• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Frontispiece
 Stories of the Red children
 The winds
 The North Wind and the duck
 The lightning
 The South Wind and the dandeli...
 The young hunter
 The morning star
 The wandering star (the will-o...
 Winter and spring
 The star that became a lily
 Little red plume
 Robin Redbreast
 How the rain comes
 The rainbow
 The brave little mole
 How the patient worm saved the...
 How the summer came
 Back Cover






Title: Stories of the red children
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085049/00001
 Material Information
Title: Stories of the red children
Physical Description: 162 p. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Brooks, Dorothy
Educational Publishing Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: Educational Publishing Company
Place of Publication: Boston
New York
Chicago ;
Publication Date: 1896
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Indians of North America -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1896   ( lcsh )
Folk tales -- 1896   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre: Children's stories
Folk tales   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
United States -- California -- San Francisco
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Dorothy Brooks.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00085049
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002222752
notis - ALG2998
oclc - 55106835

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 1a
    Front Matter
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
    Frontispiece
        Page 6
    Stories of the Red children
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    The winds
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    The North Wind and the duck
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    The lightning
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    The South Wind and the dandelion
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    The young hunter
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    The morning star
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    The wandering star (the will-o'-the-wisp)
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Winter and spring
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    The star that became a lily
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    Little red plume
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
    Robin Redbreast
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
    How the rain comes
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
    The rainbow
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
    The brave little mole
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
    How the patient worm saved the children
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
    How the summer came
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
    Back Cover
        Page 163
        Page 164
Full Text






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STORIES

OF THE


RED CHILDREN


BY DOROTHY BROOKS







EDUCATIONAL PUBLISHING COMPANY
BOSTON
NEW YORK CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO



































COPYRIGHTED
By EDUCATIONAL PUBLISHING COMPANY.
1896.
























CONTENTS.


Stories of the Red Children

Winds .
North Wind and the Duck .

Lightning

South Wind and the Dandelion

Young Hunter .
Morning Star

Wandering Star (Will-o'-the-Wisp)

Winter and Spring .
Star that became a Lily .

Little Red Plune

Robin Redbreast

How the Rain comes

Rainbow .

Brave little Mole .

How the Patient Worm saved the Children

How the Summer came ,


PAGE
7

11
21

33
39

43

49

55

S63
75
85
95

S 109
119
125

143

152














STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN,


Once there were only little
Red children in our land.
That was before the white
people came to this country.
These little Red children
were the Indian children.




8 STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.
There are a few of them in
this country now.
Most of them live out in the
far West.
They have little villages of
their own.
They do not like to live in
cities as we do.
These little Red children
used to tell each other very
beautiful stories.
They were as pretty as fairy
stories.
The little Red children




STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


loved the sun and the moon
and the stars.
They called the winds their
brothers.
They loved the trees and the
flowers.
They loved the shining
rivers and the high hills.
They talked to the rivers
and the hills; and they be-
lieved that the rivers and the
hills knew what was said to
them.
When the little Red children




10 STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.
were happy, they believed the
bright flowers were happy, too.
And when the little Red
children were sad, they be-
lieved the winds were sorry
for them.












THE WINDS.


Wabun was the East Wind.
He was always young and
beautiful.
It was the East Wind that
brought the morning.
He chased the darkness down
the valley.
He shot his silver arrows
after it.













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THE WIND.


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STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


He painted


the morning


clouds.
He called the deer and
the hunter from their sleep.


Kabeyun


was -the West


Wind.
He was strong and powerful.


He could drive


away the


heavy water-laden clouds of
the South.


He could drive


away


the


cold clouds of the North.
The little Red children loved
the West Wind; for when he
came the sun came, and the







































































" THERE WERRE IIHEAVY RANGING VINES."




STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


blue sky smiled down upon
the fields.
The South Wind was dreamy
and drowsy.
He dwelt in the South, where
it was always summer.
The robins and the bluebirds
loved the South Wind, and
fled to it for protection.
There were purple grapes
and rich yellow melons in the
home of the South Wind.
There were great trees and
heavy hanging vines.
Sometimes the South Wind




16 STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.
would sit beneath the vines
and smoke his pipe of peace.
Then the smoke would roll
northward and fill the air with
soft, warm, yellow haze.
The smoke would settle
lovingly over the rugged hills
and make them beautiful.
Then the little Red children
would say, See how soft the air
is! It is Indian summer now."
The North Wind came from
his lodge, amid the snowdrifts.
His home was among the
icebergs.


























































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THE NORTH WIND,




18 STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.
His long hair was sprinkled
with snowflakes.
He liked to run howling and
shrieking down the valleys.
He heaped up the crusted
snowdrifts.
He covered the lakes and
rivers with a little roof of ice.
'He liked to send the snow-
flakes flying through the air.
He liked to hear them whizz
through the forests.
He liked to drive the curlews
to their nests among the sedges.




















































HE HEAPED P THE CRUSTED NOWDIT.
HE HEAPED UP THE CRUSTED SNOWDRIFTS."


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20 STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.
And all these winds the little
"Red children loved; for they
were brothers.
Which one did the children
like best?
They liked them all best; for
the East Wind brought the
daylight; the West AWind
brought the blue sky; the
South Wind brought the sum-
mer with its fruits and flowers;
and the North Wind brought
the winter with its sparkling
snow and ice.












THE NORTH WIND AND THE DUCK.

A brave little duck lived.
beside a lake.
He lived in a poor little hut;
and he had only four logs of
wood.
"Four logs is enough," the
little duck said; "for each one
will last a whole month.
And there are only four cold
months in the year."






















"I WILL FREEZE OVwR THE WATERS."


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STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


So the little duck was cheer-
ful, even if the winter was
bitter cold.
No day was to him too cold.
Never did he mind the
shrieking of the North Wind.
"I will freeze over the waters,"
said the North Wind; "we will
see how the little duck will
like that!"
So one morning, when the
duck went down to the water,
he could catch no fish for his


breakfast.







IEr71


V ,.~,


" THEN THE DUCK WALKED OUT ONTO THE ICE."





STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


"What shall I


do!" thought


the little duck.
"Ha! ha! ha!" laughed the
North Wind; "what will you
do!"
"O, it is you, is it?" said the
duck.
"You are playing a game on


Then the
onto the ice.


He pulled


duck walked.


the rushes


grew up through the ice.
Then he put his bill down


out


that



























*' V I i


STHE COLD NORTH WIND CREPT UP TO THE LITTLE DUCK'S HUT."
"THE COLD NORTH WIND CREPT UP TO THE LITTLE DUCK S HUT."


I;si~.uePY~ b~b. .


s;-~





STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN. 27
through the holes in the ice
and caught some tiny fish.
"That's a brave little duck,"
said the North Wind; "but I
will catch her yet."
So, then, the cold North Wind
crept up to the little duck's
hut. He crept close up to her
door.
The little duck knew he was
there, for she felt his cold
breath.
So she began to sing, as
cheerily as a little duck could,




STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


"Cold North Wind,
I know your plan;
You are but my brother man.
Blow you may
Your loudest breeze,
This little duck
You cannot freeze."
"I wonder if the little duck
knows I am here," thought the
North Wind.
"How does she dare laugh at
me and sing about me!"
But the little duck sang
bravely on.
"I will not allow this little




STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


duck to laugh at me," said the
North Wind.
".I will make her feel my
power."
So, then, the North Wind
crept into the hut and sat
himself down beside the fire.
The little duck knew he was
there; so she stirred the fire
till the flames leaped high.
The little hut grew hotter
and hotter.
The North Wind blew and
blew; and the little duck sang
and sang:




30 STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.
"Cold North Wind,
I know your plan;
Blow you may
Your loudest breeze;
This little duck
You cannot freeze."
By and by, the North Wind
began to grow still.
It was so warm in the hut
he could not breathe.
The snow upon his hair
began to melt.
The icicles on his crown
began to drip.





STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN. 31
The wet tears poured down
his face.
"I cannot bear this fire!" he
said; and then he crept out of
the hut, and went away far to
the North, where he could get
cool again.
The little duck laughed to
herself, when he had gone.
"That is a strange, little
duck," the North Wind said.
"How brave she is!"












THE LIGHTNING.

Once a little Indian boy was
all alone in the dark forest.
It was night, and he was
afraid.
There were bears in the
forest.
He crept up into a pine tree
and went to sleep.
A voice came to him and




34 STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.
said, Come with me, little boy,
up among the clouds."
Then a strong wind lifted
the child and carried him high
up into the skies.
There was a beautiful palace
among the clouds; and there
were brave sachems in the
palace.
They gave the little Red boy
twelve silver arrows.
"Go and shoot the wicked
manitos," said the sachems.
"They dwell far away in the
northern sky."

































































"SO HE TOOK VERY CAREFUL AIM."


r '. --





STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


The little


boy set out with


arrows into the land of the
manitos.
He shot his arrows at them;
but not one of the manitos
was hurt.


As soon as they


saw the


arrows coming, they changed


themselves


into rocks and


stones.
Now the little boy had only
one arrow left.
"I must not fail with this,"
he said.
So he took very careful aim;





STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


and the arrow lodged in the
heart of a mountain.
Then the boy turned to go
back to the cloud palace.
"Do you think we will let
you go?" cried the manitos.
"No, no, no! We will punish
you! You shall be an arrow
yourself! You shall shoot
through the air! Z-z-z-z-z!"
And the little boy found
himself changed by the man-
itos into a flash of lightning.
And to this day, now and
then, we see him flashing
across the northern sky.





























































"THE SOUTH WIND WAS SWINGING IN HIS SOFT CLOUDLETS
ACROSS THE SOUTHERN SKY."








-vI


THE SOUTH WIND AND THE DANDELION.

The South Wind was swing-
ing in his soft cloudlets across
the southern sky.
He looked towards the north.
There he saw a great, green
field.
In -the field among the
grasses were bright golden
flowers.





STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


"0, beautiful flowers," he
said, "I wish I were beside


you, and could touch
golden crowns."


your


But the South


Wind was


lazy, and the days flew by.


One morning the


South


Wind looked again.
"I will go to the beautiful
flowers to-day," he said.




STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


But, lo! a great change had
come upon the flowers.
Their crowns had become
silver white.
"Now that is sad," said the
South Wind. "Has my brother,
the North Wind, been scatter-
ing his snows upon these
beautiful flowers ?"
And the South Wind sighed
and sighed.
-IHis sighs swept across the
field.
Then another change came
upon the dandelion crowns.





42 STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.
The air was filled with little
white feathers.
They flew hither and thither
through the air.
"See the dandelion seed!"
said the children.
"They are searching for a
place to sleep!"
"And see how the South
Wind is helping them!"
"That is very strange," said
the South Wind. "What can
those little Red children
mean ?"









THE YOUNG HUNTER.

One little Red child loved
the stars.


He 'loved


them


more than


did his brothers.
At sunset he would run up
into the hills to see the stars
come out.
There was one star he loved
most of all.


He called


it always


Star Beautiful."


"My





STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


Sometimes there would be
clouds in the evening sky, and
the little Red child could not
see the star.
Then he would say, "Good
West Wind, please drive the
clouds away, that I may see
my star."
And the West Wind always
heard the little boy's cry.
By and by, the star whis-
pered kind words through the
summer air to the little child.
"You shall be a great
hunter," the star said; "for I













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" NEVER DID HE GUIDE THEM WRONG."





46 STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.
will guide you to the places
where the deer hide."
By and by, the star whis-
pered to the little Red child
again, and said, "You are a tall,
brave youth now; and I will
make you the wisest of all
your people."
Then the people loved the
youth, and came to him for
wisdom.
Never did he guide them
wrong; never did they fail
in what he bid them do.





STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


"lHe is a wonderful brave,"
the people said.
But the youth said, "No, it
is my Star Beautiful that
makes me wise."
After a long time the youth
became an old, old man.
"He cannot live," the people
whispered.
"I shall go now to my star,"
the old man said.
Then the sunset hour had
come, and the star shone out


again.





STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


The old man smiled to see
the star.


IJNDIAN UCAJNU1i BUUIAL.
"It is my Star Beautiful,"
he said, "and it calls me as it
did when I was a little child."
Then the old man closed his
eyes; and went away to join
his own Star Beautiful.










THE MORNING STAR.

Two little Red children, a
brother and sister, played
along the river banks.
They were happy little chil-
dren, and they played from
morning till night.
But one day, a Manito came
to them.
It said, "Little boy, you
must go now to dwell upon



























































"YOU MUST GUIDE THE MOUNTAIN STREAMS."




STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN. 51
the mountains. You must
take your place far up in the
hill tops among the trees.
"You must sing to the rivers
and the brooklets. You must
guide the mountain streams
and help them to find the
oceans."
And to the little sister the
Manito said, "You must go
to the place of Breaking Light.
You must make a palace for
yourself among the morning
clouds. You must be the
Morning Star."





STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


So the little brother and
sister bade each other good-by.
The brother cut a castle for
himself from the grey rock.
The sister made a palace for
herself from the morning
clouds.
Every morning the brother
watched from his castle for
the coming of his sister-the
shining Morning Star.
And every morning the sis-
ter hurried up from the waters
to greet her brother in the
mountains.





54 STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.
But when the sun came,
then the sister would hide her
light.
"Good-by, brother," she
would say, "I will come
again."
And the brother would say,
"Good-by, sister, for a little
time. I will watch on the
mountain top till you come
again."










THE WANDERING STAR.
(THE WILL-O'-THE-WISP.)

A little star lost its way in
the mist.
It wandered down toward
the home of the Red children.
The people saw it coming
down through the air.
"Run, run to your caves,"
they cried, "it is a manito!
It means to burn our wig-
warns! It means to burn our
55

















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f: : i ;


WILL-O'-THE-WISP.


S.'l '. *-


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STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN. 57
wigwams! It means to burn
our fields!"
The bright little star was
grieved to hear the people say
these things; for it meant to
do no harm.
For a long time the star wan-
dered-up and down the valleys.
Sometimes it would come
and stand before the camp-
fires.
Sometimes it would lift itself
above the hunter's wigwam;
but the people were afraid.





STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


Whenever they saw the star
they were afraid; and the star
was very lonely.
By and by, a little child
came to live among the Red
children.
And when she saw the star,
she stretched her little hands
out towards it.
She laughed and called to
the ,star. "0 come, come to me,
my beautiful star!" she said.
Then the star was glad; for
now he had a playmate among
the Red children.





STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN. 59
By and by, the little child
grew to be a maiden, tall and
beautiful.
And one day she wandered
far down into the valley and
lost her way.
Then a great storm came.
The clouds grew black. The
sun was hidden.
There was a swamp at the
foot of the valley. It was a
treacherous swamp. And it
called to the maiden, "Come,
come "














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p^.\-j


" SHE GREW TO BE A MAIDEN."




STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN. 61
And the maiden came.
Down, down, deeper and deeper
she sank into the black waters
of the swamp.
By and by, the green grasses
closed over her, and no one
ever saw her again.
Some say the winds caught
her up and carried her away
to the cloud palaces; some say
the manitos bore her away to
their home in the North.
The little Red children do
not know; but the wandering





62 STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.
star knew. And to this day it
hovers over the marshy place
at night and watches.
Perhaps it watches for the
maiden to come back.
Some of the Red children
believe her spirit does come
back when the summer nights
are long.
For then it is the hunters see
the star she loved, hovering
over the marsh where the
maiden disappeared.









WINTER AND SPRING.


Old Winter sat all alone in
his hut. It was a cold, little
hut, and it stood beside a frozen
river.
The winds were howling and
shrieking, and the flowers had
hid themselves away in the
earth.
Even the big round sun had
crept away towards the south,
for he did not like Old Winter
and the north.






















`.-

































.A .O .. O ." ,




"All! YOU HAVE COME, GOOD SPRINGTIME."




STORIES OF. THE RED CHILDREN.


One morning Old Winter
heard a gentle step at his door;
a soft perfume came in upon
the air.
"Ah! you have come, good
Spring-time," Old Winter said.
"Come in, the Red children
will be glad you have come.
Sit down and let us talk
together.
"I shall have to creep away
to my own home very soon,
now that you have come.
"You have never seen my


It is very beautiful, I


home.




66 STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.:
think, and it is white and
shining.
"The waters have a beautiful,
sparkling roof over them. It
is smooth, and one can see the
water underneath sometimes;
and when the sun looks upon
it, it shines like silver."
"Of course it is beautiful,"
said the Spring, "but I like
mine better. There is no spark-
ling snows there; but we have
sparkling waters.
"There are green leaves on









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WHEN I BREATHE THE WHOLE EARTH TURNS TO STONE."


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68 STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.
the trees and the fields are full
of flowers.
"When the soft wind comes,
then.the waters dance, and the
grasses bend before it."
"But I have great power,"
Old Winter said, "for when I
breathe, the rivers and the
whole earth harden, and I
change to stone.
"'If I shake my long white
locks of hair. then the earth is
covered with glistening snow-
flakes. The leaves drop from




STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


the trees and the flowers dis-
appear."
"I, too, have power," said
the Spring.
"My voice is not very loud,
but when I whisper all the
trees and the flowers hear
me, though they are fast
asleep.
"When I breathe the grasses
spring up and all the flowers
burst forth to greet me.
"I shake my golden hair,
and soft showers fall upon-the























































W WHEN I BREATHE THE GRASSES SPRING UP,"





STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN. 71
earth. The raindrops help the
flowers and grasses to come out
into the sunlight; and the
hearts of the Red Children are
full of joy."
But already the sun had
begun to creep back towards
the north. He thought he
heard the voice of Spring and
was coming to see.
He felt the softness in the
air, and he smelled the sweet-
ness.
IlOSS.
The birds, too, thought they
heard the voice of Spring, so





STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


they came and perched upon
the roof of Old Winter's hut.
The rivers, too, had heard
their name called; and already
they were beginning to dance
and sparkle.
There was a sweet odor, like
new grass in the hut; then Old
Winter began to grow very
still. "I am sleepy," he said.
By and by, the water dripped
from his long, white hair, he
grew very, very small and very,
very weak; until at last no
sign of Winter was left; and on-




STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN. 73
the floor of the hut where he
had sat, sprang up a beautiful,
pink flower.
"It is the Spring Beauty!"
the Red children say, and
when they see it they rejoice;
for they know that Old Win-
ter has crept away to his home,
and that Spring has come to
dwell in his place.

Xse











































"ONCE A BEAUTTIFTT, STAR CAME DOWN TO EARTH."














THE STAR THAT BECAME A LILY.

Once a beautiful star came
down to earth. For a long time
it had watched the children at
play in the green fields, and
the star said, "- love those
little Red children, I would
like to go down and live with
them."




STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


So one night the star shot
down, down, 'till at last it
stood out upon a big plain.
The people in the wigwam
village saw it, and ran to look
at it.
"I have come, 0 good people,"
said 'the star, "to dwell with
you on the earth.
"I love to watch you in your
wigwams.
"I love to see you make your
birch canoes.
"I love to watch your chil-
dren at their play.





STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN. 77
"Tell me, then, where I may
dwell?
"It must be where I can see
you all, and where at night I
can look up to my home in
the skies."
Then One chief said: "Dwell
here upon the mountain top;
where you can overlook the
plain.
The clouds will come down
and rest upon the high peaks,
and each morning you may
greet the sun."

































































"DWELL HERE UPON THI MOUNTAIN TOP."




STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN. 79
"Dwell here upon the hill-
sides," said another chief, "for
there the flowers grow bright-
est, and the sun is warmest."
"Dwell in the forests," said a
third. chief, "for there the sweet
violets grow, and the air is
cool, and the smell of spruce is
in the air."
But the star thought the
mountain was too far away, as
it could not see the children
from such a height, and it was
they it wanted to be near.





80 STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.
The hillside, too, the star
thought was far away, and the
forest, it was sure, was too dark
and dreary.
But one day the star saw a
beautiful little lake. The very
water was clear,-one could see
the skies and the clouds in it.
At night the stars shone
down into its waters.
The water was soft and
warm, and the star was pleased
to see it ripple and dance. It
liked to see the sunlight glim-
mer on the waters.




STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN. 81
The children loved the lake,
too; they played all day on
its banks, and often paddled
out upon it with, their little
canoes.
"I will dwell right here," the
star said; "for then I can be
near the children."
- And so, when the sun had
set, the star floated down upon
the waters.
It sent its rays away down
beneath the waters; and the
Red children are sure these
rays took root.




STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


Perhaps they did; for, sure
enough, the very next morn-
ing there was a beautiful lily
upon the waters.
Its roofs reached away down
into the rich earth, its petals
were pure white, and it had a
heart of rich yellow gold.
"No flower has a perfume so
sweet," the children cried.
Then they rowed out to look
at it.
"It is the star," the children
said; "it will dwell with us
forever, and we will call it the
Lily Star."


























































" THEN OTHER LILLIES GREW UP AROUND IT."




84 STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.
Then the children rowed
back to the shore. They did
not pluck the lily, but each
morning they went to see it.
"Dear, beautiful lily!" they
would say.
By and by it opened wide
its petals, and the air was
filled with sweetness.
Then other lilies grew up
around it; and after a time
these water lilies, or Lily Stars,
as the children called them,
were floating on the waters of
the lakes everywhere.











'W LITTLE RED PLUME.

There was
once a warrior
chief whom
Every body loved.
ven his enemies
Y loved him, for he was
never cruel.
He loved his people; he
longed always to bring some
good to them.





86 STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.
This good chief would cure
the sick. He could fly in the
air. He could swim in the
deep waters. The good man-
itos loved him, and gave him
these wonderful gifts.
One morning he was wan-
dering through a forest. It
was very early.
The sun was only just aris-
ing, and there was not much
light.
"Good morrow," said a voice
at the feet of the chief.





STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN. 87
The chief looked down. He
could hardly see who was
there.
"Who are you?" he said.
"I am Mondamin," said a
little man; and he shook his
funny little red-plumed head
at the big chief.
"You are strong, Chief," the
little man said. "Tell me
what makes you so strong?"
"I am strong only as all men
are strong," said the chief.
"Very well, then, let us





88 STORtES Of TFH RlE CHILDREN.
wrestle. If you throw me, cry,
Wa-ge-ne-wa! -Wa-ge-ne-wa!
And if I throw you, I will
cry, Wa-ge-ne-wa! Wa-ge-ne-
wa!"
Then the big, brave chief and
tiny, little Red Plume wrestled.
All day long they wrestled,
for little Red Plume had magic
strength; but when the sun
began to go down, then Red
Plume's strength began to fail.
"Wa-ge-ne-wa! Wa-ge-ne-
wa!" cried the big chief, for at
last Red Plume lay at his feet.





STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


The chief stooped to pick up
his tiny foe. But, lo! there was
no foe there. Only an ear of
red corn was there.
And, indeed, had it not been
for the same waving red plume,
the chief would have thought
the manitos had carried the
little man away.
But there he lay, red plume
and all.
Then Red Plume spoke:
"Again, good Chief, you
shall carry a great gift to
your people, for I am Moli-













































































THE YEAST OF MONDAMIN{.





STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


damin, the friend of the Red


children.


Because you have


conquered me, you shall take
me to them.


"But first strip
that protects me
storms and cold.


off the


coat


from the


"Then take my kernels
scatter them in the rich


and
soil


by the riverside.
"Go away, then, and do not


come back till one moon
passed.
"Then I will give you


has


for


your people, the Gift of Corn."




/
92 STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.
The chief did as he was told;
and when he came back, there
he saw a whole field of tall,
waving corn, and on each
plant was a waving plume;
and, hid away among the thick
leaves, was a husk of corn.
"It is Mondamin!" the chief
said.
Then Mondamin spoke again:
"This is the Gift of Corn, I
promised.
"Now go call your people,
gather all the Red Plumes,
grind the kernels between





STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN. 93
great rocks, and you will have
then a food that will never
fail.
"Some of the kernels you will
plant again; then another field
of corn will rise up, and you
shall gather it and hide it
away for the winter's food."
Then the chief called the
people.
They all came, the fathers
and the mothers and the little
children.
They gathered the Red





94 STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.
Plumes and fed the tall plants
to the cattle.
Then they held a great feast,
and danced and sang songs to
Mondamin; for they knew
now that he was their friend.
Then they thanked the Great
Spirit, and said: "Mondamin,
the friend of the -Red Man!
Mondamin, the giver of the
Gift of Corn!"








ROBIN REDBREAST.


"It is time, my son, to go
forth into the forest.
"Here is the mat your mother
has made for you.
"Take it with you into the
densest part of the forest.
"Place yourself upon it face
down; and lie there for twelve
days and nights.
"Each morning I will come
to you, and on the twelfth
morning I will bring you food.





STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.


"You are a tall, strong youth
now. It is time you were a
warrior.
"But first you must prove to
your people that you are strong
to endure.
"When the twelve days of
fasting are passed, then you
shall come back to your tribe.
"We will hold a great feast
for you. There shall be music
and dancing. And the chief
shall say, 'Now you are a war-
rior brave.' "
This is what the fathers of




STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN. 97
the Red children say to their
tall boys.
Each father is very proud
when his boy reaches the age
at which he can go forth to fast.
The boy, too,. is proud; for
when the fast is over the
people honor him.
But there was one youth
that went forth to the fasting
sad of heart.
"Alas, my father," he said,
"I am afraid I shall never be a
warrior. I am afraid you will
never be proud of your son."




98 STORIES OF THE RED CHILDREN.
"Talk not like that," the
father said, "but be brave!"
Poor boy! he was brave
enough, but he did not love
war and bird-shooting.
He loved the birds too well
to want to shoot them; and as
to war, why should he kill
other youths like himself?
Still, the boy went forth to
the forest. He spread out the
mat his mother had made, and
stretched himself upon it.
Each morning the father
came to see the youth, and-








































"EACH MORNING THE FATHER CAME TO SEE THE YOUTH."


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