• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Favourite rhymes for the nurse...
 Frontispiece
 Half Title
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Riddles and rhymes
 Answers to the puzzle question...
 Back Cover
 Spine














Group Title: Favorite nursery library
Title: Favourite rhymes and riddles
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085075/00001
 Material Information
Title: Favourite rhymes and riddles two volumes in one
Series Title: Favorite nursery library
Alternate Title: Favorite rhymes and riddles
Favourite rhymes & riddles
Favourite rhymes for the nursery
Riddle and rhymes
Physical Description: 128, 127, 1 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: T. Nelson and Sons
Place of Publication: London ;
Edinburgh ;
New York
Publication Date: 1896
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1896   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1896   ( rbgenr )
Riddles -- 1896   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1896   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1896   ( local )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre: Children's poetry
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Riddles   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Publisher's advertisements follow text.
General Note: Both volumes include an added engraved t.p. and are dated 1896.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy: some illustrations are hand-colored; probably by young owner.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00085075
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002226110
notis - ALG6393
oclc - 233648353

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page A-1
        Page A-2
    Frontispiece
        Page A-3
    Title Page
        Page A-4
        Page A-5
        Page A-6
    Table of Contents
        Page A-7
        Page A-8
        Page A-9
        Page A-10
    Favourite rhymes for the nursery
        Page A-11
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    Frontispiece
        Page B-1
        Page B-2
    Half Title
        Page B-3
        Page B-4
    Title Page
        Page B-5
        Page B-6
    Table of Contents
        Page B-7
        Page B-8
    Riddles and rhymes
        Page B-9
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        Page B-119
        Page B-120
        Page B-121
        Page B-122
        Page B-123
        Page B-124
    Answers to the puzzle questions
        Page B-125
        Page B-126
        Page B-127
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text















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Little Tom Tucker
Sings for his supper:


What shall he have to eat ?
White bread and butter.


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The Favourite Nursery Library


Favorite


Rhymes


and


RzIddles


TWO VOLUMES IN ONE






T. NELSON AND SONS
London, Edinburgh, and New York
1896








FAVOURITE RHYMES

FOR THE


NURSERY.


"And when she came back
He was reading the news."
Old Molter Hubbard and her Dog.




THOMAS NELSON AND SONS,
LONDON, EDINBURGH, AND NEW YORK.


--4







FAVOURITE


RHYMES


FOR THE


NURSERY.








WITH \NUMEROUS PICTURES AND
PICTURE-PAQE .









T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW.
EDINBURGH; AND NEW YORK.
1896





















GDontents.


A, B, C, ...
A man of words, ...
A-milking, a-milking,
A pie sat on a pear tree, ...
A rainbow at morning, ... ...
A ten o'clock scholar, .
A thatcher of thatchwood, ...
"A was an apple pie, ... ...
A was an Archer, ... ... ...

Baby and I,... ... ..
Baby shall have an apple, ... ...
Bah! bah black sheep,
Bat, bat, come under my bat, ...
Bessy Bell and Mary Gray, ..
Birds of a feather,... ....
Blow, wind, blow,... ...
Bow-wow-wow, ... ...
Bye, baby bunting, ... ...

Catch him, crow, ... .
Charley, Charley, Charley Wag, ...
Clap hands! clap hands, ... .
Clap hands daddy comes, .
Cock Robin got up early,... .
Come, let's to bed, ... ... ...
Cross-patch, ..... ...
Curly locks curly locks, ......
Cushy cow bonny, .. ... ...

Dance, little baby, ...
Dance to your daddy, ...
Daffy-down-dilly has come up to
town, ... ... .. ... ..:
Diddle, diddle, dumpling, my son
John, ... ... ... ... ...


72 Diddledy, diddledy, dumpty,
122 Ding, dong, bell, ...
102 Doctor Faustus, ... .
91 Doctor Foster, ...
23
108 Early to bed, ... ... ...
99
22 Four and twenty tailors,
811


Girls and boys, come out to play,
Goosey, goosey, gander,
Go to bed first, ...

Handy-Spandy, Jack-a-dandy,
Hark hark the dogs do bark,
Here comes a poor woman,...
Here sits the Lord Mayor, ...
Here we come a-piping,
Hey, diddle, diddle, ...
Hey diddle dbubt,... .
Hey, my kitten, ... ...
Hickory, dickory, dock, ...
Hot cross buns, ...
How many days was my ba
away? ....
Hush-a-bye, baby, ...

If all the seas were one sea,
If all the world were water,
I had a little cow,
I had a little husband,
I had a little pony, ...
I had two pigeons,..
I'll sing you a song, .
I'll tell you a story, ...
I love a sixpence,


... 90
... 84
... 45
... 80

... 61

... 108

.. 88
... 42
... 125

... 71
... 71
... 47
... 99
... 98
... 100
... 102
.. 23
... 42
29
by
.. 25
... 50






CONTENTS.


I saw three ships come sailing by,
Is John Smith within ?

Jack and Jill, ... ... ... ...
Jack and Jill went up the hill, ..
Jack Sprat, ... ... ... ...
Jack Sprat could eat no fat, .
Jenny and Fanny, ... ... ...
John Cook and his little gray mare,
Johnny, ... ......

Lady-bird, lady-bird, .. ...
Lend me thy mare, ... ... ...
Let us go to the woods, ... ...
Little Betty Blue, ... ...
Little Bo-peep, ... ... .
Little boy Blue, ... ...
Little Fred, ... ... ... ...
Little General Monk, ...
Little Jack Horner, ... ... ...
Little Johnny Pringle, ... ...
Little Miss Muffet, ... ... ...
Little Polly Flinders, ...
Little Robin Redbreast, ... ...
Little Tom Tucker, .. ... ...

Mary and her bird, .. ... ...
Mary, Mary, quite contrary, .
Merry are the bells, ... ...
Mother Goose, ...
Multiplication is vexation, ...
My little Doggy, ... ... ...
My little Hen, ... ...
My little Hobby-horse, ... ...
My little Puss, .. .. ...

No doubt about it, .. ... ...

Old chairs to mend, .. ... ...
Old King Cole, .. .. .
Old Mother Hubbard, ..
Once I saw a little bird,
One, two, buckle my shoe, ...
One, two, three, four, five, ...

Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, ...
Pease-pudding hot, ... ... ...
Peter Piper, ... ... ... ...
Polly, put the kettle on,... .
Poor Robin, ... ... ... ...


Pussy and doggy, ... ... ... 91
Pussy cat, ... ... ... ... 20
Pussy cat Mole, ... ... ... 64
Pussy cat, pussy cat, where have
you been? ... ... ... ... 106
Pussy-cat, wussy-cat, ... ... 91

Rain, rain, ... ... .. ... 68
Rain, rain, go away, ... ... 24
Remember, remember, ... ... 68
Riddle, A, ... ... ... ... 12
Riddle, A, ... ... .. ... 29
Riddle, A, ... ... ... ...32
Riddle, A, ... ... .. ... 74
Riddle, A, ...... .... ... 92
Riddle, A, ... ... ... ... 92
Riddle, A, ... ... ... ... 98
Riddle, A, ... ... ... ... 105
Riddle, A, ... ... .. ... 108
Riddle, A, ... ..... ... 111
Riddle, A, ... ... ... ... 114
Ride a cock horse, ... ... ... 18
Ride, baby, ride, ... ... ... 70
Robert Barnes, ... ... ... 120
Robin and Richard, ... ... ... 125
Robin Hood, Robin Hood, ... ... 77
Robin Redbreast and puss, ... ... 123
Rock-a-bye, baby, ... ... ... 68
Rosy, Colin, and Dun, ... ... 124
Round the mulberry bush, ... ... 44

See-saw, ... ... ... ... 126
Sieve my lady's oatmeal, ... ... 47
Simple Simon, ... ... ... 40
Sing a Song of Sixpence, ... ... 38
Sing ivy, sing ivy, ... ... ... 86
Sing, sing! what shall I sing? ... 73
Snail! snaul, ... ... ... ... 72
Solomon Grundy, ... ... .. 128
St. Swithin's-day, ... ... .. 122
Swan, swan, over the sea, ... ... 108

Taffy was a Welshman, ... ... 25
Tell tale tit, ... ... ... ... 76
The boy and the owl, ... ... 87
The boy and the sparrow, ... ... 21
The cuckoo, ... ... ... ... 105
The days of the months, ... ... 62
The fat man of Bombay, ... ... 115
The fisher's rhyme, ... ... ... 115






CONTENTS.


The five pigs, ....
The frog who would a-wooing go, ...
The girl in the lane, ... ... ...
The house that Jack built, ...
The king of France, ...
The Lion and the Unicorn, ...
The man in the moon,
The man in the wilderness asked
m e, ... ... ... ... ...
The miller of Dee, ...... ...
The old man of Tobago, ...
The old woman and the miller,
The old woman of Leeds, ...
The piper and his cow, ... ...
The Queen of Hearts, ...
There was a crooked man, ...
There was a little man, ... .
There was a little man,
There was a man of our town,
There was an old woman, ... ...
There was an old woman went up in
a basket, ... ......
There was an old woman who lived
in a shoe, ... ... ... ...
There was an owl lived in an oak,
There were three crows sat on a
stone, ..... ...
The robber fox, ... ...
The tailor and the crow,... ...
The three jovial Welshmen, ...
This is the way the ladies g, ...


Three blind mice, ... ... ... 48
Three children sliding on the ice, 41
Three little kittens, ... ... ... 28
Three mice went into a hole to spin, 22
Three wise men of Gotham, ... 73
To market ride the gentlemen, ... 98
To market, to market, ... ... 41
Tom he was a piper's son, ... ... 109
Tommy Snooks and Bessy Brooks, 46
Tom, Tom, the piper's son,... ... 46
Totsy, toodleum, doodleum, ... 70
Turn again, Whittington, ... ... 88
Twelve huntsmen with horns and
hounds, ... ... ... ... 114
Two Robin Redbreasts, ... ... 85


V and I,


... ... ... 124


Wash hands, wash, ... ... ...
Wee Willie Winkie, ... ... ...
We'll go to the wood, ... ...
What are little boys made of ? ...
What the bells say, ... ... ...
When good King Arthur ruled this
land, ..... .........
When Jacky's a very good boy, ...
Where are you going to, my pretty
maid?
Who comes here ?
Willy boy, where are you going? ..
Young lambs to sell,...


71
12
112
37
59


ANSWERS TO THE RIDDLES.

1. Two legs sat upon three legs. Page 12. 1, a man; 2, a stool; 3, a leg of mutton;
4, a dog.
2. Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall. Page 29. An egg.
3. As I was going to St. Ives. Page 32., None.
4. What shoes are made without leather? Page 74. Horse-shoes.
5. Old Mother Twitchett. Page 92. Needle and thread.
6. As I went through the garden gap. Page 92. A cherry.
7. Formed long ago. Page 98. A bed.
8. In marble walls. Page 105. An egg.
9. Flour of England, fruit of Spain. Page 108. A plum-pudding.
10. Black we are, but much admired. Page 111. Coals.
11. Thirty white horses. Page 114. Teeth and gums.











FAVOURITE RHYMES

FOR THE NURSERY.



LITTLE TOM TUCKER.
Little Tom Tucker
Sings for his supper.
What shall he have to eat ?
White bread and butter.
How shall he cut it
Without e'er a knife ?
How can he marry
Without e'er a wife ?


THERE WAS AN OWL LIVED IN AN OAK.
There was an owl lived in an oak-
Wiskey, waskey, weedle;
And every word he ever spoke
Was fiddle, faddle, feedle.

A gunner chanced to come that way-
Wiskey, waskey, weedle;
Says he, I1 shoot you, silly bird !"
Fiddle, faddle, feedle.





NURSERY RHYMES.


A RIDDLE.*
Two legs sat upon three legs,
With one leg in his lap :
In comes four legs,
And runs away with one leg;
Up jumps two legs,
Catches up three legs,
Throws it after four legs,
And makes him bring back one leg. (.)


WEE WILLIE WINKIE.
Wee Willie Winkie runs through the town,
Upstairs and downstair's in his night gown;
Tapping at the window, crying at the lock,
Are the babes in their beds, for it's now ten o'clock?


THE LION AND THE UNICORN.
The Lion and the Unicorn
Were fighting for the crown;
The Lion beat the Unicorn
All round about the town.
Some gave them.white bread,
Some gave them brown;
Some gave them plum-cake,
And sent them out of town.


* For Answers to Riddles, see end of Contents.







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iD Mother Hubbard went to the cupboard,
/ !o get her poor Dog a bone;
.''ut w en she came there the cupboard was bare,
inc so the poor Dog hac none.


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went to the baker's
o buy him some bread,
when s1e came back
he poor Dog was dead.



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H HEwent to the joiner's
To buy him a coffin,
SBut when she came back
l The poor Do was laulDhil
"*'' I / / -

















S*. HE ent to the tavern
rI For wvite \vine and red. '
'But when she came b.rt:k
The Dog stood on his head. '








HE- took a clean 1di7
SO get I- im some tripe,
But when she came bacl,
H I..e .as smoking a iPe.








HE went to the fruiterer's '
To buy him some fruit,
SBut when she came :back ..
He was playing tle uLte.


HE went to the barber's -
To buy him a ikg, '
ut when she came Ibac
He was dancing a ji.



-' HE went to the cobbler's
"'.' "' T7 buy him some sloes,
'u when sle came Pack
He was reading the news.






HE went'to the hosier's '
'To buy him some hose,
SBut when she came bacl
He was dressed in is clothes.








HE went to the tailor's
To buy him a coat,
Wut when sle came bac
He was riding a goat. (



LI-IE ame made a curtsy
The Dog made a bow;
TheDame said, "your servant,"
IThe Do said, "Bow wow





NURSERY RHYMES.


RIDE A COCK HORSE.
Ride a cock horse
To Banbury cross,
To see an old woman
Ride on a white horse,
With rings on her fingers
And bells on her toes,
And she shall have music
Wherever she goes.



THERE WAS AN OLD WOMAN WENT UP
,IN A BASKET.
There was an old woman went up in a basket,
Seventy times as high as the moon:
What she did there I could not but ask it,
For in her hand she carried a broom.
" Old woman, old woman, old woman," quoth I,
" 0 whither, O whither, O whither, so high ?"
" To sweep the cobwebs off the sky,-
And I shall be back again by-and-by !"



PETER PIPER.
Peter Piper picked a peck of pepper,
A peck of pepper Peter Piper picked.
If Peter Piper picked a peck of pepper,
Where's the peck of pepper Peter Piper picked ?






























rNr
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There was an old woman went up in a basket,
Seventy times as high as the moon:
What she did there I could not but ask it,
For in her hand she carried a broom.





NURSERY RHYMIES.


PUSSY CAT.
Pussy cat lives in the servants' hall-
She can set up her back and purr.
The little mice live in a crack in the wall,
But they hardly dare venture to stir;

For whenever they think of taking the air,
Or filling their little maws,
The pussy cat says, Come out if you dare;
I will catch you all with my claws."

Scrabble, scrabble, scrabble went all the little mice,
For they smelt the Cheshire cheese:
The pussy cat said, It smells very nice;
Now do come out, if you please."

"Squeak!" said the little mouse; "squeak, squeak,
squeak !"
Said all the young ones too;
" We never creep out when cats are about,
,Because we're afraid of you."

So the cunning old cat lay down on a mat
By the fire in the servants' hall:
" If the little mice peep, they'll think I'm asleep;"
So she rolled herself up like a ball.

" Squeak !" said the little mouse; we'll creep out
And eat some Cheshire cheese;
That silly old cat is asleep on the mat,
And we may sup at our ease."





NURSERY RHYMES.


Nibble, nibble, nibble! went all the little mice,
And they licked their little paws;
Then the cunning old cat sprang up from the mat,
And caught them all with her claws.



I HAD A LITTLE PONY.
I had a little pony,
His name was Dapple Gray;
I lent him to a lady,
To ride a mile away:
She whipped him,
She lashed him,
She rode him through the mire:-
I would not lend
My pony now
For all the lady's hire !


THE BOY AND THE SPARROW.
A little cock-sparrow sat on a tree,
Looking as happy as happy could be,
Till a boy came by, with his bow and arrow,
Says he, I will shoot the little cock-sparrow.

His body will make me a nice little stew,
And his giblets will make me a little pie, too.
Says the little cock-sparrow, I'll be shot if I stay,
So he clapped his wings and then flew away.





NURSERY RHYMES.


"A" WAS AN APPLE PIE.
A was an apple pie; B bit it;
C cut it; D dealt it;
E eat it; F fought for it;
G got it; H had it;
J joined it; K kept it;
L longed for it; M mourned for it;
N nodded for it; 0 opened it;
P peeped into it; Q quartered it;
R ran for it; S stole-it;
T took it; V viewed it;
W wanted it; X, Y, Z, and &,
All wished for a piece in h:iiin:l.


THREE MICE WENT INTO A HOLE TO SPIN.
Three mice went into a hole to spin;
Puss passed by, and puss looked in:
What are you doing, my little men ?"
"Weaving coats for gentlemen."-
" Please let me help you to wind off your threads."-
" Ah, no, Mistress Pussy; you'd bite off our heads !"

Says Puss: "You look so wondrous wise,
I like your whiskers, and bright black eyes;
Your houses the nicest house I see:
I think there is room for you and me."
The mice were so pleased, that they opened the door;
And Pussy soon laid them all dead on the floor !





NURSERY RHYMES.


POLLY, PUT THE KETTLE ON.
Polly, put the kettle on !
Polly, put the kettle on!
Polly, put the kettle on,
And let's drink tea.
Sukey, take it off again !
Sukey, take it off again!
Sukey, take it off again,
They're all gone away !



A RAINBOW AT MORNING
A rainbow at morning
Is the shepherd's warning;
A rainbow at night
Is the shepherd's delight.


HEY, MY KITTEN.
Hey, my kitten, my kitten,
And hey, my kitten, my deary !
Such a sweet pet as this
Was neither far nor nearly.

Here we go up, up, up;
And here we go down, down, downy;
And here we go backwards and forwards,
And here we go round, round, round.





NURSERY RHYMES.


THERE WERE THREE CROWS SAT ON A STONE.
There were three crows sat on a stone-
Fa, la, la, la, la, lal, de;
Two flew away, and then there was one-
Fa, la, la, la, la, lal, de;









-.

\ -- ,- -- -



The other crow finding himself alone-
Fa, la, la, la, la, lal, de;
He flew away, and then there was none-
Fa, la, la, la, la, lal, de.



RAIN, RAIN, GO AWAY.

Rain, rain, go away,
Come again another day ;
Little Johnny wants to play.





NURSERY RHYMES.


TAFFY WAS A WELSHMAN.
Taffy was a Welshman;
Taffy was a thief;
Taffy came to my house,
And stole a piece of beef.
I went to Taffy's house;
Taffy wasn't at home;
Taffy came to my house,
And stole a marrow-bone.
I went to Taffy's house;
Taffy was in bed ;
I took up the marrow-bone
And flung it at his head !



HOW MANY DAYS WAS MY BABY AWAY?
How many days was my baby away ?
Saturday, Sunday, Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday,
Saturday, Sunday, Monday.



MULTIPLICATION IS VEXATION.
Multiplication is vexation;
Division is as bad;
The Rule of Three doth puzzle me;
And Practice drives me mad.





NURSERY RHYMES.


THE TAILOR AND THE CROW.
A carrion crow sat on an oak,
Fol-de-riddle, lol-de-riddle, hi-ding-do,
Watching a tailor shape his coat;
Sing he, sing ho, the old carrion crow,
Fol-de-riddle, lol-de-riddle, hi-ding-do!

Wife, bring to me my old bent bow,
Fol-de-riddle, lol-de-riddle, hi-ding-do,
That I may shoot yon carrion crow;
Sing he, sing ho, the old carrion crow,
Fol-de-riddle, lol-de-riddle, hi-ding-do !

The tailor shot, and he missed his mark,
Fol-de-riddle, lol-de-riddle, hi-ding-do,
And shot the miller's sow right through the
heart;
Sing he, sing ho, the old carrion crow,
Fol-de-riddle, lol-de-riddle, hi-ding-do

Wife! 0 wife! bring brandy in a spoon,
Fol-de-riddle, lol-de-riddle, hi-ding-do,
For the old miller's sow is in a swoon;
Sing he, sing ho, the old carrion crow,
Fol-de-riddle, lol-de-riddle, hi-ding-do!


BOW-WOW-WOW!
Bow-wow-wow! whose dog art thou?
Little Tom Tucker's dog, bow-wow-wow!





























































































Wife, bring to me. my old bent bow,

That I may shoot yon carrion crow.


.. _I i






'


. '' ~1





NURSERY RHYMES.


THREE LITTLE KITTENS.
Three little kittens lost their mittens;
And they began to cry,
Oh! mother dear, we very much fear
That we have lost our mittens."
" Lost your mittens you naughty kittens !
Then you shall have no pie."
Mee-ow, nee-ow, mee-ow.
No, you shall have no pie."
Mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow.

The three little kittens found their mittens;
And they began to cry,
Oh mother dear, see here, see here !
See, we have found our mittens."
" Put on your mittens, you silly kittens,
And you may have some pie."
Purr-r, purr-r, purr-r.
Oh let us have the pie."
Purr-r, purr-r, purr-r.

The three little kittens put on their mittens;
And soon ate up the pie:
Oh mother dear, we greatly fear
That we have soiled our mittens."
" Soiled your mittens you naughty kittens! "
Then they began to sigh,
Mi-ow, mi-ow, mi-ow;
Then they began to sigh,
Mi-ow, mi-ow, mi-ow.





NURSERY RHYMES.


The three little kittens washed their mittens,
And hung them out to dry:
Oh mother dear, do not you hear
That we have washed our mittens ?"
" Washed your mittens Oh you're good kittens.
But I smell a rat close by.
Hush hush !" mee-ow, mee-ow;
"We smell a rat close by,"
Mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow.
--_s.f.f .e- _

A RIDDLE.
Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall;
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall;
Not all the king's horses, nor all the king's men,
Could set Humpty Dumpty up again. (2.)


HOT CROSS BUNS!
Hot cross buns
Hot cross buns!
One a penny, two a penny,
Hot cross buns !
Hot cross buns!
Hot cross buns!
If you have no daughters,
Give them to your sons !
But if you have none of these little elves,
Then you may eat them all yourselves.





NURSERY RHYMES.


THE FROG WHO WOULD A-WOOING GO.
A frog he would a-wooing go,
Heigho, says Rowley,
Whether his mother would let him or no.
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !

So off he set with his opera hat,
Heigho, says Rowley,
And on the road he met with a rat.
With a rowley powley, etc.

" Pray, Mr. Rat, will you go with me,
Heigho, says Rowley,
Kind Mrs. Mousey for to see ?"
With a rowley powley, etc.

When they came to the door of Mousey's hall,
Heigho, says Rowley,
They gave a loud knock, and they gave a loud call.
With a rowley powley, etc.

" Pray, Mrs. Mouse, are you within ?"
Heigho, says Rowley,
" Oh yes, kind sirs, I'm sitting to spin."
With a rowley powley, etc.

" Pray, Mrs. Mouse, will you give us some beer ?
Heigho, says Rowley,
For Froggy and I are fond of good cheer."
With a rowley powley, etc.





NURSERY RHYMES.


"Pray, Mr. Frog, will you give us a song ?
Heigho, says Rowley,
But let it be something that's not very long."
With a rowley powley, etc.

" Indeed, Mrs. Mouse," replied Mr. Frog,
Heigho, says Rowley,
" A cold has made me as hoarse as a dog."
With a rowley powley, etc.

" Since you have caught cold, Mr. Frog," Mousey said,
Heigho, says Rowley,
" I'll sing you a song that I have just made."
With a rowley powley, etc.

But while they were all a merry-making,
Heigho, says Rowley,
A cat and her kittens came tumbling in.
With a rowley powley, etc.

The cat she seized the rat by the crown;
Heigho, says Rowley,
The kittens they pulled the little mouse down.
With a rowley powley, etc.

This put Mr. Frog in a terrible fright;
Heigho, says Rowley,
He took up his hat, and wished them good-night.
With a rowley powley, etc.

But as Froggy was crossing over a brook,
Heigho, says Rowley,





NURSERY RHYMES.


A lily-white duck came and gobbled him up.
With a rowley powley, etc.

So there was an end of one, two, and three,
Heigho, says Rowley,
The Rat, the Mouse, and the little Frog-gee !
With a rowley powley, gammon and spinach,
Heigho, says Anthony Rowley !



THE QUEEN OF HEARTS.
The Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts,
All on a summer's day;
The Knave of Hearts, he stole the tarts,
And took them clean away.
The King of Hearts called for the tarts,
And beat .the Knave full sore;
The Knave of Hearts brought back the tarts,
And vowed he'd steal no more.



A RIDDLE.
As I was going to St. Ives,
I met a man with seven wives;
Every wife had seven sacks;
Every sack had seven cats;
Every cat had seven kits.
Kits, cats, sacks, and wives,
How many were there going to St. Ives? (1.)











































p--




The Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts.
All on a summer's day;
The Knave of Hearts, he stole the tarts,
And took them clean away.
3





NURSERY RHYMES.


LITTLE JACK HORNER.
Little Jack Horner sat in a corner,
Eating a Christmas pie;
He put in his thumb, and he pulled out a plum,
And said, What a good boy am I !"



DIDDLE, DIDDLE, DUMPLING, MY SON JOHN.
Diddle, diddle, dumpling, my son John,
Went to his bed with his breeches on,
One shoe off and the other shoe on:
Diddle, diddle, dumpling, my son John.



OLD CHAIRS TO MEND.
If I had as much money as I could spend,
I never would cry, Old chairs to mend !
Old chairs to mend old chairs to mend !-
I never would cry, Old chairs to mend !



COME, LET'S TO BED.
Come, let's to bed," says Sleepy-head;
Let's stay a while," says Slow;
Put on the pot," says Greedy-sot-
We'll sup before we go !"





NURSERY RHYMES.


LITTLE BO-PEEP.
Little Bo-peep has lost her sheep,
And can't tell where to find them;
Leave them alone, and they'll come home,
And bring their tails behind them.

Little Bo-peep fell fast asleep,
And dreamt she heard them bleating;
But when she awoke, she found it a joke,
For still they were all fleeting.




1 -





-. L. C_ ,_ ..




Then up she took her little crook,
Determined for to find them; [bleed-
She found them, indeed, but it made her heart
For they'd left their tails behind them !

It happened one day, as Bo-peep did stray
Along a meadow hard by,





NURSERY RHYMES.


There she espied their tails side by side,
All hung up on a tree to dry !

















She heaved a sigh, and wiped her eye,
And ran o'er hill and dale, 0 !
And tried what she could, as a shepherdess should,
To tack to each sheep its tail, 0 !



BABY AND L
Baby and I
Were baked in a pie-
The gravy was wonderful hot;
We had nothing to pay
-' '. _





















To the baker that day,
AnAnd tried so we crept out of the potherdess should,!
To tack to each sheep its tail, 0 .






NURSERY RHYMES.


WHAT ARE LITTLE BOYS MADE OF?
What are little boys made of, made of,
What are little boys made of?
Snaps and snails, and puppy-dogs' tails;
And that's what little boys are made of, made of.

What are little girls made of, made of, made of,
What are little girls made of?
Sugar and spice, and things that are nice;
And that's what little girls are made of, made of.


JACK AND JILL WENT UP THE HILL.
Jack -and Jill went up the hill,
To fetch a pail of water;
Jack fell down, and broke his crown,
And Jill came tumbling after!



POOR ROBIN.
The north wind doth blow,
And we shall have snow,
And what will poor Robin do then ?
Poor thing!
He'll sit in a barn,
To keep himself warm,
And hide his head under his wing,
Poor thing!





NURSERY RHYMES.


SING A SONG OF SIXPENCE.
Sing a Song of Sixpence,-
A bag full of rye;
Four-and-twenty blackbirds
Baked in a pie!
When the pie was opened,
The birds began to sing:
Was not this a dainty dish
To set before the king ?

The king was in his counting-house,
Counting out his money;
The queen was in the parlour,
Eating bread and honey.














The maid was in the garden
Hanging out the clothes;
There came a little blackbird,
And snapped off her nose.




















































Sing a Song of Sixpence,-
A bag full of rye;
Four-and-twenty blackbirds
Baked in a pie!




NURSERY RHYMES.


SIMPLE SIMON.
Simple Simon met a pieman
Going to the fair;
Says Simple Simon to the pieman,
Let me taste your ware."

Says the pieman to Simple Simon,
Show me first your penny."
Says Simple Simon to the pieman,
Indeed I have not any."

Simple Simon went a-fishing
For to catch a whale;
All the water he had got
Was in his mother's pail.

Simple Simon went to look
If plums grew on a thistle;
He pricked his fingers very much,
Which made poor Simon whistle.



LADY-BIRD, LADY-BIRD.
Lady-bird, lady-bird, fly away home!
Thy house is on fire, thy children are gone--
All but one, and her name is Ann,
And she crept under the pudding pan.
0 lady-bird, lady-bird, fly away home !
Thy house is on fire, thy children are gone.





NURSERY RHYMES.


JACK AND JILL.
There were two dickey birds sitting on a hill,
One named Jack, and the other named Jill:
Fly away, Jack,-fly away, Jill;
Come again, Jack,-come again, Jill.


THREE CHILDREN SLIDING ON THE ICE.
Three children sliding on the ice
Upon a summer's day,
As it fell out, they all fell in,
The rest they ran away.

Now had these children been at home,
Or sliding on dry ground,
Ten thousand pounds to one penny,
They had not all been drowned.

You parents all that children have,
And you that have got none,
If you would have them safe abroad,
Pray keep them safe at home.


TO MARKET, TO MARKET.
To market, to market, to buy a fat pig;
Home again, home again, jiggety jig.
To market, to market, to buy a fat hog;
Home again, home again, jiggety jog.





NURSERY RHYMES.


HICKORY, DICKORY, DOCK.
Hickory, dickory, dock,
The mouse ran up the clock;
The clock struck one,
And down the mouse ran-
Hickory, dickory, dock.


BAH! BAH! BLACK SHEEP.
" Bah bah black sheep,
Have you any wool ?"-
"Yes, sir, I have,
Three bags full:
One for my master,
One for my dame,
And one for the little boy
That lives in our lane."


GOOSEY, GOOSEY GANDER.
Goosey, goosey gander,
Whither dost thou wander ?
Upstairs, downstairs,
And in my lady's chamber.
There I met an old man,
And he had many cares--
For bad boys stole his apples,
And birds pecked all his pears.
























































"Bah! bah! black sheep,
Have you any wool?"-
"Yes, sir, I have,
Three bags full."


,"-`

-5;





NURSERY RHYMES.


ROUND THE MULBERRY BUSH.
Here we go round the mulberry bush,
Mulberry bush,
Mulberry bush,
Here we go round the mulberry bush,
On a cold frosty morning.

This is the way we brush our hair,
Brush our hair,
Brush our hair,
This is the way we brush our hair,
On a cold frosty morning.
[Followed by "This is the way we clean our boots," etc.]


LITTLE MISS MUFFET.
Little Miss Muffet
Sat on a tuffet,
Eating of curds and whey:
There came a little spider,
Who sat down beside her,
And frightened Miss Muffet away.


MARY, MARY, QUITE CONTRARY.
Mary, Mary, quite contrary,
How does your garden grow?
With silver bells and cockle-shells,
And pretty maids all of a row.





NURSERY RHYMES.


DOCTOR FAUSTUS.


Doctor Faustus was a good man;
He whipped his scholars now and then.
When he whipped them, he made them dance
Out of Scotland into France--
Out of France into Spain :
And then he whipped them back again.


ONCE I SAW A LITTLE BIRD.
Once I saw a little bird
Come hop, hop, hop;
So I cried, "Little bird,
Will you stop, stop, stop ?"
And was going to the window
To say, How do you do ?"
But he shook his little tail,
And away he flew.



LITTLE BOY BLUE, COME BLOW ME YOUR HORN.
Little boy Blue, come blow me your horn,
The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's in the corn;
Where is the boy that looks after the sheep ?"--
He's under the haycock, fast asleep !"-
"Will you wake him ?"-" No, not I;
For if I do, he'll be sure to cry."





NURSERY RHYMES.


TOM, TOM, THE PIPER'S SON.
Tom, Tom, the piper's son,
Stole a pig, and away he ran;


The pig was eat, and Tom was beat,
And Tom ran crying down the street.



TOMMY SNOOKS AND BESSY BROOKS.
As Tommy Snooks and Bessy Brooks
Were walking out one Sunday,
Says Tommy Snooks to Bessy Brooks,
To-morrow will be Monday."


05----- __





NURSERY RHYMES,


THE MAN IN THE MOON.
The man in the moon
Came down too soon,
And asked his way to Norwich;
He went by the south,
And burnt his mouth
With eating cold plum-porridge.



HERE COMES A POOR WOMAN.

Here comes a poor woman from baby-land,
With three small children in her hand:
One can brew, the other can bake,
The other can make a pretty round cake.
One can sit in the garden and spin,
Another can make a fine bed for the king;
Pray, ma'am, will you take one in ?



SIEVE MY LADY'S OATMEAL.

Sieve my lady's oatmeal,
Grind my lady's flour,
Put it in a chestnut,
Let it stand an hour:
One may rush, two may rush,
Come, my girls, walk under the bush.





NURSERY RHYMES.


LITTLE JOHNNY PRINGLE.
Little Johnny Pringle had a little Pig;
It was very little, so was not very big.
As it was playing beneath the shed,
In half a minute poor Piggy was dead.
So Johnny Pringle he sat down and cried,
And Betty Pringle she lay down and died.
There is the history of one, two, and three-
Johnny Pringle, Betty Pringle, and Piggy Wiggie.



WHO COMES HERE?
Who comes here ?"
A grenadier."
What do you want ?"
A pot of beer."
Where's your money ?"
I've forgot."
Get you gone,
You drunken sot."


THREE BLIND MICE.
Three blind mice see, how they run !
They all ran after the farmer's wife,
Who cut off their tails with the carving knife !
Did you ever see such fools in your life ?
Three blind mice!


















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NURSERY RHYMES.


WHERE ARE YOU GOING TO, MY PRETTY MAID?
Where are you going to, my pretty maid?"
I am going a-milking, sir," she said.
May I go with you, my pretty maid ?"
You're kindly welcome, sir," she said.
What is your father, my pretty maid? "
My father's a farmer, sir," she said.
What is your fortune, my pretty maid ?"
My face is my fortune, sir," she said.
Then I won't marry you, my pretty maid."
Nobody asked you, sir," she said.



THIS IS THE WAY THE LADIES GO.
This is the way the ladies go-
Nim, nim, nim.
This is the way the gentlemen go-
Trot, trot, trot.
This is the way the -hunters go-
Gallop, gallop, gallop.



I'LL SING YOU A SONG.
I'll sing you a song: though not very long,
Yet I think it as pretty as any.
Put your hand in your purse, you'll never be worse,
And give the poor singer a penny.





NURSERY RHYMES.


I SAW THREE SHIPS COME SAILING BY.
I saw three ships come sailing by,
Sailing by, sailing by;
I saw three ships come sailing by,
On New-Year's Day in the morning.

And what do you think was in them then,
In them then, in them then;
And what do you think was in them then,
On New-Year's Day in the morning ?

Three pretty girls were in them then,
In them then, in them then;
Three pretty girls were in them then,
On New-Year's Day in the morning.

And one could whistle, and one could sing,
The other play on the violin;-
Such joy there was at my wedding,
On New-Year's Day in the morning.



I'LL TELL YOU A STORY.
I'll tell you a story,
About Jack-a-Norry--
And now my story's begun:
I'll tell you another
About Jack and his brother-
And now my story is done !





NURSERY RHYMES.


HUSH-A-BYE, BABY.
Hush-a-bye, baby, on the tree top !
When the wind blows, the cradle will rock!


When
Down


the bough breaks the cradle will fall-
will come baby, cradle and all!


WHAT THE BELLS SAY.
Oranges and lemons,
Said the Bells of St. Clement's.

You owe me five shillings,
Said the Bells of St. Helen's.





NURSERY RHYMES.


When will you pay me ?
Said the Bells of Old Bailey.

When I grow rich,
Said the Bells of Shoreditch.

When will that be ?
Said the Bells of Stepney.

I do not know,
Said the great Bell at Bow.

Two sticks in an apple,
Say the Bells of Whitechapel.

Half-pence and farthings,
Say the Bells of St. Martin's.

Kettles and pans,.
Say the Bells of St. Ann's.

Brickbats and tiles,
Say the Bells of St. Giles'.

Old shoes and slippers,
Say the Bells of St. Peter's.

Pokers and tongs,
Say the Bells of St. John's.





NURSERY RHYMES.


THE PIPER AND HIS COW.
There was a piper had a cow,
And he had nought to give her;
He pulled out his pipes and played her a
And bade the cow consider. [tune,


The cow considered very well,
And gave the piper a penny,
And bade him play another tune,
Corn rigs are bonny."


EARLY TO BED.
Early to bed, and early to rise,
Is the way to be healthy, wealthy, and wise.





NURSERY RHYMES.


THE FIVE PIGS.

1. This pig went to market;
2. This pig stayed at home;
3. This pig had a bit of meat;
4. And this pig had none;
5. This pig said, Wee, wee, wee !
I can't find my way home.



THE DAYS OF THE MONTHS.

Thirty days hath September,
April, June, and November:
February has twenty-eight alone,
All the rest have thirty-one;
Excepting Leap-year, that's the time
When February's days are twenty-nine.



THERE WAS A MAN OF OUR TOWN.
There, was a man of our town,
And he was wondrous wise;
He jumped into a bramble bush,
And scratched out both his eyes.
And when he saw his eyes were out,
With all his might and main
He jumped into another bush,
And scratched them in again !





















































This pig went to market;
This pig stayed at home;
This pig had a bit of meat,
And this pig had none.





NURSERY RHYMES.


PUSSY CAT MOLE.
Pussy cat Mole
Jumped over a coal,
And in her best petticoat
Burned a great hole!

Poor pussy's weeping:
She'll have no more milk,
Until her best petticoat's
Mended with silk!


DANCE, LITTLE BABY.
Dance, little baby, dance up high;
Never mind, baby, mother is nigh;
Crow and caper, caper and crow;
There, little baby, there you go !

Up to the ceiling, down to the ground,
Backwards and forwards, round and round!
Dance, little baby, and mother will sing
With the merry coral, ding, ding, ding !


THERE WAS AN OLD WOMAN.
There was an old woman, called Nothing-at-all,
Who lived in a dwelling exceedingly small;
A man stretched his mouth to its utmost extent,
And down at one gulp house and old woman went





NURSERY RHYMES.


MY LITTLE DOGGY.

I had a little Doggy
That used to sit and beg.
Doggy tumbled down the stairs
And broke his little leg.
Oh! Doggy, I will nurse you,
And try to make you well;
And you shall have a collar
With a pretty little bell.


Ah Doggy, don't you think you
Should very faithful be,
For having such a loving friend
To comfort you as me.
And when your leg is better,
And you can run and play,
We'll have a scamper in the fields,
And see them making hay.


But, Doggy, you must promise
(And mind your word you keep)
Not once to tease the little lambs,
Or run among the sheep.
And then the yellow chicks,"
That play upon the grass,
You must not even wag your tail
To scare them as you pass.





NURSERY RHYMES.


CATCH HIM, CROW!
Catch him, crow carry him, kite !
Take him away till the apples are ripe:
When they are ripe, and ready to fall,
Here comes baby, apples and all!



THE ROBBER FOX.
A fox jumped up on a moonlight night,
The stars were shining and all things bright;
" Oh, ho !" said the fox, it's a very fine night
For me to go through the town,. 0."


The fox when he came to the farmer's gate,
Whom should he see but the farmer's drake:
" I love you well for your master's sake,
And long to be picking your bones, 0 !"


--





NURSERY RHYMES.


The farmer's wife she jumped out of bed,
And out of the window she popped her head;



II


i "S ,"-- ,IN"_-




Ic 10
-- -'"-" ii" =
~-.





" 0 husband! 0 husband the geese are all dead,
For the fox has been through the town, 0 !"

The farmer he loaded his pistol with lead,
And shot the old rogue of a fox through the
head:
" Aha!" said the farmer, I think you're quite
dead,
And no more will trouble the town, 0 !"

But up the cunning old fox jumped, then,
And bore the gray goose off to his den;
And he and his wife they supped off a hen,
And the little ones scrambled for the bones, 0.





NURSERY RHYMES.


THE GIRL IN THE LANE.
The girl in the lane,
That couldn't speak plain,
Cried, Gobble, gobble, gobble!"
The man on the hill,
That couldn't stand still,
Went hobble, hobble, hobble !


REMEMBER, REMEMBER.
Remember, 'remember,
The fifth of November,
Gunpowder treason and plot;
I see no reason
Why gunpowder treason
Should ever be forgot.


ROCK-A-BYE, BABY.
Rock-a-bye, baby, thy cradle is green;
Father's a nobleman, mother's a queen;
And Betty's a lady, and wears a gold ring;
And Johnny's a drummer, and drums for the king.


RAIN! RAIN!
Rain! rain go to Spain, and
Mind you don't come back again!






















































Rain! rain! go to Spain, and
Mind you don't come back again!





NURSERY RHYMES.


BABY SHALL HAVE AN APPLE.
Baby shall have an apple,
Baby shall have a plum,
Baby shall have a rattle,
When daddy comes home.



ONE, TWO, THREE, FOUR, FIVE.
One, two, three, four, five,
I caught a hare alive;
Six, seven, eight, nine, ten,
I let her go again.



RIDE, BABY, RIDE.
Ride, baby, ride!
Pretty baby shall ride,
And have a little puppy dog tied to one side,
And a little pussy cat tied to the other-
And away she shall ride to see her grandmother.



TOTSY TOODLEUM, DOODLEUM.
Totsy toodleum, doodleum!
Oh, what a pretty little boy!
Totsy toodleum, doodleum!
Daddy's pride and mammy's joy !





NURSERY RHYMES.


CLAP HANDS! CLAP HANDS!

Clap hands clap hands !
Till daddy comes home;
Daddy's got money,
And mammy's got none.



HARK! HARK! THE DOGS DO BARK,
Hark hark the dogs do bark:
Beggars are coming to town;
Some on nags, and some in rags,
And some in velvet gown.



WASH HANDS, WASH.
Wash hands, wash,
Pussy's gone to plough;
If you want your hands washed,
Have them washed now.



HANDY-SPANDY, JACK-A-DANDY

Handy-Spandy, Jack-a-dandy,
Loves plum-cake and sugar-candy r
He bought some at a grocer's shop,
And, pleased, away went hop, hop, hop !





NURSERY RHYMES.


SNAIL! SNAUL!
Snail, snaul!
Robbers are coming to pull down your wall!
Snail, snaul!
Put out your horn,










An I0 0
,_g --- __ _
/ <^ '^'' i'''^1--~-'^* 't

12- ". .i :


Robbers are coming to steal your corn,
Coming at four o'clock in the morn!


A, B, C.
A, B, C,
Tumble down D,
The cat's in the cupboard,
And can't see me.





NURSERY RHYMES.


THREE WISE MEN OF GOTHAM.
Three wise men of Gotham
Went to sea in a bowl;
And if the bowl had been stronger,
My song would have been longer.



SING, SING! WHAT SHALL I SING?
Sing, sing! what shall I sing ?
The cat's run away with the pudding-bag string !
Do, do what shall I do ?
The cat has bit it quite in two !



JACK SPRAT.
Jack Sprat had a cat,
It had but one ear;
It went to buy butter,
When butter was dear.



BLOW, WIND, BLOW!
Blow, wind, blow! and go, mill, go !
That the miller may grind his corn;
That the baker may take it,
And into rolls make it,
And send us some hot in the morn.





NURSERY RHYMES.


THERE WAS A LITTLE MAN.
There was a little man,
And he had a little gun,
And his bullets were made of lead, lead, lead;
He went to the brook,
And he saw a little duck,
And he shot it through the head, head, head.

He carried it home
To his old wife Joan,
And bid her a fire for to make, make, make,
To roast the little duck
He had shot in the brook,
And he'd go and fetch her the drake, drake, drake.


A RIDDLE.
What shoes are made without leather,
With all the four elements put together-
Fire and water, earth and air ---
Every customer has two pair. (4)



JACK SPRAT COULD EAT NO FAT.
Jack Sprat could eat no fat,
His wife could eat no lean;
And so, betwixt them both, you see,
They licked the platter clean.













C1
/i j -'-.

v ti'1 r ", '> ,-,'


There was a little man,
And he had a little gun,
And his bullets were made of lead, lead, lead.





NURSERY RHYMES.


CHARLEY, CHARLEY, CHARLEY WAG.
Charley, Charley, Charley Wag,
Ate the pudding and left the bag.


TELL TALE TIT!
Tell tale tit,
Your tongue shall be slit 1
And all the dogs in the town
Shall have a bit!


LITTLE GENERAL MONK.
Little General Monk
Sat on a trunk,
Eating a crust of bread.,
There fell a hot coal,
And burned in his clothes a hole;
Now General Monk is dead.
Keep always from the fire;
If it catch your attire,
You too, like Monk, will be dead.


CLAP HANDS! DADDY COMES.
Clap hands! daddy comes,
With his pockets full of plums,
And a cake for Johnny !






NURSERY RHYMES.


ROBIN HOOD, ROBIN HOOD.
Robin Hood, Robin Hood,
Is in the mickle wood;
Little John, little John,
He to the town is gone.

Robin Hood, Robin Hood,
Is telling his beads,


"FA


All in the greenwood,
Among the green weeds.

Little John, Little John,
If he comes no more,
Robin Hood, Robin Hood,
He will fret full sore.





NURSERY RHYMES.


LITTLE POLLY FLINDERS.

Little Polly Flinders
Sat among the cinders
Warming her pretty little toes.
Her mother came and caught her,
And scolded her little daughter
For spoiling her nice new clothes.



LITTLE FRED.

When little Fred went to bed,
He always said his prayers;
He kissed mamma, and then papa,
And straightway went upstairs.



THE MAN IN THE WILDERNESS ASKED ME.
The man in the wilderness asked me,
How many strawberries grew in the sea ?
I answered him, as I thought good,
As many red herrings as grew in a wood !



DAFFY-DOWN-DILLY HAS COME UP TO TOWN.
Daffy-down-dilly has come up to town,
In a yellow petticoat and a green gown.
















t.---._- .'- ,,






"-" 1
..
^ ^ ; ^- ----"
















S' ., -.. .


Little Polly Flinders
Sat among the cinders
Warming her pretty little toes.





NURSERY RHYMES.


JOHNNY.
Johnny shall have a new bonnet,
And Johnny shall go to the fair;
And Johnny shall have a new ribbon,
To tie up his bonny brown hair.

And why may not I love Johnny ?
And why may not Johnny love me ?
And why may not I love Johnny
As well as another body?

And here's a leg for a stocking,
And here is a leg for a shoe;
And he has a kiss for his daddy,
And two for his mammy, I trow.

And why may not I love Johnny ?
And why may not Johnny love me ?
And why may not I love Johnny
As well as another body?



DOCTOR FOSTER.
Doctor Foster went to Glo'ster
In a shower of rain;
He stepped in a puddle, up to the middle,
And never went there again.





NURSERY RHYMES.


WHEN JACKY'S A VERY GOOD BOY.
When Jacky's a very good boy,
He shall have cakes and a custard;
But when he does nothing but cry,
He shall have nothing but mustard.



A WAS AN ARCHER, WHO SHOT AT A FROG.
A was an Archer, who shot at a frog,
B was a Butcher, who kept a bull-dog.
C was a Captain, all covered with lace,
D was a Drummer, who played with much grace
E was an' Esquire, with pride on his brow,
F was a Farmer, who followed the plough.
G was a Gamester, who had but ill luck,
H was a Hunter, who hunted a buck.
I was an Italian, who had a white mouse,
J was a Joiner, who built up a house.
K was a King, so mighty and grand,
L was a Lady, who had a white hand.
M was a Miser, who hoarded up gold,
N was a Nobleman, gallant and bold.
0 was an Organ boy, who played about town,
P was a Parson, who wore a black gown.
Q was a Queen, who was fond of her people,
R was a Robin, who perched on- a steeple.
S was a Sailor, who spent all he got,
T was a Tinker, who mended a pot.





NURSERY RHYMES.


U was an Usher, who loved little boys,
V was a Veteran, who sold pretty toys.
V was a Watchman, who guarded the door,
X was expensive, and so became poor.
Y was a Youth, who did not love school,
Z was a Zany, who looked a great fool.



ONE, TWO, BUCKLE MY SHOE.
1, 2 One, two, buckle my shoe;
3, 4 Three, four, shut the door;
5, 6 Five, six, pick up sticks;
7, 8 Seven, eight, lay them straight;
9, 10 Nine, ten, a good fat hen;
11, 12 Eleven, twelve, who will delve ?
13, 14 Thirteen, fourteen, draw the curtain;
15, 16 Fifteen, sixteen, maids in the kitchen;
17, 18 Seventeen, eighteen, who is waiting?
19, 20 Nineteen, twenty, my stomach's empty,
Please, mamma, give me some dinner.



BYE, BABY BUNTING.
Bye, Baby bunting,
Father's gone a-hunting,
Mother's gone a-milking,
Sister's gone a-silking,
And Brother's gone to buy a skin,
To wrap the Baby bunting in.





NURSERY RHYMES.


THERE WAS A LITTLE MAN.

There was a little man,
And he wooed a little maid,
And he said, Little maid, will you wed, wed, wed ?
I have no more to say,
Then will you, yea or nay,
For the least said is soonest mended, ded, ded."


'' -


The little maid she sighed,
And very soon replied,
"But what shall we have for to eat, eat, eat ?
Will the flame that you're so rich in
Make a fire in the kitchen ?
Or the little god of love turn the spit, spit, spit ?"





NURSERY RHYMES.


DING, DONG, BELL.
Ding, dong, bell,
Pussy's in the well.
Who put her in ?
Little Tommy Thin.
Who pulled her out?
Little Johnny Stout.
Oh! what a naughty boy was that,
To drown his poor pussy cat,
Who never did him any harm,
But killed the mice in his father's barn.



WHEN GOOD KING ARTHUR RULED THIS LAND.
When good King Arthur ruled this land-
He was a goodly king-
He stole three pecks of barley-meal,
To make a bag-pudding!

A bag-pudding the king did make,
And stuffed it well with plums;
And in it put great lumps of fat,
As big as my two thumbs!

The king and queen did eat thereof,
And noblemen beside;
And what they could not eat that night,
The queen next morning fried!





NURSERY RHYMES.


TWO ROBIN REDBREASTS.
Two Robin Redbreasts built their nests
Within a hollow tree;
The hen sat quietly at home,
The cock sang merrily;
And all the little young ones said,
" Wee, wee, wee, wee, wee, wee !"

One day (the sun was warm and bright,
And shining in the sky)
Cock Robin said, My little dears,
'Tis time you learn to fly."
And all the little young ones said,
" I'l try, I'll try, I'll try."

I know a child, and who she is
I'll tell you by-and-by,
When mamma says, Do this," or "that,"
She says, What for ?" and Why ?"
She'd be a better child by far
If she would say, I'll try."



PAT-A-CAKE, PAT-A-CAKE.
Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, baker's man;
So I will, master, as fast as-I can;
Pat it, and prick it, and mark it with B,
Put it in the oven for Baby and me.





NURSERY RHYMES.


SING IVY, SING IVY.

My father left me three acres of land,
Sing ivy, sing ivy;
My father left me three acres of land,
Sing holly, go whistle and ivy !


I ploughed it with a ram's horn,
Sing ivy, sing ivy;
And sowed it over with one pepper-corn,
Sing holly, go whistle and ivy !


I harrowed it with a bramble bush,
Sing ivy, sing ivy;
And reaped it with my little penknife,
Sing holly, go whistle and ivy!


I got the mice to carry it to the barn,
Sing ivy, sing ivy;
And thrashed it with a goose's quill,
Sing holly, go whistle and ivy !


I got the cat to carry it to the mill,
Sing ivy, sing ivy;
The miller vowed he would give her no grace,
And the cat she said she would scratch his face,
Sing holly, go whistle and ivy !





NURSERY RHYMES.


THE BOY AND THE OWL.

A little boy went into a barn,
And lay down on some hay;
An owl came out, and flew about,
And the little boy ran away.



JOHN COOK AND HIS LITTLE GRAY MARE.

John Cook he had a little gray mare,
Hee, haw, hum;
Her legs were long, and her back was bare,
Hee, haw, hum.

John Cook was riding up Shooter's Bank,
Hee, haw, hum;
The mare she began to kick and to prank,
Hee, haw, hum.

John Cook was riding up Shooter's Hill,
Hee, haw, hum;
The mare she fell down and made her will,
Hee, haw, hum.


The saddle and bridle were laid on the shelf,
Hee, haw, hum;
If you want any more, you may sing it yourself,
Hee, haw, hum.





NURSERY RHYMES.


TURN AGAIN, WHITTINGTON.
Turn again, Whittington;
Whittington, turn again;
Turn again, Whittington,
Lord Mayor of London !



GIRLS AND BOYS, COME OUT TO PLAY.
Girls and boys, come out to play,
The moon is shining bright as day;
Leave your supper, and leave your sleep,
And come with your play-fellows into the street:-
Come with a whoop, and come with a call,
Come with a good will, or come not at all;
Up the ladder, and down the wall,
A halfpenny roll will serve us all;
You find milk, and I'll find flour,
And we'll have a pudding in half an hour.



LEND ME THY MARE.

Lend me thy mare to ride a mile ?
She is lamed, leaping over a stile.
Alack! and I must keep the fair !
I'll give thee money for thy mare.
Oh, oh say you so ?
Money will make the mare to go.

























































Turn again, Whittington;
Whittington, turn again;
Turn again, Whittington,
Lord Mayor of London !


F~~r





NURSERY RHYMES.


I LOVE A SIXPENCE.

I love sixpence, pretty little sixpence,
I love sixpence better than my life;
I spent a penny of it, I spent another,
And took fourpence home to my wife.

Oh, my little fourpence, pretty little fourpence,
I love fourpence better than my life;
I spent a penny of it, I spent another,
And I took twopence home to my wife.

Oh, my little twopence, my pretty little twopence,
I love twopence better than my life;
I spent a penny of it, I spent another,
And I took nothing home to my wife.

Oh, my little nothing, my pretty little nothing,
What will nothing buy for my wife ?
I have nothing, I spend nothing,
I love nothing better than my wife.



DIDDLEDY, DIDDLEDY, DUMPTY.
Diddledy, diddledy, dumpty;
The cat ran up the plum tree.
I'll wager a crown
I'll fetch you down;
Sing diddledy, diddledy, dumpty.





NURSERY RHYMES.


PUSSY AND DOGGY.

Pussy sits beside the fire;
How can she be fair ?
In walks a little doggy,
Pussy, are you there ?"



A PIE SAT ON A PEAR TREE.

A pie sat on a pear tree,
A pie sat on a pear tree,
A pie sat on a pear tree,
Heigh 0, high 0, high !
Once so merrily hopped she,
Twice so merrily hopped she,
Thrice so merrily hopped she,
Heigh 0, high 0, high !



PUSSY-CAT, WUSSY-CAT.

Pussy-cat, wussy-cat,
With a white foot,
When is your wedding ?
For I'll come to't.
The beer is to brew,
The bread is to bake;
Pussy-cat, pussy-cat,
Don't be too late.





NURSERY RHYMES.


BAT, BAT, COME UNDER MY HAT.

Bat, bat (clap hands), come under my hat,
And I'll give you a slice of bacon;
And when I bake, I'll give you a cake,
If I am not mistaken.



A RIDDLE.

Old mother Twitchett had but one eye,
And a long tail which she can let fly;
And every time she went over a gap,
She left a bit of her tail in a trap. (5.)



IS JOHN SMITH WITHIN?


Is John Smith within ?
Can he set a shoe ? Ay,
Here a nail, there a nail,


Yes, that he is.
marry, two;
tick, tack, too.


A RIDDLE.

As I went through the garden gap,
Whom should I meet but Dick Red-cap !
A stick in his hand, a stone in his throat.
If you'll tell me this riddle, I'll give you a groat. (e.)





NURSERY RHYMES.


THE OLD MAN OF TOBAGO.

There was an old man of Tobago,
Who lived on rice, gruel, and sago;
Till, much to his bliss,
His physician said this,
To a leg, sir, of mutton you may go.



MOTHER GOOSE.

Old Mother Goose, when
She wanted to wander,












.". ,--- .- .
p. -




Would ride through the air
On a very fine gander.





NURSERY RHYMES.


Mother Goose had a house;
'Twas built in a wood,
Where an owl at the door
For sentinel stood.

Her son's name is Jack-
A plain-looking lad;
He is not very good,
Nor yet very bad.

She sent him to market;
A live goose he bought.
" Here, mother," says he;
It will not go for nought."

Jack's goose and her gander
Grew very fond;
They'd both eat together,
Or swim in one pond.

Jack found one fine morning,
As I have been told,
His goose had laid him
An egg of pure gold.

Jack ran to his mother,
The news for to tell;
She called him a good boy,
And said it was well.





NURSERY RHYMES.


Jack sold his gold egg
To a rogue of a Jew,
Who cheated him out of
The half of his due.

Then Jack went a-courting
A lady so gay,
As fair as the lily
And sweet as the May

The Jew and the squire
Came behind his back,
And began to belabour
The sides of poor Jack.

And then the gold egg
Was thrown into the sea,
When Jack jumped in
And got it back presently.

The Jew got the goose,
Which he vowed he would kill,
Resolving at once
His pockets to fill.

Jack's mother came in,
And caught the goose soon.
And mounting its back,
Flew up to the moon.





NURSERY RHYMES.


THERE WVAS AN OLD WOMAN WHO LIVED
IN A SHOE.
There was an old woman who lived in a shoe;
She had so many children, she didn't know what to do:
She gave them some broth
Without any bread;
She whipped them all soundly,
And sent them to bed.



OLD KING COLE.

Old King Cole was a merry old soul,
And a merry old soul was he:
He called for his pipe, and he called for his bowl,
And he called for his fiddlers three.
Every fiddler he had a fiddle,
And a very fine fiddle had he :
(Twe-tweedle-de, tweedle-de, went the fiddlers three)-
Oh, there's none so rare as can compare
With King Cole and his fiddlers three i



IF ALL THE WORLD WERE WATER.
If all the world were water,
And all the water were ink,
What should we do for bread and cheese ?
What should we do for drink?




































































There was an old woman who lived in a shoe;

She had so many children, she didn't know what to do.


I 1





NURSERY RHYMES.


HERE WE COME A-PIPING.

Here we come a-piping,
First in spring and then in May.
The queen she sits upon the sand,
Fair as a lily, white as a wand.
King John has sent you letters three,
And begs you'll read them unto me.-
We cannot read one without them all,
So pray, Miss Bridget, deliver the ball.



TO MARKET RIDE THE GENTLEMEN.

To market ride the gentlemen-
So do we, so do we;
Then comes the country clown,
Hobbledy-gee, hobbledy-gee;
First go the ladies, nim, nim, nim;
Next come the gentlemen, trim, trim, trim;
Then come the country clowns, gallop-a-trot.



A RIDDLE.

Formed long ago, yet made to-day;
Employed while others sleep;
What few would like to give away,
Nor any wish to keep. (7.)




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