• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Preface
 Poem
 Table of Contents
 Life among the Indians
 The Norsemen
 Coming of Columbus
 Americus Vespucius and Balboa
 Sir Francis Drake
 Sir Walter Raleigh
 Captain John Smith and Virgini...
 The Pilgrims
 The first Thanksgiving Day
 Settlement of Salem
 Salem witchcraft
 Marblehead
 The Quakers
 The Dutch in New York
 The French and Indian war
 George Washington
 Revolutionary War
 War of 1812
 Abraham Lincoln
 Back Matter
 Back Cover






Title: Stories of the United States for youngest readers
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085059/00001
 Material Information
Title: Stories of the United States for youngest readers
Physical Description: 221 p. : ill., port. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Davis, Anna Chase
Educational Publishing Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: Educational Publishing Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1896
 Subjects
Subject: Indians of North America -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
History -- Juvenile literature -- United States   ( lcsh )
Textbooks -- 1896   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1896   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre: Textbooks   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
General Note: Publisher's advertisements on back cover.
Statement of Responsibility: by Anna Chase Davis.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00085059
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225221
notis - ALG5493
oclc - 233648364

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Preface
        Page 3
    Poem
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
    Life among the Indians
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    The Norsemen
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Coming of Columbus
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Americus Vespucius and Balboa
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Sir Francis Drake
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Sir Walter Raleigh
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Captain John Smith and Virginia
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
    The Pilgrims
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    The first Thanksgiving Day
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    Settlement of Salem
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
    Salem witchcraft
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
    Marblehead
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
    The Quakers
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
    The Dutch in New York
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
    The French and Indian war
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
    George Washington
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
    Revolutionary War
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Pages 167-168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
    War of 1812
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
    Abraham Lincoln
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
    Back Matter
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text



















































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FELCHVILLE, VT.

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THIS BOOK IS PRESENTED BY

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REMARKS












The Bald*in Lbrary
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STORIES

OF THE



UNITED STATES


FOR


YOUNGEST READERS





]y
ANNA CHASE DAVIS
Principal of the Hamilton Hall School, Salem, Mass.


EDUCATIONAL PUBLISHING COMPANY
BOSTON
NEW YORK CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO




































COPYRIGHTED

BY ANNA CHASE DAVIS.













PREFACE.

These simple lessons in history have been prepared for
those children who are too young to take up the real study
of history. The intent is to awaken in very young minds an
interest in the leading events of our country, with the belief
that they will the more eagerly approach the deeper study of
the subject later.
The author has begun with the Indian period. In con-
nection with the study of this interesting people, teachers
will find the reading of Hiawatha very helpful. Children
of seven and eight years of age will take very great pleasure
in making sketches illustrating here and there incidents i
the poem.
A chapter on the Norsemen comes before that of the
discovery by Columbus. More interest, the author thinks,
should be aroused concerning the brave sailors who came
before the Genoese discoverer. In this connection the
teacher should read to her children about Lief Ericson and
his voyage along our shores.
The author trusts that this simple reading book may be
acceptable to the many teachers who have been seeking in
vain, as she has, to find something in its line within the grasp
of very young minds.
A. C. D.





















SMy Country, 'tis of thee,
Sweet Land of liberty,
Of thee I sing;
Land where my fathers died,
Land of the Pilgrim's pride,
From every mountain side
Let Freedom ring."





















CONTENTS.
PAGE
Life among the Indians 7
The Norsemen 23
Coming of Columbus 27
Americus Vespucius and Balboa 49
Sir Francis Drake 53
Sir Walter Raleigh .. .59
Captain John Smith and Virginia 63
The Pilgrims 73
The First Thanksgiving Day 81
Settlement of Salem 85
Salem Witchcraft .. 95
Marblehead 99
The Quakers 107
The Dutch 115
French and Indian War 131
George Washington .. 139
Revolutionary War. 153

War of 1812 .. 177
Abraham Lincoln 183







STORIES OF THE UNITED STATES

FOR YOUNGEST READERS,

LESSON I.
When the white men came to New
England they found Indians here.
We do not know how long they
had lived here.
There were a great many of them.
They were Red Men.
They were fierce and cruel.
,They lived in wigwams.





8 Stories of the United States.

The wigwams were made of long
poles, which met at the top. :
They were covered with skins or
mats. 4
A hole was left in the top, so that
the smoke could go out.
*The Indian women were called
squaws.
The squaws sometimes lined the
wigwams with mats.
These wigwams were snug and
warm.
There were two low doors.
The Indians had to stoop to go
inside.




Stories of the United States.


They hung a mat over the doorways

to keep the wind out.


liked to move.


about from


place to place.


They could take the wigwams down,


Indians








































































- -; ----=--- _-


RED MEN.





Stories of the United States. 11
and carry them wherever they went.
You could not carry your home
around with you, could you?
In the winter they went where it
was sheltered.








In the spring they moved near the
corn-fields, and stayed through the
summer.
In the autumn they moved to the
hunting-grounds.









































































INDIAN' SQUAW.


TI -;
~- '-













INDIAN UTENSILS.

LESSON II.

The squaws did all the hard work.
The men cut the poles for the
wigwams.
When they moved, the squaws had
to carry packs on their backs.
'They all slept on mats on the floor.
They. kept a fire burning all night.
They had no chairs nor tables.




Stories of the United States.
They sat on the ground.
The Indians had a few pots,


and wooden dishes.
Their clothes were
skins of beasts,


made of the.


The squaws made them, and used
the sinews of the deer for thread.
Their needles were made from
*thorns.
The Indians used a great many
feathers and beads.


baskets,





Stories of the United States. 15

They dyed them in bright colors

to make them look gay.

Their shoes and stockings were

made of deer skins.

Their shoes were called moccasins.


INDIAN HOE.


The men painted their faces.

The squaws did all the planting.

Corn was the chief food of the.

Indians.

They had no ploughs.
1 B "J'





16 Stories of the United States.
The squaw dug a hole in the ground
wih a hoe made of a big clam shell.
She fastened a handle on it of wood.
She dropped the corn or beans into
the hole.
She put in a fish for manure; then
she covered it up with earth.
The warm sun and soft rain soon
made the corn or beans grow.
When the corn was ripe the squaws
gathered it.
It was piled in round-hyeaps to dry.














CORN STACKS.

LESSON III.

The squaws made hominy out of
the corn.
They pounded it in a mortar.
When the men went off to hunt, they
carried some in a basket on their backs.
The squawv roasted the meat on
sticks before the fire.
They dug clams and baked them.
17





18 Stories of the United States.
The Indian had no cows; so the

children could have no milk.

There were no schools.


-' i '" ,'T








The children could not learn to read

or write as you do.

The boys learned to fish and hunt

and build canoes.


The canoes were their boats.




Stories of the United States.


They made them of chestnut, pine,
or oak.
Sometimes they made them of birch-

bark.


The babies were called papooses.

They were strapped in a cradle.


They


were kept there about two


years.




Stories cf the United States.


Then they were strong enough to
run about.
The cradle was lined with skins.
Sometimes the squaw hung the
cradle upon a tree.
The winds would rock the baby to
sleep.
The mother carried the papoose on
her back when she traveled.
The little Indian girls had to learn.
to work.
This seems hard, doesn't it?
The children had their games, too.
They made "mud pies" just as you
do. :





Stories of the United States. 2

The Indian money was called
wampum.
It was made of shells.
They were strung on deer sinews.
The Indians loved their children.
They could be cruel in time of war.
They fought with bows, arrows and
tomahawks.
The bows were strung with deer
sinews.
The arrows were pointed with sharp
bone or flinL.
The tomahawk was shaped like an
axe.
Have you ever seen a tomahawk?
















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LESSON IV.

The first white men who came to
this country were Norsemen.
They were called Vikings.
Their leader's name was Lief
Ericson.
There is a statue of him in Boston.
The Norsemen came from Norway
to Greenland a great many years ago.
Afterward they went to the coast of
New England.
23






















ROUND TOWER, NEWPOkT.


-z -


P'i




Stories of the United States. 25
They came in the autumn.
They called the place where they
landed Vineland, because they found
grapes there.
We do not know just where it was.
Some people think they came to
Newport in Rhode Island.
The Norsemen stayed all winter.
They went home in the spring.
Others came, but they did not stay
long.
They had trouble with the Indians.


























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NORSEMEN.












LESSON V.

Sometime after the visit of the

Norsemen to America; a baby boy was

born in Genoa, Italy.
When he grew to be a man he was

to cross the great ocean.
He was to find the new world across
the sea.

His name was Christopher Colum-
bus.
27









































BUST OF COLUMBUS, CAPITOL, ROME


F:.r.'i~a~
~ ~~P





Stories of the Uiited States. 29
When he was a little boy he played
on the wharves in Genoa.
He watched the great ships come in.
He listened to the stories the sailors
told him.
He learned much about other
countries.
"I shall be a sailor some day," he
said to his mamma.
He could hardly wait to be a man.
Columbus' father and mother were
poor.
They tried to give their son a good
education.


He learned to read and *write.










2


STATUE OF COLUMBUS, BOSTON.
* '"'"""' *^--'^

STATUE OF COLUMBUS, BOSTON.




Stories of the United States.


He. liked to study arithmetic, draw-

ing, and geography.

He liked to read stories about other
countries.
Sometime you may see a statue of
Columbus.
It is in Boston.
There is a globe beside him.
He is pointing to America upon it.
When he was fourteen he went to
the East Indies.
When he was a man he went to


Lisbon in Portugal.






















GREENLAND









NORTH

AMERICA

S. i A




A F R I C A






s a T

M E R ICA
















SOUTH















COLUMBUS LEAVING S'AIN.


LESSON VI.

: Some people at this time thought

the earth was flat.

Columbus thought it was round.

A good many men thought he was

crazy.
33


~J~a~





Stories of the United States.


They laughed at him.
Columbus had studied and thought
so much about it, he felt quite sure the
earth was round.
At last he went to Spain.
He took his little boy, Diego, with
him.
One day the King and Queen of
Spain sent for him.
They wanted to hear about his plans
for finding this new country.
Columbus told them his story.
It was like a strange dream.
Still they could not believe that the
earth was round.



































































STATUE OF COLUMBUS.





36 Stories of the United States.
At last, the good Queen Isabella
said she would send him to find this
new country.


THE SHIPS OF COLUMBUS.


She would'even sell her jewels, if
she must, to get the money.
She fitted out three ships for
Columbus.




Stories of the United States.


They. were the Santa


Maria, the


Pinta, and the Nina.
They were not like our ships that we
hive to-day.
They were small, and not very safe.
They sailed from Spain, August 3,

1492.
The sailors were afraid to go so far
from home.
At last they wanted to go back.


They


said they


Columbus overboard


would throw


if he did


not


turn back.


Columbus told them that if he did













,444 j.; :;



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, 16~
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COLUMBUS ON'THE DECK OF THE SANTA MARIA.


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we. ~


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Stories of the United States. 39
not see land in three days, he would
go back home.
Soon they saw birds flying about.
A piece of a tree floated by.
At last they saw land.
Soon they landed upon an island.
It was one of the Bahama Islands
Columbus set up the Spanish flag.
That was to show that the island
belonged to Spain.


















LANDING OF COLUMBUS (FROM AN OLD PRINT.)

LESSON VII.

The Indians. lived here when

Columbus -came, you know.

When they saw the ships sailing

along, they were frightened.

They thought they were big birds.
41





Stories of the United States.


They ran down to the shore to s ;e
them.
They danced and screamed.


When the white men landed, the
Indians ran into the woods.


After a while they came back.




Stories of the United States.

They said, in Indian lang
"Welcome, white men!"
Columbus was kind to them.
He gave them pretty beads
other things.
The Indians gave Columbus
gold ornaments.
They showed him where to


43
uage,


and


some


find


gold.
When Columbus went back to Spain
he took some Indians with him.
The King and Queen of Spain were
very proud of him.
They called him "Don," and let
him ride beside them.




44 Stories of the United States.
Columbus soon after made a second
voyage.
He had more ships this time.
He took some good men to teach
the Indians.
The Spaniards were not kind to the
Indians.
They wanted to make slaves of them.
They made them work hard.
The Spaniards, also, began to be
unkind to Columbus.
They were jealous of him because
he found this new country.
They 'put him in chains and sent
him back to Spain.





Stories of the United States.


That was not right.

After a time they let


him come out


of prison.


DEATH OF COLUMBUS.


He died May 20, 1506, a poor man.

After a good many years his body


was taken to San Domingo.




















I I







...p ...-.. .. .- .- ... ...
REPRODUCTION OF THE SANTA MARIA AT THE WORLD'S FAIR, CHICAGO.
(COPYRIGHTED 1893, II. C. PEABODY, BY PERMISSION.)




Stories of the United States.


The Spanish people have put up a
monument for him.
It was through Columbus that our
own dear country was found.
He never knew how. much good he.
did.
The World's Fair was in memory
of Columbus.
It was held in Chicago in the sum-


mer of 1893.





































'4



9a


STATUE OF AMERICUS VESPUCIUS, (PORTICO OF THE UFFIZI.)


D








LESSON VIII.

This new country was not named
for Columbus.
It was named for another discoverer;
and his name was Americus Vespu-
cius.
He came to this country in 1497.
His home was in Florence, Italy.
He sailed over to this country, and
*along the coast for some distance.
SHe studied the stars, climate and




Stories of the United States.


It grew very cold, for they were
sailing toward the North.
The nights were very long.
The sailors were afraid.
They thought they would freeze.
They begged to go home.
Then Americus Vespucius decided
to sail back to Florence.
He told everyone of the wonderful
things he had seen.
All Europe was talking about him.
At last they named this country
America.
It was too bad Columbus could not
have had this honor.





Stories of the United States. 5

In I513, a Spaniard named Balboa
was in Central America.
The Indians told him of another sea
beyond the mountains.
He started out with his men and
an Indian guide to find it.
He came to a high mountain.
He went up alone to the top of it.
' He wanted to be the first to see this
new ocean.
Balboa was the first man from
Europe to see this great sight.
He called his men, and they thanked
God together.
Then Balboa took possession of this
ocean in the name of his King.
; 1
































































SIR FRANCIS DRAKE.














LESSON IX.

England sent over some discoverers
to the new world.
One of them was Sir Francis Drake.
. He sailed around Cape Horn.
H-e had five ships.
One was named the Golden Hind.
Sir Francis Drake sailed along the
oast and landed several times.
53








Map showing the World as known in the Middle of the 17th Century.



-- ,, N




Stories of the United States. 55
Some of his men took some bars of
silver from the Spaniards.
Sir Francis thought he could find a
passage to the North-west.
He wanted to go home that way.
It grew very cold and he had to
turn back.
He was afraid to return around
Cape Horn.
The Spaniards might attack them.
Tiey went west through the Indian
Ocean. S- fi
At last, after three years, he sailed
into Plymouth harbor, England.
I '















































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Stories of the United States.


The Golden Hind was the only
ship that was left.
Sir Francis ias the first white man
to sail around the world.
The church bells were rung, and
there was great rejoicing.
Guns were fired and the people
Cheered.
Queen Elizabeth made Sir Francis
Drake a knight.
A chair was made from the pieces
of the ship.
I~ is now in the University of Oxford.

1*

































































SIR WALTER RALEIGH.











LESSON X.
Sir Walter Raleigh was another
brave Englishman who came to this
country.
He fought the Spaniards in a battle
at sea.
The Spaniards blew up their vessels
so that the English could not get them.
Spain was never so powerful again.
I Queen Elizabeth was very proud of































































.r Y


- .- =LZE











QUEEN E1LIZAHETH.




.torzes of the United States.


S He was a great favorite of hers.
All England was proud of him, too.
About this time the good Queen
died.
James of Scotland became King.


He was jealous of Sir


Walter


Raleigh.
He hated him and did all that he
could to injure him.
At last he put him in prison.
Later he was beheaded.
It was very unkind of King James,
and a sad story.




























































RUINS AT JAMESTOWN.








LESSON XI.
Several years after this some good
men wanted to come from England to
this country to live.
The king gave his consent, and they
started.
They landed on the coast of Vir-
ginia.
There was a river there, and they
called it the James river, after King


ames.


They called the town Jamestown.






























































CAPTAIN JUHN SMITH.




Stories of the United States. 65
There was a very good man with
them.
His name was John Smith.
One day he went up the river for a
little trip in his boat.
He took one man with him.
He wanted to see what kind of a
country it was.
When they had gone some little
distance up the river, they landed.
Smith left the man with the boat.
He wanted to walk a little way
alone.
The Indians were watching them.




Stories of the United States.


After Smith had gone they seized
his boat.
They scalped the man he had left
there.
Then they started to find Smith.
When they came up to him he
fought them.
At last they captured him.
They took him to the camp.
Smith had a compass in his pocket.
He showed it to the Indians.
He told them how the needle always
pointed North.
They were so interested that they
did not kill Smith at once.





Stories of the United States.


They finally decided not to wait any

longer.

His life was saved in a strange way,


A COMPASS.


















































cI-



41


POAHONTAS SAVES CA IN SMITHS LIF


.t




PO'CAHONTAS SAVES CAPTAIN SMITH'S LIFE.










LESSON XII.
Smith was bound hand and foot.
He was brought out to be killed.
He had to lie down and put his
head on the trunk of a tree.
An Indian had raised a club to kill
Shim.
All at once a little Indian girl came
rushing up to them.
-She threw her arms around Smith s


neck.




Stories of the United States.


She was the daughter of the Chief.
She was very beautiful.
Her name was Pocahontas.
Pocahontas begged her father to
spare Smith's life.
It was strange, but the Chief lis-
tened to the child.
He let Smith go back to Jamestown.
After a time a young Englishman,
named John Rolfe, married Pocahontas.
He took her to his home in England.
They were coming back to make a
home in America.
Pocahontas did not seem well in
England.




Stories of the United States. 71
The change from her free forest
home was not good for her.
Before they could come back she
died.
She left a baby boy, who was very
handsome.
John Rolfe took him to America.
Some old Virginia families are
descendants of this boy.











-, -,,~. .,-p-, I


PILGRIMS' MONUMENT, PLYMOUTH.










LESSON


The next colony


XIII.

settled


on the


coast of Massachusetts.


I will tell you who the men
women were who came here.


They were


good people


England.
There were one hundred of them.
They wanted to leave England so
that they could worship God in their
own way.


and


from


I~i~i~~




74 Stories of the United States.
The people were called Pilgrims.
They were also called Separatists,
because they separated from the
Church of England.
They would not allow any music in
their churches, nor have the old
church service.
They dressed very plainly, and wore
their hair short.
The English people made fun of
them.
They called them unkind names.
So these people were, not happy
in their English homes.




Stories of the United States. 75
At last they could bear this treat-
ment no longer.
They left and went to Holland.
They were quite happy there, but
they wanted a country of their own.
They wanted to come here to the
"new world."
The Pilgrims were full.of cour .ge.
They started with two vessels.
I think they were very brave.
This was an unknown world to them.
One vessel had to go back.
It was not strong enough to go so far.
The other ship was named the
Mayflower.

















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MONUMENT ON PLYMOUTH ROCK, PLYMOUTH.












LESSON
t-I


The Pilgrims sailed from Southamp-
ton, in England..
They finally reached our bleak New
England coast.
It was winter and very cold.
They sailed into Plymouth bay and
east anchor in the harbor.
SThey stepped from their boat on to
large rock.


XIV.




Stories of the United States.


It is called Plymouth Rock even
now.
Perhaps you will see it some day.
They landed on the 2 st of Decem-
ber, 1620.
The first thing the Pilgrims did was
to build a large house.
It would hold their things until they
could build a better one.
They built a fence, or stockade, all
around the land they called their
village.
They were afraid of the Indians and
wild beasts.





Stories of the United States. 79
They elected a Governor and signed
a promise to obey the laws.
The first Governor was John Carver.
They soon had some huts to live in.
Some of the people lived on the
ship all winter.
During the winter a great many of
the Pilgrims died.
They had a military company.
The Captain was Miles Standish.
The Pilgrims sometimes saw the
Indians.
They seemed friendly, and one of
them taught the Pilgrims how to plant
orn.





80 Stories of the United States,

SThey did not have corn like ours

in England.
When the Mayflower returned to

England in April, not one of the

Pilgrims went back.
They had suffered much, but they
wanted to stay.
Read the Sailing of the Mayflower" in the
" Courtship of Miles Standish," by Longfellow.









MILES STANDISH'S AUTOGRAPH, SWORD AND DISH.










LESSON XV.
In the fall of 162 1,the Pilgrims had
their first Thanksgiving Day.
Their crops had done well.
They had plenty of corn.
The Governor thought it was right
to thank God for these blessings.
He sent the men out to hunt and
fish.
The women baked and cooked until
all was ready.




82 Stories of the United States.
They invited the Indian Chief, Mas-
sasoit, and some of his braves to come
to the feast.
The people all gathered in the
church for their Thanksgiving service.
The snow had just begun to fall.
After the service they went to have
their good dinners.
When the Indians saw all the'good'
things the Pilgrims had to eat, they
were surprised.
They did not know how to cook so
well.
They thought the Great Spirit loved
his white children best.



































































MASSASOIT AND THE PILGRIMS.




Stories of the United States.


Massasoit was a friend of the white
men for a great many years.
On this Thanksgiving Day the
Pilgrims had a great deal to be thank-
ful for.
They had also a great deal to make
them sad.
So many of their deai-ones haddied!
and they missed them on this day.
They had also suffered very much.
ZNow things began to look brighter
to them.
They're very thankful and happy.















JOHN ENDICO1T.


LESSON XVI.

Now we come to the settlement of
Salem, Massachusetts.
The word, Salem, means peace.
Salem was first called Naumkeag.
It was then only a litl fishing
village, with very few people.




Stories of the United States.


Afterward more settlers came, and
with them their governor, John Endi-
cott.
The first settlers of Salem did not
wish to obey this new governor.
They at last came to a pleasant
understanding.
They then changed the name of
Naumkeag to Salem.
These last people who came to
Salem were Puritans.
They were named so in England
because they wanted to make the ser-
vices in'e Church of England more
simple.




Stories of the United States. 87
They began to make homes for
themselves in this new country.
They brought seeds with them,
which they planted.
They began to spin, and weave, and
make leather from the skins of beasts.
There were carpenters, bricklayers,
blacksmiths, millers, tailors, shoe-
makers and tanners among the men.
They had learned their trades in
England.
The men began to work in different
ways here.
The settlers were so nearlthe coast
that they made a business of fishing, too.





Stories -of the United States.


Within a year they began to build

ships.

They started schools for their chil-

dren, and soon had the beginning of a

college at Cambridge.

This is now Harvard College.


HARVARD COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE.
HARVARD COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE.

















ROGER WILLIAMS' HOUSE, SALEM, BUILT 1635.


LESSON XVII.

The old homes in Salem were homes
indeed.
In some of them children were not
only born, but they lived is them all
their lives and died there.




90 Stories of the United States.
The working day began at six o'clock
in summer and seven o'clock in winter.
In the winter there were large wood
fires in open fireplaces.
But the rooms were cold.
The halls were never heated.
They did not often have fires in
their sleeping rooms.
The water froze in the pitchers.
People did not mind the cold -in
those days.
The breakfast was a pleasant meal.
They had plenty of good johnny-
cake, drop cakes and griddle cakes.
There was milk and honey, too, for
the children.





Stories of the United States. 91
After breakfast the children started
for school..
They sometimes had to go through
deep snow-drifts.
The girls were not allowed to have
sleds of their own.
They were called "Tom-boys"-. if
they coasted.
I think they were sometimes tempted
to try thte4firothers' sleds.
I have heard of some girls, who
coasted down hill on boards.
It was great fun, too, though hard to
steer.





92 Stories of the United States.
For dinner, they had pudding first
and then meat.
The children had to go back to
school in the afternoon.
School began at two o'clock.
Supper was at six o'clock, and, when
*the table was cleared, the family all
gathered about it.
The children studied for a time and
then played games until bed-time:.
The older ones read and sewed.
SThey had apples and cider for a treat.
Sometimes they had pop-corn and
made candy.




Stories of the United States


They popped the corn over the hot
wood ashes.
The children of Salem were very
happy in those good old days.
Some of the old homes are still
standing, and are very interesting.
The first church is there, too; the
key to open the door is very large, but
the church is very small.


.7 II`






















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REBECCA NURSE HOUSE, DANVERS.

REBECCA NURSE, OCCUPANT OF THIS HOUSE, WAS HANGED CLOSE BY AS A WITCH.











LESSON XVIII.

Now we must talk a little about a
sad time in the history of Salem.
That was the time when some of
the people were thought to be witches.
The excitement began among the
children.
In these days we should say that
children who behaved as they did were
crazy.
Then they were said to be bewitched.
95





96 Stories of the United States.
Some of the children did and said
strange things.
At last the people blamed some old
women for bewitching the children.
The old women were taken before
the judge and found guilty.
They were sentenced to be hung.
The witches, or women who were
called witches, were taken up on a hill.
This place is still called Gallows
Hill.
There they were hanged.
It is sad to think that people could
be so foolish as to really believe such
things.





Stories of the United States. 97
After a time, not very long either-
the people began to see that they were
doing wrong.
Soon witchcraft became a thing of
the past.
No one believed there were such
things as witches.
Of course, there never were any.
The children and the people who
acted so strangely were sick.
They should have been put by
themselves until they were well.





























I,;


OLD POWDER HOUSE, MARBLEHEAD.




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