• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Title Page
 Financial
 Trade, agriculture, and indust...
 Legislation
 Education
 Government institutions, Judicial...
 Postal, telegraph, and telephone...
 General observations






Group Title: Colonial reports--annual
Title: Bermuda
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085034/00001
 Material Information
Title: Bermuda
Series Title: Colonial reports--annual
Uniform Title: Bermuda (London, England 1920)
Alternate Title: Bermuda report for ..
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: H.M.S.O.
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: 1914
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Periodicals -- Bermuda Islands   ( lcsh )
Economic conditions -- Periodicals -- Bermuda Islands   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: Bermuda
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -1930.
General Note: Description based on: 1920; title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00085034
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 36282924
lccn - 2004240276
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Annual report on the social and economic progress of the people of Bermuda

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Financial
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Trade, agriculture, and industries
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Legislation
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Education
        Page 11
    Government institutions, Judicial statistics
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Postal, telegraph, and telephone services
        Page 15
    General observations
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
Full Text










No. 853.


BERMUDA.





REPORT FOR 1914.

(For Report for 1913 see No. 803.)


presenteb to botb lbouses of parliament bp CommanD of btse Mfiajestt.
September, 1915.


LONDON:
PRINTED UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF HIS MAJESTY'S
STATIONERY OFFICE
By BARCLAY AND FRY, LTD., THE GROVE, SOUTHWARD STREET, S.E.
To be purchased, either directly or through any Bookseller, from
WYMAN AND SONS, LIMITED, 29, BREAms BUILDINGS, FETTER LANE,E.C.,
and 28, ABINGDON STREET, S.W., and 54, ST. MARY STREET, CARDIFF; Or
H.M. STATIONERY OFFICE (SOOTTISH BRANCH),
23, FORTH STREET, EDINBURGH; or
E. PONSONBY, LIMITED, 116, GRAFTON STREET, DBLIN ;
or from the Agencies in the British Colonies and Dependencies,
the United States of America and other Foreign Countries of
T. FISHER UNWIN, LIMITED, LONDON, W.C.
1915.
[CcL 7622/44.] Price 1id.


,0
LLJ
O

o U
O ul
20

cc



Oj4j


> r
















CONTENTS.


I. FINANCIAL


II. TRADE, AGRICULTURE, AND INDUSTRIES


III. LEGISLATION .. .. .


IV. EDUCATION .. .


V. GOVERNMENT INSTITUTIONS ..


VI. JUDICIAL STATISTICS .


VII. VITAL STATISTICS .. .. ..


VIII. POSTAL, TELEGRAPH, AND TELEPHONE SERVICES


IX. GENERAL OBSERVATIONS .


PAGE.


4


6


9


. 11


12


12


13


15


16








COLONIAL REPORTS-ANNUAL.


No. 853.



BERMUDA:

(For Report for 1913 see No. 803.)




THE GOVERNOR TO THE SECRETARY OF STATE.

Government House,
Bermuda,
27th July, 1915.

SIR,
I have the honour to transmit herewith the report on the Bermuda
Blue Book for 1914, which has been prepared by the Colonial Secretary,
Mr. R. Popham Lobb, C.M.G.

I have, &c.,
G. M. BULLOCK,
Lieutenant-General, Governor
and Commander-in-Chief.

The Right Honourable
A. Bonar Law, M.P.,
etc., etc., etc.,
Secretary of State for the Colonies,
Downing.Street, S.W.


(C191) Wt.36076/850. 1125 & 90. 9.15. B.&F. Ltd. Gp. 11/2.








COLONIAL REPORTS-ANNUAL.


REPORT ON THE BLUE BOOK FOR THE YEAR 1914.

I.-FINANCIAL.
(a) GENERAL REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.
The revenue for the year amounted to 80,504, being 72 less
than that for 1913, which was 80,576.
The following tables show the revenue and expenditure for 1914,
as compared with the. corresponding figures for 1913:-

Revenue.


Year

1913
1914


Increase
Decrease


Customs. Other Receipts.

64,711 15,865
59,464 21,040


5,247


5,175


Total.

80,576
80,504


72


Expenditure.


Personal
Emoluments.

22,177
24,147


1,970


Other charges.

65,602
65,428


174


The decrease in the revenue for 1914 as compared with that for
1913 was caused by decreased receipts from Customs,. due to the
falling off of imports due to the war.
The revenue, which amounted to 80,504 19s. 8d., was made up


as follows:-

Ad valorem duties..
Specific duties
Other receipts





Postal
Ad valorem duty


s. d.
32,934 9 0
26,530 5 9
21,040 4 11

Total .. 80,504 19 8


leads of Decrease.


Heads of Increase.

Savings Bank
Pilotage .. ..
Reimbursements ..



776
4,898



3,000
1,145
1,678


Year.

1913
1914


'Increase
Decrease


Total.

87,779
89,575

1,796








BERMUDA, 1914.

Expenditure.
The principal increases appear in the following items :-


Trade Developmeni
Agriculture
Legislation
Education
Martial Law




Miscellaneous.
Public Works



2,497
997
755
409
5,877


Heads of Decrease.

S.. .. 2,250
.. .. 5,177


(b) REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE FOR LAST FIVE YEARS


Year.

1910
1911
1912
1913
1914


Revenue. Expenditure.

78,593 68,392
79,248 90,100
83,629 78,210
80,575 87,779
80,504 89,575


The cash balance in hand on 31st December, 1914, was 2,463,
as against 11,534 at the end of 1913, and 18,737 at the end of 1912.

The expenditure for the year 1914 was 1,796 greater than that in
1913.

(c) ASSETS AND LIABILITIES.
The assets of the Colony at the end of 1913 were as follows :-
s. d.
Cash in Treasury .. 2,463 16 0
Advances made to Savings Bank .. 8,204 9 8


Amount invested under Surplus Funds
Account ..


7,762 0 1


Total .. 18,430 5 9


There were no liabilities on 31st December, 1914, beyond the Public
Debt, which is separately dealt with.

(d) PUBLIC DEBT.
The Public Debt at the end of 1914 amounted to 45,500, made
up as follows :-Local Inscribed Stock: Channel Loan, 40,000;
Causeway Loan, 5,500







COLONIAL REPORTS-ANNUAL.


On 40,000 of the local inscribed stock the rate of interest is 41.
per cent., and on the balance (5,500) the rate is 4 per cent. The
first mentioned sum was raised in 1893-4 for the purpose of improving
the channels leading into Hamilton Harbour. The stock is redeemable
at par in 1923. The sinking fund invested on account of this loan
stood at 25,847 on the 31st December, 1914.

The amount of 5,500 was raised early in 1900 for defraying a part
of the cost of repairing the causeway connecting St. George's with
the main island, a large portion of which structure had been destroyed
by the hurricane in September, 1899. The sinking fund created in
connection with this loan amounted to 5,420 on 31st December, 1914.
The stock is redeemable at par in 1916.

Both loans referred to were raised locally.

(e) CURRENCY.

All Government accounts are kept in sterling, and English money
is in universal use. There is no local Government bank. The paper
money:in circulation consists of a limited number of Bank of England
notes, and in the winter a large amount of United States green-
backs." The number of these latter notes in circulation has increased
considerably, and they are accepted generally (although not at the
banks) at par, owing to the fact that they can be used for remittance
purposes through letter post. The legal tender of silver coin is
unlimited.

There are two local banks, the Bank of Bermuda, Limited, and the
Bank of N. T. Butterfield & Son, Limited, both incorporated by local
Acts.

A Treasury Chest Office, established in connection with the main-
tenance of the Imperial naval and military establishments in the
Colony, issues bills of exchange on His Majesty's Treasury in London,
and these bills form the basis of exchange with the outside world.

The Colonial Government keeps a current account with the Bank
of Bermuda and the Bank of N. T. Butterfield & Son, Limited, to'
the extent of a maximum deposit of 4,000 at each bank, against
which deposits the banks give security to the maximum amount.



II.-TRADE, AGRICULTURE, AND INDUSTRIES.
(a) IMPORTS .AND EXPORTS.
Imports.
The value of the imports (exclusive of specie valued at 26,000) in
1914 was 539,611.








BERMUDA, 1914. 7

Compared with 1913 this shows a decrease of 19,929. The follow-
ing is a comparative table for the five years from 1910 to 1914
inclusive:-


Other United
Year. Total. United Canada. British States Other
Kingdom. Colonies of Countries.
Colon America.

I
1910 517,074 158,043 83,429 7,648 266,981 973
1911 545,540 153,867 84,129 8,193 297,681 1,670
1912 637,178 170,779 95,799 10,567 353,599 6,434
1913 570,575 154,988 75,494 6,490 325,253 8,350
1914 565,611 133,174 75,352 7,088 349,284 713


In the above figures the value of Government Stores, Civil, Military
and Naval, is not included.

The total value of imports from the United Kingdom for the year
1914 was 133,174, as against 154,988 in 1913 and 170,779 in 1912.

The total value of imports from Canada for the year 1914 was
75,352, being 142 less than in 1913.

The following table shows the value of imports from Canada (de-
clared) during the last ten years:-
Year. Value.

1905 .. .. 81,146
1906 .. .. .. 55,451
1907 .. .. .. 72,388 367,925
1908 .. .. .. 75,055
1909 .. .. .. 83,885
1910 .. .. 83,429
1911 .. .. .. .. 84,129
1912 .. .. .. 95,799 413,903
1913 .. .. 75,494
1914 .. .. 75,352
= 12-33 per cent. increase.

The total value of imports from the United States for the year was
349,284, as against 325,253 in 1913 and 353,599 in 1912.

Exports.

The value of the exports (exclusive of specie valued at 12,313)
in 1914 was 94,348.

Compared with 1913, this shows an increase of 3,653. The total
value of the exports for the year of the produce and manufactures of
the Colony was 91,670, as against 73,175 for 1913.








COLONIAL REPORTS-ANNUAL.


(b) MANUFACTURES AND FISHERIES.
Manufactures.
There is one ice factory, which manufactures most of the ice con-
sumed locally.
There is one arrowroot factory, which is equipped with modern plant
andis capable of producing a large quantity of this commodity.
Bermuda arrowroot apparently continues to hold its premier place
in home and foreign markets. The price (retail) per lb. in London is
about 2s. 6d.
A factory for the manufacture of cigars from imported tobacco
was established in Hamilton in 1906, and now supplies the bulk of
cigars locally consumed. This industry has caused a decline in the
quantities of cigars imported and a consequent loss of revenue. The
value of cigars imported for 1914, as compared with 1905, was for
1905 4,508, and for 1914 2,528.
Fisheries.
There are no organized fisheries in the Colony.
(c) AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRIES AND BOTANICAL STATIONS.
The cultivation of onions, potatoes, and lily bulbs for the United
States markets still continues to be the chief agricultural industry
of these islands. The principal market is New York. The exporta-
tion of kitchen garden produce, such as lettuce, beans, peas, parsley,
celery, carrots, beets, etc., to New York in the early part of the year
is increasing gradually.
The potato crop for 1914 was large, and the average price received
in the New York markets was fair.
The quantities exported were as follows :-41,125 barrels, of a
declared value of 35,623. The quantity exported in 1913 was 52,675
barrels, of a declared value of 38,803.
The quantity and value of the onions exported during the last five
years are shown in the following table :-
Year. Quantity Value.
Crates.
1910 .. .. .. 134,176 31,094
1911 .. .. .. 187,241 42,711
1912 .. .. 140,000 31,183
1913 .. .. .. 65,074 8,126
1914 .. .. .. 87,279 25,877
The quantity and declared value of green vegetables exported in
1914, exclusive of potatoes and onions, were 167,596 crates, valued at
22,907, as compared with 141,939 crates exported in 1913, of a
declared value of 17,789.
The quantity and declared value of the export of lily bulbs were as
follows :-941 packages, of a declared value of 1,867, as against
2,357 packages, of a declared value of 3,470, in 1913.
The quantity and declared value of arrowroot exported in 1914
were 4 tons 5 cwt., valued at 530, as compared with 2 tons 4 cwt.,
valued at 248, in 1913.









BERMUDA, 1914.


(d) SHPPING.
The total tonnage of vessels which entered and cleared during the
year 1914, in comparison with 1913, is shown in the following table:-

Vessels Entered and Cleared.


British ..
American
German..
Norwegian
Dutch
Italian
Greek
Danish ..
Swedish .
Mexican..
Russian ..


Total


1913.


Tons.
1,047,115
13,828
75,486
38,409
12,428
18,030
13,206
3,250

934
1,222,686


1914.

Tons.
1,064,461
33,299
27,318
36,594
6,762
17,230
4,828
13,462
3,282
222
3,554
1,211,002


Shipping Entered and Clearedfor Last Five Years.


Year.

1910
1911
1912
1913
1914


British
Tons.
1,103,392
1,108,116
1,087,429
1,047,115
1,064,461


Foreign.
Tons.
285,585
294,804
186,507
208,751
146,541


III.-LEGISLATION.


Fifty-seven Acts and forty-one Resolves were passed during the
year 1914, of which the following are the most important:-

The Produce Inspection Act, No. 1. The regulations of the
Department of Agriculture of the United States necessitated certain
amendments to the Produce Inspection Acts, which this Act accordingly
provided, the general effect being to increase the stringency of in-
spection and to raise the standard of quality of local produce grown
for export.


I








COLONIAL REPORTS-ANNUAL.


The Potato Importation Act, No. 2. This Act empowers the Board
of Agriculture to regulate the measures required in order to protect
the potato industry from risk of injury caused by imported diseased
potatoes.
The New York Steam Communication Act, No. 6, authorized the
Trade Development Board to enter into a contract with the Canada
Steamship Lines, Ltd. for a subsidized steamship service between
Bermuda and New York on the terms set forth in certain corres-
pondence between Government and the Company referred to in the
Act, which consists only of a Preamble and one section.

The terms in question provided for the construction and operation
of two vessels of 10,000 tons and 18 knots speed to perform a weekly
service, with special rates for freight and passengers, in return for an
annual subsidy.
The measure was the first serious attempt on the part of the Colony
to secure a regular service adequate for local requirements and at
reasonable rates. The magnitude of the proposal and the financial
liability involved occasioned lively controversy and the measure only
passed the House of Assembly and the Legislative Council by small
majorities.
No. 17. The Dredger Act (No. 2). The expected operation on the
New York route of the large vessels provided for under the contract
with the Canada Steamship Lines, Ltd. rendered it desirable to con-
stitute a shorter channel from Grassy Bay to inland waters giving
access to Hamilton Harbour than would have resulted from the
improvement of the existing Staggs Channel. The Legislature
therefore authorized an alternative channel to the east of the Staggs
Rocks, which had originally been suggested by Commander G. E.
Corbett, R.N., Commander-in-Charge, H.M. Dockyard.

No. 41. The War Contribution Act. As the financial condition
of the Colony did not admit of an immediate cash contribution in aid
of the war fund to the Imperial Treasury of such an amount as the
Legislature deemed suitable, provision was made by this Act for the
payment of 51,750 in fifteen annual instalments, as the equivalent
of a lump sum of the present value of 40,000.

No. 42. The Bermuda-American Steamship Company Act.

No. 43. The Bermuda-American Steam Service Act.

The dislocation of regular steam traffic with New York caused by
the war led to a petition to the Legislature from a number of local
merchants for incorporation and for a monthly subsidy in return for
a weekly service with that port for six months. The former measure
is the Act of incorporation. The latter fixes the accommodation and
rates for freight and passengers, and provides for a subsidy at the rate
of one pound for each 1st class passenger brought to the Colony up
to a maximum of 1,000 in any one month.








BERMUDA, 1914. 11

No. 54. The Registration Act. Besides enacting minor amend-
ments to the Regulation Act, 1899, this Act prohibits the burial of
any deceased child as if it were still-born without a medical certificate
of the cause of death, a Coroner's order, or a declaration by a responsible
person that a medical certificate was not obtainable and that the child
was not born alive.
Further provision is made for the registration of the cause of death
when a deceased person has not been attended by a Medical Practitioner,
and for the appointment and duties of Deputy Registrars.

Resolve No. 40. 800 is provided towards the cost of equipment
and transport to a Canadian port of the Volunteer Contingent raised
in the Colony for active service during the war.






IV.-EDUCATION.

The Director of Education furnishes the following returns:-
Twenty-nine aided primary schools with 2,494 scholars; school fees,
1,319. Government contribution, 2,382.
The schools referred to are private schools aided by grants from the
Colonial Treasury. Ten of them are attended by white children, and
conducted by white teachers, 19 of them are attended by coloured
children, under coloured teachers. None of them are free schools,
the fee charged in most cases being 3d. per week. The Legislature
provided a sum of 3,681 to aid in the working of the schools and for
educational purposes generally during 1914; 3,149 of this grant is
administered by a Board of Education appointed by the Governor.
The aided schools are inspected regularly by the Director of Education.

In addition to three military schools and two naval schools, there
are about 18 other primary schools not receiving any aid from Colonial
funds.
There are five secondary schools in the Colony receiving no Govern-
ment grants, namely, the Saltus Grammar School, for white boys,
the Berkley Institute, for coloured boys and girls, the Whitney
Institute, for white boys and girls, the Convent School, and the High
School for white girls.
There are now three Bermuda Rhodes scholars in residence at
Oxford.
The Bermuda Scholarship Act, 1905, provides one scholarship
annually, of the value of 150, and tenable for two years, to enable
youths educated in Bermuda to proceed abroad at the age of 17 or
over to prepare themselves for nomination to a Rhodes scholarship.








COLONIAL REPORTS-ANNUAL.


V.-GOVERNMENT INSTITUTIONS.

(a) Hospital.

There is no hospital maintained by the Colonial Government, but
during 1912 an Act was passed outlining the building of a general
hospital to be known as the King Edward VII Memorial Hospital.
The erection of this hospital was begun during 1913 and although the
work was discontinued for the last five months of 1914 it is hoped that
a portion of it may be ready for use in 1915.
There is a cottage hospital near the city of Hamilton which is
supported by voluntary contributions, and hospitals are also main-
tained in connection with the Imperial Naval and Military establish-
ments.
(b) Lunatic Asylum.

An Asylum for the care and treatment of the insane was first estab-
lished in this Colony in 1846.
The Medical Officer of Health is the Medical Superintendent of the
institution, and there is a competent staff of attendants. 10 patients
(7 male and 3 female) were admitted into the asylum in 1914. Four
patients were discharged and three died; 73 patients (35 male and
38 female) remained in the institution at the end of the year.

(c) Savings Bank.

The number of depositors on 31st December, 1914, was 3,132,
having an aggregate sum of 41,826 to their credit, as compared with
2,369 depositors in 1913, having 43,759 to their credit. The amount
of deposits during the year was 15,110 as against 15,419 in 1913.
The amount of invested funds of the Bank on the 31st December,
1914, was 50,032 12s. Id.
The rate of interest allowed on deposits is 2 per cent.

(d) Friendly Societies.

The number of Friendly Societies on the register on 31st December,
1914, was nine.




VI.-JUDICIAL STATISTICS.
(a) Police.
The regular police force consists of one inspector, three chief con-
stables, and 22 regular police constables. There are in addition 21
salaried rural police constables appointed by the Governor.








BERMUDA, 1914.


Under the provisions of the Police Act, 1901, the Governor is
empowered to employ in any temporary emergency or for any special
occasion extra constables not exceeding 20 in number, and may
. authorize the employment of an unlimited number of special constables
on the application of the Inspector of Police or other persons.
Special constables are not remunerated from the public treasury.
The cost of the police establishment in 1914 was :-

Salaries (inclusive of the salaries of the three
police magistrates) .. .. .. 3,370
Other charges .. .. .. .. 236

Total .. 3,606

The cost of the establishment in the previous year was 3,587.

(b) Prisons.
The number of persons confined in the gaols was 185 (164 males
and 21 females), as against 173 (149 males and 24 females) in 1913.
Of these 55 were committed for safe custody till trial, or for want of
security, and 101 for purposes of penal imprisonment.
The cost of the gaols in 1914 was 2,874, as compared with 2,680
in 1913.
(c) Criminal Statistics.
The number of offences reported to the police during the year was
588, an increase compared with 1913 of 46.
The number of persons apprehended by the police or summoned
before the magistrates was 485, of whom 374 were summarily convicted,
7 discharged for want of prosecution, 51 acquitted, and 20 committed
for trial in the superior courts.
Of the 374 persons summarily convicted 170 were fined, 21 imprisoned
in lieu of fine or security, 47 peremptorily imprisoned, 90 bound over
to keep the peace, and 17 whipped.
Thirty-four cases were tried in the superior courts during the year,
as compared with 21 in the previous year, and the convictions numbered
27; of these 8 were for offences against the person, 21 for offences
against property, and 3 for other offences.



VII.-VITAL STATISTICS.
(a) Population (1914).
At the census taken on the 2nd April, 1911, the resident civilian
population was returned at 18,994 persons, the white population
numbering 6,691 (3,175 males and 3,516 females), the coloured 12,303
(5,895 males and 6,408 females).







COLONIAL REPORTS-ANNUAL.


The Registrar General estimates that the total resident civilian
population at the end of 1914 numbered 20,443 persons, namely,
7,137 white (3,403 males and 3,734 females) and 13,306 coloured
(6,436 males and 6,870 females), an increase, as compared with the
census figures of April, 1911, of 1,449 persons.
The birth-rate was 31-99 (20-03 per 1,000 white and 38-40 per 1,000
coloured) and the death-rate 15-60 per 1,000 among the resident
civilian population.
The infants registered as born out of wedlock were in the proportion
of 17-5 per 100 civilian births (6-29 white and 20-7 coloured.)

(b) Public Health.
The mortality during the year was again exceedingly low.
Among resident civilians the death-rate per 1,000 was 11-48 for
white and 17-81 for coloured.
The European infantile mortality per 100 living births was 12-68.

The coloured rate also showed a marked decrease, being 15-6 per
cent., as against 30-6 in 1910, 30-55 in 1911, 20-0 in 1912 and
16-3 in 1913. The combined rate was 14-97 per cent.

The deaths of children under five years of age formed 37-7 per cent.
of the total deaths, excluding still-births, as compared with 47-8 in
1911, 40-8 in 1912 and 37-5 in 1913.
Comparing white and coloured children under five years, the death-
rate per 100 living births was 20-5 for white and 19-0 for coloured,
as compared with 12-7 and 21-7 per cent. respectively in 1913.

(c) Meteorological Observations.
The returns from the Observatory at Prospect Camp, 151 feet above
sea level, are as follows:-
Mean atmospheric pressure for the year, 29-978 inches.
Mean temperature of the air, 70-5 degrees.
Mean relative humidity, 82-0 per cent.
Mean hourly velocity of the wind, 12-3 miles.
Total amount of rainfall, 61-60 inches.
Difference of rainfall from average of past nine years, 7-94 inches
more.
Number of days on which rain fell, 148.

Rainfall.
The amount registered during 1914 was 61-60 inches, an increase of
14-3 per cent. on the decennial average 1904-13.
Two months, February (10-40) and December (10-46) contributed
20-86 inches, or 33-8 per cent. of the total for the year.







BERMUDA, 1914.


(d) Deaths from Cancer.
The death from cancer among the resident civilian, population
numbered 11 (3 white and 8 coloured), equivalent to a rate per 1,000
of 0-42 for white and 0-60 for coloured persons, or 0-53 together.
The mean age at death was 63-3 years for Europeans and 56-3 years
for coloured.

(e) Tuberculosis.
The mortality from tuberculous disease was at the rate of 2-98
and 6-98 per 100 living civilian white and coloured births respectively
(4 white and 34 coloured deaths).
The estimated death-rate per 1,000 resident civil inhabitants was
0-55 for Europeans and 2-55 for coloured.
The mean age at death was 29-0 years for white and 27"0 for
coloured.





VIII.-POSTAL, TELEGRAPH, AND TELEPHONE SERVICES.

Postal Service.
There are 19 post offices in the Colony, and four money order offices.
The total revenue of the Post Office Department in 1914 was 9,036,
compared with a revenue of 9,469 in 1913. The expenditure was
6,902, compared with 6,721 in 1913.
The surplus of revenue over expenditure was thus 2,134, as
compared with 2,748 in 1913.
The sum of 8,389 was paid out in the Colony on money orders and
postal orders, as compared with 7,426 in 1913.
SThe amount paid into the post office on account of money orders
and postal orders during the year was 38,878, as compared with
37,971 in 1913. The remittances by means of money orders to the
United Kingdom amounted to 15,250, those to the West Indies
2,603, to the United States 9,904, and to Canada 3,832. The
British postal orders issued in the Colony amounted to 7,278, as
compared-with 7,565 in 1913. The value of orders received and paid
was 1,357.
It is estimated that the number of letters dealt with during the
year was 1,579,894, book packets, printed papers and circulars 478,298,
post cards 571,704, and parcels 21,768.








COLONIAL REPORTS-ANNUAL.


The following table shows the revenue and expenditure for the last
five years:-
Year. Revenue. Expenditure.

1910 .. .. .. 7,984 6,394
1911 .. :. .. 9,423 6,550
1912 .. .. .. 10,234 6,438
1913 .. .. .. 9,469 6,721
1914 .. .. .. 9,036 6,902

Telegraphs and Telephones.
There is no inland telegraph.
An efficient telephone service throughout the Colony is worked by
a private, company.
The cables of the Halifax and Bermudas Cable Company, Limited,
and the Direct West India Cable Company, Limited, connect Bermuda
with the outside world, through Halifax on the one hand and Turks
Island and Jamaica on the other. The cable to Halifax was laid in
1890, and that to Turks Island and Jamaica. in 1898. The Company
also have a cable between Hamilton and St. George's for the use of
the public.
Subsidies were granted to the above Companies by the Imperial
Government; that to the former Company expired in 1910 and the
subsidy to the latter will expire in 1918.




IX.-GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.

CIVIL ESTABLISHMENT.

During the year the following occurrences and changes took place
in the establishment:-
In September the Honourable R. Popham Lobb, Colonial Secretary
and Registrar General, was appointed a Companion of the Most
Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George.
The Worshipful Colonel W. R. Winter was appointed Chairman of
the Board of Agriculture on the 3rd of February in the room of Mr.
F. G. Gosling, Assistant Colonial Secretary, resigned.
Dr. George S. Patton was appointed Director of Education on the
7th August on the resignation of Mr. H. C. Cox.
On the 19th of November, Mr. S. Stanley Spurling was appointed
a member of His Majesty's Executive Council.
In November, Dr. R. L. Tucker, Veterinary Surgeon, was appointed
to the newly created office of Government Veterinary Officer under
the provisions of The Animal Diseases Act, 1914.








BERMUDA, 1914. 17

TOURIST TRAFFIC.

The number of tourists arriving during 1914 was 14,773, as compared.
with 21,595 in 1913, and 22,918 in 1912.
The number arriving in the winter months was 8,934 and in the
summer 5,893. Compared with 1913 these figures show a decrease of
4,260 and 2,508 respectively.
On the outbreak of war The Royal Mail Steam Packet Company
removed their steamship Caribbean -from the New York-Bermuda
route and the Quebec Steamship Company substituted for the steam-
ship Bermudian a much smaller vessel, the steamship Trinidad."
The falling off in the number of tourists-in the latter half of the year,
caused by the war and a lack of sufficient transportation, seriously
embarrassed the hotel interests and other enterprises connected with
the business, and a question arose as to whether the larger hotels
should re-open for the winter.
It was decided, however, to carry on as usual, even at a loss, and a
number of enterprising business men formed a Company to charter a
large steamship to aid in the transportation of passengers to and from
New Yofk.
The following table shows the monthly number of visitors during
the past four years :-
1911. 1912. 1913. 1914.
January .. 2,142 2,906 2,096 2,575
February .. 3,801 3,735 4,217 2,723
March .. .. 3,830 3,596 3,649 2,445
April .. .. 2,422 2,164 1,351 1,838
May ..... 545 789 723 672
June .. .. 806 748 741 701
July .. .. 2,755 1,287 1,118 1,285
August .. .. 2,460 1,695 1,593 685
September .. 2,298 1,465 1,647 365
October .. .. 2,529 1,158 1,448 293
November .. 1,309 1,466 1,131 360
December .. 2,152 1,909 1,881 831

Total. .. 27,045 22,918 21,595 14,773


I have, &c.,

R. POPHAM LOBB,
Colonial Secretary.
fth June, 1915.








COLONIAL REPORTS, &c.

The following recent reports, &c., relating to His Majesty's
Colonial Possessions have b6en issued, and may be obtained from
the sources indicated on the title page:-

ANNUAL.


No. Colony, &c.

816 Imperial Institute .
817 Falkland Islands .
818 Malta. .
819 Trinidad and Tobago
820 Jamaica ..
821 Northern Nigeria
822 Grenada ..
823 Zanzibar ..
824 Barbados ..
825 Southern Nigeria..
826 Mauritius ..
827 British Honduras
828 Colonial Survey Committee
829 Tongan Islands Protectorate
830 Swaziland ..
831 Uganda ..
832 Nyasaland
833 British Guiana
834 Imperial Bureau of Entomology
835 St. Vincent
836 St. Lucia ..
837 Somaliland
838 Straits Settlements
839 Cayman Islands ..
840 East Africa Protectorate
841 Leeward Islands ..
842 Gilbert and Ellice Islands
843 Zanzibar ..
844 Turks and Caicos Islands
845 Weihaiwei
846 Seychelles.. .
847 St. Helena
848 Fiji ..
849 Bahamas ..
850 Gibraltar ..
851 Sierra Leone
852 Grenada ..


Year.

1913

1913-1914


1913

1913-1914
1913


1913-1914




1914
1913-1914


1913
1913-1914



1914




1914-1915
1914
S1914-1915


MISCELLANEOUS.


No. Colony, &c.

79 Northern Nigeria

80 Nyasaland
81 Southern Nigeria
82 Imperial Institute ..
83 Southern Nigeria
84 West Indies ..

85 Southern Nigeria .
86 Southern Nigeria
87 Ceylon
88 Imperial Institute ..
89 Southern Nigeria
90 St. Vincent ..


Subject.

Mineral Survey, 1907-8 and
1908-9.
.Mineral Survey, 1908-9.
.Mineral Survey, 1908-9.
.Rubber and Gutta-percha.
.Mineral Survey, 1910.
Preservation of Ancient
Monuments, &c.
Mineral Survey, 1911.
Mineral Survey, 1912.
Mineral Survey.
Oilseeds, Oils, &c.
Mineral Survey, 1913.
Roads and Land Settlement.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs