which can be divided into those corresponding to a first
phase, at the national level, and to those of a subsequent phase, at the
regional and subregional levels:

A. Phase I. National level

The following immediate activities were proposed at this level:

1) Promotion of the Network in the countries and ratification of their
interest to participate in it. The following activities would be
undertaken for the purpose: i) disseminate the conclusions and results
of the Round Table to the officials of the participating institutions;
ii) prepare a list of Governmental institutions, private agencies and
rural organizations that could participate in the National Network; and
iii) convene them to communicate the conclusions and results of the
Round Table.

2) Decision by the competent authorities regarding the designation of the
national coordinating institution, and confirmation of their
participation in the Network.

3) Collection of data and identification and coordination of activities to
initiate the action of the Network. Data will be collected on: i)
characteristics of the institutions, agencies and organizations
participating in the National Network; ii) determination of the subjects
of their interest and establishment of priorities among them; iii)
initiation of the diagnosis on supply and demand of technical
cooperation that could be executed within the framework of the Regional
Network.







54. In order to initiate the coordination, contacts would be made with
institutions that have advanced projects and programmes on the subject, as
well as with financial agencies.

55. The working group proposed that the information collected be sent to the
FAO Regional Office, for the purposes of establishing a database.

B. Phase II. Regional and subregional levels

56. For this phase, the groups proposed the following activities: i) gather
and organize the information obtained at the national level, sharing it at
least among the coordinators; ii) carry out a working meeting of the four
Coordinators and the FAO Technical Secretariat; and iii) prepare the work plan
for the operational phase of the Network.

57. Phase III would be the operation of the Network as such.

58. The Caribbean group, in turn, invited the Network Coordinators at the
regional and subregional levels to review all existing projects, both those
supported by the United Nations System as well as by other cooperation
agencies, in order to determine the possibility of expanding them to include
gender analysis, which has been a major concern of the Workshops and of the
Round Table.

59. Each working group designated the coordination for the corresponding
subregion, which were confirmed as follows:

South America: Instituto de Desarrollo Agropecuario, Chile.
Caribbean: Ministry of Agriculture, Saint Lucia.
Mesoamerica: Ministerio de Recursos Naturales, Honduras.
Mexico and Venezuela were proposed for the Regional Coordination.

60. During the discussions that followed the presentations of the three
groups, agreements were reached on the phases and on the activities during
each phase. Phase I would be strictly at the national level. For this purpose,
the FAO Regional Office (FAO/RLAC) is requested to prepare and deliver to each
country the pertinent documentation, through official channels, so that they
designate the institution and person responsible for the Network in each
country. The decision is communicated to the FAO Regional Office, also through
official channels.

61. The institutions participating in the networks communicate through the
National Coordinator of each country with the Regional Coordinator or with
FAO/RLAC, depending on the subject. In turn, FAO addresses its communications
to the national coordinator of the Network through the FAO Representative in
the country (FAOR), informing the Regional or Subregional Coordinator.

62. The subject of legitimizing the Coordinators designated at the Round
Table was discussed. It was suggested that FAO/RLAC communicate to the
governments the names of the persons designated at the meeting on a pro
tempore basis, requesting them to consider their endorsement and communicate
their decision.

63. The Regional Coordination was designated among the nominations of Chile,
Mexico and Venezuela. Chile declined, and Mexico was elected by majority of
votes (16 vs. 10). Subsequently, the designation of the Subregional







Coordinations, which had been initiated in the working groups, was confirmed
as follows:

South America: Ms. Liliana Barria, Instituto de Desarrollo
Agropecuario,, Chile.
English-speaking Caribbean countries: Ms. Rufina Jean-Paul,
Ministry of Agriculture, Saint Lucia.
Mesoamerica: Ms. Cecilia Callejas, Ministry of Natural Resources,
Honduras.

64. Some participants insisted on the need to receive the Report of the
Round Table as soon as possible, in order to begin activities of Phase I at
the national level.


3. SYNTHESIS OF AGREEMENTS REACHED
AT THE ROUND TABLE


65. This section includes all the agreements reached during the Round Table,
even if they have already been mentioned in the report, in order to facilitate
their dissemination and follow-up, both by the participants and by FA0.

1) The Round Table agreed to establish a Regional Technical Cooperation
Network in Support of Rural Women, with three subregional components.
The Regional Network was organized with a Regional Coordination, for
which Mexico was designated, and three Subregional Coordinations: Chile
(South America); Honduras (Mesoamerica); and Saint Lucia (English-
speaking Caribbean countries).

2) Three sectors of the member countries can integrate the Network: the
public sector, especially through institutions of the agricultural and
planning sector; the private sector, through development agencies; and
peasant organizations, either women's or mixed. A fundamental condition
to integrate the Network is that the interested institutions, agencies
or organizations must be working on policies, programmes and projects
that include the development of or support to women of the rural sector,
particularly as regards agricultural and rural development.
Additionally, these institutions must have resources and experiences
that they wish to share with other institutions, or identify their own
needs which can be met through the Network.

3) The objectives of the Network were defined as follows:

1. Immediate objective:.to formalize the Network in the countries of
the Region.

2. Medium-term objective: to strengthen the institutional capacity of
the participants in the Network, and to establish national
networks with the institutions, agencies and organizations that
work with and for rural women.

3. Long-term objective: to contribute to an exchange among all the
institutions and agencies involved from the various countries, in
relation to fundamental problems that affect rural women, as well
as to encourage the formulation of governmental policies in favour
of women of the rural sector in the countries.







4) Interest was expressed on the following subjects for the action of the
Network: organization of women of the rural sector; technologies for
rural women, particularly in the productive sphere but also in the
reproductive (domestic) one; training on gender issues at various
levels, including staff and peasants; legislation and rural women, with
emphasis on its dissemination; policy analysis and establishment of
databases to support planners; statistics that reflect the true
participation of rural women; exchange on work in productive projects
with women of the rural sector.

Out of these subjects, which are too numerous for the action of a
Network, the ones that evidenced the greatest coincidence were the ones
on training and on technologies. In view of the short time available at
the Round Table to prepare the work programme of the Network, FAO was
recommended to convene a meeting for the purpose with the four
Coordinators and the Secretariat in March 1992, at the Regional Office
in Santiago. It was agreed that the subjects to be dealt with by the
Network can vary in time, and that they can receive various degrees of
emphasis or treatment in each subregion, according to the needs of the
countries.

5) In order to advance with the establishment of the Network, agreements
were reached on various activities that correspond to two initial
phases, prior to the operational phase as such.

Phase I. At the national level

In the first place, activities include the promotion of the Network in
the countries and the ratification of the countries in respect of their
interest to participate. For this purpose:

i) the results of the Round Table will be disseminated to the
institutions which the participants in the event belong to;

ii) a list will be prepared of governmental institutions, private
development agencies and peasant organizations that could
participate in the National Network; and

iii) all these entities will be convened in order to communicate to
them the conclusions of the Round Table.

In the second place, the pertinent authorities will be requested to
decide on the national coordinating institution, and to ratify the
participation of the country.

In the third place, work will begin in data collection and in the
coordination of activities for work in the Network. This information
refers to the characteristics of the institutions and organizations
participating in the National Network; to subjects of their interest for
cooperation; and to supply and demand for technical cooperation which
could be carried out within the framework of the Regional Network.

Phase II. At the regional and subregional levels

Activities during this phase include the collection and analysis of
information obtained at the national level during Phase I, sharing it
with all the Coordinators and with the FAO Secretariat; and a working






meeting of the four Coordinators and the FAO Technical Secretariat,
where the work plan for the operational phase of the Regional Network
would be prepared.

In order to launch Phase I, the FAO Regional Office should prepare and
deliver the Report of the Round Table to each country, and a letter to
the pertinent authorities, through the corresponding FAO Representative,
officially communicating the results of the Round Table, informing on
the designations of pro tempore coordinations and requesting the
governments to confirm to FAO their interest in becoming Network
members. In addition, they should be requested to designate a
coordinating institution at the national level and a responsible
official, as well as to ratify the designation of Regional and
Subregional Coordinators that was made at the Round Table.

Phase III corresponds to the operational phase of the Network.









ANNEXI


LIST OF PVARTTICIPANTS


SOUTH AMERICA

Maria del Pilar Foti Laxalde
Coordinadora Area Mujer del Departamento de Desarrollo Rural
Subsecretaria de Agricultura, Ganaderia y Pesca
Paseo Col6n 982, 29 Piso, Of. 209 C.F. (1063)
Tel6fono: 361-8196, 362-6634
ARGENTINA

Carmen Llanos de Vargas
Comisi6n Mujer Campesina y Desarrollo
Miembro Componente de la Comisi6n
Av. Hugo Estrada No. 6, La Paz
Telefono: 36-9953
gOLIVIA

Dirce Maria da Fonseca
Asesora CAmara da Pesca, Ministerio de Agricultura e Reforma Agraria
Anexo B de Ministerio de Agricultura, Sala 229, Brasilia
Telefono Residencia: (061) 244-3206
Fax: (061) 218-2338
BRASIL

Fernando Corrales Cruz
Gerente General, Instituto Colombiano de Reforma Agraria (INCORA)
Avenida El Dorado INCORA
Tel6fono Oficina: 222-0963
Telefono Residencia: 256-6798
Fax: 2220963
COLOMBIA

Liliana Barria I.
Jefa de Estudios y Proyectos del Instituto Nacional de Desarrollo
Agropecuario (INDAP), Ministerio de Agricultura
Teatinos 40, 59 piso, Santiago
Tel6fono: 671-1553
Fax: 672-3997
CHILE

America Celi de Sevilla
Asesora, Ministerio de Bienestar Social SEDRI
Robles y Pdez, Edif. M.B.S.
Telefono: 52-5996, 54-6618
ECUADOR

Nancy Romero
Jefa Divisi6n Educaci6n para el Hogar, Servicio de Extensi6n Agricola
Ministerio de Agricultura y Ganaderia
Km. 11 San Lorenzo
Telefono: 50-0377, 022-2526, 022-2451
PARAGUAY








Fidelina Diaz Aquino
Director Programa y Presupuesto P.E.P.S.
Oficina de Planificaci6n, Ministerio de Agricultura
Av. Salaverry 1350, Jesus Maria, Lima
Tel6fono: 7-1396, 67-6406
PERU

Mario C. Irazabal Canzani
Gerente T6cnico, Instituto Nacional de Colonizaci6n
Cerrito 488, Montevideo
Tel6fono: 36-3458, 95-4118
URUGUAY

Vilma Aray de Jiminez
Comi~ionada, Ministerio de Estado para la Promoci6n de la Mujer
Av. Libertador, Centro Comercial Libertador, P.H. Caracas
Tel6fono: (02) 74-6811
VENEZUELA


CARIBBEAN

Ruth Gwendolyn Hammerton
Agricultural Officer, Department of Agriculture
P.O. Box 3028, Nassau
Tel6fono: 361-4370, 325-7502
Fax: 809 361 4236
BAHAMAS

Ruth N. Dover
Agricultural Officer, Ministry of Agriculture (Extension)
Regent Vlissengen Road, Georgetown
Tel6fono: 02 5-3851, 02 6-0393, 68714
Fax: MIN FLAN 256 281
GUYANA

Hyacinth D. Bernard
Assistant Director, Ministry of Agriculture
Hope Gardens, Kingston 6
Tel6fono: 92-85527, 92-71206
JAMAICA

Gwendolyn Nisbett
Assistant Secretary, Ministry of Women's Affairs
Church Street, Basseterre
Tel6fono: (809) 465 2521 Ext. 1085 (Oficina)
Fax: 4651316
ST. KITTS

Rufina Jean-Paul
Chief Agricultural Planning Officer, Ministry of Agriculture
Mongiraud Street, Castries
Telefono: (809-45) 22526, 23773, 26676
Fax: (809-45) 36314
ST. LUCIA






Theresa Luana Daniel
Journalist/Researcher, Community Developer
Women's Affairs Department, Ministry of Women's Affairs
Baynes Building, Kingstown, St. Vincent
Telefono: 457-2789, 456-4886
Fax: 45 72445
ST. VINCENT & THE GRENADINES

Christine Bocage
Agricultural Officer/Nutritionist
Ministry of Food Production and Marine Exploitation
St. Clair Circle, St. Clair, Port-of-Spain
Tel6fonos: (809) 622-1221 Ext. 266
TRINIDAD & TOBAGO

Cornelly G. Fitz James Forst
Director International Relations, Ministry of Agriculture
Cultuur Tuinlaan, Paramaribo
Telefono: 47-8986, 47-4177
Fax: (597) 478986
SURINAME


MESOAMERICA

Lucrecia Mejia Leiva
Asesora Sefor Ministro, Ministerio de Trabajo y Seguridad Social
Av. 2 y 4, Calle 9, San Jose
Telefono: 21 0038
Fax: 22 8085
COSTA RICA

Tamara Silvia ColumbiA Matos
Funcionaria, Federaci6n de Mujeres Cubanas
Paseo NQ 260, La Habana
Telefono: 39932, 311259
CUBA

Margarita Garabot
Subdirectora de Planificaci6n, Secretaria de Agricultura
Centro de los H6roes, Feria, Santo Domingo
Tel6fono: 532-5896
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

Mercedes Llort
Director OSPA, Ministerio de Agricultura y Ganaderia
83 Av. Nte., entire 11 y 13 Calle Pte., San Salvador
Telefono: 79-1943
Fax: 245208
EL SALVADOR

Sara Esther L. de Fuentes
Jefa T6cnica Administrativa, Oficina Nacional de la Mujer
14. Calle 5-49 Zona 1 HO Nivel Edificio NASA, Ciudad de Guatemala
Tel6fono: 53-3821, 77-6379
GUATEMALA







Ginette Riviere
Consultora en la Oficina de la Condici6n de la Mujer
Ministerio de los Asuntos Sociales
c/o Bureau de la FAO, Port-au-Prince
Tel6fono: 45-3010, 22-8090
HAITI

Cecilia Callejas
Coordinadora de Asuntos Campesinos, Ministerio de Recursos Naturales
Av. FAO, Boulevard Miraflores, Tegucigalpa
Tel6fono: 32-9862
HONDURAS

Irma Victoria Jim6nez Lugo
Subdirectora de Investigaci6n del Programa Nacional de Mujeres en
Solidaridad, Secretaria de Programaci6n y Presupuesto
San Antonio Abad 124 3er. piso, Mexico, D.F.
Telefono: 740-2440, 740-7840 ext. 207
MEXICO

Anayansi P. de Rodriguez
Coordinadora del Programa de la Mujer Rural -Herrera-
Ministerio de Desarrollo Agropecuario
Chitre, Provincia de Herrera
Tel6fono: Oficina 96-4406 Residencia 96-0998
PANAMA

INTERNATIONAL OBSERVERS

Maria Luisa JAuregui de Gainza
Especialista Alfabetizaci6n y Educaci6n de Adultos, UNESCO/OREALC
Calle Enrique Delpiano 2058, Casilla 3187, Santiago
Tel6fono: (562) 204-9032
Fax: (562) 49 1875
Telex: 340258 UNESCO CK
CHILE

Lucie Bazinet
Agencia Canadiense de Desarrollo Internacional
Oficina de Cooperaci6n Canadiense,
Edificio OMNI, 6Q piso, Apartado Postal 7717, San Jos6 1000
Tel6fonos: 21-6322, 28-1662
Fax: 554016
COSTA RICA

Lea Guido L6pez
Coordinadora Subregional, Proyecto "Salud Integral a la Mujer" OPS-OMS
Ministerio de Salud, Oficina Panamericana, San Jos6
Tel6fono: 33-7354
COSTA RICA

Sergio Sepilveda
Especialista D.R., IICA Programa Desarrollo Rural
55-2200 Coronado, San Jos6
Tel6fono: 29-0222
Fax: 506-294741
COSTA RICA








Beatriz Soriano
Director Proyecto Mujer y Comunicaci6n, IICA
Apartado 7533-1000 Coronado
Tel6fono: 29-0222
Fax: 29-2147
COSTA RICA

Rebeca Arias Flores
Official de Programas, Programa de Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD)
15 Calle Poniente # 4319 Col. Escal6n, San Salvador
Tel6fono: 23-4466, 79-0610
EL SALVADOR

Jorge Garza
Director, Cooperaci6n Canadiense
Av. Las Palmas No. 111 Col. San Benito, San Salvador
Tel6fono: 79-0765
EL SALVADOR

Aura Maritza Majano Rivas
Asistente de Programa, Programa Mundial de Alimentos (PMA)
Paseo General Escal6n 5355, San Salvador
Telefono: 24-0990
EL SALVADOR

Marina Morales Carbonell
Consultora, UNICEF
la. Calle Pte. No. 3649, Colonia Escal6n, San Salvador.
EL SALVADOR

Luis Oberti
Especialista, BID
Edificio Torres del Bosque Piso 10, San Salvador
Tel6fono: 23-8300
EL SALVADOR

Mariano Olazabal
Representante IICA
61 Avenida Norte y Ira., Calle Poniente, San Salvador
Tel6fono: 23-2561
EL SALVADOR

Amaro Rodriguez
Coordinador Proyecto Reinversi6n Agro-Industrial, IICA
Apartamento 01-78, San Salvador
Tel6fono: 23-2561 y 23-3774
Fax: 23-5446
EL SALVADOR

Oscar Sarroca
Director, PMA
Paseo Escal6n N9 5355, San Salvador
Tel6fono: 24-0990
EL SALVADOR







Marcela Smutt
Consultora, Cooperaci6n Italiana
Pasaje Senda Florida 127 Colonia Escal6n, San Salvador
Tel6fono: 23-9323, 23-3530
EL SALVADOR

Esperanza Villafuerte
Asistente de la Direcci6n, Oficina de Cooperaci6n Canadiense
Col. San Benito Avenida Las Palmas No. 111, San Salvador
Apartado Postal 1924
Tel6fono: 79-0765
EL SALVADOR

Hayd6e Arriaga de Martinez
Coordinadora Nacional Proyecto GCP/HON/015/NET
a/c Representaci6n de la FAO en Honduras, Tegucigalpa
Apartado Postal 1808
Tel6fono Oficina: 32-4321
HONDURAS

Beatriz Azarcoya Gonzalez
Consultora FAO
Telefono: 684-8396, 684-8184, Ciudad de Mexico
Fax: (52-5) 683-09-53
a/c Representaci6n de la FAO en Mexico
Apartado Postal 10783, Mexico 11.000, D.F.
MEXICO


NATIONAL OBSERVERS

Ren4 Porfirio Osorio
Director de Asistencia Social, Procuraduria General de la Repiblica
Centro de Gobierno El Salvador, San Salvador
Telefono: 21-8217
EL SALVADOR

Ing. Patricia Quevedo de Arce
Asesora de Proyectos, TECHNOSERVE INC.
81 Av. Norte y 11 Calle Poniente NQ 4216, San Salvador
Tel6fono: 24-0475, 24-5734, 24-5368
Fax: 23-4060
EL SALVADOR

Vicky Guzmin de Luna
Director General, Asociaci6n Salvadoreia Pro Salud Rural (ASOPROSAR)
Kil6metro 62 1/2 Carretera Panamericana
Col. El Mora Santa Elena. Apartado Postal NQ 52, Santa Ana, Santa Elena
Tel6fono: 41-0646 40-7216
EL SALVADOR

Maria Teresa Delgado de Mejia
Director Unidad de Asesoria Legal, Secretaria Nacional de la Familia
Casa Presidencial, San Salvador
Tel6fonos: 71-2505, 71-0636 Ext. 214 y 215
Fax: 71-1012
EL SALVADOR








Leonardo Canales
Gerente de Operaciones, ISTA
Km 4 1/2 Carretera a Santa Tecla, San Salvador
Telefono: 24-6334
EL SALVADOR

Victor A. Ramirez N.
Especialista-Sector Educaci6n, GAES El Salvador
Edificio Setefe NQ 2, Centro de Gobierno, San Salvador
Tel6fonos: 81-1640, 81-1760
EL SALVADOR

Vilma de Calder6n
Especialista Producci6n y Precio, GAES-MIPLAN
Edificio II de MIPLAN, San Salvador
Tel6fonos: 81-1640, 81-1760
EL SALVADOR

Mirna Alas de Miranda
T6cnica en Programaci6n, Direcci6n de Cooperaci6n Tecnica/MIPLAN
Final 17 Av. Norte Contiguo Cel., San Salvador
Tel6fono: 21-5334
Fax: 21-5334
EL SALVADOR

Nubia Anabel Ortega Monge
Colaboradora Tecnica, Unidad de Planificaci6n
Federaci6n de Cajas de Cr4dito y Banco de los Trabajadores
25 Avenida Norte y 23 Calle Poniente, San Salvador
Tel6fono: 26-5116
Fax: 26-7059
EL SALVADOR

Zoila Gonzalez de Innocenti
Jefa del Depto. de Sociologia y CC.PP.
Universidad Centroamericana Jose Sime6n Cafas (UCA)
Apartado Postal 05-178, San Salvador
Telefono: 24-0011 Ext. 216 y 220
Fax: 34-0037
EL SALVADOR

Victoria Elsy Villatoro Molina
Jefa Secci6n Analisis de Cartera, Banco de Fomento Agropecuario
Km. 10 1/2 Carretera al Puerto de la Libertad, San Salvador
Tel6fono: 28-0060
EL SALVADOR

Roosevelt Quintanilla
Gerente de Regi6n Occidental Agraria
Institute Salvadorefo de Transformaci6n Agraria (ISTA)
Av. Fray Felipe de Moraga Sur. 17 A.S. entire 37 y 39 Calle Poniente
Quinta Altamira, Santa Ana, San Salvador
Apartado Postal 1757
Tel6fonos: 40-4478, 40-4479, 40-05855
EL SALVADOR








Violeta Larde de Rodriguez
Jefa Divisi6n de Cooperaci6n Internacional, OSPA-MAG
83 Avenida Norte y 11 Calle Poniente, San Salvador
Tel6fono: 79-1938
EL SALVADOR

Rosalba Marroquin
Servicios Profesionales PEEU Programa Social, CONARA
Casa Presidencial, San Salvador
Tel6fono: 71-3901
EL SALVADOR

Alma Sonia Nuila Mel6ndez
Analista Econ6mica, Unidad de AnAlisis de Politicas (UAP-MAG)
79 Avenida Norte NQ 717 Colonia Escal6n, San Salvador
Tel6fono: 23-4981, 24-1787
Fax: 24-5098
EL SALVADOR

Maria Isaura Avalos
Coordinadora Programa de Educaci6n para el Hogar
Direcci6n de Servicios Agropecuarios MAG
2823 Avenida Roosevelt, San Salvador
Telefono: 24-5130, 23-2598
EL SALVADOR

Berenice Barraza de Medina
Jefa de Gesti6n Empresarial, Ministerio de Trabajo y Previsi6n Social
Direcci6n General de Formaci6n Profesional
Km. 11 1/2 Zona Franca San Bartolo Ilopango, San Salvador
Tel6fono: 77-0049
EL SALVADOR

Bertila Gir6n GonzAlez
Jefa de la Unidad de Proyectos y Cooperaci6n Internacional
Centro de Tecnologia Agricola (CENTA)
Km. 33 1/2 Carretera a Santa Ana-Valle de San Andr6s
Departamento La Libertad, San Salvador
Tel6fono: 28-2066
Fax: 282628
EL SALVADOR

Ever Amaya
Director, Centro de Tecnologia Agricola (CENTA)
Km. 33 1/2 Carretera a Santa Ana, Ciudad Arce, Dpto. La Libertad, San Salvador
Telefono: 28-2628, 28-2412
Fax: 28 2628
EL SALVADOR

Prudencia Juarez Capilla
Secretaria de Acci6n Femenil del C.E.N.
Confederaci6n Nacional Campesina
Mariano Azuela 121, 3er. piso
Col. Santa Maria de Rivera, Mexico, D.F.
Telefono: 541-6659, 547-2488, ext. 206
MEXICO







TECHNICAL SECRETARIAT


Jos6 Tubino
Representante de la FAO en El Salvador
Alameda Roosevelt 2803, Apartado Postal 2454, San Salvador
Telefono: 23-4452, 24-2856, 24-2697
Fax: (503) 243031
EL SALVADOR

Virginia Lattes
Official Regional, Programa Mujer en Agricultura y Desarrollo Rural
Oficina Regional de la FAO para America Latina y el Caribe
Santa Maria 6700, Casilla 10095, Santiago
Tel4fono: 2185503
Fax: (56-2) 2184427
CHILE

Fabiola Campillo
Official de Programas para la Mujer, Sede de la FAO en Roma
Via delle Terme di Caracalla, 00100, Roma
Telefono:(39-6) 5797-5091
Fax: (396) 57973152
ITALIA

Mabel Cordini
Consultora FAO
Edificio Porto Maior, Rua Heitor Lug6n 214-Apto. 601
Guarapari ES 29200 -
Tel4fono: (027) 261-1422
BRASIL

Susana Balarezo
Consultora FAO
Carri6n 555 -B-, Casilla 9013 Suc. No. 7, Almagro, Quito
Telefono: 24-5107
ECUADOR

Anita Spring
Profesora, University of Florida
1350 Turlington, Gainesville, FLA, 32611
Tel4fono: (904) 392-4691, (904) 376-4833
Fax: (904) 392-6929
U.S.A.

Gonzalo Ibaiez
Consultor FAO/RLAC
Santa Maria 6700, Casilla 1.0095, Santiago
Tel6fono: 2185503
Fax: (56-2) 2184427
CHILE

George Huggins
Consultor FAO
115 Broadway,Boston, MA. 02116
Tel6fono:(617) 482-1211 (X 505), DIR. (617) 728-2505
Fax: (617) 556 8925
U.S.A.







LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE


Geraldina Castillejos
Director de la Unidad de Atenci6n a la Mujer
Secretaria Nacional de la Familia (SNF)
Casa Presidencial, Barrio San Jacinto, San Salvador
Telefono: 71-2505, 71-2636
Fax: 71-1012
EL SALVADOR

Ruth Vega de Manzano
Official de Proyecto Mujer, Salud y Desarrollo OPS-S.N.F.
Casa Presidencial, Barrio San Jacinto, San Salvador
Tel6fono: 71-2505
Fax: 71-1012
EL SALVADOR

Maria Consuelo de Miranda
Asistente de Programas, FAO
Alameda Roosevelt 2803, Apartado Postal 2454, San Salvador
Tel6fono: 23-4452, 24-2856, 24-2697
Fax: (503) 24-3031
EL SALVADOR







ANNEX II


INAUGURAL STATEMENTS



Statement by Mr. Jos6 Tubino,
FAO Representative in El Salvador,
at the inauguration of the Subregional Workshops for the
Implementation of the FAO Plan of Action for the Integration of
Rural Women in Development, and of the Regional Round Table
for the Establishment of the Technical Cooperatidn Network
of Institutions in Support of Rural Women



On behalf of the Director-General of FAO, Mr. Edouard Saouma,
and of the Assistant Director-General and Regional Representative for Latin
America and the Caribbean, Mr. Rafael Moreno, I warmly welcome the
participants to the Subregional Workshops on the Implementation of the FAO
Plan of Action for the Integration of Women in Development, that we are
inaugurating today, and to the Round Table for the Establishment of the
Technical Cooperation Network of Institutions in Support of Rural Women in the
Latin American and Caribbean Region which will start next Thursday. Both
meetings are enframed within the systematic efforts that have been undertaken
by FAO for supporting the full and active participation of women in the
development processes of the countries.

FAO's concern with the subject to be dealt with is based on the
awareness that rural women have increasing importance, both in respect of
productive activities on small farms and in seasonal work carried out in
commercial productive units. Women are also an extremely vulnerable segment of
the rural population.

Considered in the past to be invisible subjects within agrarian economy,
women today are beginning to be increasingly valued for their productive
contribution and supporting role in the operation of rural households.
However, statistical figures available considerably underestimate the work
performed by women, because they disregard the numerous hours spent in
productive labour on peasant units, and do not take into account the enormous
effort implied in reproductive activities within a context of large families,
marginality and poverty.

It is well known that, in many cases, women are mainly responsible for
cultivation, weeding, harvesting, processing, storage and marketing of
products. Numerous studies have indicated that women not only undertake the
responsibility of breeding small animals but also participate in the care and
milking of cattle. In addition, women frequently participate in small-scale
processing and marketing of fish, either directly or together with the men.

In summary, routine tasks of women in agriculture, fisheries and
forestry, as well as in food processing and marketing, prove their essential
contribution to production generated in the agricultural sector. However,
recognition of their participation has not always implied their inclusion as
beneficiaries of governmental policies and participants in the sector's
programmes and projects. In general, women do not have access to resources







such as land and technology, nor to productive services such as credit and
extension. This prevents rural women from fully developing their potential.

The recognition of the role of women in agricultural and rural
development has been the result of a relatively lengthy process. The
"International Year for Women" in 1975, and the subsequent "United Nations
Decade for Women", constituted decisive events to motivate international
agencies and many governments to give due attention to the role of women in
development. These initiatives also served to initiate actions for eliminating
all forms of discrimination against women. In this context, FAO organized the
World Conference on Agrarian Reform and Rural Development in 1979, which has
constituted one of the most important milestones in the long fight against
poverty and hunger in the world. On that occasion, representatives from 145
governments and delegates of international agencies adopted a Declaration of
Principles and a Programme of Action containing, as an element of major
relevance, the participation of women in agricultural and rural development
under equal conditions to those of men.

The FAO Plan of Action for the Integration of Women in Development was
formulated upon the request of the Member Nations at the FAO Conference in
1987. The Plan foresees the systematic incorporation of women in all
programmes and projects of the Organization, recognizing that the design and
formulation of projects that include both men and women are decisive for the
successful development of rural areas. Conceived for the period 1990-1995, the
Plan establishes the framework and specific initiatives required to guarantee
women's participation in the fruits of development.

Subsequently, in 1988, the Executive Council of the Organization
unanimously adopted the Plan of Action, which was ratified at the FAO
Conference in 1989. It should be mentioned that the FAO Conference is the
highest directive body of the Organization, in which the 158 member countries
participate directly. In 1989, the Conference was attended by over one hundred
Ministers of Agriculture.

In order to support rural women in their condition as producers and
social agents of development, the Plan foresees four spheres of action,
namely: legal condition, economic situation, social situation and decision-
making. Each of these spheres includes activities that endeavor to eliminate
existing barriers and to generate concrete conditions for the full integration
of women in the development process.

The Plan considers that the FAO Technical Units and the Governments
should intensify their activities in each of these spheres, mainly through
systematic collection of data, promotion of adequate policies and technical
assistance. The Plan envisages a dual approach in technical assistance: on the
one hand, it aims at integrating women's issues and interests in all FAO
projects and activities. On the other, it fosters projects aimed exclusively
at women, when required because of discriminatory conditions or by the need to
create intervention methodologies and models to encourage their active
participation.

The Plan seeks to increase women's participation through projects and
programmes that will systematically include them in the main current of
development activities and in national life. Within this framework, future
activities identify more clearly women's special needs as regards income-
generating activities and their control. Attention is also paid to
opportunities for women's access to education and training, to technology and







to other means that are necessary to alleviate the work burden of women and
increase their productivity.

Upon adopting the Plan, the governments of the Member Nations declared
their interest in contributing to its execution. Evidently, without the
interest and commitment of the governments, the initiatives foreseen in the
Plan cannot prosper. Therefore, in order to achieve good results, the
formulation of global policies, the planning, execution and evaluation of
programmes and projects, as well as the adoption of laws in relation to the
problems of women, are indispensable requisites.

In compliance with its mandate, FAO is interested and willing to support
the member governments in achieving full participation And equality of rural
women within the context of norms and working strategies set forth in the
Plan.

In view of the above-mentioned considerations, FAO has convened the
three subregional workshops that are being inaugurated today. These workshops
will permit:

a) Systematizing FAO's knowledge on activities being undertaken by the
governments of the Region to ensure the participation of rural women in
all agricultural and rural development policies, programmes and actions.

b) Adapting FAO's technical assistance and cooperation to the requirements
and needs to which Governments that have assigned priority, and promote
the fullest possible participation of other multilateral and bilateral
agencies that are already acting in favour of rural women.

I am sure that the subregional workshops will help to translate the
spirit of the Plan into concrete actions. In this sense, the workshops will
contribute so that the recognition of the multiple roles performed by rural
women will encourage national authorities to formulate policies and programmes
aimed at a more equitable and efficient participation of women and men in the
development of rural society.

The countries can count on permanent support from FAO and each of its
technical departments in order to achieve these objectives.

Finally, I would like to wish the delegates present here today that the
forthcoming days will be productive and constructive, and that they will also
help to strengthen friendship throughout the American continent.

Thank you.









Statement by Eng. Antonio Cabrales,
Minister of Agriculture and Livestock,
at the Inauguration of the Subregional Workshop
on the Implementation of the Plan of Action for the
Integration of Women in Development and Regional Round Table
for the Establishment of the Technical Cooperation Network
of Institutions in Support of Rural Women



- Mr. Francisco Merino, Acting President of the Republic
- Members of the Government Cabinet
- Dr. Virginia Lattes, FAO Regional Officer, Chile
- Ms. Fabiola Campillo, Officer, Women in Development, FAO Rome
- Dr. Anita Spring, FAO Consultant for the Caribbean Workshop
- Mr. Jose Tubino, FAO Representative in El Salvador
- FAO Staff Members
- Representatives of International Agencies
- Members of the Diplomatic and Consular Corps accredited in the country
- Distinguished Visitors of the Countries of the Continent and of the world
- Dr. Geraldina Castillejos, Director, National Secretariat for the Family
- Members of the National Secretariat for the Family
- Chairmen and Managers of the Autonomous Institutions of the Sector
- Representatives of Women's Organizations in El Salvador
- Executives and Technicians of the Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock
- Special Guests
- Members of the Press
- Ladies and Gentlemen


I am greatly honoured to represent Lic. Alfredo Cristiani, President of
the Republic, and his wife, our First Lady, Mrs. Margarita de Cristiani, who
have requested me to convey to you that they are extremely sorry to be absent
from this inaugural ceremony of the Subregional Workshop on the Implementation
of the FAO Plan of Action for the Integration of Women in Development, and
Regional Round Table for the Establishment of the Technical Cooperation
Network of Institutions in Support of Rural Women.

As President of the National Secretariat of the Family, Mrs. Margarita
de Cristiani made special efforts so that this Workshop could be held here in
San Salvador, and worked arduously for the success of its results. The
participation of 33 countries is a clear testimony of the interest in this
subject and I feel that everyone here is aware of the enormous sense of
urgency in achieving the integration of women in the economic development of
our countries.

I think we were all awaiting this Workshop anxiously, just as the coach
of an Argentine or Brazilian football team would anxiously await the
integration of his best player -who has been absent- into the National Team.

We all know with certainty and clarity what women mean to our countries.
Woman is undoubtedly the key element, the most important player within Latin
American society because, to my mind, she is the cement, the cohesive element,
that has made possible the permanence of the most important institution of our
societies -the family. People talk of the power of the Church, of the Military







institution, of political power, economic power, but all this would be
pointless if the family did not exist as an institution.

The family is, and has been, the basis of progress and development
throughout the world. The role and evolution of women and their families in
the developed countries has been easier, because law and order have protected,
supported and promoted her, in order to maintain the family as an institution.
However, we all know the depressing reality of the Latin American family. The
vestiges of this institution exist because of an only factor, our women. Our
mothers and wives.

After 12 years of fratricidal, senseless war, which has caused
bloodshed, sorrow, pain and many tears to our women, our country is a
magnificent example of what women are capable of achieving, as, in spite of
this nightmare which is still present in our country, the :solidity of the
family is evident, and today it becomes more evident than ever before. This is
thanks to thousands of Salvadorians who have sadly been forced to flee from
violence, and who, according to ECLAC, send approximately one billion dollars
each year to their beloved families. Thanks to these family remittances, the
country is still on its feet from the economic viewpoint, as these incomes are
four times higher than incomes from our sales of coffee, the main export
product. In other words, the family, as an institution, is stronger than ever
in El Salvador, with no legal protection, and it is the women of El Salvador
who have made this heroic action possible. Obstacles such as illiteracy,
extreme poverty, fatherless homes, illegitimate children, high child mortality
rates, etc., have been unable to do away with the Salvadorian family, and its
defender, the protagonist of this heroic feat, has been the Salvadorian woman,
who is the same as the Latin American and Caribbean woman.

How is it possible that our best element, the most valuable player in
the country's economic team, has not been provided with better equipment, not
even with shoes to help her to kick with more strength? We have not trained
her, we have not taken care of her health and nutrition, and this player is so
noble that she demands no reward, as she plays for the love of her team, her
family, her children, her country.

How blind we have been, because we have not taken advantage of all the
potential of this great element. The secret of this great player we have in
women is that the motor is her heart, which has made possible the conservation
of her family through the most potent weapon of the universe, the love for her
children. A love only known by God and women, because it is the maximum
expression of giving, where the life of a son or daughter is more important
than her own life.

How shortsighted we have been in not recognizing these facts and in not
integrating women in the economic development contest. How is it possible that
we do not provide her with better education, we do not facilitate her access
to credit, we do not teach her to improve the management of her enterprise,
her home, because the homes of our countries produce, trade and transport.

Proof of my words is that last year we celebrated the First Competition
of Bean Production, and the first place at the regional level, and third place
at the national level, was won by Ms. Ana Margarita Torres, a peasant woman
from the Department of San Miguel, who produced 34 qq/m' when the national
average is only 12 qq/m .







In truth, when I wrote this brief statement, I reflected that we really
have been very foolish, because we fight to eradicate poverty, we form
economic and social committees, and we assign priority to the social aspect,
especially nowadays, to compensate for the hardships of economic structural
adjustments which are so necessary to stabilize our economies.

We bring economic and social consultants from all over the world. All
this is fine, but we have not given weapons to the main protagonists of our
societies. Women should be our principal and most important economic and
social consultants. This is why we should all feel very fortunate to be making
history here in this Seminar-Workshop, which I am sure will be successful, and
where we Salvadorians are going to learn a lot from your experiences. I am
also sure that this day is going to change the mentality of the Salvadorian
team profoundly, as we will start making the most important element play in
economic development: the Salvadorian woman. The truth is that the most
important conclusion of this Workshop will be the recognition of a fact, a
reality, that women have played an extremely important role in economic
development. The only thing we need is to formulate specific programmes of
action, so that her participation can have the highest economic impact at the
shortest term possible.

I congratulate the National Secretariat for the Family, and very
specially, I thank the United Nations who, through FAO, hve made it possible
to hold this Workshop, where a diagnosis of each subregion will be made in
relation to the Integration of Women in Development.

The present policies and programmes for the integration of women in
agricultural and rural development will be identified. Proposals for
cooperation projects of a national or regional nature will be elaborated. As
Minister of Agriculture and Livestock, I am enormously pleased with these
objectives.

Ladies and Gentlemen: Welcome to these Subregional Workshops, the first
link of a chain aimed at the integral improvement of peasant women.

Very specially, our acknowledgement to FAO and its diligent staff of the
FAO Representation in El Salvador, for their full support and for all their
actions in the benefit of the national agricultural sector.

Our good wishes for success to the participants, a warm welcome and
happy stay in our country for such long-awaited visitors, to whom we reiterate
our esteem.

Finally, and with much pleasure, on behalf of the Government of the
Republic, in my capacity as Minister of Agriculture and Livestock, I am
honoured to declare this Seminar/Workshop for the Integration of Women in
Development officially inaugurated.

Your applause will be received in the name of the women of Latin America
and the Caribbean.

May God bless Latin American and Caribbean women.

Thank you.







ANNEX III


AGENlDA


Thursday 19

14:00-15:00


15:00-16:00







16:00-16:15

16:15-16:45


16:45-17:45

17:45-18:00


SeDtember


Plenary Session: Presentation of Conclusions of the
Subregional Workshops

Background and information on the Round Table:
- The Technical Cooperation Networks sponsored by FAO/RLAC
in Latin America and the Caribbean
- Operation of the networks at the national level:
the case of El Salvador
- Objectives and methodology of the Round Table
- Election of moderators for the Plenary Sessions

Break

A proposal for the Technical Cooperation Network of
Institutions and Agencies in Support of Rural Women

General debate on the proposal

Installation of the working groups
The groups will define the following aspects of the Network:
i) Objectives
ii) Priority subjects for action
iii) Criteria for admitting Network members
iv) Coordination mechanisms of the sub-networks and
their linkage with national networks


Friday 20 September


08:00-09:30

09:30-11:00



11:00-11:30

11:30-12:30


12:30-14:00

14:00-15:00

15:00:18:00





18:00


Working groups: First Session (cont.)

Plenary session to present the reports of the working groups
and to reach agreements on the four points discussed during
the first session

Break

Working groups: Second Session
The groups will prepare the work plan for the constitution
and initial operation of the Network


Lunch


Working groups: Second Session (cont.)

Plenary session to:
1) present the reports of the groups, discuss them and adopt
a work plan (or one for each sub-network)
2) Designate the general coordinator and the coordinators
for each sub-network

Closure










ANNEX IV


FAO S PROPOSAL FOR THE
ESTABLISHMENT AND OPERATION OF
A TECHN I CAL COOPERATION NETWORK
OF INSTITUTIONS AND AGENCIES
IN SUPPORT OF RURAL WOMEN




1. BACKGROUND INFORMATION

Since 1979, the FAO Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean
has been promoting the establishment and development of Technical cooperation
Networks, as mechanisms formed by national institutions, either governmental,
autonomous or private, with the purpose of exchanging knowledge among
countries. This is basically carried out through the use of their own
technical, human and financial resources, in order to promote agricultural and
rural development, thus contributing to improving the standard of living of
the population.

Among the main objectives set up for the Technical Cooperation Networks,
the following stand out:

Promote co-operation among developing countries by joining efforts and
exchanging knowledge and experience;

encourage training of human resources at all levels;

strengthen technical capabilities of national institutions,
particularly in the identification of their problems and potentialities
and in the formulation of suitable solutions; and

accelerate development through the more efficient use of the human,
physical and financial resources available in the Region.

On the other hand, after the United Nations Decade for Women, FAO
designed a Plan of Action for the Integration of Rural Women in Development
with equal rights to the benefits of development, thus recognizing not only
the important reproductive role that rural women have traditionally played
within peasant families, but also their growingly important share in family
agricultural production and local labour markets.

The referred Plan of Action notes that, notwithstanding women's active
participation in agricultural, fishing, artisanal and agro-industrial
productions, they have not been properly incorporated so as to have access,
under equal conditions, to the benefits of development. In this light and
based on its work experience with rural women and with the Governments of its
Member Nations, FAO has identified four spheres of action (the legal,
economic, social and decision-making ones), each one including activities
aiming at overcoming obstacles to the full incorporation of rural women in
development and at fostering ways to facilitate their full integration into
economic, social and political processes in the various countries.







2. THE TECHNICAL COOPERATION NETWORK IN SUPPORT OF RURAL WOMEN

2.1 Justification

In compliance with FAO's mandate of assigning priority to rural women,
embodied in the Plan of Action for the Integration of Women in Development,
and within the framework of the Technical Cooperation Network system, as a
tool to take advantage of existing resources in the promotion of development,
the FAO Regional Office, jointly with the ESH Division of FAO Headquarters in
Rome, has agreed to promote the establishment of a Technical Cooperation
Network. This Network would facilitate the exchange of knowledge and
experience and the pooling of efforts made by the countries of the region with
a view to overcoming the problems affecting the integral development of rural
women.

It has been found that, notwithstanding the various research efforts and
actions in connection with rural women's productive work, there has not been
a smooth flow of information and exchange of experience among the institutions
and organizations promoting these activities; this has limited their
systematic dissemination with the resulting waste of resources and efforts due
to the duplication of already tested experiences.

In summary, the purpose is to link public and private bodies and
institutions of the various countries so as to generate a process of exchange
of information and experience.

2.2 Objectives

2.2.1 Short-term objectives

i) To formalize the establishment of one or two technical cooperation
networks among the countries of the region, constituted both by
governmental and non-governmental institutions implementing programmes
concerning rural women and by peasants' organizations.*

ii) Prepare a yearly programme of work that includes the exchange of
information and experience, horizontal cooperation and training.

iii) Establish national networks of institutions and organizations working in
the promotion and development of rural women.

2.2.2 Long-term objectives

i) Contribute to the exchange and coordination among governmental, non-
governmental and peasant organizations in the countries of the region in
connection with the essential problems affecting rural women.

ii) Encourage the formulation of governmental policies favouring peasant
women, taking into account the State's own action, the NGOs experience
and the demands of peasant organizations.

2.3 The Network's activities

2.3.1 The Network's priority areas

In view of the importance of the role of women in food security (through
food production, transformation, preservation and marketing) and in the







family's economy through multiple production activities, FAO strongly supports
this sphere of rural female activity. On this basis, it is proposed that the
priority subjects for action of the TCN-RW should be those that refer to the:

- organization of women
- training at all levels (of peasants, of officials of the agricultural
sector at different levels, of planners and politicians) on gender
issues and other relevant subjects, and
the technologies required by women for a better performance in their
productive and domestic activities.

Rural women's organizations are deemed essential for transferring to them
the necessary political power leading to their effective participation in
decision-making at the family and community levels, in the defense of their
interests and in the satisfaction of their collective demands.

Presently, there are signs of a strong trend in the region to establish
rural women's organizational bodies, which have slowly but steadily gained
legitimacy in the eyes of both the communities where they belong and outside
institutions. The proposed Network would be an invaluable tool to carry out an
even stronger effort at promoting associative and organizational actions for
peasant women and for increasing opportunities for their participation in
economic, political and social activities under equal terms with men. The
Network can also undertake activities aiming at overcoming the weaknesses
generally found in rural women's organizations, through technical training,
personal development and leadership training.

On the other hand, it is important to discover and properly orient the
relationship between women and technology in the light of the following facts:

i) the important role played by women in food security at home and at
national levels, that is strongly dependent on their productive
capacity;

ii) women's predominant responsibility for agricultural tasks, when men
emigrate or work outside their homes;

iii) the fact that peasants' cropping patterns are directly related to the
way women handle domestic food consumption;

iv) saving time and energy both in domestic and productive work;

v) improve their working conditions;

vi) the little access they presently have to training and to the
transference of agricultural technology.

An important function that the Network can perform in this connection is
contributing to the systematization of information on who actually works in
agriculture, what are the tasks to be performed, how do men and women
intervene in the production of each crop and how are decisions made on the use
of technological inputs in peasant production units. The Network will also be
useful in the exchange of experience aimed at the introduction of the
institutional reforms required for improving research on rural women's
specific needs of technology and to grant them access to such technology.







In order that rural or agricultural development institutions and
agencies and their technical and directive staff may become fully aware of the
importance of the activities performed by rural women and of the needs for
incorporating them into plans, programmes and projects undertaken by these
institutions, it will be necessary to train staff from various levels. The
basic purpose of such training is both to arise their awareness of development
problems facing rural women and building their capability for taking these
problems into account in the design, execution, follow-up and evaluation of
agricultural and rural development projects and programmes.

Moreover, the Network may also organize activities aimed at different
groups of rural women in order to train them on the most varied subjects
concerning productive, domestic, managerial or organizational tasks that, in
turn, may also strengthen their self-respect and awareness of the issues they
face.

2.3.2 The Network's elements

Differing from the other existing Technical Coooperation Networks, the
TCN-RW will be the first Network concerned with a social subject, in this
case: "rural women". The strategy to be followed in the consolidation of the
Network should therefore take into account this fact in a fundamental manner
and, to this effect, it should include the following:

a) Guarantee the participation of peasant grassroot organizations grouping
or representing rural women in such a manner that they, as beneficiaries, play
active roles in the Network's action.

b) The establishment and development of the Network will be in charge of
the FAO Regional Office, which will act as Technical Secretariat, although its
work will be carried out on the basis of the interests and needs of its member
institutions and organizations.

c) Each country should have only one agency or institution assuming the
main responsibility for national coordination.

d) In each country, one national Network can be established that is
connected to the regional Network through the national coordination.

2.3.3 The Network's operational mechanisms

a) Subregional seminars
b) National workshops
c) A bulletin
d) Handbooks
e) A newsletter
f) Studies
g) Exchange trips
h) Cadastre of organizations
i) Bibliographic exchange

2.3.4 The Network's stages

a) Convene the governments of the countries of the region to a meeting for
the establishment of the TCN-RW.






b) Official establishment of the TCN-RW, defining its internal
organization, election of the regional and sub-regional coordinations and
preparation of the programme of work for its first year of operation.

c) Development of the programme of work approved at the above mentioned
meeting. To this effect, the necessary actions should be taken for the
operation of the Technical Secretariat and the national and sub-regional
coordinations, of the internal communication mechanisms and for the execution
of the plans on information and exchange of experience, technical cooperation
among countries and training through national workshops.

d) Evaluation of the establishment and development of the TCN-RW in its
first year of operation, with the purpose of consolidating its action and
defining the guidelines and criteria for adjusting its activities.

2.3.5 Related activities

The training activities envisaged by the TCN-RW will require
professional experts in areas that the Network's participants will define as
worthy of priority attention. Within a TCDC's framework, countries forming the
Network will provide the greatest part of these professionals.

Eventually, however, the support of some Regional Officers outposted at
FAO/RLAC or of specialists from FAO Headquarters and of experts from other
Agencies of the United Nations System might be required for training both in
gender-related subjects and in specific technical areas.

Within FAO/RLAC itself, a close coordination between the Regional
Officer that will coordinate the implementation of the project with Regional
Officers from other technical areas and with those acting as Technical
Secretaries of other Networks presently under operation will be required.
This coordination is essential for two main reasons: first, because it takes
advantage of long-accumulated experience, existing human resources, installed
infrastructures and the mechanisms that have proven efficient; secondly,
because, for the best utilization of available resources, it is highly
convenient to combine follow-up and coordination trips required by this
project with duty travel plans of Regional Officers in connection with other
networks.

2.3.6 Follow-up actions on the part of FAO

Although it is not FAO/RLAC's ultimate responsibility to establish and
consolidate the TCN-RW but that of the national institutions and organizations
themselves, FAO/RLAC will support them so that once the Network has been
established, it will eventually become consolidated, thus requiring growingly
less support from international agencies to continue its action.































9









OTHER DOCUMENTS IN THIS SERIES


TITLE

PRIMER TALLER NATIONAL DE EJECUTIVOS DE
PROYECTOS DE DESARROLLO RURAL.
ASUNCION-PARAGUAY (25-29 OCTUBRE 1982)

INFORMED DE LA PRIMERA MESA REDONDA
INTERNATIONAL DE DIRECTORS DE PROYEC-
TOS DE DESARROLLO RURAL EN AMERICA LA-
TINA.CALI-COLOMBIA (3-7 MAYO 1982)

INFORMED TERCERA CONSULT INTERAGENCIAL
PARA A.L.SOBRE SEGUIMIENTO CONFERENCIA
MUNDIAL REFORM AGRARIA Y DESARROLLO
RURAL. SANTIAGO-CHILE (22-24 FEBRERO
1983)

INFORMED SEGUNDA MESA REDONDA INTERNACIO-.
NAL DE DIRECTORS DE PROYECTOS DE DESA-
RROLLO RURAL EN AMERICA LATINA
VILLAHERMOSA-MEXICO (15-19/11/1962)

INFORMED MESA REDONDA PROBLEMS DEL MINI-
FUNDIO Y LAS ALTERNATIVES DE SOLUTION
LA PAZ-BOLIVIA (12-16 SEPTIEMBRE1983)

ESTRATEGIAS DE SOBREVIVENCIA EN ECONO-
MIAS CAMPESINAS. EL ROL DE LA MUJER.
BOGOTA-COLOMBIA (22-25 NOVIEMBRE 1983)
REV. 1

INFORMED MESA REDONDA ESTRATEGIAS DE SO-
BREVIVENCIA EN ECONOMIES CAMPESINAS --EL
ROL DE LA MUJER.BOGOTA-COLOMBIA (22-25
NOVIEMBRE 1983)

INFORMED DE LA MESA REDONDA CENTROAMERI-
CANA SOBRE EXPANSION DE LA FRONTERA
AGRICOLA. SAN JOSE (COSTA RICA).
22-26 AGOSIO 1983.

INFORMED MESA REDONDA INTEIR IACIONA.. DE
DIRECTORES DE PROYECTO(S DE [)ESARRU ..L)
RURAL. L.A HADANA-CUBA (10-14 OCTJUB-RE
1963)


DATE SERIES

01.83 RLAT/83/7-DERU-1


02.83




02.83


RLAT/83/8-DERU-2




RLAT/83/9-DERU-3


08.83 RLAT/83/30-DERU-4




09.83 RLAT/83/33-DERU-5


01.84




0 1.84




02.84




04.84


RLAC/84/06-DERU-6




RLAC/64/07-DERU-7




RLAC/84/10-DERU-8




RLAC/84/29-DERU-9


Note: The documents indicated above can be pbteined, indicating the series,
from the FAO Representative in the country, or from the FAO Regional
Office for Latin America and the Caribbean, P.O. Box 10095,
Santiago, Chile









OTHER DOCUMENTS IN THIS SERIES


DATE SERIES


ACTIVIDADES DEL GRUPO DE DESARROLLO
RURAL DE RLAC SANTIAGO-CHILE (10-11 MAYO
1984)

INFORMED CUARTA CONSULT INTERAGENCIAL
PARA AM.LAT.Y EL CAR.SOBRE SEGUIMIENTO
CMRADR. SANTIAGO-CHILE (10-11 MAYO 1984)

ESTRATEGIAS DE DESARROLLO RURAL.
(ALGUNAS CONSIDERACIONES PARA LA ACCION
DE RLAC)

EL PAPEL DE LA MUJER EN LA ECONOMIC
CAMPESINA-EL CASO DE LA VII REGION DE
CHILE

RAPPORT FINAL DE L'ATELIER DE TRAVAIL
SUR "LA FEMME HAITIENNE DANS LE MONDE
RURAL"PORT-AU-PRINCE HAITI.
(15-19 OCTOBRE 1984)

INFORMED PRIMER TALLER PARTICIPATIONN DE
LA MUJER EN AGRICULTURE Y PRODUCTION DE
ALIMENTOS.IMPLICACIONES POLITICAL PRO-
GRAMAS DE ACTION Y SERVE. DE APOYO".

AGRICULTURAL TRAINING CAPABILITY AND
NEEDS IN THE CARIBBEAN.

CONCLUSIONS GENERALS TALLER PREPARA-
CION Y OPERATION PROYECTOS DE DESARRO-
LLO RURAL EN ECOSISTEMAS DE TROPICO
HUMEDO. VERACRUZ-MEXICO (12-16 NOVIEMBRE
1984)

INFORMED MESA REDONDA INTERNATIONAL EX-
PANSION DE LA FRONTERA AGRICOLA EN LOS
PAISES ANDINOS.OTAVALO-ECUADOR (15-20
OCTUIRE 1984)


05.84



05.84


12.84


12.84


RLAC/84/32-DERU-10



RLAC/84/33-DERU-11


RLAC/84/50-DERU-12


RLAC/84/51-DERU-13


01.85 RLAC/85/01-DERU-14




01.85 RLAC/85/05-DERU-15


01.85


01. 85


07.85


RLAC/85/07-DERU-16


RLAC/85/08-DERU-17


RLAC/85/21-DERU-18


Note: The documents indicated above can be pbteined, indicating the series,
from the FAO Representative in the country, or from the FAO Regional
Office for Latin America and the Caribbean, P.O. Box 10095,
Santiago, Chile


TITLE









OTHER DOCUMENTS IN THIS SERIES


TITLE

INFORME TALLER NATIONAL SOBRE PARTICI-
,CION DE LA MUJER EN ACTIVIDADES PRO-
CTIVAS SECTOR PRIMARIO SAN JOSE-COSTA
RICA (16-20 OCTUBRE 1984)

REPORT OF THE ROUND TABLE ON AGRICULTU-
RAL TRAINING AT THE INTERMEDIATE LEVEL
IN THE CARIBBEAN.ST.AUGUSTINE-TRINIDAD
& TOBAGO (26--2B AUGUST 1985)

INFORMED DEL PRIMER SEMINARIO NATIONAL
SORE LA FRONTERA AGRICOLA.
MANAGUA-NICARAGUA (14-16 AGOSTO 1985)

INFORMED MESA REDONDA INTERNATIONAL FOR-
MAS ASOCIATIVAS TENECIA Y/O PRODUCTION
EN LOS PROCESS DE REFORMA AGRARIA Y
COLONIZACION.OAXTEPEC-MEXICO (11-15
NOV.1985)

CRECIMIENTO PRODUCTIVE Y HETEROGENEIDAD
AGRARIA.

LA AGRICULTURE CAMPESINA EN AMERICA
LATINA Y EL CARIBE.

REPORT ROUND TABLE ON THE PARTICIPATION
AND INTEGRATION OF WOMEN IN
AGRICULTURALAND RURAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE
CARIBBEAN. CASTRIES-ST.LUCIA (6-10Y JULY
1987)
INFORMED M/R LA EDUCATION AGRICOLA SUPE-
RIOS Y LAS NECESIDADES DE DESARROLLO
RURAL EN AMERICA LATINA Y EL CARIBE.
EL ZAMORANO-HONDURAS (3-7 AGOSTO 1987)

INFORMED CURSOS SUBREGIONALES PARA
EJECU-TIVOS EXTENSION
RURAL.SANTIAGO/CHILE 9-
13.11.8.7-S.JOSE/COSTA RICA 23-27.11.87
CARACAS/VENEZUELA 7-11.12.87.


DATE

11.85


SERIES


RLAC/85/38-DERU-19


01.86 RLAC/86/03-DERU-20


03.86



04.86





09.86


12.86


10.87




10.87


RLAC/86/12-DERU-21



RLAC/86/15-DERU-22





RLAC/86/34-DERU-23


RLAC/86/49-DERU-24


RLAC/87/49-DERU-25




RLAC/87/51-DERU-26


01/88 RLAC/88/01-DERU-27


Note: The documents indicated above can be pbteined, indicating the series,
from the FAO Representative in the country, or from the FAO Regional
Office for Latin America and the Caribbean, P.O. Box 10095,
Santiago, Chile









OTHER DOCUMENTS IN THIS SERIES


TITLE
APLICACION DE UN MANUAL DE EVALUACION A
ONCE PROYECTOS DE GENERATION DE
INGRESOSPARA MUJERES GAMPESINAS.

INF. TALLER CAPACITACION SOBRE EVALUA-
CION DE PROYECTOS DE GENERACION DE
INGRESOS CON MUJERES CAMPESINAS
SANTIAGO-CHILE (12-15 ABRIL 19889)

INF.M/REDONDA INT. SOBRE POLITICAL Y
ESTRATEGIAS DE GENERATION Y DIFUSION DE
INNOVACIONES PARA EL DESARROLLO
AGRICOLAY RUAL EN A.LATINA. (STGO-CHILE
8-12 AGO 1988)

INFORMED FINAL M/R INTERNATIONAL SOBRE
LA PARTICIPATION CAMPESINA EN EL
DESARROLLO RURAL.QUITO-ECUADOR
(24-28 OCTUBRE 1988)
INFORMED DE LOS SEMINARIOS SUBREGIONALES
SOBRE FORMACION Y CAPACITACION DE
PROFESIONALES DE CIENCIAS AGRICOLAS PARA
LA EXTENSION Y EL DESARROLLO RURAL EN
A.L. Y EL CARIBE

REFORM AGRARIA Y EMPRESAS ASOCIATIVAS.

INFORMED TALLER INTER-PAISES SOBRE
CANALIZACION DE RECURSOS PARA PROYECTOS
DE ACTIVIDADES PRODUCTIVAS CON MUJERES
CAMPESINAS. BOGOTA-COLOMBIA (19-22
NOVIEMBRE 1985)

LA SITUATION DE LA MUJER CAMPESINA
FRENTE A LA LEGISLATION EN NUEVE PAISES
DE AMERICA LATINA

INFORMED M.REDONDA REGIONAL SOBRE
BUSQUEDA DE MECANISMOS JURIDICOS QUE
POSIBILITEN LA PARTICIPATION DE LA MUJER
EN EL DESARROLLO RURAL.SANTIAGO-CHILE
(10-14 SET. 1990)


DATE SERIES

01.88 PRLAC/88/02-DERU-28



07.88 RLAC/88/14-DERU-29


10.88





11.88


RLAC/88/24-DERU-30





RLAC/88/27-DERU-31


12.88 RLAC/88/31-DERU-32





12.88 RLAC/88/34-DERU-33


08.89





07.90



11.90


RLAC/89/17-DERU-34





RLAC/90/22-DERU-35



RLAC/90/28-DERU-36


Note: The documents indicated above can be pbteined, indicating the series,
from the FAO Representative in the country, or from the FAO Regional
Office for Latin America and the Caribbean, P.O. Box 10095,
Santiago, Chile









OTHER DOCUMENTS IN THIS SERIES


TITLE

M/R ADECUACION SERVICIOS DE EXTENSION A
LAS NECESIDADES DEL DESARROLLO RURAL EN
AMERICA LATINA Y EL "
CARIBE.SANTIAGO-CHILE (20-24 AGOSTO
1990)

FINAL REPORT ROUND TABLE ON THE
ADAPTATION OF EXTENSION SERVICES TO
RURAL DEVELOPMENT NEEDS IN LATIN AMERICA
AND THE CARIBBEAN.SANTIAGO-CHILE (20 TO
24 AUGUST 1990)

STUDIOS DE CASO DE ORGANIZACIONES DE
MUJERES RURALES DE CINCO PAISES DE LA
ZONA ANDINA BOLIVIA COLOMBIA -
ECUADOR PERU VENEZUELA

INFORMED TALLER FORMACION DE TECNICOS
AGRICOLAS PARA LA REALIDAD AGROPECUARIA
DE AMERICA LATINA Y EL
CARIBE.SANTIAGO-CHILE (5-9 AGOSTO 1991)


INF. M/R PARA CONSTITUIR UNA RED DE
COOP.TECNICA DE INSTITUCIONES Y
ORGANISMOS DE APOYO A LA MUJER RURAL.SAN
SALVADOR-EL SALVADOR (19 Y 20.9.1991)

REPORT ON THE REGIONAL R/T FOR
ESTABLISHMENT OF TECHN.COOP.NETWORK OF
INSTITUTIONS AND AGENCIES IN SUPPORT
RURAL WOMEN.SAN SALVADOR-EL SALVADOR
(19-20 SEPTEMBER 1991)


DATE


SERIES


11.90 RLAC/90/32-DERU-37





02.91 RLAC/90/32-DERU-37


04.91




10.91






11.91





12.91


RLAC/91/11-DERU-38




RLAC/91/35-DERU-39






RLAC/91/38-DERU-40





RLAC/91/38-DERU-40


Note: The documents indicated above can be pbteined, indicating the series,
from the FAO Representative in the country, or from the FAO Regional
Office for Latin America and the Caribbean, P.O. Box 10095,
Santiago, Chile




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