• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 The fugitives from Samaria
 The rabbi's lecture
 Cyril and the Roman soldier
 Bringing home the bride
 Wine for the feast
 Capernaum
 Jerusalem
 The scourge of small cords
 Herod's amphitheater
 In Capernaum
 The cave of Adullam
 The healing of the leper
 The sick of the palsy
 John in "the Black Castle"
 The son of the widow of Nain
 Ezra's withered hand
 The great draught of fishes
 The storm that was calmed
 The rabbi's curse
 The tower in Siloam
 Cyril and the outlaws
 The massacre of the Galileans
 The sword for the king
 Feeding the multitude
 Cyril's errand
 Ezra and the centurion
 Cyril at Rome
 A foot-race for freedom
 The shipwreck
 The colt, the foal of an ass
 Before the last Passover
 Gethsemane
 The cross and the crown
 After the Resurrection
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: The swordmaker's son : a story of the year 30 A.D.
Title: The swordmaker's son
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085070/00001
 Material Information
Title: The swordmaker's son a story of the year 30 A.D.
Physical Description: x p., 277 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Stoddard, William Osborn, 1835-1925
Century Company ( Publisher )
De Vinne Press ( Printer )
Publisher: Century Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: De Vinne Press
Publication Date: 1896
 Subjects
Subject: Youth -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Fathers and sons -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Swords -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Soldiers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Romans -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Massacres -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Shipwrecks -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Leprosy -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Rabbis -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- Israel   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by William O. Stoddard.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00085070
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002393396
notis - ALZ8298
oclc - 05297764
lccn - 08016101

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Half Title
        Page iii
    Frontispiece
        Page iv
    Title Page
        Page v
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page vii
        Page viii
    List of Illustrations
        Page ix
        Page x
    The fugitives from Samaria
        Page 1
        Page 1a
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The rabbi's lecture
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Cyril and the Roman soldier
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Bringing home the bride
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Wine for the feast
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Capernaum
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Jerusalem
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    The scourge of small cords
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Herod's amphitheater
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
    In Capernaum
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    The cave of Adullam
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
    The healing of the leper
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
    The sick of the palsy
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
    John in "the Black Castle"
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
    The son of the widow of Nain
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
    Ezra's withered hand
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
    The great draught of fishes
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
    The storm that was calmed
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
    The rabbi's curse
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
    The tower in Siloam
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
    Cyril and the outlaws
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
    The massacre of the Galileans
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
    The sword for the king
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
    Feeding the multitude
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
    Cyril's errand
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
    Ezra and the centurion
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
    Cyril at Rome
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
    A foot-race for freedom
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
    The shipwreck
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
    The colt, the foal of an ass
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
    Before the last Passover
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
    Gethsemane
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
    The cross and the crown
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
    After the Resurrection
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text























































The Baldwin Library
Unive rU ity
mB rida
mo io


I ~



















THE SWORDMAKER'S SON











/


WITH A PEBBLE FROM HIIS SLING, CYRIL STRIKES THE HELMET FROM
THE ROMAN SOLDIER'S IIEAD. (SEE PAGE 21.)


B







THE


SWORDMAKER'S SON
A STORY OF THE YEAR 30 A. D.


BY
WILLIAM O. STODDARD
AUTHOR OF "THE WHITE CAVE," ETC.


NEW YORK
THE CENTURY CO.
1896
































Copyright, 1895, 1896,
by THE CENTURY Co.






















THE DE VINNE PRESS.
















CONTENTS


PAGE
I THE FUGITIVES FROM SAMARIA 1
II THE RABBI'S LECTURE 12
III CYRIL AND THE ROMAN SOLDIER 20
IV BRINGING HOME THE BRIDE 26
V WINE FOR THE FEAST 36
VI CAPERNAUM 43
VII JERUSALEM 51
VIII THE SCOURGE OF SMALL CORDS 60
IX HEROD'S AMPHITHEATER 68
X IN CAPERNAUM 76
XI THE CAVE OF ADULLAM 85
XII THE HEALING OF THE LEPER 93
XIII THE SICK OF THE PALSY 100
XIV JOHN IN "THE BLACK CASTLE" 106
XV THE SON OF THE WIDOW OF NAIN 113
XVI EZRA'S WITHERED HAND 121
XVII THE GREAT DRAUGHT OF FISHES 129
XVIII THE STORM THAT WAS CALMED 135
XIX THE RABBI'S CURSE 142






viii CONTENTS
PAGE
XX THE TOWER IN SILOAM 153
XXI CYRIL AND THE OUTLAWS 163
XXII THE MASSACRE OF THE GALILEANS 172
XXIII THE SWORD FOR THE KING 178
XXIV FEEDING THE MULTITUDE 186
XXV CYRIL'S ERRAND 193
XXVI EZRA AND THE CENTURION 202
XXVII CYRIL AT ROME 211
XXVIII A FOOT-RACE FOR FREEDOM 218
XXIX THE SHIPWRECK 228
XXX THE COLT, THE FOAL OF AN Ass 235
XXXI BEFORE THE LAST PASSOVER 241
XXXII GETHSEMANE 248
XXXIII THE CROSS AND THE CROWN 258
XXXIV AFTER THE RESURRECTION 271















LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS


PAGE
WITH A PEBBLE FROM HIS SLING, CYRIL STRIKES THE
HELMET FROM THE ROMAN SOLDIER'S HEAD.. Frontispiece
CYRIL SHOOK HIS CLENCHED FIST AT THE ROMANS 7
RABBI BEN NASSUR'S DISCOURSE TO HIS SON RAPHAEL 17
"'CYRIL,' SAID LOIS, POINTING, 'LOOK! HE IS COME!'" 33
"' LOIS, MY PITCHER IS FULL OF WINE!'" 39
CYRIL AND LOIS ON THEIR WAY TO CAPERNAUM 47
"' JERUSALEM IS GLORIOUS! '" 57
THE MONEY-CHANGERS AND DEALERS EXPELLED FROM
THE TEMPLE 63
"THERE WERE CONTESTS BETWEEN SWORDSMEN 69
RABBI BEN NASSUR AND THE THRONG BEFORE THE
HOUSE OF SIMON PETER 79
IN THE CAVE OF ADULLAM 89
"THE POOR OUTCAST WAS EVIDENTLY MAKING A DES-
PERATE EFFORT" 95
"THEY WERE PERMITTED TO STAND AT THE GRATED
DOOR OF THE DUNGEON" 109
"LOIS RETURNED TO HER NEEDLE-WORK" 117
"'IT IS RESTORED WHOLE AS THE OTHER,' GASPED
CYRIL 125







x LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
PAGE
" CYRIL SAT BY THE BOAT FOR A WHILE" 139
THE RABBI DENOUNCES CYRIL. GET THEE HENCE!
THOU ART NO LONGER OF MY KINSMEN!'" 149
"THE TOWER CAME CRASHING, THUNDERING DOWN!" 157
"'WHO ART THOU ?" 165
"' WHAT A SPLENDID SWORD!' EXCLAIMED CYRIL" 181
"'CYRIL,' SAID A LOW, SWEET VOICE NEAR HIM, LOOK
UP. FATHER AND I ARE HERE'" 199
" EZRA AT ONCE HELD OUT HIS STRONG AND PERFECT
HAND" 207
"'WIN THOU, APOLLOS !'" 225
"THE THRONG WAS LED BY JUDAS 249
"THEY WERE DRAWING LOTS FOR THE SEAMLESS
VESTURE 267



















THE SWORDMAKER'S SON












THE SWORDMAKER'S SON



CHAPTER I

THE FUGITIVES FROM SAMARIA

A SCORE of mounted spearmen were galloping sharply
along the broad, well-kept highway that led past
the foot-hills of Mount Gilboa toward the southern gate
of the ancient city of Jezreel. The pattern of their bur-
nished helmets, and their arms and armor, indicated that
they were from the light cavalry of some Roman legion.
There was but little conversation among them, but as they
rode on enough was said by both officers and men to tell
that they were pursuing fugitives, whom they expected
soon to overtake.
"We shall cut them down before they reach Jezreel,"
came from a harsh voice in the ranks.
"Slay them not," responded the foremost horseman.
"The old smith must be crucified, and the boy is wanted
for the circus."
Less than a mile eastward from the highway and the
horsemen, under thick tree-shelter on the brow of a hill,






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


stood two persons who eagerly watched the passage of
the cavalry, and seemed to know their errand. One was
a well-grown, handsome youth, with dark, closely curling
hair, clear olive complexion, and eyes that were really
glittering in their brilliancy. He may have been some-
what over sixteen years of age; but that is no longer
boyhood among the nations of the East. The simple dress
that he wore a sleeveless tunic of thin woolen cloth -
hardly concealed the lithe, sinewy form that seemed to
promise for him the suppleness of a young panther.
Over his left arm was thrown a loosely fitted linen gar-
ment-a kind of robe, to be put on when needed; and
on his feet were sandals. A leather belt around his waist
sustained a wallet.
The other person was a powerfully built, middle-aged
man, with a deeply lined, intelligent face. There was a
strong resemblance between the two, but there was one
marked difference. The features of the man were of the
highest type of the old Hebrew race, and his nose was
aquiline, while that of the boy was straight, and his lips
were thinner, as if in him the Hebrew and Greek races
had been merged into one.
The summer air was wonderfully pure and clear. The
two watchers could almost discern the trappings of the
cavalry horses, while the Carmel mountain ridges, far
across the plain of Esdraelon before them, rose above the
horizon with a distinctness impossible in any moister at-
mosphere. Behind them, eastward, were the forests and






THE FUGITIVES FROM SAMARIA


crags of Gilboa, and the elder of the fugitives turned and
anxiously scanned its broken outline.
They seemed to have escaped for a time, for the Roman
spearmen were galloping away steadily; and the young
man shook his clenched fist at them as he exclaimed:
"Ye wolves! We could have dared the Samaritan
mob, if it had not been for you."
"But, Cyril, hearken," responded his father, gloomily;
"there were too many, even of the mob. There is but
one hope for us now. We are followed closely, and we
could not long be concealed here. I must flee into the
wilderness until this storm is over. It will pass. Go thou
to our kinsmen in Galilee. Go first to the house of Isaac
Ben Nassur, and see thy sister; but stay not long in
Cana. If thou art not safe in Galilee, go on and join one
of the bands in the fastnesses of Lebanon, or find thy
way to Caesarea."
"Nay, father," exclaimed Cyril. "Lois is safe there in
Cana. It is better I should go with thee. Thou wilt need
me."
His brave young face was flushed with intense earnest-
ness a she spoke. His father had been watching it with
eyes that were full of pride in his son, but he interrupted
him, almost sternly.
Go, as I bid thee," he said. "So shalt thou escape the
galleys or the sword. Whither I go, I know not; but
what becomes of me is of less importance, now that my
right hand has failed me."







THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


He stretched out his hand, and Cyril shuddered, al-
though he must often have seen it. Sinewy, remarkably
muscular as was the bare, bronzed arm, all below its
wrist was shriveled, distorted, withered, perhaps by rheu-
matism or some kindred affliction. The father's face grew
dark and bitter as he added: "Who, now, would believe
that this hand had led the men of Galilee when they slew
the soldiers of Herod the Great in the streets of Jerusalem ?
We were beaten ? Ay, they outnumbered us; but how
they did go down! 'T was a great day -that old Pass-
over fight. I have smitten the wolves of Rome, too, in
more places than they know of! Many and many a good
blade have I shaped and tempered--many a shield and
helmet; but the war-work and the anvil-work of Ezra
the Swordmaker are done, and he goes forth a crippled
beggar yea, even a hunted wild beast! Go, my son;
go thou to Isaac Ben Nassur."
"I will go," replied Cyril, with tears on his face and a
tremor in his voice; but when when shall I see thee
again ? "
The Lord, the God of our fathers, he only knoweth,"
said Ezra. There have been terrible times for Israel,
and there are bloodier days to come. I am glad thy
mother is at rest. Only thou and Lois remain. Our kin-
dred are fewer than they were. Something tells me that
the day of a great vengeance is near at hand. So all the
prophets tell us. 0 my son, be thou ready for the coming
of the promised King! "






THE FUGITIVES FROM SAMARIA


"The King!" Cyril exclaimed. "Why does he not
come now ? Why is it that our people are left without a
leader, to be slaughtered like sheep ?"
Who shall know the counsel of the Most High ?" rev-
erently responded Ezra. But the Messiah, the Prince
of the house of David, the Captain of the host of Israel,
he will surely come "
Something of their family history presented itself in
their after-talk. Long years ago, it appeared, a Greek
proselyte to the Jewish faith, a woman of high character
and great beauty, named Lois, had met with Ezra the
Swordmaker at a Passover week at Jerusalem, and had
not long afterward become his wife. She had been as
zealous a believer as if she had been born a daughter of
Abraham.
They talked of her, and of the young Lois at Cana, and
of the oppressions of their people, and of the seeming
hopelessness of any present help; but at last Ezra turned
and waved his withered right hand westward.
"On that plain of Esdraelon," he said, since the world
was made more men have fallen by the sword than upon
any other piece of ground. In the day of the coming
King, in the year of his redeemed, there shall be fought
there the greatest of all battles, on the field of blood in
the valley before Jezreel."
He seemed truly to grow in stature. His face flushed,
and his voice rang out like a trumpet. All the fierce en-
thusiasm of the brave old Hebrew, however, was repro-






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


duced in the face and attitude of his son. Cyril looked
toward Esdraelon and Carmel with eyes that blazed, and
cheeks that were white instead of red.
The great battle! he exclaimed. Dost thou think
I may be there ? "
God grant it!" responded the swordmaker, with great
solemnity. "I have taught thee my trade; thou hast
also learned every feat that is to be performed with the
sword and spear. I have taught thee to box, and to
wrestle, and to swim. Thou art as fleet of foot as Asahel
as fleet as a wild roe. Thou art perfect, for thy age,
with the bow and with the sling. I have hoped for thee
that thou mayest be a captain. Therefore, as thou goest,
learn all there is to know about war. Learn from the
Romans; study their camps and forts, and the marching
of their cohorts. What we need is their drill and their
discipline. Go, now. If I am slain, I am slain. Live
thou, and be strong; and pray that in the day that is
coming thou mayest indeed fight at the right hand of the
anointed King of Israel."
For one short moment he held. Cyril tightly in his arms,
and then they parted. The face of the old warrior-ar-
morer grew stern, perhaps despairing, but he turned and
silently strode away toward the rugged declivities of the
Gilboa Mountains.
Cyril stood, motionless, looking after his father until
the rocks and trees hid him from view. He turned again
toward the plain, but it was no time for thinking of the












































































CYRIL SHOOK IIS CLENCHED FIST AT THE ROMANS.






THE FUGITIVES FROM SAMARIA


mighty hosts which had met there or were yet to meet.
The spot he stood on was no hiding-place, and the boy,
too, must flee for his liberty or his life.
The galloping spearmen had long since disappeared,
and now Cyril's eyes fell upon something that lay on the
ground at his feet. He stooped and picked it up a little
bag that answered with a chink to the shake he gave it.
He had known that it was there, but acted as if he had
been unconscious of it until now. He untied it and poured
out the contents into his hand.
Seven shekels and twenty denarii," he mused. "I am
afraid he gave me all he had. He can get more, if he can
reach his friends at the cave in the wilderness of Judea.
I want to go there some day. I wish I could be with him
now, and not in Galilee. I will not spend one denarius
until I am compelled to."
He put the money back into the bag and hid it under
his tunic. It was not a large sum, but it was quite a pro-
vision, in that time and place, for a young fellow like
him. The shekel, nominally worth sixty-two and a half
cents of our money, was a Hebrew coin, and it might have
been called the dollar of Palestine but that it would buy
so much more than would a dollar of the present day.
The denarius was a Roman coin worth sixteen cents, and
was a fair day's wages for a laboring-man.
Cyril's bag, therefore, contained his living for three
months, if he could prevent it from being violently taken
away by one kind of robber or another. There were






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


many, of many kinds, for such as he, and he was mind-
ful of them while he so carefully concealed the bag.
During the years that he could remember, thousands
of Jewish youths had been sold into slavery, and thou-
sands of Jewish patriots, such as Ezra, had been slain
with the sword or crucified beside the highways. He
had evidently been, himself, an eye-witness of terrible
scenes, and his eyes were flashing angrily as he recalled
them.
"Oh, that the King of Israel would come!" he ex-
claimed aloud. He will rule at Jerusalem and in Sama-
ria He will conquer the Romans He will subdue the
world! I will go to Galilee, now, but I hope to be with
him on that day,- the day of the great battle in the val-
ley before Jezreel!"
He set off at once down the hillside, toward the very
highway along which the cavalry had ridden. It led to-
ward Jezreel, but it also led toward the boundary-line
between the district of Samaria, belonging to the region
under Pontius Pilate, the representative of the Roman
emperor Tiberius, and the district of Galilee, belonging
to Herod Antipas, son of Herod the Great, who was also
a subject of the Roman emperor. If Cyril were once
across that line, the perils of such an insignificant fugi-
tive from Samaria would be very much diminished, for
there were jealousies between Herod and Pilate, and the
military forces of one of them did not trespass upon the
territory of the other. No doubt there would be guards
along the frontier as well as patrols on the great military






THE FUGITIVES FROM SAMARIA


road, and Cyril may have been thinking of such obstacles
when he said:
"I can get through in spite of them and I will die
rather than be taken prisoner!"
As for Eira the Swordmaker, he walked very rapidly
for some time after parting from his son. More and more
wild and rugged grew the scenery around him. He clam-
bered out, at last, upon a bare, sunlit knob of granite,
above a narrow valley in the middle of which was a
cluster of rude dwellings.
"No," he said, looking thoughtfully down upon them;
"I must not sleep under a roof to-night. Neither will my
boy. The villagers are hospitable enough, but who
knows what enemies I might find among them ?"
He looked up, for a moment, but the cloudlessly blue
sky sent back no answer. He had murmured an earnest
prayer in the old Hebrew tongue, and when he ceased he
turned his face toward the north, the direction in which
Cyril had gone.
My brave young lion !" he exclaimed. "It must be
his hand, not mine, that will henceforth ply the hammer
and draw the sword. I am like Israel.and Judah, for my
right hand is withered and I can strike no more."
His deep, mournful voice rang out unheard through
the solitude, and then he was silent. There was uncom-
mon vigor in the firm, elastic step with which he now
pushed forward, across broken ledges and through the
tangled forest-growths, toward a mass of gloomy-looking
cliffs which rose to the northward of the valley.













CHAPTER II


THE RABBI'S LECTURE

THE village street, in which the maiden stood by the
well, wore a half-sleepy look, for little breeze was
stirring and the day was warm. Others were coming and
going, but she did not seem to be speaking to any of her
companions. It will be one of the largest wedding-par-
ties they 've ever had in Cana," she was thinking. The
bride is very handsome, and is rich."
She had put down her tall, slender-necked water-pitcher
upon the circle of masonry around the mouth of the well.
She stood erect, and the merry expression which had
twinkled for a moment in her brilliant dark eyes faded
away. They suddenly grew thoughtful, and her lip quiv-
ered as she exclaimed:
"When will they come, and why do I not hear from
them ? They may have been killed !"
Cana was a thriving village on the great highway
through the hills west of the Sea of Galilee. From the
main road a number of narrow, irregular streets wan-
dered up and along a low hillside, and were bordered by
houses that were built mostly of stone. The inhabitants
12






THE RABB'S LECTURE


had need for thrift and industry, if it were only because
of the tax-gatherers; for Herod Antipas was building
palaces, fortresses, and cities. All the people paid taxes
and bribes to him and to his builders.
While the consequences were often painful enough,
there were no signs of actual poverty in the vicinity of
the well. It stood several paces in front of a dwelling,
two stories in height, which seemed somewhat better than
its neighbors. The porch along its lower story was
thickly clad with vines, and from under these the girl
had come to bring her jar to the well. A Jewish maiden
of nearly fifteen was accounted a full-grown woman, and
the slightness of her graceful figure did not interfere with
an air of maturity which her present state of mind much
increased. Her simple dress, that became her so well,
was of good materials.
Ranged on either side of the well were six large, cum-
brous-looking water-pots of stoneware, partly filled, for
the convenience of any person wishing to perform the
foot or hand ablutions required by the exacting ceremo-
nial law of the Jews.
The vine-clad porch was a pleasant place. It was pro-
vided with wooden benches; and on one of these sat a
man who seemed to consider himself a person of impor-
tance. Every movement, and even his attitude when sit-
ting still, might be said to accord with a conviction that
he, Rabbi Isaac Ben Nassur, was the wisest, the most
learned man in Cana.






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


He was very tall, as well as broad and heavy; and his
thick, gray beard came down to the voluminous sash that
was folded around his waist. His eyebrows were black
and projecting; his nose was prominent; his black eyes
were piercing; he was dressed, as became a rabbi, or any
other highly respectable Jew, in a long linen tunic with
sleeves, that was belted by the sash. Over this he wore a
long, loosely flowing robe, called an abba," also of linen.
Around his shoulders, with the ends falling in front, was
a broad white woolen scarf, with narrow bars of red and
purple and blue, and with blue tassels at the corners of
each of its two ends. This was the tallithh," and was
worn as a reminder that the wearer must remember all
the commandments of the Law and faithfully perform
them.
Every good Jew wore a tallith, larger or smaller, and
some were costly; but Rabbi Isaac was by no means a
rich man, as even his well-worn sandals testified, and there-
fore his tallith was only of fine wool, without ornament.
On his head, instead of a turban, was a long linen ker-
chief so folded that three of the corners fell down at the
back and sides. A band kept the kerchief in place.
In front of the rabbi stood a tall young man, listening
with most reverent attention, having taken off his turban
to receive his father's admonitions.
The thick vine-leaves which veiled the shady porch did
not prevent the sonorous voice of the rabbi from carrying
at least as far as the well.






THE RABBI'S LECTURE


The audience there consisted of more than one person.
The women, of all ages, who came to the well with water-
jars, were ready to rest and gossip a little before carrying
them away on their shoulders or gracefully balanced
upon their heads.
Lois was disposed to ask, even eagerly, for other news
than that of the village of Cana. She laughed when
others did, but, as her gossiping neighbors came and
went, shadow after shadow, as of disappointment, flitted
across her face. Not one of them had any news to tell
her of the absent ones for whom she longed.
It was evident that the wedding of Raphael, the near
kinsman of Lois, and only son of the wise Rabbi Isaac,
was considered an important event, and a welcome varia-
tion in the somewhat humdrum course of the daily life
of the village. The rabbi himself, so regarding it, dis-
coursed eloquently upon the general subject of matri-
mony, as well as upon the especial ceremony now at hand;
and Raphael would surely be a model husband if he
should succeed in living up to his father's instructions.
So said the laughing maids and matrons at the well. Al-
most all of them expected to have some share in the wed-
ding festivities. Some were friends or kindred of the
bride's family, and were to join the procession from her
residence which would escort her and the bridegroom to
the house of Ben Nassur. Others were to wait with Lois
and the rabbi's family until they should be told that the






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


bridegroom was coming. Then they would go out to
meet him.
The wedding was to take place in the evening of the
following day, whereupon seven days of feasting were to
follow, and for these great preparations had been made.
Kindred and friends were expected to come from far
and near on such an occasion, and were welcomed with
liberal hospitality.
No news is sometimes akin to good news, and the gos-
sippers at the well had brought with them no alarming
rumor of any kind. The shadows gradually flitted away
from the face of Lois. She lifted her jar and put it upon
her head. She was just disappearing through the porch
into the house, when the deep tones of Ben Nassur seemed
to send a thrill through her. His whole manner had
suddenly changed, and he was now standing erect.
So now, my son," he said, see to it that all things are
ready for the wedding. Speak not to any man, impru-
dently, of this that I now tell thee. I go to the house of
Nathaniel, to hear more; but a mounted messenger from
Samaria, this morning, brought tidings of another tumult
in that city. More of our brethren have fallen by the
swords of their enemies, and there was none to help, for
the centurion in command there hates our nation as he
hath oft proved. Accursed may he be!"
Bitter and wrathful were the face and voice of the
rabbi, but the low-toned, fierce response of his son was
not audible beyond the porch. Now, however, there were






















Ii:


RABBI BEN NASSUR'S DISCOURSE TO HIS SON RBPHIAEL.






THE RABBPS LECTURE 19

tears in the eyes of Lois, and her cheeks were white with
fear.
"And my father and Cyril are in Samaria!" she ex-
claimed. Oh, how I wish I could hear from them!
What if they have been slain, or -or crucified! The
Romans are merciless!"












CHAPTER III


CYRIL AND THE ROMAN SOLDIER

CYRIL was now well out upon the battle-plain of Es-
draelon. Too many people were coming and going
upon the highways. They were not soldiers, nor pursuing
him, but the young fugitive preferred the broad stubble
fields, from which the wheat had long since been reaped,
and where now the tall growths of weeds concealed him
very well. There were stone walls to climb and villages
to go around, and the need for keeping under cover made
the distances to be traveled longer. On he went, with a
springing, elastic step, and he did not seem to feel at all
the heat of the sun. It was his native climate and did
not oppress him.
The many orchards and vineyards to which he came
were those of his friends, for he did not seem to mind
the husbandmen at work in them. As he made his
way between the long rows of a luxuriant vineyard, he
thought:
It cannot be far now to the Kishon. Father says that
there is always a Roman patrol up and down the bank, so
that no one can cross, except under the eyes of the guards






CYRIL AND THE ROMAN SOLDIER


at the bridges. I shall have to keep watch for the patrol.
Once across the Kishon, and no man in heavy armor can
overtake me."
Ezra had said of him, as fleet of foot as Asahel, the
brother of Joab," and Cyril had already shown himself a
very rapid traveler; but he might meet mounted men.
He went forward more cautiously, among the sheltering
vines, and as he paused, listening, there came a sound
that startled him. It was faint and far, but he exclaimed:
"A trumpet? That must be a signal. Those camel-
drivers on the road saw me, and they must have reported
me to the guard at the bridge. It is life or death, now!"
In a minute more, he was peering out from the north-
erly border of the vineyard.
There is the Kishon!" he said. "There is a patrol,
too; he is a legionary."
On the bank of the deep and swift river stood a fully
armed soldier of that terrible power which overshadowed
all the known world. To Cyril, that solitary legionary,
stationed there to prevent such as he from crossing the
Kishon, was an embodiment of all the enemies of Israel
and Judah. The soldier stood erect, with his pilum, or
broad-bladed spear, in his right hand. The vizor of his
bronze helmet was open. He seemed to have understood
the trumpet-note of warning, and was looking in all di-
rections. His sword hung at the left side, ready for use,
and on his left arm was a large round shield, now raised
a little as he scanned the vineyards and the river-bank,
2






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


as if he wondered from which of them an enemy could
come upon him at that time and place. After a few mo-
ments, he turned and strode slowly, vigilantly, along the
river-bank, while Cyril watched him.
"Good!" exclaimed Cyril, at last. He is far enough
now. I can reach the river."
Out he darted and sprang away toward the Kishon. Of
course he was at once seen by the quick-eyed patrol, and
hoarse and loud came the Latin summons to halt. To dis-
obey was sure and instant death, if Cyril should be over-
taken, and he would be followed with relentless persistence
if he should escape; but he bounded steadily forward while
the soldier ran toward him. The soldier ran well, too,
considering the weight of arms and armor he carried, for
all Roman legionaries were trained athletes; but he could
not get between the armorer's son and the Kishon.
Not broad, but very deep and swift, was the torrent
that came rushing down from its sources among the
Gilboa hills. A spring, a splash, and Cyril was swim-
ming vigorously, though swept along down-stream by
the strong current, while his left hand held his rolled-
up robe high and dry above the water.
Fierce, indeed, were the threatening commands of the
legionary, but on the brink of the Kishon he was com-
pelled to halt and consider. No doubt he could swim,
but not well with his heavy armor, his shield, and his
sword.
Lightly and rapidly swam Cyril, and in a few moments






CYRIL AND THE ROMAN SOLDIER


more he was out on the northerly bank of the Kishon,
sending back a shout of triumph and defiance. But he
meant to send back something more. His eyes were
swiftly searching the ground around him, while he drew
out something which had been hidden among the folds
of his robe.
It was a square of leather, as broad as his two hands,
with corner-straps as long as his arm -a sling, such as
David used of old. In that older day, all the tribe of
Benjamin, to which the house of Ezra the Swordmaker
belonged, were noted slingers; and here was their young
representative, stooping to pick up smooth, rounded peb-
bles, as David had picked up his pebbles from the brook
in the valley of Elah. In an instant he was erect again,
sling in hand, while yet the soldier stood considering
the risk of swimming the Kishon.
Whirl went the sling, with such a swiftness that it
could hardly be seen, and away hissed the stone. No
doubt the Roman had faced slingers, many a time; but
the distance was more than fifty yards, and he may not
have expected so true an aim. Up went his shield, in-
deed, a second too late, and well for him that he bowed
his head, for Cyril's first pebble struck him full upon the
crest. It did not knock him down, only because, in the
heat of the day, he had loosened the fastenings of his
helmet, so that the blow of the stone struck it from his
head, and sent it rolling away in the grass.
No crossing of the Kishon now, with that slinger to






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


practise upon his bare head all the way! Expert warrior
though he was, he had enough to do for the next two
minutes in warding off with his shield the well-aimed
pebbles which rapidly followed the first.
Fast they came, and loudly they rang, one of them
glancing from the shield to batter the brazen greave on
his right leg.
"I must not delay," thought Cyril. "Other Romans
may be coming. One more!"
Away flew the stone, but the blow on his leg had warned
the soldier to kneel and guard now, and the missile made
only a deep dent in the face of the shield.
When the bearer of it looked out again from behind
the target of bull's-hide and metal which had served him
so well, the slinger had disappeared; and there was nothing
for the beaten Roman patrol to do but to go and report
to his officer that one of the best slingers he had ever
met had escaped from him. He could not have guessed
how one Jewish boy's heart was dancing with delight and
pride as he pushed along northward, thinking, dreaming,
and even exclaiming enthusiastically:
Oh, that the King would come to lead us against the
Romans!"
No hunted wolf could have gone forward more cau-
tiously than did Cyril. There were other streams to cross,
and some of them were deep; but there were no patrols in
his way, and the waters were no impediment. They were
more like cooling baths provided for a wayfarer who was






CYRIL AND THE ROMAN SOLDIER


fond of them. If nothing worse should block his path,
he would have no difficulty in getting to Cana some time
during the next day.
The sun went down, and a cloudless night came on.
The sky seemed to blaze with stars, and the young traveler
could still find his way, somewhat more slowly, along the
lanes which led from house to house and from hamlet
to hamlet. It was toilsome journeying, and there was
now added the danger of being taken by anybody and
everybody for a prowling robber.
They would make short work of me," he said, "or I
might be sold for a slave. They would not crucify me,
but they would surely scourge me."
It seemed as if Cyril gave hardly a thought to the fact
that he had gone without any supper. Perhaps he was
used to privation. At all events, he at last lay down under
the shadow of a wide-branching olive-tree, and went to
sleep as peacefully as if he had no enemies in the world.
His last thought was:
"Father will escape them I know that he will. To-
morrow will be the fifth day of the week, and I shall see
Lois before sunset."














CHAPTER IV


BRINGING HOME THE BRIDE


ABOUT an hour after Cyril lay down at the foot of
the olive-tree, that Wednesday evening, Lois was
one of a joyous procession which set out from the house
of Rabbi Isaac, as soon as word arrived that the bride-
groom was coming. Already, at the house of the bride's
father, all the wedding formalities and ceremonials re-
quired by the Law or by Galilean custom had been fully
performed, and the bridal procession from that place was
winding its somewhat noisy way through the narrow and
crooked streets of Cana. The bridal pair were escorted
by all who had any right or will to accompany them.
When the procession from Ben Nassur's house met them,
it faced about, forming one company, which increased as
they went along.
The bride herself, closely attended by the bridegroom
and his friends, was the central figure; but of her nothing
could be seen excepting the tresses of flowing hair which
escaped from under her veil. Her robes, however, were
glittering with all the jewels of her family for which a
place could anywhere be found. There were many musi-
26






BRINGING HOME THE BRIDE


cians,--flute-players, beaters of cymbals, and others,-
and there were a number of fine singers among the girls
who came dancing along in front of the bride and groom,
singing the songs that befitted the occasion. Most of
these were in praise of the beauty and good qualities of
the bride. Among all the singers there was no voice
sweeter than that of Lois. She was accompanied by her
friends and neighbors; and each young girl carried in
her hand a lighted lamp, and all were exceedingly careful
lest it should go out, for an idea of evil fortune attached
to such a happening. The lights of the little lamps carried
by the dancing, singing maidens, however, were as nothing
compared with that of the blazing torches borne by the
young men who went before or at the sides of the proces-
sion. This was evidently no ordinary wedding, in the
estimation of the people of Cana.
When the house of Ben Nassur was reached, most of
the merrymakers were at liberty to return to their own
homes; but a chosen few walked in with the bride and
groom, and thereupon the outer door of the house was
shut.
The fifth day of the week, Thursday, would be counted
as the first day of the feast, and during seven days Ben
Nassur would keep open house in honor of his son's
wedding.
The fifth day of the week dawned brilliantly over Ju-
dea. Ezra the Swordmaker was just then cautiously
emerging from an opening which, at a little distance,






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


looked like a crack or furrow in the steep side of a hill.
His place of refuge for the night had been one of the
numberless caves, partly natural and partly artificial, with
which all that region abounds. They form very safe
hiding-places both for hunted men and for wild beasts.
Ezra stood still for a moment in the doorway of his
cave, and drew a long breath, glad to see the light and to
breathe the fresh morning air.
Cyril is safe by this time," he said. "He must have
passed the border. So am I safe, but of what use am
I now ?" He groaned as he lifted his right hand. "I can
hardly call myself a man," he said. "I must go and hide
in the wilderness of Judea. My days of service are done.
There is no power on earth that can restore a withered
hand!"
For withered it was: shriveled and crooked and gnarled.
He could neither grasp with the nerveless fingers nor
straighten them, and he let his arm fall loosely this side,
and, turning, speedily disappeared in the forest.
There were a great many people coming and going that
day at the house of the wise rabbi Isaac Ben Nassur.
They were not all Cana people, by any means. The bridal
feast was spread in the large front room opening upon
the porch, and all who had a right to enter were wel-
comed heartily. Food was plentifully provided, but the
merriest hour of each day would be after sunset, when,
the day's work being done, all the invited guests would
come.






BRINGING HOME THE BRIDE


The bridegroom was continually present, to receive con-
gratulations and good wishes. With him were several
young men of his more intimate friends; but decidedly
the most important figure in that room was Isaac him-
self. As master of the house and as ruler of the feast, he
sat at the head of the long table provided for the occa-
sion. His dress was as simple as ever, but it seemed to
have undergone a change, he wore it with so grand an
air. He appeared to be happy, and he received great re-
spect from the throng of people who came to congratulate
him upon the marriage of his son.
So the marriage-feast went on until the mid-day was
past and the shadows began to lengthen in the streets of
Cana. In the shade of Ben Nassur's house, hours before
sunset, on the easterly side, stood two young people, half
hidden by the vines and shrubbery, who seemed to have
forgotten all about the wedding. Their talk was subdued
but exceedingly animated, for Cyril had arrived and he
was telling Lois of all that had happened since they had
parted at Samaria so many months before. She was as
earnestly patriotic as Cyril himself, and her face said
more than her words while she listened to Cyril's account
of the doings of Samaritans and Romans, and of the deeds
of her father and his friends. Then he told her of his
own feat at the Kishon, and her bright black eyes flashed
with exulting admiration of a brother who had actually
struck off the helmet of a Roman legionary.
"Oh, Cyril!- what a soldier thou wilt be!"






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


"If the King were here to lead us!" broke in Cyril.
"Oh, for the Messiah, the Captain! I could fight under
him."
"Cyril," replied Lois, "I have somewhat to tell thee.
Nathanael, Isaac's friend, was at the Jordan where John
the Baptizer is preaching. That was several weeks ago.
He came back with a report about Jesus of Nazareth, and
how John had said of him that he was the Lamb of God.
It is so strange!"
"Herod has imprisoned John in the Black Castle," said
Cyril, not far from the Dead Sea."
But he is a prophet," said Lois; Nathanael believes
it. The carpenter's son is of the royal house of David.
He will be here to-day with some of his friends from
Capernaum and Bethsaida, and thou wilt see him."
Cyril listenedin silence, for the tidings deeply interested
him. He had dreamed and hoped and talked, as had all
other Jews young or old, about a Prince of the house of
David, an Anointed Deliverer; but it was quite another
thing to be told that the man he longed for had already
been found, and that he was to meet him at the house of
Ben Nassur.
Come," said Lois, "I will show thee his mother. She
is there by the well, waiting for him. She is Hannah's
near kinswoman, and we love her greatly."
"He is only a carpenter now," said Cyril.
"Rabbi Isaac said to Nathanael that Jesus is indeed a
lineal descendant of David, but he is not a soldier. He






BRINGING HOME THE BRIDE


reads in the synagogues, and he has been preaching much
of late. Still, Isaac says he is not learned like a rabbi."
"I wish I could see him," exclaimed Cyril.
Come," said Lois, again; and they went slowly, talk-
ing almost in whispers. Lois had not yet seen the son of
the carpenter of Nazareth, and her eagerness to do so
was quickly communicated to her enthusiastic brother.
He felt his heart beat more quickly, and his breath came
faster, as she told him of the various marvels that had
been crowned at last by the testimony of John at the
Jordan.
Even while he was in the water," she said, "a beauti-
ful white dove came down and alighted on his head, and
there was heard a voice from the heavens."
"I wish I had been there!" exclaimed Cyril. "But
is that Mary, his mother ?"
Yes; she stands there there by the well," said Lois.
"Is she not a noble-looking woman ? And she says her
son has never seemed just like other men."
But such was not the opinion of Isaac Ben Nassur and
other leading residents of Cana and of Nazareth. They
knew the young Jesus (or Joshua, as they more frequently
called him), the son of Joseph. They had seen him from
boyhood. They thought no less of him because he worked
for a living: the wisest and greatest rabbis did so. More-
over, it was an important matter that he was of the royal
line of David, now so nearly extinct; every Jew was
ready to acknowledge so rare a distinction; but there






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


their reverence ended, for otherwise he had neither rank
nor power. The older and wiser they thought themselves,
the less they were concerned about Nathanael's talk of
the marvelous occurrences at Bethabara.
Cyril and Lois were young, and were neither wise nor
learned. They, therefore, were more and more excited as
they drew nearer the noble-looking matron who stood by
the well, gazing expectantly down the street. Her face
had just been lighted by an expression of pleasure; but
now it suddenly clouded again, as if something whispered
to her by a woman who came from the house might be
unpleasant tidings. At that moment also, the bridegroom
himself appeared in the doorway, accompanied by his
mother, Hannah; and his face, like her own, wore an
anxious look.
Such a disgrace, Raphael! exclaimed Hannah, in a
half-frightened tone to have the supply of wine fail
on the first day of the feast!"
The tax-gatherers are to blame!" he responded, in
angry mortification. "They had secured almost every
wine-skin that was for sale in Cana. So I sent all the
way to Chorazin, and I provided abundance; but the tax-
gatherers have stopped it on the way. They declared that
it had not paid its full duty; but I know that is untrue.
They have taken it they are robbers!"
Raphael was sorely mortified. Anybody might have sym-
pathized with him. Such a scarcity would be considered
a disgrace to his whole family and to that of his bride.











































"'CYRIL,' SAID LOIS, POINTING, 'LOOK! HE IS COME!'"


41 -; T






BRINGING HOME THE BRIDE 35

"Do not tell your father, yet," said Hannah. "But
what are we to do ?"
Cyril and Lois, out by the well, had now heard this
news, the same which had so clouded the face of Mary.
" The publicans took it," whispered Lois; but her brother
was gazing earnestly at the mother of Jesus of Nazareth,
and so did not reply. He could not explain to himself
what it was that was so different in her manner from any
of the other women around her. Her face was so pure,
so good, he thought; so full of light as she now turned
again to look down the street. Then she exclaimed:
"Hannah! He is coming! He will be here quickly."
Cyril," said Lois, pointing, "look! There is Jesus of
Nazareth! He is come!"












CHAPTER V


WINE FOR THE FEAST


T HERE were half a dozen men in the foremost group
of the new-comers, and others were not far behind
them. All were in their best array, in honor of the wed-
ding. They were strongly made, brawny, resolute-look-
ing men, of the somewhat peculiar Galilean type, with
faces bronzed by the sun and hands hardened by toil.
There was no need for Lois to point out to Cyril the one
of whom she had been speaking.
Somewhat in advance of the rest walked one who was
speaking to a vigorous, fiery-eyed man, who strode along
at his side. Could this really be the heir of David and of
Solomon, this simply dressed and quiet Galilean?
Whether or not Cyril had begun to form expectations
of a different kind, this was the man of whom Nathanael
had spoken to Ben Nassur. He wore no crown, no sword,
no jewels; and Cyril had not supposed that he would.
But there was about him no sign of soldiership, or lead-
ership, or of authority.
"He is no captain," thought Cyril, sadly; "he is no
warrior; he seems no greater than other men!"
The boy had a sense of disappointment, so little cause
36






WINE FOR THE FEAST


for enthusiasm or hope did this man from Capernaum
seem to bring with him. He should have been very
different, if he were indeed to be a king.
Nevertheless, Cyril could not turn his eyes away, al-
though they failed to keep an accurate picture which he
could afterward remember. He was sure, indeed, that
this man, while no taller than others, was of at least full
height, broad-shouldered, muscular, with the firm, easy
step and movement which belong to men of perfect form
and unimpaired strength. He was as erect as a pine, and
his sashed tunic and flowing robe, not different from
others around him, befitted him well. Cyril took note of
even his hair and beard; but if the boy also tried to tell
the color of the eyes, he could not do so, for his own sank
before them, and he had a curious sensation of being
looked through rather than looked at; and yet his heart
beat high and fast for a moment.
"Lois," he whispered.
"Hush!" she answered softly. Mary is about to
speak to him."
The party from Capernaum had halted at the well, and
Mary stood in front of her son, looking up at him with
an expression that seemed to be partly doubt and partly
expectation. Before a word was said by either of them,
Lois whispered to Cyril:
"Look! just see how he loves her!"
"Hush listen," said Cyril-- for at that moment the
lips of Mary parted.






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


Her heart was full of the grave disaster which threat-
ened the wedding-feast, and behind her stood Hannah,
the bridegroom's mother and Mary's friend and kins-
woman.
They have no wine!" said Mary.
Why does she tell him whispered Lois; and some-
thing of the same idea was expressed in the answer of
Jesus. A different spirit, nevertheless, was manifest in
the kindly manner and smile with which he replied:
"Woman, what have I to do with thee ? Mine hour is
not yet come."
Mary must have understood her son's meaning better
than others did or could, for she at once turned to those
who stood by the well. Among them were servants of
Ben Nassur, and she said to these:
Whatsoever he saith unto you, do it."
"Will he send them for wine?" thought Lois. "I
heard Raphael say there was none to be had in Cana. He
may send even to Nazareth." And Cyril exclaimed aloud:
"I will go with them."
But at that moment the man Cyril felt so ready to obey
pointed to the great jars by the well and said:
"Fill the water-pots with water."
There had been many ceremonial washings that day, as
the guests of the wedding came and went, for not one
had gone in without pausing by the well. The water-pots
were therefore nearly empty, and it would require much
drawing to fill them.











IL_


"'LOIS, MY IITCIIER IS FULL OF WINE!'"


7.,,, 1,


~~ ~_,






WINE FOR THE FEAST


This must be done before he sends for the wine," said
Lois. His mother knows he has some."
Or she certainly would not have asked him to provide
some for the feast," said Cyril, leaning over to lift his full
bucket from the well.
There was even some haste and a kind of excitement
among those whose ready hands were drawing and pour-
ing; and in a few minutes more the sunshine sparkled
upon brimming fullness in the last of the six jars.
Now we are to go for the wine," said Cyril.
They can't drink water at a wedding-feast," thought
Lois.
There was a startled look upon every face around her, as
she glanced from one to another, for the next command was:
"Draw out, now, and bear to the governor of the
feast."
Cyril could not account for the tremor he felt as he
dipped a pitcher into a water-pot, filled it, and lifted it,
and stepped away toward the house.
Water, for the governor of the feast?" he thought.
"Water, to Ben Nassur himself? Does he mean to mock
the rabbi, because there is no wine?"
Still, he could hardly help looking into the pitcher in
his hands. Just behind him was Lois. Suddenly she
heard her brother exclaim : It is wine! Lois, my pitcher
is full of wine Let me see yours."
Down came her pitcher, and the two were placed side
by side.






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


Oh, Cyril!" said Lois, "it is wine! Was that what
Jesus meant ?"
It must be," said Cyril, in a low voice. Then, after a
pause, We must carry it in. Come!"
Behind them followed the line of servants. In a mo-
ment more the two tall, slender pitchers were deposited
before Isaac Ben Nassur, at the head of the table. It was
his duty, as ruler of the feast, to critically taste each new
supply of refreshments provided, and now he quickly
filled a drinking-vessel, for a hint of the threatened
scarcity had reached him.
Cyril and Lois, and behind them the servants of the
house, with Mary and Hannah and several others, gazed
expectantly upon the face of the rabbi, waiting for his
opinion. A little distance from him, at his right, pale and
red by turns with anxiety, stood his son, the bridegroom.
To him Ben Nassur turned, well pleased and radiant, but
still somewhat judicial, as became the ruler of the feast,
and remarked:
"Every man, at the beginning, doth set forth good
wine, and when they have well drunk, then that which is
worse; but thou hast kept the good wine until now."
So it was said by all. It was as if it had been recently
pressed from the best grapes of the vintage.
Cyril!" exclaimed Lois, as they hurried out, so awed
that they were almost frightened, "it was water, and it
became wine !"
"What will the people say?" said Cyril. "I wish I
dared to ask him if he is to be our king."















CHAPTER VI


CAPERNAUM

HOW great was the wonder of the guests who drank
the good wine at the marriage-feast when they
learned that the pitchers must have been filled from the
well in front of Ben Nassur's house.
The rabbi himself had not been among those who stood
at the well. He had only seen the wine brought to him
in pitchers. But Mary and Hannah, the men who came
with Jesus, the house-servants, and a few others, well
knew the water had been changed into wine.
Cyril and Lois had no opportunity to discuss the mat-
ter until late that evening.
A sleeping-place, even for Lois, had to be found at the
house of a neighbor; and the best that could be done for
Cyril was to give him the freedom of the flat roof of
Isaac's own home.
It was no hardship to sleep there, during a warm night.
Cyril and his sister went up to the roof while yet the
sounds of merriment, the music, and the singing, came up
from the marriage-festival below.







THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


It was a beautiful night, and the roof was cool and
quiet.
Cyril came up first, and he stood at a corner leaning
over the stone parapet, when Lois joined him.
"I cannot be mistaken," said Cyril, as if thinking aloud.
"I poured the water into that jar, and I saw it was wine
when I took it out in my pitcher, and carried it into the
house to Ben Nassur. All the servants saw that there
was water in the pitchers first, and afterward there was
wine."
"It is true. So it was in mine," said Lois, who had
come to his side. "They all go to Capernaum to-morrow.
Jesus of Nazareth means to live there. His mother will,
too, for a while. Then she returns to her own house, at
Nazareth. I wish I could live with her."
"I would like to know what sort of work I can find to
do while I am there," exclaimed Cyril.
I know what I am going to do, I think," said Lois.
"There is a woman named Abigail the tallith-maker, who
lives there. Some of the women at the wedding told me
she wants a girl who knows something of the trade to
work for her. I learned needle-work while I was staying
in Samaria."
Thou didst very good work," said Cyril. There is
more to do in Capernaum than there is here. I '11 find
some work."
Most of the people are fishing-folk," said Lois. "The
lake is full of fish."






CAPERNAUM


"Sometimes little is taken, they say," replied Cyril.
"But I must try it. I long to see Jesus of Nazareth, and
he will be there. What did he mean by the words he said
to his mother Mine hour is not yet come.' "
"I do not know; I did not understand them. I mean
to be with her, part of the time, while she remains there,"
replied Lois. I go to Capernaum, to-morrow, with her
and her friends."
I am glad," said Cyril, "I will go, too. Jesus is to stay
in Cana, for a day or two, but I '11 come."
Lois bade her brother good-night, and Cyril was alone
upon the roof.
"I wish father could see this man, Jesus of Nazareth,"
the boy said to himself. "Father is an experienced old
soldier, and has been a captain. He would know what
the people might expect of him."
Ezra the Swordmaker had studied carefully, and had
talked with his son about the ways and means for collect-
ing, equipping, and arming a force of patriotic Jews such
as might, at some future day, drive out the Romans and
destroy the power of Herod.
At last Cyril went to sleep, but when he awoke, in the
morning, his head was still full of the arrangements for
his proposed journey from Cana to Capernaum.
Lois also was making ready, and both Rabbi Isaac and
his wife were entirely satisfied with the plans of their
young relatives. There would be more room in the some-
what overcrowded house in Cana. As for the transfer of






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


Mary's residence from Nazareth to Capernaum, for a sea-
son, such temporary removals were not at all uncommon
among the Jewish people.
Only two days later, and while yet the wedding festivi-
ties continued in the house of Isaac, Cyril and Lois reached
Capernaum. Their little baggage was carried by one don-
key, while Lois rode another, and the hire of these ani-
mals made the first large draft upon the money Cyril had
received from his father.
The direct distance from Cana was only about twelve
miles, but the road so wound among hills as to make it
longer. Both brother and sister felt they had never
before seen so beautiful a country, and when at last they
came out in sight of Chinnereth, or the Sea of Galilee,
they understood why the rabbis declared: "God made
seven seas in the land of Canaan, but chose for himself
only one -the Sea of Galilee."
The lake itself was beautiful, and the shores were lined
with cities, larger or smaller, or with palaces whose
grounds and gardens came down to the water's edge. Ca-
pernaum was a well-built and prosperous place at some
distance from the shore, but there were no buildings
along the beach near it; only boat-wharves, here and
there, little more than mere landing-places in the little
bays which indented the long, curving shore-line.
The region was a kind of fisherman's paradise; and
around it was also a rich farming country, with a climate
so mild that even figs and grapes ripened during ten




















































CYRIL AND LOIS ON THEIR WAY TO CAPERNAUI.






CAPERNAUM


months of the year, and the fruits of temperate and tropi-
cal regions grew luxuriantly, side by side. The popula-
tion was dense, and it was a continual marvel that the
lake was not fished out, so numerous were the fishermen
and so heavy were the catches. All the country around
furnished them a market, and Cyril was assured that he
would find enough to do, but that his wages would barely
support him; so he was glad when Lois was kindly wel-
comed by Abigail the tallith-maker. This woman made
other garments worn by the people among whom she
lived, and it was of importance to her that the brother of
her new assistant was a youth whose training under so
good a smith as Ezra enabled him to mend her needles of
all sizes. No doubt even the very smallest of them would
seem both coarse and clumsy to the eyes of a modern
seamstress.
Cyril, from the hour of his coming, was full of the idea
which had brought him to Capernaum; and it may have
been his eagerness to see and hear Jesus of Nazareth
which brought him into acquaintance with Simon and
Andrew, and several other men. Soon after his arrival
he told Lois:
"The people around the lake know more about Jesus
than is known at Nazareth. He teaches and preaches
here and all come to hear him. They believe about the
turning of the water into wine more readily than some
of those who saw the water drawn and carried into the
house."






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


Lois could hardly have told how happy she was. She
was not conscious that she had ever been at all afraid of
so wise and learned a man as Rabbi Ben Nassur, but she
felt more at ease now she was not near him. Besides,
during several weeks she was often with Mary and her
son. She sat at her work in the quiet house dreaming
over the stories that were told her of the carpenter's son.
Some of them went back to the very cradle of Jesus, and
this, as Lois now knew, had been a manger in a cattle-
stable, in Bethlehem of Judea.
None of these stories had been written down, but Lois
learned them all by heart, and she would think of them
whenever she saw Jesus or heard him teach.
Cyril had thoughts and dreams of his own very differ-
ent from hers, for his spirit was becoming more and more
warlike. He saw that Jesus had been making himself
well known in many places, and would soon be widely
talked of. It was the right thing to do, if he was ever to
raise an army among the Galileans. So Cyril considered
it his own duty to seize upon every opportunity for study-
ing, as his father had bidden him, the fortifications of the
towns and cities near the lake, and for witnessing mili-
tary parades and marches, and for examining weapons of
all sorts and whatever else could be made use of in war -
in the war of Jews against Romans, in which he hoped
to be a soldier.












CHAPTER VII


JERUSALEM

SOMETHING in the air of the beautiful country
around the Sea of Galilee seemed to give its people
tranquillity. Everybody was busy, indeed, and it was not
difficult to earn a living where the needs of all were so
simple. There was no contentment, however, for the
yoke of the Roman foreigner pressed heavily, and so did
the oppressions of Herod Antipas, whom no Jew could
regard but as a foreigner, although his mother had been
a Jewess. Every act of brutal cruelty and every merci-
less exaction which the Galileans suffered helped to keep
them in mind of the prophecies of future freedom.
There had never been a time when all Jews were so
busy with thoughts concerning the coming of the Mes-
siah, and their fixed idea was that he was to be a glorious
conqueror and king, one greater than David or Solomon,
one who was to make the Jews the foremost nation on
the earth.
Lois and Cyril saw each other almost daily, and all
their thoughts and talk were about their father. They
longed to know what had become of him, but there were
no tidings.






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


"I wish father could come and see the Teacher and
hear him," said Cyril, one day. He and Lois had been
talking of the subject which was uppermost in the minds
of the people, and Cyril had been studying the stockade
at the Roman camp.
Lois was thoughtfully silent, and he went on:
Father ought to be getting ready, if there is ever to
be a rising against the Romans. He knows hosts of men
all over the country. He knows old fighting men, and
they know him. He could get them together, too, when-
ever the right time comes. Oh, if his right hand were
sound, what things he could do!"
"The Nazarene is not often in Capernaum now," said
Lois. He is teaching and preaching among the villages,
everywhere, and so many go to hear him."
"I wish I could see him do some new wonder!" ex-
claimed Cyril. "They '11 forget all about the wine at
Cana. I met a man who was at the wedding, and he said
he thought I was mistaken in what was done."
For some undeclared reason, the Teacher, as all men
except the rabbis called Jesus, was only teaching and
preaching among the towns around the head of the lake.
He was becoming widely known, however, as those who
heard him carried news of his discourses, and as yet he
had not made enemies.
The days and weeks wore on until the autumn went
by, and then the winter, of that mild climate. The land
grew green again with the swift growth of the spring





JERUSALEM


crops. The time drew near for the annual Passover
Feast, and every year a host of pious Galileans all who
were able were sure to celebrate it at Jerusalem. When
it was announced that Jesus of Nazareth and his disciples
intended to go, most who heard it took it as a matter of
course, but it aroused enthusiasm in Cyril. "I am going,"
he said to Lois. "I cannot take thee this time; we have
not money enough. But I must be with him at Jerusa-
lem. Who knows what great works he will do when he
gets there ? Isaac Ben Nassur is going, and the Cana
people."
"I wish I might go with thee!" said Lois. "Thou
canst not wish to go more than I do. I want to see Jeru-
salem I want to see the Temple. I long to see what the
Master will do there."
"I wish I could take thee with me," said Cyril. "We
will try to have more money for the journey next year.
But he surely will not yet try to take Jerusalem; I do
not think there will be any fighting this time. I do not
see how he ever can take that great city; it is so strong.
But he must take it some day, if he is the predicted king.
Father says there will be a terrible battle, and I am to be
in it. Our captain will have to raise an army from all
over the country."
Lois made no reply to that. She had never been able
to think as Cyril did of the Teacher. She could not
imagine him with a sword in his hand, fighting other men.
One of Cyril's ideas had been that the journey of Jesus






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


of Nazareth to Jerusalem would be like a royal progress,
and that he would preach to crowds along the way as he
was accustomed to do in Galilee. But Cyril was mis-
taken, for the Teacher traveled both quietly and rapidly.
As for the boy himself, he believed he was safe in cross-
ing the district of Samaria, so completely was he hidden
among the crowds of Passover pilgrims. From these pil-
grims the Samaritans kept away, and to them the Roman
soldiers paid no manner of attention. The weather was
glorious; not too warm for traveling, except in the middle
of the day; and all the country was in bloom and green.
The Passover was to be eaten on the fifteenth day of
the month Nisan, or April; but earlier than that multi-
tudes began to gather at Jerusalem, from all parts of the
world; for there were great preparations to be made be-
forehand. Some of these had reference to food and
lodgings, but even more were connected with the sacrifices
to be offered in the Temple.
The Temple, crowning a high hill, and visible from a
great distance, was in a vast inclosure of strongly fortified
walls. Within this there were several minor inclosures,
separated by walls and by gates which were themselves
important features of the gilded splendor of the most
costly and beautiful place of worship on all the earth.
These inner inclosures were called courts," and opened
into one another. Beyond the outer court, none save
those known to be Jews could enter, and they only after
ceremonial preparation. Nevertheless, the outer court,






JERUSALEM


just within the Temple wall, was part of the Temple, the
" sacred place," the house of God." Because others than
Jews were permitted to enter, it was called the Court of
the Heathen or Gentiles. According to the Scriptures,
and all the teachings of the rabbis, this court was holy.
Into it nothing unclean could be brought. In it nothing
could be bought or sold, nor could any trade be carried
on there. The entire area, and not a part only, was
solemnly consecrated and set apart for worship. Never-
theless, so bad had become the management of the Temple
affairs by the priests and other rulers, that during four
weeks before the Passover all the laws were set aside, and
this court was rented out to dealers in cattle and all sorts
of merchandise, and to brokers who exchanged current
coins -such as Jewish shekels and half-shekels -for the
foreign coins brought by worshipers from other countries.
The holy place, therefore, was lined with cattle-pens, the
booths of tradesmen, the tables of money-changers, coops
of doves, while droves of cattle and sheep, and swarms of
buyers and sellers, shouting, jostling, bargaining, and
even quarreling, turned the entire court into a sort of fair,
where a vast amount of cheating, extortion, bribery, and
other mischief went on continually.
If Cyril had heard of all this desecration of the Temple,
he thought no more of it than did others, for it was a
thing to which even those who condemned it had become
accustomed.
The road from the north, by which the Galileans came,







THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


must wind among the hills as it nears Jerusalem, but at
last, just after the city comes in sight, the road descends
into a valley. When that is passed, there is a long ascent
to the great gate in the high and massive wall that then
guarded the capital of Judea.
Cyril's eagerness increased as he drew nearer, and at
last the long procession of pilgrims he was with reached
the ridge of the Mount of Olives, and he could see the
city.
"Jerusalem is glorious he exclaimed. "What mas-
sive walls, and great towers! They say there is a whole
legion of Roman soldiers camped near the city, and that
the garrison inside is always very strong at Passover
time. What can our Nazarene do with them? He is
going into the city."
Hardly a pause was made, indeed, by the Teacher and
his friends. They were not hindered at the gate, and
Cyril hardly allowed himself to wonder at the palaces and
forts and other splendors as he followed close after Jesus
of Nazareth up the steep street that led to the Temple.
It would have taken him or anybody long enough to tell
of what he saw by the way; the throngs of people from
every nation he had ever heard of, the many different
kinds of dress, the horses and their trappings, the cha-
riots, the flowers and fruits, the shops and merchandise,
the women in bright colors, the slaves, the soldiers in
their armor, the men whom he knew to be gladiators,
trained to fight in the terrible arena outside of the walls.














r



L'ft


-7ti
-*b~? L


e r 'i


" JERUSALEM IS GLORIOUS !'






JERUSALEM 59

It was still early in the forenoon of the bright April day
when the Teacher passed into the outer court of the
Temple. His face took on an expression of sadness and
severity as he gazed upon the scene of traffic and con-
fusion before him.
Only for a few moments, however, did Jesus linger and
look. His friends from Galilee, as many as were with
him, may have had errands of their own among the buy-
ers and sellers, for when he suddenly turned and walked
away out of the court, he went almost alone, only Cyril
following, at a little distance, half breathless with awe
and with an intense anxiety as to what might be about
to come.














CHAPTER VIII


THE SCOURGE OF SMALL CORDS

IN the city of Jerusalem, as in other Oriental cities, the
several trades were not in every quarter, but the deal-
ers in different wares generally kept separate. Cyril could
not have found his own way to any quarter, but he could
follow his captain, as he considered him, to a narrow
street near by, mainly occupied by dealers in rope, cord-
age, and similar wares. There were also tent-makers in
that street, and it was by the shop of one of these that
the Teacher halted.
Hanging in front of the booth were quantities of the
small, strong, tough cords used for tent fastenings; and
Cyril wondered to see the Teacher buy some of these.
Cyril and the dealer looked on with more than a little
curiosity. A bunch of the cords were at first cut into
lengths, and then the Teacher plaited them into a kind
of whip, half as large at its beginning as a man's wrist.
Swiftly he worked and dexterously; and Cyril watched
him from a little distance.
The whip, or scourge," was soon finished; and he who
60






THE SCOURGE OF SMALL CORDS


made it rolled it up and silently strode away toward the
Temple, whither Cyril followed him.
Through the great gate and into the outer court they
went, past the glittering ranks of Roman legionaries
posted there to put down any Jewish tumult; the hub-
bub of buying and selling was before them.
It seemed to be at its height. The unseemly disorder
was even louder than usual. Sheep bleated, fowls crowed,
cattle bellowed, men shouted to one another.
What will he do ?" exclaimed Cyril, for now the whip
was raised above the head of the Master. Stern indeed
was his face at that moment, as he drove forth the chaffer-
ing throng. Loud bellowed the beasts as they fled in
terror, and loudly, for a moment, shouted their astonished
and angry owners.
"They will turn and stone him!" was one quick
thought in Cyrils mind; but it vanished.
Not even the cattle and the sheep fled more unresist-
ingly than did the human beings from before that scourge
and from the rebuking face of him who wielded it. The
dealers in fowls caught up their coops and cages to hurry
them away, but no such escape was permitted to the deal-
ers in money. A moment before they had been sitting,
in their customary insolent security, behind their tables,
upon which were piled the various coins they dealt in.
Of all the thieves who polluted the Temple they were the
worst offenders. A punishment came to these men that
they could feel more deeply than even the scourge, for
4






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


the Teacher grasped the nearest table and scattered the
ringing coins on the marble pavement, as he said:
Take these things hence; make not my Father's house
a house of merchandise."
Cyril thought for a moment of the armed guards of the
Temple. They were there, truly, but this was a matter
that seemed to concern the Jews and their religion not
the guards at all, for the guards were Romans.
There was nothing, apparently, for Cyril to do, nor for
any man of the throng which was now gathering behind
the Teacher. His own disciples were there, and a fast-
increasing throng of sturdy Galileans, whose faces showed
hearty approval of his course.
So the buying. and selling which had so long polluted
the outer court of the Temple came to an end. Cyril was
a Jewish boy, and he could perfectly understand the ac-
clamations that were arising so noisily on all sides. He
knew that the Teacher from Nazareth had only acted in
accordance with the public opinion and the religious feel-
ing of the Jewish people. Every rabbi and every pious
Israelite would surely approve of what had been done.
"But the priests and the rulers what will they think
of it ? "- was a question in Cyril's mind, and others felt
as he did, for he heard one of the disciples say to another:
It is written, The zeal of thy house hath eaten me up.'"
The only criticism came from one of the Jewish by-
standers, speaking as if for the others. He said, as
questioning the Master's authority:




























*y


~wdP


THE MONEY-CHANGERS AND DEALERS EXPELLED FROM THE TEMPLE.






THE SCOURGE OF SMALL CORDS


"What sign shewest thou unto us, seeing that thou
doest these things?"
It sounded like an entirely reasonable question, con-
sidering what a responsibility had been taken in enforcing
the Temple law of holiness entirely without the authority
of priest or ruler, and the reply was:
"Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it
up."
It did not appear to be an answer. It did not offer even
the sign demanded, for nobody could or would destroy
the Temple; and the questioner responded:
Forty and six years was this temple in building, and
wilt thou rear it up in three days?"
No more was said, but many were beginning to treasure
the utterances of the Galilean Teacher, and this saying
of his was not forgotten. Cyril could not then, nor for
long afterward, have understood at all, if he had been
told that Jesus really spoke of the temple of his own body.
But in later times his answer was thus explained. All
Cyril then knew was that the expulsion of the money-
changers was a proof of power by one who would soon,
he fully believed, draw the sword of a military leader,
and become a captain of the house of Israel.
Just then he heard a voice behind him in tones of
strong approval:
"He has done well. He is for the Law. He is of the
house of David; he should be zealous for the Law."
Cyril turned to look into the glowing face of Isaac Ben






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


Nassur. The cleansing of the Temple was in accordance
with the strict principles of the learned rabbi, and Isaac's
next words to Cyril were both cordial and affectionate:
"Come thou with us. Thou shalt eat thy Passover
lamb with thine own kindred. Thou belongest with us."
This invitation was in keeping with Jewish custom, and
Cyril went with Isaac. He felt himself, however, a very
insignificant addition to the party, which included some
of the most dignified men of Cana.
Isaac's wife, Hannah, was with him, and there were
other women belonging to the several families repre-
sented.
There were yet two days to be spent before the Pass-
over itself; and Cyril at first knew hardly what to do
with them. He heard, however, that the chief priests and
the rulers of the Temple had immediately issued orders
that the outer court of the Temple should be kept abso-
lutely clear of everything and everybody prohibited by
the Law.
A complete victory had therefore been gained. As for
the Romans, or any other heathen, they did not care how
strict might be the religious notions of anybody who did
not meddle with their power to govern Judea and to
collect the taxes.
Cyril's main idea, as soon as his mind began to clear a
little, was to find out all he could about the Roman power.
As he learned its extent, his respect for it grew. With
the dawn of each day, he was out from among his friends,







THE SCOURGE OF SMALL CORDS


bent upon learning all about Jerusalem. They, too, had
much that required their attention, and did not give him
a thought.
The walls were so high that it seemed impossible for
any enemy to get over them. There were towers, and
there were guards at all the gates. The castles and forts
were so many and so strong, and the soldiers were so
warlike, so well trained, the city seemed unconquerable.
It made Cyril's heart sink, the day before the Passover,
when he went out by the Roman camp and saw a legion
of the men who had overcome the armies of all nations
drawn up in glittering ranks to be reviewed by their offi-
cers, and by some great men who were there from Rome,
and by some visiting princes from other provinces who
were guests of the rulers of Judea. He asked himself
sadly, how could the coming king of Israel gather a force
strong enough to withstand the Roman legions, of which
so many could be sent against him, or how could he
drive them out of such a stronghold as the walled city
Jerusalem ?













CHAPTER IX


HEROD'S AMPHITHEATER

T HE Passover feast was eaten with all solemnity, and
Cyril went with Ben Nassur and his friends, before
and afterward, to witness the Temple sacrifices and to
take part in the grand ceremonies. He heard the priests
and Levites chant the psalms; he saw the smoke go up
from the altars. It seemed to him that he had never be-
fore had any idea of what it was to be a Jew and to have
a right in Jerusalem, the City of the Great King, the Holy
Place, to which all the nations of the world were one day
to come and worship. It was to be a wonderful kingdom;
but, somehow, the more he thought about it and the more
he saw, the smaller grew the idea which had brought him
to the feast--the idea that Jesus of Nazareth was really
the king who was to come. It had not seemed so in-
credible while he was among the hills of Galilee.
During the few days before Ben Nassur and his friends
were to set out for home, Cyril saw hardly anything of
the Teacher. On one of those days he went to the amphi-
theater, the circus which Herod the Great had built, at
some distance from the city. He paid for a seat in one

































































"THERE WERE CONTESTS BETWEEN SWORDSMEN."






HEROD'S AMPHITHEATER


of the upper galleries. On the tiers of seats below him
were all sorts of people, and far away, on the opposite
side of the vast arena, the sandy level in the middle, he
saw, in the lower tier, a canopied place that was furnished
magnificently. In it there were throne-seats, and on them
sat King Herod Antipas, Pontius Pilatus, the Roman
governor, two Roman generals, with other distinguished
men, and a number of richly dressed women, some of
whom wore brilliant tiaras or coronets upon their heads.
He stared at them for a few minutes, and at the tremen-
dous throng of people, but after that he thought only of
what was going on in the arena.
There were chariot races; and Cyril could not help
being intensely excited by the mad rush of the contend-
ing teams, while all the thousands who looked on shouted
and raved. After the races, however, came scenes some
of which made him shudder. There were foot-races and
boxing-matches, but these were soon over, and then there
were contests between pairs of swordsmen, spearmen, club-
men, and the like, in which the fights went on until one of
the combatants was slain. Close upon the last of these
duels, bands of gladiators marched in from opposite sides
of the arena, and charged each other like detachments of
soldiers upon a real battle-field. The fighting was furious
and desperate, but one side was soon beaten, for the par-
ties had not been equal. One party had been trained
warriors, professional gladiators, and the other only com-
mon men, captives taken in a recent raid of Pilate's sol-






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


diers upon a wild tribe beyond the Dead Sea. They were
brave enough, but they were put there only to be killed
for the amusement of the great men and of the multitude.
So were the poor victims with whom the day's exhibition
closed, for they were driven into the arena, half armed,
to contend as best they could with a number of hungry
lions, tigers, leopards, and hyenas, which were loosed upon
them from their dens under the tiers of seats.
"Oh !" thought Cyril, "if our king were to come, he
would never permit such cruelty as this! I ought not to
be here! I will not come again !"
It was no place for him, and yet he had all the while
been thinking of some things that he had seen, and of
more that he had heard, of the dealings of Herod and
of the Romans with such Jews as had offended them.
"They seem," he said to himself, "to enjoy putting our
people to death, just as they enjoy the suffering of cap-
tives and gladiators in the circus. The king will drive
out these wicked Romans when he comes and takes the
kingdom."
Cyril had something new to hear that night, his last
night in Jerusalem. Rabbi Isaac, during the first few
days after his arrival, had had a hard time of it; so many
people had inquired of him concerning Jesus of Naza-
reth, the Galilean Teacher, and particularly about the
wonder performed at Isaac's house, in turning water into
wine. The rabbi had firmly declared all he knew, but the
dread of having to tell it over and over had inclined him






HEROD'S AMPHITHEATER


to keep away from questioners. Of any other marvelous
things which had been done in Galilee he knew nothing.
Neither did Cyril, but now something entirely new and
positive had come. The Nazarene, as some men called
Jesus, had been healing sick people in Jerusalem during
the Passover season -not a few, but many. His fame
was growing rapidly, and the Passover pilgrims would
carry news of him not only to every corner of the land
of Canaan, but to other lands -to the very ends of the
earth.
Ben Nassur said that he wished he had seen some of
these marvelous cures; but his regret was slight compared
to that of Cyril.
I did not think he would heal the sick in the city," he
said. "Yet I might have known the Teacher would do
wonderful works. But I have learned all about Jeru-
salem?.
Thou hast done well enough," said Isaac. "Thou art
only a youth. What wonder he has healed the sick ? He
is of the house of David. He is now a rabbi, truly. But
Nathanael is wrong, for he is not the coming king of
Israel. They will never anoint him. No, no, my son;
he will never be the Anointed."
Cyril was silent. Ben Nassur had spoken in Hebrew,
and the words he used, "the Anointed," were the very
words which, translated through the Greek and Latin
tongues into our own, are "the Christ."
Cyril went to sleep that night with the determination






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


to cease his sight-seeing about the city. He would keep
as close as he could to the Teacher, so that he might see
him do works as remarkable as that which he had done
at Cana.
Perhaps Isaac had formed a like purpose, but it was too
late, for almost the first words Cyril heard from him the
next morning were these:
"The son of Joseph of Nazareth hath departed for
Galilee. It is time for us also to go. Get thee ready.
We shall see, now, what he will do in his own country."
It was all in vain that Ben Nassur and his friends pre-
pared in haste, for Jesus and his disciples were a day's
journey on their way. As for Cyril, he felt that a mis-
fortune had befallen him!
"I long to see the wonderful works he is doing," he
thought; "and I shall not be with him."
And indeed many were healed all along the homeward
way. Ben Nassur and those who were with him heard
accounts of these events from place to place. He had
worked wonders even at and near Samaria. When they
reached Cana, the Master had been there already. He
had preached there, and he had healed the sick; then he
had gone onward toward Capernaum.
"My son," said the rabbi to Cyril, with great dignity
of manner, "I will go to Capernaum myself. There have
been many rabbis who have healed the sick. It is won-
derful, but I have heard of such marvels; yet it is my
duty to see it done."






HEROD'S AMPHITHEATER 75

So the wise and learned rabbi hardly paused in his
journey save to sleep one night at his own house in
Cana. He even bade Cyril go forward that very evening,
promising to follow in the morning.
"It will be the sixth day," he said. "I must be in
Capernaum to hear him preach in the synagogue on the
Sabbath."
"Simon is living at Capernaum now," said Cyril.
"Thou wilt find me at his house. I shall see Lois, too,
and she will tell me all she has heard about the Teacher,
and where he is to preach."












CHAPTER X


IN CAPERNAUM

W HEN Cyril reached Capernaum he did not find
Lois at the house of Abigail. He went there at
once, only to be told that his sister had gone to the house
of Simon Peter to help, for his wife's mother was sick.
Simon's house was toward the sea; and even before
Cyril reached the house he learned that Jesus had not yet
returned to Capernaum. He was preaching in one of the
neighboring villages, and would not be in his own town
again before the Sabbath.
Lois had watched for her brother when the time for
Cyril's arrival drew near, and he found her waiting for
him in the porch of Simon's house. Her face seemed sad,
too, in spite of the pleasure she felt at seeing him.
"I am so glad thou art here," she said, in her very
earnest welcome. "I hope that the Teacher will come!
She is so sick, I think she will die. Where didst thou
leave him ?"
Cyril had a wonderful story to tell, but he did not tell
it to Lois alone. Even Simon's wife left her mother for
a moment, and came out of the house, and some of her






IN CAPERNAUM


friends came with her. The nearer neighbors had seen
Cyril arrive, and they gathered about him to learn the
news, according to the custom of village folk. He was
quickly the center of a little group of questioners and
hearers, old and young, and to them he related the clear-
ing of the Temple by the Teacher of Galilee. Yet they
were not so much impressed by the stories of cures, for
these Cyril had heard of but had not seen.
"Thou shouldst have remained with him," said Lois,
reproachfully. Then thou couldst have told us more of
what he did."
He will be here on the Sabbath," replied Cyril. "Ye
will then see for yourselves what he will do."
"He will not cure anybody on the Sabbath," remarked
one of his hearers. We must wait until next week."
The people separated, and Cyril went into the house;
but the questions of Lois had only begun. As they went
in, however, she pointed toward the door of the sick room
and whispered:
"If the Master could cure her! We think she cannot
live. I wish he would come! He does not even know she
is sick. Simon is with him, and perhaps even he has not
yet heard of her sickness."
Cyril sympathized with her thoroughly, but as he turned
to go, he exclaimed again:
"Lois, if thou hadst but seen him in the Temple. He
fears no one. I hope that he will be our leader against
the Romans."






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


Cyril believed that the time for him to be a soldier was
drawing near. All through that night he dreamed of
marching legions and of battle-fields. When the next
morning came he went out to find that the people of Ca-
pernaum were waiting in a state of impatient expectation
for the arrival of the man whom some of them called
"The Prophet of Galilee."
The Sabbath began with the evening of our Friday, and
the sun set without the arrival of any further tidings
except that the Teacher might be expected to preach in
the synagogue on the next day. During that sixth day
Lois was too busy for more than a brief talk with her
brother, but she was waiting even more eagerly than he.
Sabbath morning came, and the hour (about nine o'clock
of our time) for the synagogue services drew near, but
Ben Nassur had not been seen in Capernaum. Cyril pre-
pared to go early, but Lois was to remain at Simon's
house. She was sincerely glad to be there and to help,
but she could not help saying to herself: "I wish I could
be at the synagogue, and that I could see and hear him !"
The first thing that Cyril saw to interest him that Sab-
bath morning was the throng passing along the street
toward the synagogue, with the Teacher. He had walked
several miles to reach the. synagogue, and some of his
followers had come all the way with him.
"There is Ben Nassur," exclaimed Cyril. "But who
is that behind him?"
The very strict rabbi had strained a point and had





















































RABBI BEN NASSUR AND THE THRONG BEFORE TIIE IOUSE OF SIMON PETER.






IN CAPERNAUM


walked further than the Law allowed on the Sabbath, in
order to attend these synagogue services. The throng
was dense, so that the Teacher and his disciples advanced
slowly. Among the crowd walked a tall, haggard, wild-
eyed man, to whom no other spoke, and from whose
parched and panting lips no sound was uttered.
Is he insane ?" whispered Cyril to Ben Nassur, when
they met and when the rabbi had greeted his young
kinsman.
"Not so," responded Ben Nassur. "He hath a demon,
it is said. Such cases are more and more numerous, now-
adays. Only the chief priests can aid these sufferers -
they and the most learned rabbis."
Cyril had heard that even the rabbis and the priests
avoided undertaking to remedy these evils, which some
called casting out unclean spirits, and he asked the
question, "What is this they call a 'demon '?"
"No man knoweth," calmly replied the rabbi. "But I
have thought that Herod hath one," he added thought-
fully.
During all the usual opening services the Teacher sat
in silence, but afterward a parchment copy of the Scrip-
tures was handed him, and he read from it several pas-
sages. Then he rolled up the parchment, handed it back
to its keeper and began to speak.
Cyril was leaning forward to listen, when he became
aware of a man moving close beside him, and a fierce face
was pushed toward his shoulder. Cyril shrank away, al-






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


most in fear, for now came a loud voice, as if some power
within the man spoke through his lips: "Let us alone;
what have we to do with thee, thou Jesus of Nazareth?
art thou come to destroy us ? I know thee, who thou art,
the Holy One of God."
Ben Nassur had risen upon his feet, and so had other
men, in the intensity of their surprise and curiosity.
But there was no change in the manner of the Master,
except that he at once spoke, as if reprovingly:
Hold thy peace, and come out of him."
Down fell the man, as if some wrestler had thrown
him, but when, a moment later, he arose again, he was
found to be altogether himself, quiet and sane.
"Is the demon gone ?" exclaimed Cyril. "Where did
he go? What is he?"
"He is gone," said a man who pushed close to him.
"But what a word is this! for with authority and power
he commandeth the unclean spirits, and they come out."
Those who stood near Isaac Ben Nassur said afterward
that he seemed to be completely overawed by this
evidence of power.
As for Cyril, his first impulse was to go and tell Lois.
It was all the easier to go, because he could not now get
anywhere near the Master, and because the crowd was
slowly making its way out of the synagogue. He reached
the house of Simon, and Lois listened in silence to his
wonderful story; but she seemed to be thinking of
something else.






IN CAPERNAUM


I am glad the man was cured," she said. Why can-
not the Master do something for the people of this
house? "
Cyril did not make any reply, for up the street toward
Simon's house, at that moment, was coming the crowd
that accompanied the Teacher.
"I believe he is coming to see her," whispered Lois.
"I hope he is."
He reached the door, but did not pause there. He
walked through the main room, and was led into the
smaller one, where the sick woman lay.
Little enough could any Jewish physician do for the
sufferers from the malignant fevers bred by the marshes
around the Sea of Galilee. What would the Teacher do
in such a case? What comfort could he give to the poor
woman who lay there tossing and moaning ?
The Teacher was now standing by the sick woman, but
neither Cyril nor Lois caught the few words that he
.uttered as he took the sufferer by the hand, and raised
her gently. He did not seem to be speaking to her, but
Lois exclaimed, joyfully:
"Cyril, Cyril! The fever has left her. She is cured.
She is well!"
And indeed the matron so suddenly restored to health
was quickly out among her kinsfolk. Her very gladness
for her recovery at once expressed itself, moreover, in
her zeal for the hospitable entertainment of him who had
cured her, and of her thronging guests.
5






84 THE SWORDMAKER'S SON

Not far from the outer doorway stood Isaac Ben Nas-
sur. His face expressed both wonder and disapproval.
He, at least, remembered what so many others had for-
gotten-that this was the Sabbath day, a day upon
which not even such ministration to the sick was per-
mitted by the rabbis.













CHAPTER XI


THE CAVE OF ADULLAM


T HE law of the seventh day of the week, as inter-
Spreted by the rabbis, enjoined a quiet Sabbath after-
noon. During the hours when perfect rest was observed,
however, the news of the Teacher's power to heal spread
rapidly from house to house; and people everywhere
made ready to claim his aid as soon as the Law would
let them.
Ben Nassur had been consulted by several persons,
and, among other wise remarks, he had said:
"I did not see the water changed into wine. Neither
did I see this woman cured. She was cured, she got up,
and came out. I know no more than that. I do not say
yet what it is best for the people to think or believe
concerning this Teacher."
When the sun went down everybody in Capernaum
was listening for the trumpet, in front of the synagogue,
to tell them that the Sabbath hours were over.
At length came the signal to the clustered homes of the
city, and to the scattered dwellings of the fisher-folk
along the shore. It was heard by rich and poor alike, by
85






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


sick and well, and from every direction they went in a
swelling tide toward the open space in front of the house
of Simon.
It was still daylight when Cyril and Lois stood and
watched the Master and the people.
He laid his hands on every one of them, and healed
them," said Lois, as she and Cyril walked away, for the
darkness came on, and the crowd was dispersing. Cyril,
I heard some voices crying, 'Thou art the Anointed!'
and as if answering them I heard the voice of the Teacher
reproving and forbidding them."
"It is not time yet," said Cyril. "If the Romans sus-
pected that he was the King, and was to be anointed over
all Israel, they would slay him."
"Would they really slay him?" exclaimed Lois. "For
healing the sick?"
Not for that," replied Cyril; "but for being the King,
to raise a rebellion. I mean to watch all night. If he
goes away, I must go with him. How I wish father were
here! He would know what to do!"

Neither his son nor his daughter knew where Ezra the
Swordmaker was; but it was many and many a long mile
from Capernaum. With a number of companions he was
in hiding within a great cave.
It was exceedingly dark, excepting in one spot. That
also was gloomy and strange enough. A cresset, or
basket made of thin strips of iron, for holding embers to






THE CAVE OF ADULLAM


give light, swung at the end of a chain that hung from a
dim frame-work high above the ground. The cresset was
about two yards above a mass of iron, smooth on top,
which could be recognized as a rude but serviceable anvil.
This was indicated also by a brickwork forge, a bellows,
hammers, charcoal, and ashes, with other evidences of the
blacksmith's trade.
The place was neither untenanted nor silent. Not far
from the anvil sat or lay the party of bearded men, to
whom a voice, deep and solemn, was rehearsing the story
of the doings at Jerusalem during the Passover week,
the cleansing of the Temple, and the teachings of the bold
prophet from Nazareth of Galilee.
It was an exciting and wonderful story, for it contained,
though with some exaggerations, all the tales brought to
Jerusalem by the enthusiastic men of Galilee. The name
of Rabbi Ben Nassur and the wonder of the wine at the
marriage feast were by no means omitted. Dark faces,
bronzed and scarred, upon which the red light fell from
the fragments of resinous wood that were blazing in the
cresset, grew more striking in the earnestness with which
they listened.
Some turned to look at one another, or at the almost
unseen narrator, back among the shadows; but one
brawny form by the anvil never stirred. This man's head
was bowed forward and the face could not be seen; but
one bare arm rested on the mass of iron, so that the hand
- a right hand -lay upon the pointed projection at one






THE SWORDMAKER'S SON


end. It was a hand, truly, but twisted and gnarled out
of all shape, and its very fingers were shrunken to little
more than the bones.
"Men and brethren," said the speaker, in conclusion,
"they call us robbers of the wilderness; disciples of John
the Baptizer; followers of the old faith.' We who wait
for the hope of Israel know that John, indeed, is in prison.
He is bound in the deep dungeon of the fort of Machas-
rus. But this new prophet of Galilee, what shall we say
of him?"
There was silence for a moment, and then another voice
answered:
"Let us go and ask John. They still permit us to
speak with him. Herod has shut John up, but dares not
harm him. I was with him, by the Jordan, when he bore
witness of this man of Galilee. Let us know from his
own lips what he will say of him now."
Then spake the strong man by the anvil:
Go ye to John. I will go to Galilee to inquire for my-
self. The boy who was with Rabbi Ben Nassur is my
own son. Perhaps he can tell me somewhat. I am of no
use here. I can ply the hammer no more. Ye must find
you another swordmaker. For if this is indeed the King,
the day of those who can draw the sword is not distant !"
Slowly he arose to his feet, and in a moment more Ezra
the armorer had disappeared in the gloom beyond the
red light from the cresset.































































IN THE CAVY OF ADU.LAIM.




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