• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Favourite nursery rhymes
 Back Matter
 Back Cover














Title: Favourite nursery rhymes
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085076/00001
 Material Information
Title: Favourite nursery rhymes
Alternate Title: Favorite nursery rhymes
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.) ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Nister, Ernest ( Publisher, Printer )
E.P. Dutton (Firm) ( Publisher )
Publisher: Ernest Nister
E.P. Dutton & Co.
Place of Publication: London
New York
Manufacturer: E. Nister
Publication Date: [189-?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1895   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry -- 1895   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre: Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
Germany -- Bavaria -- Nuremberg
 Notes
General Note: Cover title
General Note: Date of publication suggested by the Bodleian Library.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00085076
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002226107
notis - ALG6390
oclc - 233648349

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Frontispiece
        Page 5
    Favourite nursery rhymes
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
    Back Matter
        Page 100
    Back Cover
        Page 101
        Page 102
Full Text




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Four and twenty blackbirds baked in a pie.
When the pie was open'd, the birds began to sing;
Wasn't that a dainty dish to set before the king?











S The king was in his counting-house,
Counting out his money;
The queen was in the parlour,
Eating bread and honey.

The maid was in the garden
Hanging out the clothes;
There came a little blackbird
S And snapt off her nose.
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TWEEDLE-DUM and Tweedle-dee
Resolved to have a battle.
For Tweedle-dum said Tweedle-dee
Had spoiled his nice new rattle.
Just then flew by a monstrous crow,
As big as a tar-barrel,
Which frightened both the heroes so
They quite forgot their quarrel.


HUMPTY DUMPTY sate on a wall,
Humpty dumpty had a great fall;
Three score men and three score more
Cannot place Humpty Dumpty as he was before.











LITTLE Bo-peep has lost her sheep,
And can't tell where to find them;
Leave them alone, and they'll come home,
And bring their tails behind them.

Little Bo-peep fell fast asleep,
And dreamt she heard them bleating;
But when she awoke, she found it a joke,
For they still were all a-fleeting.

Then up she took her little crook,
Determin'd for to find them;
She found them indeed, but it made
her heart bleed;
For they'd left all their tails behind 'em.


I HAD a little dog, and they called him Buff;
I sent him to the shop for a ha'porth of snuff;
But he lost the bag, and spilt the snuff,
So take that cuff, and that's enough.


OLD Dame Widdle Waddle jumped out of bed,
And out at the window she popped her head,
Crying, John, John, John, the grey goose is gone,
And the fox is off to his den, oh!













WHERE ARE you going, my pretty maid ?
I'm going a-milking, sir, she said.
Sir, she said, sir, she said,
I'm going a-milking, sir, she said.


May I go with you, my pretty maid ?
You're kindly welcome, sir, she said.
Sir, she said, sir, she said,
You're kindly welcome, sir, she said.


What is your father, my pretty maid ?
My father's a farmer, sir, she said.
Sir, she said, sir, she said,
My father's a farmer, sir, she said.


Shall I marry you, my pretty maid ?
Oh, thank you kindly, sir, she said.
Sir, she said, sir, she said,
Oh, thank you kindly, sir, she said.


But what is your fortune, my pretty maid ?
My face is my fortune, sir, she said:
Sir, she said, sir, she said,
My face is my fortune, sir, she said.










Then I can't marry you, my pretty maid.
Nobody asked you, sir, she said;
Sir, she said, sir, she said,
Nobody asked you, sir, she said.


[A thorn.]
I WENT to the wood and got it,
I sat me down and looked at it;
The more I looked at it the less I liked it,
And I brought it home because I couldn't help it.


LITTLE Tom Tittlemouse
Lived in a bell-house;
The bell-house broke,
And Tom Tittlemouse woke.


POLLY, put the kettle on,
Polly, put the kettle on,
Polly, put the kettle on,
And let's drink tea. -.7

Sukey, take it off again, s '
Sukey, take it off again,
Sukey, take it off again, ,
They're all gone away.











OLTD IKJIn COLe.

OLD King Cole
Was a merry old soul,
A merry old soul was he;
He called for his pipe,
And he called for his bowl,
And he called for his fiddlers three.
Every fiddler, he had a fiddle,
And a very fine fiddle had he;
Twee tweedle dee, tweedle dee went the fiddlers.
Oh, there's none so rare,
As can compare
With King Cole and his fiddlers three !


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PETER WHITE will ne'er go right!
Would you know the reason why?
He follows his nose where'er he goes,
And that stands all awry.


I LOVE sixpence, pretty little sixpence,
I love sixpence better than my life;
I spent a penny of it, I spent another,
And I took fourpence home to. my wife.

-Oh, my little fourpence, pretty little fourpence,
I love fourpence better than my life;
I spent a penny of it, I spent another,
And I took twopence home to my wife.

Oh, my little twopence, my pretty little twopence.
I love twopence better than my life;
I spent a penny of it, I spent another,
And I took nothing home to my wife.

Oh, my little nothing, my pretty little nothing,
What will nothing buy for my wife ?
I have nothing, I spend nothing,
I love nothing better than my wife.





DAME TROT and her cat
Led a peaceable life,
SWhen they were not troubled
With other folks' strife.



t When Dame had her dinner,
SNear Pussy would wait,
And was sure to receive
A nice piece from her plate.


HEY! diddle diddle,
The cat and the fiddle;
The cow jumped over the moon,
The little dog laughed
To see such sport,
And the dish ran away with the spoon.


I'LL tell you a story
About Jack a Nory-
And now my story's begun:
I'll tell you another
About Jack, his brother,
And now my story's done.













HARK, hark!
The dogs do bark.
Beggars are coming to town;
Some in jags,
Some in rags,
And some in velvet gowns.


I-- .___ _


LITTLE Willie Winkie runs through the town,
Upstairs and downstairs, in his nightgown,
Rapping at the window, crying through the lock,
"Are the children in their beds, for now
it's eight o'clock ?"




MONDAY'S child is fair of face,
Tuesday's child is full of grace,
Wednesday's child is full of woe,
Thursday's child has far to go,
Friday's child is loving and giving,
Saturday's child works hard for its living;
And a child that is born
on Christmas Day,
_-7 Is fair and wise, and good and gay.


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MARY had a little lamb,
Its fleece was white as snow;
And everywhere that Mary went,
The lamb was sure to go.

He followed her to school one day
That was against the rule;
It made the children laugh and play
To see a lamb at school.

And so the teacher turned him out,
But still he lingered near,
And waited patiently about
Till Mary did appear.

Then he ran to her, and laid
His head upon her arm,
As if he said, "I'm not afraid-
You'll keep me from all harm."

"What makes the lamb love Mary so ?"
The eager children cry.
"Oh, Mary loves the lamb, you know,"
The teacher did reply.








































XeIIRJ HIAD7 I LITTLE LIAWMB.









And you each gentle animal
In confidence may bind,
And make them follow at your will,
If you are only kind.


FOR every evil under the sun,
There is a remedy, or there is none.
If there be one, try and find it,
If there be none, never mind it.


ONE misty, moisty morning,
When cloudy was the weather,
There I met an old man
Clothed all in leather,
He began to compliment,
And I began to grin.
How do you do, and how do you do,
And how do you do again?


CROSS-PATCH, lift the latch,
Sit by the fire and spin;
Take a cup, and drink it up,
Then call your neighbours in.













HIGGLEPY Piggleby,
My black hen,
She lays eggs -
For gentlemen;
Sometimes nine,. ""
And sometimes ten,
Higglepy Piggleby,
My black hen
j-
I WOULD if I cou'd, I
If I couldn't, how cou'd I .
I couldn't, without I cou'd, cou'd I ?
Cou'd you, without you cou'd, cou'd ye ?
Cou'd ye, cou'd ye ?
Cou'd you, without you cou'd, cou'd ye ?

HURLY, burly, trumpet trase,
The cow was in the market place.
Some goes far, and some goes near,
But where shall this poor henchman steer?

ROBERT ROWLEY rolled a round roll round,
A round roll Robert Rowley rolled round;
Where rolled the round roll Robert Rowley rolled
round ?












SOLOMON GRUNDY,
Born on a Monday,
Christened on Tuesday,
Married on Wednesday,
Took ill on Thursday,
Worse on Friday,
S Died on Saturday,
Buried on Sunday:
This is the end
Of Solomon Grundy.



JACK SPRAT could eat no fat,
His wife could eat no lean;
And so betwixt them both, you see,
They made the platter clean.


A THATCHER of Thatchwood went
thatching;
Did a thatcher of Thatchwood go
thatching ?
If a thatcher of Thatchwood went
thatching,
Where's the thatching the thatcher
has thatch'd?


to Thatchet a

to Thatchet a

to Thatchet a

of Thatchwood












HoT-cross Buns!
Hot-cross Buns !
One a penny, two a penny,
Hot-cross Buns !
If ye have no daughters,
Give them to your sons.


Little Tom Tucker
Sings for his supper;
What shall he eat ?
White bread and butter.
How shall he cut it
Without e'er a knife ?
How will he be married
Without e'er a wife ?


PUSSY CAT sits by the fire,
How did she come there?
In walks the little dog,
Says, "Pussy are you there ?
How do you do, Mistress Pussy ?
Mistress Pussy, how d'ye do ?"
"I thank you kindly, little dog,
I fare as well as you!"


























FOUR and twenty tailors went to kill a snail,
The best man among them durst not touch her tail;
She put out hor horns like a little Kyloe cow,
Run, tailors, run, or she'll kill you all e'en now.


I SAW three ships come sailing by,
Come sailing by, come sailing by-
I saw three ships come sailing by,
New Year's Day in the morning.


And what do you think was in them then,
Was in them then, was in them then ?
And what do you think was in them then ?
New Year's Day in the morning.









Three pretty girls were in them then,
Were in them then, were in them then-
Three pretty girls were in them then,
New Year's Day in the morning.


One could whistle, and another could sing,
And the other could play on the violin--
Such joy was there at my wedding,
New Year's Day in the morning.


CURLY locks, curly locks, wilt thou be mine ?
Thou shalt not wash dishes, nor yet feed the swine;
But sit on a cushion, and sew a fine seam,
And feed upon strawberries, sugar, and cream.




























THERE was an old woman who lived in a shoe,
She had so many children she didn't know what to do;
She gave them some broth without any bread,
She whipped them all soundly and put them to bed.


DANCE, little baby, dance up high,
Never mind, baby, mother is by;
Crow and caper, caper and crow,
There, little baby, there you go.;
Up to the ceiling, down to the ground,
Backwards and forwards, round and round;
Dance, little baby, and mother will sing,
With the merry coral, ding, ding, ding!











THERE WAS an old man who lived in a wood,
As you may plainly see;
He said he could do as much work in a day,
As his wife could do in three.
" With all my heart," the old woman said;
"1 If that you will allow,
To-morrow you'll stay at home in my stead,
And I'11 go drive the plough.

" But you must milk the Tidy cow,
For fear that she go dry;
And you must feed the little pigs
That are within the stye;
And you must mind the speckled hen,
For fear-she lay away;
And you must reel the spool of yarn
That- I spun yesterday."

The old woman took a staff in her hand,
And went to drive the plough;
The old man took a pail in his hand,
And went to milk the cow;
But Tidy hinched, and Tidy flinched,
And Tidy broke his nose,
And Tidy gave him such a blow,
That the blood ran down to his toes.











"High Tidy ho Tidy high !
Tidy, do stand still!
If ever I milk you, Tidy, again,
'Twill be sore against my will.'
He went to feed the little pigs,
That were within the stye;
He hit his head against the beam
And he made the blood to fly.


He went to mind the speckled hen,
For fear she'd lay astray,
And he forgot the spool of yarn
His wife spun yesterday.
So he swore by the sun, the moon, and the stars,
And the green leaves on the tree,
If his wife didn't do a day's work in her life,
She should ne'er be ruled by he.


LITTLE Miss Muffet
She sat on a tuffet,
Eating of curds and whey;
There came a little spider
Who sat down beside her,
And frightened Miss Muffet away.

































HUSH-A-BYE, baby, on the tree top,
When the wind blows the cradle will rock;
When the bough bends, the cradle will fall,
Down will come baby, bough, cradle, and all.

Rock-a-bye, baby, thy cradle is green;
Father's a nobleman, mother's a queen;
And Betty's a lady, and wears a gold ring:
And Johnny's a drummer, and drums for the king.










THERE was an old man,
And he had a calf,
And that's half;
He took him out of the stall,
And put him on the wall;
And that's all.



THIS IS the way the ladies ride,
Tri, tre, tre, tree,
Tri, tre, tre, tree!
This is the way the ladies ride,
Tri, tre, tre, tre, tri, tre, tre, tree!

This is the way the gentlemen ride;
Gallop-a-trot,
Gallop-a-trot!
This is the way the gentlemen ride,
Gallop-a-gallop-a-trot

This is the way the. farmers ride;
Hobbledy-hoy,
Hobbledy-hoy !
This is the way the farmers ride,
Hobbledy hobbledy-hoy I



















THIS is the house that Jack built.

This is the malt.
That lay in the house that Jack built.




















This is the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cat,
That kill'd the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.


,,













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This is the dog,
That worried the cat,
That kill'd the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house


that Jack built.


This is the cow with the crumpled horn,
That toss'd the dog,
That worried the cat,
That kill'd the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.















S This is the maiden all forlorn,
That milk'd the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
I That ate the malt
0- // That lay in the house that Jack built.




This is the man all tatter'd and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
That milk'd the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That kill'd the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.































This is the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the man all tatter'd and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That kill'd the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.











This is the cock that crowd in the morn,
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the man all tatter'd and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
That milk'd the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That kill'd the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.








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This is the farmer sowing his corn,
That kept the cock that crowd in the morn,
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the man all tatter'd and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
That milk'd the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That kill'd the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.











I HAD a little pony,
His name was Dapple Grey;
I lent him to a lady
To ride a mile away.
She whipped him, she slashed him,
She rode him through the mire;
I would not lend my pony now
For all the lady's hire.

[A well.]
As round as an apple, as deep as a cup,
And all the king's horses can't pull it up.

ROWLEY POWLEY, pudding and pie,
Kissed the girls and made them cry;
When the girls came out to play,
Rowley Powley ran away.

Bah, bah, black sheep,
Have you any wool ?
Yes, marry, have I,
Three bags full:
One for my master,
And one for my dame,
But none for the little boy 0-
Who cries in the lane.
























Co CI


ST was on a merry time,
When Jenny Wren was young,
So neatly as she danced,
And so sweetly as she sung-
Robin Redbreast lost his heart:
He was a gallant bird;
He doffed his hat to Jenny,
And thus to her he said:











,, My dearest Jenny Wren,
If you will but be mine,
You shall dine on cherry-pie,
And drink nice currant-wine.
I'll dress you like a Goldfinch,
Or like a Peacock gay;
So, if you'll have me, Jenny,
Let us appoint the day."

Jenny blushed behind her fan,
And thus declared her mind:
"Then let it be to-morrow, Bob,
I take your offer kind.
Cherry-pie is very good,
So is currant wine;
But I'll wear my russet gown,
And never dress too fine."

Robin rose up early,
At the break of day;
He flew to Jenny Wren's house,
To sing a roundelay.
He met the Cock and Hen,
And bade the Cock declare
This was his wedding-day
With Jenny Wren the fair.




























The Cock then blew his horn,
To let the neighbours know
This was Robin's wedding-day,
And they might see the show.
And first came Parson Rook,
With his spectacles and band;
And one of Mother Hubbard's books,
He held within his hand.
Then followed him the Lark,
For he could sweetly sing;
And he was to be the clerk
At Cock Robin's wedding.










He sung of Robin's Love
For little Jenny Wren,
And when he came unto the end,
Why he began again.
The Goldfinch came on next,
To give away the bride;
The Linnet, being bridesmaid,
Walked by Jenny's side;






















And as she was a-walking
Said, "Upon my word,
I think that your Cock Robin
Is a very pretty bird!"

The Bullfinch walked by Robin,
And thus to him did say:
"Pray mark, friend Robin Redbreast,
That Goldfinch dressed so gay;
What though her gay apparel
Becomes her very well?
Yet Jenny's modest dress and look
Must bear away the bell."

Then came the bride and bridegroom;
Quite plainly was she drest,
And bWushed so much, her cheeks were
As red as Robin's breast.











But Robin cheered her up;
"My pretty Jen," said he,
"We 're going to be married,
And happy we shall be."

The Blackbird and the Thrush,
And charming nightingale,
Whose sweet jug sweetly echoes
Through every grove and dale;
The Sparrow and Tom-Tit,
And many more were there-
All came to see the wedding
Of Jenny Wren, so fair.

Oh, then," says Parson Rook,
"Who gives this maid away ?"
I do," says the Goldfinch,
"And her fortune I will pay."





























r oSte r.


" Here's a bag of grain of many sorts,
And other things besides;
Now happy be the bridegroom,
And happy be the bride !.
"And will you have her, Robin,
To be your wedded wife ?"
"Yes, I will," says Robin,
"And love her all my life !"










"And you will have him, Jenny,
Your husband now to be ?"
"Yes, I will,' says Jenny,
And love him heartily !"
Then on her finger fair
Cock Robin put the ring;
"You're married now," says Parson Rook,
While aloud the Lark did sing.

Happy be the bridegroom,
And happy be the bride;
And may not man, nor bird, nor beast,
This happy pair divide!
The birds were asked to dine-
Not Jenny's friends alone,
But every pretty songster
That had Cock Robin known.

They had a cherry-pie,
Besides some currant-wine,
And every guest brought something,
That sumptuous they might dine.
Now they all sat or stood,
To eat and to drink:
And everyone said what
He happened to think.










Then each took a bumper,
And drank to the pair,
Cock Robin, the bridegroom,
And Jenny the fair.
The dinner-things removed,
They all began to sing;
And soon they made the place
Near a mile around to ring.

The concert it was fine,
And every bird tried
Who best should sing for Robin
And Jenny Wren the bride.
When in came the Cuckoo,
And made a great rout;
He caught hold of Jenny,
And pulled her about.

Cock Robin was angry,
And so was the Sparrow,
Who fetched in a hurry
His bow and his arrow.
His aim then he took,
But he took it not right;
His skill was not good,
Or he shot in a fright-












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For the Cuckoo he missed,
But Cock Robin he killed!
And all the birds mourned
That his blood was so spilled.

Who killed Cock Robin ?
"I, said the Sparrow,
With my bow and arrow,
I killed Cock Robin."

Who saw him die ?
"I, said the Fly,
With my little eye,
I saw him die."


Hi'

W















* Who caught his blood ?
"I, said the fish,
With my little dish,
I caught his blood."

Who'll make his shroud ?
"I, said the Beetle,
With my thread and needle;
I'll make his shroud."

Who'll be chief mourner ?
"I, said the Dove,
For I mourn for my love,
I'll be chief mourner.

Who'll carry the link ?
"I, said the Linnet,
I'11 fetch it in a minute,
I'll carry the link."












Who '11 be the Parson ?
"I," said the Rook,
"With my little book,
I'll be the Parson."

Who'll be the Clerk?
I," said the Lark,
"If it's not in the dark,
I'll be the Clerk."

Who'll dig his grave ?
"I," said the Owl,
"With my spade and show,
I'll dig his grave."



























Who'11 carry him to the grave?
I, said the Kite,
If it's not in the night,
I '11 carry him to the grave."

Who'll toll the bell ?
I, said the Bull,
Because I can pull,
So, Cock Robin, farewell!

All the birds of the air
Fell a-sighing and sobbing,
When they heard the bell toll
For poor Cock Robin.











THE cuckoo's a fine bird,
He sings as he flies;
He brings us good tidings,
He tells us no lies.

He sucks little birds' eggs,
To make his voice clear;
And when he sings cuckoo !"
The summer is near.


[A candle.]
LITTLE Nan Etticoat,
In a white petticoat,
And a red nose;
The longer she stands
The shorter she grows.


THE Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts,
All on a summer's day;
The Knave of Hearts, he stole the tarts,
And took them clean awa'.

The King of Hearts called for the tarts,
And beat the Knave full sore;
The Knave of Hearts brought back the tarts,
And vowed, he'd steal no more.




























C' .- *""








--' .z-
-rn^ ~ ~ ~ i* ^ -


"0
Ni










As Tommy Snooks and Bessie Brooks
Were walking out one Sunday,
Says Tommy Snooks to Bessy Brooks,
"To-morrow will be Monday."


I, 2, 3, 4, 5! I caught a hare alive;
6, 7, 8, 9, 10! I let her go again.


See, saw, Margery Daw,
Little Jacky shall have a new master;
Little Jacky shall have but a penny a day,
Because he can't work any faster.


Little Boy Blue, come blow up your horn,
The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's in the corn;
Where's the little boy that looks after the sheep ?
He's under the hay-cock fast asleep.


PETER PIPER picked a peck of pickled pepper;
A peck of pickled pepper Peter Piper picked;
If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled pepper,
Where's the peck of pickled pepper Peter Piper picked?









[Sunshine.]
HICK-A-MORE, Hack-a-more,
On the king's kitchen-door;
All the king's horses
And all the king's men
Couldn't drive Hick-a-more, Hack-a-more /
Off the king's kitchen-door.



If all the world was apple-pie,
And all the sea was ink, .
And all the trees were bread and cheese, )
What should we have for drink ? 1 ,/



When I was a little boy, I had but little wit
It is some time ago, and I've no more yet;
Nor ever ever shall, until that I die,
For tTe longer I live, the more fool am I.



THERE was an old woman had three cows-
Rosy, and Colin, and Dun;
Rosy and Colin were sold at the fair,
And Dun broke his head in a fit of despair;
And there was an end of her three cows-
Rosy, and Colin, and Dun.










THERE was a little man,
And he had a little gun,
And his bullets were made of lead, lead, lead,
He went to the brook,
And saw a little duck,
And shot it through the head, head, head.
He carried it home
To his old wife, Joan,
And bade her a fire to make, make, make,
To roast the little duck
He had shot in the brook,
And he'd go and fetch the drake, drake, drake.

BLESS you, bless you, bonny bee:
Say, when will your wedding be ?
If it be to-morrow day,
STake your wings and fly away.



S Beggars would ride;
I If turnips were watches,
S, I'd wear one by my side.









You shall have an apple,
You shall have a plum,
You shall have a rattle-basket,
When papa comes home.



THERE was an old woman of Norwich,
Who lived upon nothing but porridge;
Parading the town,
She turned cloak into gown,
This thrifty old woman of Norwich.



A MAN in the wilderness asked me
How many strawberries grew in the sea ?
I answered him, as I thought good,
As many as red herrings grew in the wood.



YOUNG lambs to sell, young lambs to sell,
If I had as much money as I could tell,
I never would cry, young lambs to sell.
Young lambs to sell, young lambs to sell,
I never would cry, young lambs to sell.










LITTLE Polly Flinders
Sate among the cinders
Warming her pretty little toes !
Her mother came and caught her,
And whipped her little daughter,
For spoiling her nice new clothes.




To market, to market, to buy a fat pig,
Home again, home again, jiggety, jig.
To market, to market, to buy a fat hog,
Home again, home again, jiggety jog.




GIRLS and boys, come out to play,
The moon doth shine as bright as day;
Leave your supper, and leave your sleep,
And come with your playfellows into the street.
Come with a whoop, come with a call,
Come with a good will or not at all.
Up the ladder and down the wall,
A halfpenny roll will serve us all.
You find milk, and I'll find flour,
And we'll have a pudding in half an hour.










HANDY SPANDY, Jack-a-dandy,
Loved plum-cake and sugar-candy;
He bought some at a grocer's shop,
And out he came, hop, hop, hop.


DIDDLEDY, diddledy, dumpty;
The cat ran up the plum-tree.
I'll lay you a crown
I'll fetch you down;
So diddledy, diddledy, dumpty.


THERE was a jolly miller
Lived on the River Dee:
He worked and sung from morn till night,
No lark so blithe as he.
And this the burden of his song
For ever used to be-
'I jump mejerrime jee !
I care for nobody-no! not I,
Since nobody cares for me.

SEE a pin and pick it up,
All the day you'll have good luck;
See a pin and let it lay,
Bad luck you'll have all the day.










SNAIL, snail, shut out your horns;
Father and mother are dead:
Brother and sister are in the back yard,
Begging for barley bread.

CocK-a-doodle-do !
My dad's gane to ploo;
Mammy's lost her pudding-poke,
And don't know what to do.

PRETTY John Watts,
We are troubled with rats,
Will you drive them out of the house ?
We have mice, too, in plenty,
That feast in the pantry;
But let them stay,
And nibble away;
What harm in a little brown mouse?

I HAD a little hen, the prettiest ever seen,
She washed me the dishes, and kept the house clean;
She went to the mill to fetch me some flour;
She brought it home in less than an hour;
She baked me my bread, she brewed my ale,
She sat by the fire and told many a fine tale.









WILLY boy, Willy boy, where are you going?
I will go with you, if I may..
I-am going to the meadows, to see them mowing,
I am going to see them make the hay.


PAT-A-CAKE, pat-a-cake, baker's man!
So I will, master, as fast as I can:
Pat it, and prick it, and mark it with T,
Put in the oven for Tommy and me.


THERE was a little boy went into a barn,
And lay down upon some hay;
An owl came out and flew about,
And the little boy ran away.


JACK SPRAT
Had a cat,
It had but one ear;
It went to buy butter
When butter was dear.


SIMPLE SIMON went a fishing
For to catch a whale:
All the water he had got
Was in his mother's pail.










JACK be nimble, Jack be quick;
And Jack jump over the candlestick.



THERE was a crooked man,
And he went a crooked mile;
He found a crooked sixpence
Against a crooked stile:
SHe bought a crooked cat,
Which caught a crooked mouse,
And they all lived together
In a crooked little house.


COCK-A-DOODLE-DOo My dame has lost her shoe;
My master's lost his fiddlestick and don't know what
to do.
Cock-a-doodle-doo What is my dame to do ?
Till master finds his fiddlestick she will dance without
her shoe.
Cock-a-doodle-doo My dame has found her shoe,
And master's found his fiddlestick, sing doodle-doodle-
doo!
Cock-a-doodle-doo My dame will dance with you,
While master fiddles his fiddlestick for dame and
doodle-doo.










ON Christmas Eve I turned the spit,
I burnt my fingers, I feel it yet;
The cock sparrow flew over the table;
The pot began to play with the ladle.


BLOW wind, blow-and go mill, go-
That the miller may grind his corn;
That the baker may bake it, and into rolls make it,
And bring us some hot in the morn.


THERE was an old woman called Nothing-at-all,
Who lived in a dwelling exceedingly small;
A man stretched his mouth to its utmost extent,
And down at one gulp house and old woman went.


LITTLE Robin Redbreast sat upon a tree,
Up went Pussy cat, and down went he;
Down came Pussy cat, and away Robin ran;
Says little Robin Redbreast, "Catch me if you can."
Little Robin Redbreast jumped upon a wall,
Pussy cat jumped after him, and almost got a fall.
Little Robin chirp'd and sang, and what did Pussy say ?
Pussy cat said "Mew," and Robin jump'd away.











THE lion and the unicorn
Were fighting for the crown:
The lion beat the unicorn
All round about the town.
Some gave them white bread,
And some gave them brown,
Some gave them plum cake,
And sent them out of town.

[Currants.]
HIGGLEDY piggledy
Here we lie,
Pick'd and pluck'd,
And put in a pie.
My first is snapping, snarling, growling,
My second's industrious, romping, and prowling.
Higgledy piggledy
Here we lie,
Pick'd and pluck'd,
And put in a pie.

THERE was an old woman of Leeds,
Who spent all her time in good deeds;
She worked for the poor
Till her fingers were sore,
This pious old woman of Leeds!
















'I
/
/


THERE was an old woman toss'd up in a basket
Ninety times as high as the moon;
Where she was going I couldn't but ask it,
For in her hand she carried a broom.


"Old woman, old woman, old woman," quoth I,
0 whither, 0 whither, O whither so high ?
"To brush the cobwebs off the sky !"
"Shall I go with thee ?" "Aye, by and by."


zZ











LOOCj9DO,7( BRJ9DQ IS DB T\ 0KJ&,' 'D0 WA


LONDON bridge is broken down,
Dance o'er my lady lee;
London bridge is broken down,
With a gay lady.

How shall we build it up again?
Dance o'er my lady lee;
How shall we build it up again ?
With a gay lady.

Build it up again with iron and steel,
Dance o'er my lady lee;
Build it up with iron and steel,
With a gay lady.

Iron and steel will bend and bow,
Dance o'er my lady lee !
Iron and steel will bend and bow,
With a gay lady.

Build it up with wood and clay,
Dance o'er my lady lee;
Build it up with wood and clay,
With a gay lady.











Wood and clay will wash away,
Dance o'er my lady lee;
Wood and clay will wash away,
With a gay lady.
Build it up with stone so strong:
Dance o'er my lady lee;
Huzza! 'twill last for ages long,
With a gay lady.


DING, dong bell,
Pussy's in the well!
Who put her in ?-
Little Tommy Lin.
Who pulled her out ?-
Dog with long snout.
What a naughty boy was that
To drown poor pussy-cat,
Who never did any harm,
But kill 'd the mice in his father's barn,


As I was going to St. Ives,
I met a man with seven wives;
Every wife had seven sacks,
Every sack had seven cats,
Every cat had seven kits:
Kits, cats, sacks, and wives,
How many were there going to St. Ives?












THE' ?IB~S L7\(, THE' WOOD.


MY dear, do you know
How a long time ago
Two little children,
Whose names I don't know,
Were stolen away on a fine Summer's day,
And left in a wood, as I've heard people say ?

And when it was night,
So sad was their plight;
The sun it went down,
And the moon gave no light!
They sobbed and they sighed, and they bitterly cried,
And the poor little things they lay down and died.


And when they were dead,
The Robins so red
Brought strawberry-leaves
And over them spread.
And all the day long
They sung them this song,
"Poor babes in the wood, poor babes in the wood!
And don't you remember the babes in the wood?"









7


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THE BABES IN THE WOOD.


"ti











LADY BIRD, lady bird, fly away home,
Thy house is on fire, thy children all gone,
All but one, and her name is Ann,
And she crept under the pudding-pan.


THREE blind mice, see how they run!
They all ran after the fanner's wife,
Who cut off their tails with the carving-knife,
Did you ever see such a thing in your life?
Three blind mice.











SIMPLE Simon met a pieman,
Going to the fair;
Says Simple Simon to the pieman,
"Let me taste your ware."


Says the pieman to Simple Simon,
Show me first your penny."
Says Simple Simon to the pieman,
Indeed, I have not any."


J-w










SWARM of bees in May,
worth a load of hay;
swarm of bees in June,
worth a silver spoon;
swarm of bees in July,
not worth a fly.


OF all the gay birds
that e'er I did see,
The owl is the fairest
by far to me;
For all the day long
she sits on a tree,
And when the night comes,
away flies she.



THIRTY days hath September,
April, Tune, and November;
February hath twenty-eight alone,
All the rest have thirty-one,
Excepting Leap Year, that's the time
When February's days are twenty-nine.


1<


Y;'











LITTLE Jack Homer sat in the corner,
Eating a Christmas pie;
He put in his thumb, and pulled out a plum,
And said What a good boy am I "



Bow, wow, says the dog;
Mew, mew, says,the cat;
Grunt, grunt, goes the hog;
And squeak goes the rat.

Ju-whu, says the owl;
Caw, caw, says the crow;
Quack, quack, says the duck ;
And what sparrows say you know. ',

So, with sparrows and owls,
With rats and with dogs,
With ducks and with crows,
With cats and with hogs.

A fine song I have made,
To please you my dear;
And if it's well sung, .
'T will be charming to hear. I






























Say the bells of St. Clements.


You owe me ten shillings,
Say the bells at St. Helen's.


I am sure I don't know,
'- '- ," -









ORA-NGE afll lemoi]S

Say the bells of St. Clement's.


You owe me ten shillings,
Say the bells at St. Helen's.


I am sure I don't know,
Says the great bell at Bow.


Here comes a candle to light you to bed,
And here comes a chopper to chop off your head.











MY grandmother sent me a new-fashioned three
cornered cambric country cut handkerchief. Not an old-
iishioned three cornered cambric country cut hand-
kerchief, but a new-fashioned three cornered cambric
country cut handkerchief.


HICKUP, hickup, go away!
Come again another day;
Hickup, Hickup, when I bake,
I'll give you a butter cake.


SHOE the horse, and shoe the mare;
But let the little colt go bare.


As I went over Lincoln Bridge, /_
I met Mister Rusticap ;
Pins and needles on his back, / '
A-going to Thorney Fair.


MUTTON hot, mutton cold,
Mutton young, mutton old,
Mutton tender, mutton tough,
Sure we've all had mutton enough.











.... "'t' '; :^





THE O kTH WIAfJ)

DOTH BLOW.

THE north wind doth blow,
And we shall have snow,
And what will poor Robin do then?
Poor thing!
He'll sit in a barn,
And to keep himself warm,
Will hide his head under his wing.
Poor thing!
The north wind doth blow,
And we shall have snow,
And what shall the honey-bee do,
Poor thing ?
In his hive he will stay
Till the cold's passed away,
And then he'll come out in the Spring,
Poor thing !









The north wind doth blow,
And we shall have snow,
And what will the dormouse do then,
Poor thing ?


Rolled
In his
He '11 sleep


up like a ball
nest snug and small,
till warm weather comes


back,
Poor thing !


The north -wind doth blow,
And we shall have snow,
And what will the children do then,
Poor things ?


When lessons are done,
They'll jump, skip, and run;
And that's how they 'll keep themselves wa
Poor things !



c. .. ,

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OLDJ dMOTHE k HUPB,12,D.


OLD mother Hubbard
Went to the cupboard,
To get her poor dog a bone
But when she came there
The cupboard was bare,
And so the poor dog had none.


7 ~f~
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She went to the baker's
To buy him some bread,
But when she came back
The poor dog was dead.


She went to the joiner's
To buy him a coffin,
But when she came back
The poor dog was laughing.


She took a clean dish
To get him some tripe,
But when she came back
He was smoking his pipe.





























She went to the fishmonger's
To buy him some fish,
And when she came back
He was licking the dish.


She went to the ale-house
To get him some beer,
But when she came back
The dog sat in a chair.










She went to the tavern
For white wine and red,
But when she came back
The dog stood on his head.


She went to the hatter's
To buy him a hat,
But when she came back
He was feeding the cat.













I.





I


She went to the barber's
To buy him a wig,
But when she came back
He was dancing a jig.


She went to the fruiterer's
To buy him some fruit,
But when she came back
He was playing the flute.


She went to the tailor's
To buy him a coat,
But when she came back
He was riding a goat.
















She went to the cobbler's
To buy him some shoes,
But when she came back
He was reading the news.


She went to the sempstress
To buy him some linen,
But when she came back"
The dog was spinning.


She went to the hosier's
To buy him some hose,
But when she came back
He was dress'd in his clothes.


The dame made a curtsey,
The dog made a bow ;
The dame said, your servant,
The dog said, bow, wow.











JOHNNY shall have a new bonnet,
And Johnny shall go to the fair;
And Johnny shall have a new ribbon,
To tie up his bonny brown hair.


And why may not I love Johnny ?
And why may not Johnny love me ?
And why may not I love Johnny,
. As well as another body ?


And here's a leg for a stocking,
And here is a leg for a shoe,
And he has a kiss for his daddy,
And two for his mammy, I trow.


And why may not I love Johnny ?
And why may not Johnny love me
i And why may not I love Johnny,
S As well as another body ?


Bye, baby bunting
SDaddy's gone a hunting,
To get a little rabbit's skin
To wrap a baby bunting in.













a for the ape,
that we saw at the fair;
B for the blockhead,
who ne'er shall go there;

C for a cauliflower,
white as a curd;
D for a duck,
a very good bird;

E for an egg, good in puddings or pies;
F for a farmer, rich, honest, and wise;

G for a gentleman, void of all care;
H for the hound, that ran down the hare;

I for an Indian, sooty and dark;
K for the keeper, that looked to the park;

L for a lark, that soared in the air;
M4 for a mole, that ne'er could get there;

G, for Sir Nobody, ever in fault;
0 for an otter, that ne'er could be caught;











P for a pudding, stuck full of plums;
jQ was for quartering it, see here he comes;


R\ for a rook, that croaked in the trees;
S for a sailor, that ploughed the deep seas;


T for a top, that doth prettily spin;
V for a vessel, with sailors in;


VW for wealth, in gold, silver, and pence;
X for old Xenophon, noted for sense;


Y for a yew, which for ever is green;
Z for the zebra, that belongs to the Queen.



BESSY 'kept the garden gate, and Mary kept the pantry ;
Bessy always had to wait, while Mary lived in plenty.



SwVAN swam over the sea-
Swim, swan, s\imn;
Swan swam back again,
Well swam swan.































THE FJkOG WHO


WOULD a-WOOL(q qGO.

A FROG he would a-wooing go,
Heigho, says Rowley,
Whether his mother would let him or no.
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !












So off he set with his opera hat,
Heigho, says Rowley,
And on the road he met with a rat.
With a rowley powley, &c.


"Pray, Mr. Rat, will you go with me,
Heigho, says Rowley,
Kind Mrs. Mousey for to see ?"
With a rowley powley, &c.

When they came to the door of Mousey's hall,
Heigho, says Rowley,
They gave a loud knock, and they gave a loud call.
With a rowley powley, &c.


Pray, Mrs. Mouse, are you within ?"
Heigho, says Rowley,
"Oh, yes, kind sirs, I'm sitting to spin."
With a rowley powley, &c.

"Pray, Mrs. Mouse, will you give us some beer?
Heigho, says Rowley,
For Froggy and I are fond of good cheer."
With a rowley powley, &c.










"Pray, Mr. Frog, will you give us a song ?
Heigho, says Rowley,
But let it be something that's not very long."
With a rowley powley, &c.

"Indeed, Mrs. Mouse," replied the Frog,
Heigho, says Rowley,
"A cold has made me as hoarse as a dog,"
With a rowley powley, &c.


"Since you have caught cold, Mr. Frog," Mousey said,
Heigho, says Rowley,
"I '11 sing you a song that I have just made."
With a rowley powley, &c.

C-
But while they were all
a merry-making,
Heigho, says Rowley.
A cat and her kittens
came tumbling in.
With a rowley powley, '
gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says
Anthony Rowley! i











The cat she seized the rat by the crown;
Heigho, says Rowley,
The kittens they pulled the little mouse down.
With a rowley powley, &c.


This put Mr. Frog in a terrible fright;
Heigho, says Rowley,
He took up his hat, and wished them good night.
With a rowley powley, &c.


But as Froggy was crossing over a brook,
Heigho, says Rowley,
A lily-white duck came and gobbled him up.
With a rowley powley, &c.


So there was an end of one, two, and three,
Heigho, says Rowley,
The Rat, the Mouse, and the little Frog-gee 1
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !


_I *&


























,r


LITTLE Miss, pretty Miss, blessings light upon you;
If I had half-a-crown a day I'd spend it all upon you.



I LIKE little pussy, her coat is so warm,
And if I don't hurt her she'll do me no harm;
So I'll not pull her tail, nor drive her away,
But pussy and I very gently will play.



IF all the world was apple pie,
And all the sea was ink,
And all the trees were bread and cheese,
What should we have to drink?


~C~S-- -
V












SCOCK crows in the morn,
( .'" /.'" To tell us to rise,
-^ /.. And he who lies late
_"_':- ... Will never be wise:
"Y/ For early to bed,
And early to rise,
-7 Is the way to be healthy,
) ,' And wealthy, and wise.




Jack and Jill went up the hill,
To fetch a pail of water;
Jack fell down, and broke his crown,
And Jill came tumbling after.


I HAD a little cow;
Hey-diddle, ho-diddle!
I had a little cow, and it had a little calf;
Hey-diddle, ho-diddle; and there's my song half.

I had a little cow;
Hey-diddle, ho-diddle!
I had a little cow, and I drove it to the stall;
Hey-diddle, ho-diddle; and there's my song all!











ONE, tWO,
Buckle my shoe;
Three, four,
Shut the door;

Five, Six,
Pick up sticks;
Seven, eight,
Lay them straight;

Nine, ten,
A good fat hen;
Eleven, twelve,
Who will delve ?

Thirteen, fourteen,
Maids a courting;

Fifteen, sixteen,
Maids a kissing;
Seventeen, eighteen,
Maids a waiting;
Nineteen, twenty,
My stomach's empty.


a-l


'I-~ -;


~A I
II! V'













THE THRfE K, kJTT8QS


CTHERE were three little kittens had lost their mittens,
And they began to cry, cry, cry;
Oil, mother dear, we very much fear
That we have lost our mittens.
You have lost your mittens, you naughty kittens!
Then you shall have no pie, pie, pie;
Mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow I
No, you shall have no pie !


The three little kittens, they found their mittens,
And they began to cry, cry, cry:
Oh, mother dear, see here see here!
See! we have found our mittens !
Put on your mittens,
you silly kittens,
And you may have
-- v -' & some pie, pie, pie ;
Oh, let us have
some pie, pie, pie !
Purr-urr, purr-urr,
"' purr-urr i






















Then the three little kittens put on their mittens,
And soon ate up the pie, pie, pie;
Oh, mother dear, we greatly fear
That we have soiled our mittens.
What soiled your mittens ? you naughty kittens !
Then they began to sigh, sigh, sigh;
Mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow !
Oh, we have soiled our mittens !


Then the three little kittens they washed their mittens,
And then hung them out to dry, dry, dry;
Oh, mother dear, do you not hear
That we have washed our mittens ?
You've washed your mittens ? then you're good kittens;
I smell a rat close by, by, by,
I smell a rat close by, by, by,
To catch him let us try.










MISTRESS MARY, quite contrary,
.0, How does your garden grow?
\ With cockle-shells, and silver bells,
-And mussels all of a row.


DIDDLEDY, diddledy, dumpty:
The cat ran up the plum tree.
I'll lay you a crown
I'll fetch her down;
So diddledy, diddledy, dumpty.


IF all the seas were one sea,
What a great sea that would be!
And if all the trees were one tree,
What a great tree that would be!

And if all the axes were one axe,
What a great axe that would be!
And if all the men were one man,
What a great man he would be!

And if the great man took the great axe,
And cut down the great tree,
And let it fall into the great sea,
What a splish-splash that would be!









THRUE 10 JIIL HUMNTSJI/IA,.


IT'S of three jovial huntsmen, an' a hunting they
did go,
An' they hunted, an' they hollo'd, and they blew
their horns also. Look ye there 1"
An' one said, "mind yo's e'en, an' keep yo's noses
reet i' th' wind,
And then by scent or seet, we'll leet o' summat to
our mind. Look ye there!"


They hunted, an' they hollo'd, an' the first thing
they did find,
Was a tattert boggart, in a field, an' that they left
behind. Look ye there!
One said it was a boggart, another he said, "Nay,
It's just a ge'man farmer, that has gone .an' lost
his way, Look ye there !"












They hunted, an' they hollo'd, and the
next thing they did find,
Was a gruntin', grindin' grindlestone, and
that they left behind. Look ye there !
One said it was a grindlestone, another
he said, Nay,
SIt's nowt but an ow'd fossil cheese that some-
body's roll't away. Look ye there !"

They hunted, an' they hollo'd, and the next thing
they did find,
Was two or three children leaving school, an' these
they left behind. Look ye thereI!
One said they were children, but another he said,
"Nay,
They're no but little angels, so we'll leave 'em to
their play. Look ye there "

They hunted, an' they hollo'd, an' the next thing
they did find,
Was a bull-calf in a pen-fold, an' that, too, they left
behind. Look ye there !
One said it was a bull-calf, an' another he said,
Nay,
It's just a painted jackass, who has never larnt to
bray. Look ye there !"











They hunted, an' they hollo'd, and the next thing
they did find,
Was a fat pig sitting in a ditch, and that, too, they
left behind. Look ye there !
One said it was a fat pig, but another he said,
"Nay,
It's just a Lunnon alderman, whose clothes are
stole away. Look ye there "

They hunted, an' they hollo'd, and the next thing
they did find,
Was two young lovers in a lane, an' these they left
behind.. Look ye there!
One said that they were lovers, but another he
said, Nay,
rhey 're two poor wandering' lunatics-come, let us
.go away. Look ye there "

So they hunted, and they hollo'd, till the .;
setting of the sun; _--.
And they'd nought to bring away at last,
when the huntin'-day was done. '
Then one unto the other said,
"This hunting doesn't pay ;
But we've powtert up and down a bit, --
and had a rattlin' day.
Look ye there! "


iLL
S' / '. l-











A FARMER went trotting
Upon his grey mare,
Bumpety, bumpety, bump !
With his daughter behind him,
So rosy and fair,
Lumpety, lumpety, lump !

A raven cried "Croak!"
And they all tumbled down,
Bumpety, bumpety, bump!
The mare broke her knees,
And the farmer his crown,
Lumpety, lumpety, lump !

The mischievous raven
Flew laughing away,
Bumpety, bumpety, bump !
And vowed he would serve them
The same next day,
Lumpety, lumpety, lump !


THERE was an old woman
Lived under a hill;
And if she's not gone,
She lives there still.









TO M/, TH


I~EITES S00 .


Tom, Tom, was a piper's son;
He learned to play when he was young;
But the only tune that he could play,
Was "Over the hills and far away."



Now, Tom with his pipe made such a noise,
That he pleased both the girls and boys,
And they all stopped to hear him play
"Over the hills and far away."








Tom with his pipe did play with such skill,
That those who heard him could never keep still;
Whenever they heard him they began to dance,
Even pigs on their hind legs would after him prance.


He met old Dame Trot with a basket of eggs,
He used his pipe, and she used her legs;
She danced about till the eggs were all broke,
She began to fret, but he laughed at the joke.


As Dolly was milking her cow one day,
Tom took out his pipe and began to play;
So Doll and the cow danced "The Cheshire Round,"
Till the pail was broke, and the milk ran on to the ground.


He saw a cross fellow was beating an ass,
Heavy laden with pots, pans, dishes, and glass;
He took out his pipe and played them a tune,
And the jackass's load was lightened full soon.



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