• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 List of decisions, directives,...
 Introduction
 World food and agriculture...
 Activities of FAO and WFP
 Programme, budgetary, financial,...
 Consitutional and legal matter...
 Other matters
 Appendix A
 Appendix B
 Appendix C
 Appendix D
 Appendix E
 Appendix F
 Appendix G
 Back Cover














Title: Report of the Council of FAO
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084649/00001
 Material Information
Title: Report of the Council of FAO
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations -- Council
Publisher: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Place of Publication: Rome
Frequency: irregular
completely irregular
Edition: English ed..
 Subjects
Subject: Food -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
FAO   ( gtt )
AGRICULTURE   ( unbist )
FOOD   ( unbist )
Genre: international intergovernmental publication   ( marcgt )
conference publication   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with 1st session (Nov. 1947).
General Note: Description based on: 111th session (1-10 Oct. 1996).
General Note: Latest issue consulted: 124th session (23-28 June 2003).
 Record Information
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lccn - 50013884
issn - 0251-5296
 Related Items
Other version: Rapport du Conseil de la FAO
Other version: Report of the Council of FAO
Other version: Informe del Consejo de la FAO

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
    List of decisions, directives, and recommendations of the council
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
        Page x
        Page xi
        Page xii
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
        Page xv
        Page xvi
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
    World food and agriculture situation
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Activities of FAO and WFP
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Programme, budgetary, financial, and administrative matters
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Consitutional and legal matters
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Other matters
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Appendix A
        Page A-1
        Page A-2
        Page A-3
        Page A-4
    Appendix B
        Page B-1
        Page B-2
        Page B-3
        Page B-4
        Page B-5
        Page B-6
        Page B-7
        Page B-8
        Page B-9
        Page B-10
        Page B-11
        Page B-12
        Page B-13
        Page B-14
        Page B-15
        Page B-16
        Page B-17
        Page B-18
        Page B-19
        Page B-20
        Page B-21
        Page B-22
        Page B-23
        Page B-24
        Page B-25
        Page B-26
        Page B-27
        Page B-28
    Appendix C
        Page C-1
        Page C-2
        Page C-3
        Page C-4
    Appendix D
        Page D-1
        Page D-2
        Page D-3
        Page D-4
        Page D-5
        Page D-6
        Page D-7
        Page D-8
    Appendix E
        Page E-1
        Page E-2
        Page E-3
        Page E-4
    Appendix F
        Page F-1
        Page F-2
        Page F-3
        Page F-4
        Page F-5
        Page F-6
        Page F-7
        Page F-8
    Appendix G
        Page G-1
        Page G-2
    Back Cover
        Page G-3
        Page G-4
Full Text

CL 94/REP


REPORT


OF THE COUNCIL OF FAO





Ninety-fourth Session
Rome, 15-26 November 1988


FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
ROME 1988






r


;lzo/7-~'


Algeria"
Argentina'
Australia"-
Bangladesh"
Brazil"
Cameroon*
Canada"
China"
Colombia"
Cuba"
Egypt"
Finland"*
France"-
Gabon"
Gambia"
Germany. Federal Republic of*


Guinea'"
Hungary"
India"
Indonesia'
Iran. Islamic Republic of"
Iraq"
Italy*"
Japan"
Kenya-"
Lebanon"
Lesotho""
Libya"
Madagascar"
Malaysia'
Mexico"
Nicaragua"
Niger'


'.geria""
Pakistan""
Peru"'
Philippines"-
Saudi Arabia. Kingdom of"
Spain"
Switzerland"
Thailand"
Trinidad and Tobago"
Turkey"
United Kingdom"*
United States of America"
Venezuela'
Yugoslavia'
Zaire"
Zambia"


'Term of office until 31 December 1983.
"Term of office until conclusion of Twenty-ff.h Session of the Conference November 1989
""Term of office until 31 December 1993.





COUNCIL

(as from 1 January 1989)


Independent Chairman: Lassaad Ben Osman


Algeria'
Angola-"
Argentina'
Australia"
Brazil"
Canada*
China-"
Colombia'
Congo'"
Cuba'
Czechoslovakia"'
Egypt"
Ethiopia '
Finland"
France"
Gabon'
Gambia*


Germany. Federal Republic of"
Greece""
Guinea"
Hungary'
India"
Indonesia"'
Iran, Islamic Republic of"
Iraq"
Italy"
Japan'"
Kenya"
Korea. Republic of"
Lebanon"
Lesotho"
Libya*
Madagascar'
Malaysia"


Mexico"
Nicaragua'
Nigeria"'
Pakistan"
Peru"
Philippines"
Saudi Arabia. Kingdom of"
Spain*
Switzerland*
Thailand"
Trinidad and Tobago'
United Kingdom"
United States of America*
Venezuela"
Zaire*


'Term of office until conclusion of Twenty-fifth Session of the Conference, November 1989.
"Term of office until 31 December 1990.
""Term of office until conclusion of Twenty-sixth Session of the Conference, November 1991.


'Deemed to have resigned in accordance with Rule XXII-7 of the General Rules of the Organization.


COUNCIL

(until 31 December 1988)


Independent Chairman Lassaad Ben Osman





CL 94/REP


REPORT


OF THE COUNCIL OF FAO




Ninety-fourth Session
Rome, 15-26 November 1988


FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
ROME 1988










- iii -


TABLE OF CONTENTS


LIST OF DECISIONS, DIRECTIVES AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE COUNCIL



INTRODUCTION


Adoption of the Agenda and Timetable

Election of Three Vice-Chairmen, and Designation of the
Chairman and Members of the Drafting Committee

Statement by the Director-General


WORLD FOOD AND AGRICULTURE SITUATION

State of Food and Agriculture 1988

- The Locust Situation in 1988 and Outlook for 1989

Report of the Thirteenth Session of the Committee on
World Food Security (Rome, 13-19 April 1988)


ACTIVITIES OF FAO AND WFP

Report of the Ninth Session of the Committee on Forestry
(Rome, 9-13 May 1988)

- Venue of Tenth World Forestry Congress 1991

Aspects of FAO's Policies, Programmes, Budget and Activities
Aimed at Contributing to Sustainable Development

Plan of Action for the Integration of Women in Development
(Resolution 1/94)


World Food Programme

- Thirteenth Annual Report of the Committee on Food Aid
Policies and Programmes of the UN/FAO World Food
Programme

- Election of Five Members of the WFP Committee on Food Aid
Policies and Programmes

Recent Developments in the UN System of Interest to FAO

Progress Report on World Food Day Activities


Pages

vii xvi

Paragraphs

1 10


2


3 -

5 -


11 -

11 -

25 -


36 48


49 122


49 -

56 -


58 72


73 82


83 106



83 105


106

107 119

120 122







- iv -


PROGRAMME, BUDGETARY, FINANCIAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS

Reports of the Fifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth Sessions of the
Programme Committee

- Progress Report on the Review of FAO

(a) Reform of the Programme Budget Process

(b) Arrangements for the Review

- UN System Operational Activities for Development


Reports of the Sixty-second and Sixty-third Sessions of the
Finance Committee

- Extension of Terminal Payment Fund Coverage

- Support Costs from UNDP and Trust Fund Programmes

- Miscellaneous Income: Treatment for Assessment Purposes

- Personnel Matters

- Statistics of Personnel Services


Financial Position of the Organization

- Financial Situation and Future Prospects

(a) Status of Contributions to the Budget

(b) Current Assessments

(c) Contributions in Arrears

(d) Replenishment of the Special Reserve Account and
Advances to the Working Capital Fund

(e) Future Prospects

(f) Need for All Member Nations to Pay Contributions

- Consequences of the Financial Situation and Possible
Measures to Ensure Implementation of the Programme of
Work and Budget 1988-89


Audited Accounts (Draft Resolution for the Conference)

(a) Regular Programme 1986-87

(b) UNDP 1986-87

(c) World Food Programme 1986-87


123 217


- 151

- 140

- 132

- 140

- 151


152 165

155

156 157

158 159

160 164

165


166 187

166 176

166

167 170

171


172

173

174 176



177 187


188 203










Examination of the Proposal made by the Nineteenth Regional
Conference for the Near East on the return to the Region of
the Regional Office for the Near East

First Report on Unscheduled and Cancelled Sessions in the
1988-89 Biennium

Revised Calendar of 1988-89 Sessions of the Council and of
those Bodies which report to the Council


CONSTITUTIONAL AND LEGAL MATTERS

Report of the Fifty-first Session of the Committee on
Constitutional and Legal Matters

- Requests for convening a Special Session of the Finance
Committee

Procedure for Election of Chairmen and Members of the
Programme and Finance Committees

African Forestry Commission: Change of Title to
African Forestry and Wildlife Commission

Invitations to Non-Member Nations to attend FAO
Sessions

Changes in Representation of Member Nations on the
Programme and Finance Committees


204 211


212 214


215 217


218 246


218 226


218 226


227 235


236


237 240


241 246


OTHER MATTERS

Date and Place of the Ninety-fifth Session of the Council



APPENDICES

A Agenda for the Ninety-fourth Session of the Council

B List of Delegates and Observers

C List of Documents

D Statement by the Director-General

E Status of Assessed Contributions of Member Nations

F Unscheduled Sessions Approved and Approved Sessions Cancelled
between 1 January and 1 October 1988

G Revised Calendar of 1988-89 Sessions of the Council and of
Those Bodies which Report to the Council









- vii -


LIST OF DECISIONS, DIRECTIVES AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE COUNCIL



State of Food and Agriculture 1988


Urged, in general, that developing countries, especially those undertaking
economic adjustments, be assisted through significant concessions on debt
to make possible the resumption of their economic growth and social
improvement (para. 12)

Supported, in general, the Director-General's proposal that governments
which so desired should insist for FAO to be associated with the
formulation of new food and agriculture policy guidelines as part of the
structural adjustment process (para. 13)

Renewed its call for all efforts to be made to achieve the objectives of
the Ministerial Declaration on the Uruguay Round, particularly in
agriculture and as regards tropical products, and urged all concerned
parties to ensure that significant progress be achieved at the forthcoming
mid-term review in Montreal of the Uruguay Round of Multilateral Trade
Negotiations (MTN) (para. 14)

Urged an early and successful conclusion of on-going negotiations,
including those on tropical products and specific action relating to the
principle of special and differential treatment for developing countries in
line with the objectives and principles of the Ministerial Declaration at
Punta del Este (para. 14)

Urged donors to address in appropriate fora the issue of designing a system
for maintaining levels of food and shipments in situations of rising prices
(para. 16)

Invited developed countries to take full account of the impact their
policies had on agricultural and rural development in developing countries
(para. 17)

Appealed for continued support to be given to those countries that had
suffered from a wide range of natural disasters such as droughts, floods
and tropical storms, as well as from the increased incidence of locusts
(para. 18)

Urged that International Emergency Food Reserve (IEFR) resources, which
were almost exhausted, be urgently replenished, as requested by the
Director-General (para. 18)

Requested that efforts be reinforced to enhance flows of development
assistance to the rural sector, particularly in low-income countries
(para. 23)






- viii -


- The Locust Situation in 1988 and Outlook for 1989

Urged that maximum support be given to the Organization to implement the
continued need for effecting coordination of the various activities to be
undertaken (para. 28)

Report of the Thirteenth Session of the Committee on World Food
Security (Rome, 13-19 April 1988)


Endorsed the conclusions and recommendations of the Thirteenth Session of
the Committee on .World Food Security and called on donor countries to make
all efforts to maintain the volume of food aid shipments (para. 36)

Urged that the highest priority be accorded to the development of the food
and agricultural sectors of the low-income food-deficit countries and to
the formulation of a suitable policy framework in which to accomplish it
(para. 37)

Requested the international community to support the efforts of developing
countries with adequate technical and financial assistance (para. 37)

Urged that appropriate action be taken to ensure that the debt service
payments of developing countries did not hamper the development of the food
and agricultural sectors and the performance of the overall economies of
these countries (para. 38)

Urged concerted action to bring the cereals market into a better balance in
the long-term interests of both producing and consuming countries, and to
enhance export market access in order to improve the foreign exchange
earning ability of developing countries (para. 40)

Requested the Secretariat to analyse the impact of structural adjustment
programmes and to identify possible measures to avoid a negative impact on
food security, especially on the poor (para. 41)

Endorsed the decision of the Committee to continue to examine national food
security case studies at its future sessions (para. 43)

Agreed with the Committee's suggestion that future case studies should aim
at providing an in-depth analysis of the reasons why certain policies had
greater success than others, and should attempt to draw recommendations
concerning domestic policy changes required as well as external constraints
affecting the implementation of domestic policies (para. 43)


Report of the Ninth Session of the Committee on Forestry
(Rome, 9-13 May 1988)


Endorsed the Report of the Ninth Session of the Committee on Forestry and
agreed in particular with the Committee's recommendation that FAO allocate
an increased share of its Regular Programme budget to forestry activities
(para. 49)






- ix -


Recommended that TFAP be brought to the attention of the Committee on
Agriculture (para. 50)

Endorsed the Committee's recommendation to incorporate wildlife management
and utilization in national development plans and to give it a higher
priority in FAO's programmes (para. 51)

Supported the Committee's recommendation that FAO give increased emphasis
to technical assistance in forest harvesting operations and to harvesting
methodologies of non-wood forest products (para. 54)

- Venue of the Tenth World Forestry Congress 1991

Agreed to postpone a decision on the venue until its Ninety-fifth Session,
in order to provide more time for France and Tanzania and the Secretariat
to reach a consensus (para. 57)

Aspects of FAO's Policies, Programmes, Budget and Activities Aimed
at Contributing to Sustainable Development

Requested FAO to further strengthen its internal coordination mechanisms on
environment and sustainable development (para. 69)

Urged FAO, within its specific mandate and its limited financial resources,
to progressively translate the concept of sustainable development into
practical and operational policies and programmes in the agricultural,
forestry and fisheries sectors including natural resources management,
conservation, technology development and delivery, private and public
investment in the rural sector to promote growth beyond the subsistence
level, policy reform, institution building and grass-root participation in
development planning and management (para. 69)

Called upon donors to take into account the need for external resources to
support incorporation of environmental concerns and to strengthen national
capabilities in the application of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) as
they make their assistance allocations (para. 70)


Plan of Action for the Integration of Women in Development

Unanimously approved the Plan of Action presented by the Director-General
and agreed that it be implemented in a step-by-step process (para. 73)

Recommended that FAO identify concrete priorities and a timetable of
activities for the implementation of the Plan of Action (para. 75)

Recommended that priority be given to the training of FAO staff on means
for addressing women in agriculture and rural development in FAO's
activities including programmes and projects and their planning,
implementation, monitoring and evaluation (para. 75)










Recommended that high priority be given to the strengthening of the Women
in Agricultural Production and Rural Development Service (ESHW), including
filling all vacant staff positions (para. 76)

Recommended that all technical divisions of FAO participate fully in
including WID (Women in Development) concerns in their programme of work
and that focal points, with clear responsibilities, be designated in
appropriate technical divisions (para. 76)

Urged that ways of encouraging rural women's access to credit programmes,
training, marketing, and extension services be promoted (para. 78)

Recommended a closer collaboration with the sister agencies within the UN
System, other international organizations, national agencies and NGO's and
that efforts be made for the best and most efficient use of existing data
studies, guidelines, and training programmes related to agricultural and
rural development (para. 79)

Asked FAO to prepare an updated document that would guide the Organization
in clarifying more specific action areas needed to be presented to the next
Conference, taking into account the views expressed in the debate, with
cost estimates that would particularly reflect the work to be carried out
using Regular Programme resources and extra-budgetary funds (para. 80)

Requested the Conference to approve the Plan of Action, taking into account
the views expressed by the Council, and adopted Resolution 1/94 (para. 82)


World Food Programme

Thirteenth Annual Report of the Committee on Food Aid Policies
and Programmes of the UN/FAO World Food Programme


Urged WFP to enhance the approach to ensure the effective participation of
women in WFP-assisted projects, both as beneficiaries and agents of
development (para. 93)

Invited all concerned with food aid, including FAO, to continue to
cooperate with the Programme in its implementation by providing timely and
accurate data and information (para. 101)


Election of Five Members of the Committee on
Food Aid Policies and Programmes


Elected Congo, France, Germany (Federal Republic of), Mexico and Zambia to
the Committee on Food Aid Policies and Programmes for a term of office of
three years from 1 January 1989 to 31 December 1991 (para. 106)







- xi -


Recent Developments in the UN System of Interest to FAO


Urged FAO to continue to seek ways to improve FAO cooperation with other UN
organizations (para. 108)

Called for the early implementation of the Cyprus Initiative Against Hunger
and noted with satisfaction FAO's willingness to cooperate with WFC, and
others, in this regard (para. 110)

Urged FAO to continue to provide technical assistance to interested
developing countries in connection with their preparations for the Uruguay
Round of Multilateral Trade Negotiations (para. 111)

Strongly urged all concerned the African countries, developed countries,
international organizations and others to fulfill their responsibilities
for the implementation of PAAERD and called for maximum mobilization of
resources for Africa and underlined the importance of the implementation of
the recommendations of the Advisory Group on Resource Flows to Africa
(para. 112)

Agreed that Africa should continue to be the regional priority for FAO,
taking into account the needs of other developing regions (para. 113)

Decided that this section of its report, together with paras. 107-114,
constituted its response to Resolution 4(ix) of the Intergovernmental
Committee on Science and Technology for Development (para. 114)

Urged FAO to coordinate closely in the field with other bilateral and
multilateral agencies in identifying and counteracting any possible
negative effects which structural adjustment programmes might cause in the
agricultural sector, especially in the poor areas where and whenever this
occurred in the developing countries concerned (para. 115)

Approved the proposed new title of the FAO/IAEA Joint Division: "Joint
FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture (para. 116)


Progress Report on World Food Day Activities


Supported the Director-General's decision to choose "Food and the
Environment", an extremely topical subject for developed and developing
countries alike, as the theme for 1989 (para. 122)






- xii -


Reports of the Fifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth Sessions
of the Programme Committee

Concurred with the Committee's views regarding the UN Programme of Action
for African Economic Recovery and Development (PAAERD), and placed
particular stress on the fact that the success of the Programme depended on
a massive mobilization of resources, from within and outside the region
(para. 124)

- Progress Report on the Review of FAO

(a) Reform of the Programme Budget Process

Approved, on an experimental basis, the proposal put forth by the Programme
and Finance Committees for the preparation of the Programme of Work and
Budget 1990-91 (para. 132)

(b) Arrangements for the Review

Reiterated that the purpose of the Review was to strengthen the
Organization's capability to better serve its Member Nations, to make FAO's
programmes more responsive to the challenges of the future and to enhance
efficiency. The Council welcomed the consensus which had emerged within the
Programme and Finance Committees early in the process of carrying out this
Review, and expressed the strong hope that this Consensus would be
maintained through the successive stages of the review process (para. 140)

- UN System Operational Activities for Development

Endorsed, in general, the Programme Committee's views on the case studies
of operational activities at the country level (the Jansson report)
(para. 141)

Noted that the Programme Committee's comments on the report had been
submitted to ECOSOC in July 1988 and that the Council's own views would
also be conveyed to the United Nations in compliance with the request
contained in UNGA Resolution 42/196 (paras. 144-151)


Reports of the Sixty-second and Sixty-third Sessions of
the Finance Committee


- Extension of Terminal Payment Fund Coverage

Endorsed the approval given by the Finance Committee for an extension of
the use of the Terminal Payment Fund to cover Repatriation Grant payments
arising from the Support Cost (Trust Fund) Programme, in addition to those
arising from the Trust Fund Programme proper (para. 155)






- xiii -


- Support Costs from UNDP and Trust Fund Programmes

Urged funding sources to consider the acceptance of appropriate project
servicing charges when requested by the Director-General (para. 156)

Supported the proposal that a comprehensive report be made to the next
Conference on arrangements regarding the level of support costs, which
would be submitted to the Council for its prior considerations (para. 157)

- Miscellaneous Income: Treatment for Assessment Purposes

Requested the Finance Committee to keep the matter under review, taking
into account the views expressed during the discussion and to take suitable
action (para. 159)

- Statistics of Personnel Services

Endorsed the Finance Committee's request that the Secretariat continue to
refine the statistics, providing in particular more details on temporary
services (para. 165)


Financial Position of the Organization

- Financial Situation and Future Prospects

(f) Need,for All Member Nations to Pay Contributions

Appealed to all Member Nations with outstanding contributions and
particularly to those which were in arrears, to remit the amounts due as a
matter of urgency, in order that the Organization could fulfill its mandate
(para. 176)

Further urged all Member Nations to pay their 1989 assessed contributions,
and also to inform the Organization in advance as to the timing and amount
of payment as early as possible (para. 176)

- Consequences of the Financial Situation and Possible Measures
to Ensure Implementation of the Programme of Work and Budget 1988-89

Concluded that bearing in mind the views expressed in the debate, the
Director-General should, in conformity with the mandate given to him by the
Conference, take any measures he deemed necessary to carry out the
Programme of Work and Budget approved by the Conference (para. 187)


Audited Accounts

(a) Regular Programme 1986-87

(b) United Nations Development Programme 1986-87


(c) World Food Programme 1986-87






- xiv -


Endorsed, in general, the views of the Finance Committee to the effect that
the reports of the External Auditor on the Regular Programme and UNDP
accounts be communicated to the experts involved in the ongoing Review of
FAO and that a progress report on the implementation by the Secretariat of
the Auditor's suggestions be presented to the Finance Committee (para. 192)

Agreed that it was appropriate for the next Finance Committee Session to
take the matter of the certification of WFP Audited Accounts under further
consideration (para. 202)

Agreed that it was in the interest of all, but especially of the poorest
countries, that the difficulties which had arisen between the Organization
and the Programme be resolved with respect for relevant statutes and
standards (para. 202)

Endorsed the Finance Committee's recommendation and agreed to forward a
draft resolution on Audited Accounts to the Conference for adoption
(para. 203)


Examination of the Proposal made by the Nineteenth Regional
Conference for the Near East on the return to the Region
of the Regional Office for the Near East


Fully endorsed the desire of the Member Nations of the Near East Region
that the Regional Office should return to the Region (para. 207)

Requested the Director-General to take the necessary measures to consult
other Governments of the Near East Region in the matter (para. 208)

Agreed that the Director-General should submit a full proposal on the
return of the Office to the Region to the Council, for forwarding to the
Conference at its Twenty-fifth Session in November 1989 (para. 210)


Revised Calendar of 1988-89 Sessions of the Council and of
those Bodies which report to the Council


Concluded that a Joint Session of the Programme and Finance Committees
would be held in January 1989, at dates and for a duration to be determined
by the Director-General in consultation with the Chairmen of the two
Committees; that the Sessions of the Programme and Finance Committees in
May 1989 would have to be extended by one week and that the precise dates
be determined by the Director-General in consultation with the two
Chairmen; that the Ninety-fifth Session of the Council would be convened on
Monday 19 June 1989 to conclude on 30 June 1989; and that the Fifty-seventh
Session of the Committee on Commodity Problems would be postponed by one
week and would be convened from 3 to 7 July 1989 (para. 216)







- XV -


Report of the Fifty-first Session of the Committee on
Constitutional and Legal Matters


- Requests for convening a Special Session of the Finance Committee

Endorsed the recommendation contained in paragraph 13 of the Report of the
CCLM and recommended that the Finance Committee adopt the following
provision for inclusion as a new paragraph 1(bis) in Rule II of its Rules
of Procedure:

"Where the required number of requests for the calling of a session of the
Finance Committee is received under Rule XXVII.8 (a) or (b) GRO and such
requests indicate that the session should be called on a specified date or
within a specified time limit, the Chairman and the Director-General shall
consult each other and the members of the Committee with a view to the
calling of the session on the date or within the time limit specified,
bearing in mind the pertinent factors, including the context and urgency of
the request, the availability of the Chairman and the majority of the
members of the Committee, conflicting meeting schedules and the
preparations necessary for convening the session.

Any session called pursuant to such requests shall be called as soon as
possible and at the latest within a period which shall not exceed 50 days
from the date of receipt of the third request under sub-paragraph (a) or
(b) or the fifth request under sub-paragraph (b)." (para. 225)


Procedure for Election of Chairmen and Members of the
Programme and Finance Committees


Requested the CCLM to review the matter once again and to report to the
Council at its next session (para. 235)


African Forestry Commission: Change of Title to
African Forestry and Wildlife Commission


Approved the change of name of the "African Forestry Commission" to the
"African Forestry and Wildlife Commission" (para. 236)







xvi -


Invitations to Non-Member Nations to Attend FAO Sessions


Agreed to the Director-General's proposal to invite the German Democratic
Republic, Liechtenstein and the USSR to attend as observers the Third
Session of the Commission on Plant Genetic Resources to take place in Rome
from 17 to 21 April 1989 (AGP-725) (para. 238)


Date and Place of the Ninety-fifth Session of the Council


Decided that its Ninety-fifth Session should be convened in Rome from 19 to
30 June 1989 (para. 247)











INTRODUCTION

1. The Ninety-fourth Session of the Council was held in Rome from 15 to
26 November 1988 under the Chairmanship of Lassaad Ben Osman, Independent
Chairman of the Council.

Adoption of the Agenda and Timetable 1

2. The agenda and timetable of the session were adopted. The agenda is
given in Appendix A to this report.

Election of Three Vice-chairmen, and Designation of2
the Chairman and Members of the Drafting Committee

3. The Council elected three Vice-Chairmen for its session:
Rudolf de Pourtalks (Switzerland), Bashir El Mabrouk Said (Libya) and
Gerard Phirinyane Khojane (Lesotho).

4. The Council elected Yousef Ali Mahmoud Hamdi (Egypt) as Chairman of
the Drafting Committee with the following membership: Argentina, Australia,
Egypt, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Japan, Kenya, Madagascar, Mexico,
Pakistan, Spain and United States of America.

Statement by the Director-General

5. The Director-General, after welcoming Council members, drew their
attention to the difficult world economic and food and agriculture situation
which was characterized by the fall in cereal production, the Third World
indebtedness, the downward trend in real prices of raw materials, and the
series of natural disasters affecting world agriculture, chief among them
locust infestations.

6. The Director-General underlined the cash flow problems of the
Organization, caused by the large arrears and delays in payment of assessed
contributions. He catalogued the serious damages done to its programmes and
activities at a time when demands for the Organization's services were never
greater. He briefed the Council on the on-going review of certain aspects
of the work of the Organization, and informed the members of the various
activities undertaken by the Organization since the last session of the
Council.

7. The Director-General stressed the need for FAO appropriate
participation in the process of economic adjustments recommended by the
World Bank or the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

8. The Director-General expressed his gratitude to the host country for
its generosity and for the recent authorization for the construction of new
buildings at Headquarters.



1 CL 94/1; CL 94/INF/l; CL 94/PV/l; CL 94/PV/16; CL 94/PV/17.

2 CL 94/PV/1; CL 94/PV/2; CL 94/PV/16; CL 94/PV/17.

3 CL 94/INF/5; CL 94/INF/5-Rev.1 (English only); CL 94/PV/l; CL 94/PV/16;
CL 94/PV/17.







2 -




9. The Director-General ended by renewing his call to the Council for
amicable and concerted action to address the problems in the food and
agriculture sector in an atmosphere of harmony and goodwill.

10. The full text of the Director-General's statement is given in
Appendix D to this report.







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WORLD FOOD AND AGRICULTURE SITUATION


State of Food and Agriculture 1988

11. The Council examined the world and regional food and agricultural
situation on the basis of the Director-General's Statement and his Report,
State of Food and Agriculture 1988 and its supplement, and concurred with
these assessments.

12. The Council noted with concern that the 1980s would become a lost
decade for most developing countries in terms of socio-economic progress.
The relatively robust global economic performance of recent years was
primarily due to the growth in the more industrialized countries, while the
low income countries had hardly benefitted. The burden of external debt and
the capital outflows from developing debtor countries continued to be a
major constraint to the resumption of economic growth in many of them,
particularly those in Africa and Latin America and the Caribbean. The
Council, in general, urged that developing countries, especially those
undertaking economic adjustments, be assisted through significant
concessions on debt to make possible the resumption of their economic
growth and social improvement. It further emphasized that the major
industrialized countries should endeavour to correct their own structural
imbalances that were having a negative impact on the international economic
environment.

13. The Council recognized that in the experience of developing countries
structural adjustment programmes often resulted in serious social costs, and
curtailed imports that impeded future growth prospects, as also reported in
many studies. Noting the importance of the agricultural sector in many
countries undertaking structural adjustment programmes, the Council, in
general, supported the Director-General's proposal that governments which so
desired should insist for FAO to be associated with the formulation of new
food and agriculture policy guidelines as part of the structural adjustment
process. The Council noted that FAO technical expertise could indeed be
valuable in this area and stressed the importance of FAO working closely
with other multilateral and bilateral organizations to support governments
requesting assistance in their economic adjustment efforts.

14. The Council expressed concern over the continued high level of
protectionism in agriculture. It drew attention to recent studies that had
underlined the adverse impact of such protectionism on economic growth,
especially in developing and also in developed countries. Many members
referred to measures taken to adjust their agricultural policies to permit a
larger role for market signals in determining domestic production and in
endeavouring to contribute to improvement and stabilization of markets. In
this connection, some developing countries pointed out the difficulties
which they encountered in organizing their policies owing to the climatic
and ecological conditions prevailing in their countries, coupled with an
inadequate and adverse international economic environment. The Council
renewed its call for all efforts to be made to achieve the objectives of the
Ministerial Declaration on the Uruguay Round, particularly in agriculture
and as regards tropical products, and urged all concerned parties to ensure
that significant progress be achieved at the forthcoming mid-term review in

4 CL 94/2; CL 94/2-Sup.1; CL 94/PV/3; CL 94/PV/4; CL 94/PV/5; CL 94/PV/16;
CL 94/PV/17.







- 4 -


Montreal of the Uruguay Round of Multilateral Trade Negotiations (MTN). Many
members drew attention to the proposals which they had made in the General
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) negotiations and the results of the
Cairns Group (Cairns Group.of Agricultural Fair Trading Countries) meeting
held in Budapest from 10 to 12 November 1988. The Council was informed of
the measures decided by the European Economic Community in the framework of
the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) as well as of the results obtained in
this context. Many members also referred to the need for short-term measures
for immediate implementation and commitments regarding standstill and
rollback of protectionist measures, already expressed in the Ministerial
Declaration on the Uruguay Round. The Council also urged an early and
successful conclusion of on-going negotiations, including those on tropical
products and specific action relating to the principle of special and
differential treatment for developing countries in line with the objectives
and principles of.the Ministerial Declaration at Punta del Este.

15. The Council noted with concern that world food production had failed
to increase during the past two years. Cereal stocks, including those in
developing countries, had been considerably depleted and by the end of
1988/89 season would decline to a level considered by FAO to be below the
minimum of 17 to 18 percent of annual consumption required for world food
security. Food prices had risen, making it difficult for many foreign
exchange constrained net-food importing countries to import food needed to
maintain consumption levels, and also resulting in a possible loss of
markets for exporting countries.

16. The Council also noted that the volume of food aid was expected to
decline. It urged donors to address in appropriate fora the issue of
designing a system for maintaining levels of food aid shipments in
situations of rising prices. The point was made that food should not be used
as an instrument of political pressure.

17. Apart from unusually adverse weather, particularly in North America,
the overall decline in agricultural production in the developed countries
was also due to policy measures such as land set aside programmes aimed at
reducing production, and to low world prices in previous years. Higher
prices, reduced participation in land set aside programmes and the
resumption of more normal weather conditions, could be expected to alleviate
this situation. The Council invited developed countries to take full account
of the impact their policies had on agricultural and rural development in
developing countries. At the same time, it was stressed that lower costs for
agricultural programmes due to higher world prices did not minimize the
urgency of agricultural policy reforms to reduce protectionism and
liberalize agricultural trade.

18. The Council noted that while food production in the developing
countries had recovered slightly in 1988, the recovery had been unevenly
distributed among regions and countries. The strong recovery in production
in Asia and the moderate one in Africa was welcomed, but more than half of
the developing countries recorded declines in per caput production in 1988.
The limited agricultural production increase for 1988 had also been
particularly disappointing in the Latin America and Caribbean region. The
Council noted with particular concern that 1988 had been characterized by a
wide range of natural disasters such as droughts, floods and tropical
storms, as well as by the increased incidence of locusts. It appealed for







- 5 -


continued support to be given to those countries that had suffered from such
disasters. The Council also urged that International Emergency Food Reserve
(IEFR) resources, which were almost exhausted, be urgently replenished, as
requested by the Director-General.

19. The Council listened with interest to a statement by the Executive
Director of the World Food Council. He drew attention to the evidence of
widespread rising poverty and malnutrition in the developing world, and
highlighted the Cyprus Initiative Against Hunger in the World, adopted at
the Fourteenth Ministerial Session of the World Food Council held in
Nicosia. The Council, welcoming the Cyprus Initiative, noted that a
Consultative Group formed to develop this initiative was to convene its
first session shortly. It looked forward to the development of a practical
and realistic course of action to combat hunger more effectively and trusted
that the experience of FAO would be drawn upon in this work.

20. The Council underlined that while initiatives and actions designed to
reduce hunger, alleviate rural poverty and promote agricultural and rural
development were primarily the responsibility of the developing countries
themselves, the close cooperation and support of the developed countries
were also essential. Within this context, the Council welcomed FAO's study
on the Potentials for Agricultural and Rural Development in Latin America
and the Caribbean, presented at the Twentieth FAO Regional Conference for
Latin America and the Caribbean (Recife, Brazil, 2-6 October 1988), and
called attention to the Declaration of Recife and the Regional Plan of
Action.

21. Recalling the essential role of technology in agricultural
development, the Council stressed its important effect on markets. It agreed
that environmental issues were closely intertwined with development policies
and practices; and consequently environmental goals and actions needed to be
defined in relation to development objectives and policies. The Council
underlined the important role of forestry in environmentally sound land use
practices. Drawing attention to the Tropical Forestry Action Plan (TFAP), it
highlighted the vital need for the local population to be involved in
decisions governing the use of natural resources and those with implications
for the environment. Such considerations also were of paramount importance
in the fishery'sector, where the recent production increases would not be
sustainable without greater recourse to aquaculture development. It
encouraged FAO to step up its technical assistance in the fishery sector.

22. The Council welcomed the growth in agricultural trade in 1987 against
a background of vigorous growth in global merchandise trade. Trade in
fishery and, to a lesser extent, forestry products, had been particularly
dynamic. It noted, however, that the benefits of this expansion had accrued
mainly in developed countries and, among developing countries, was largely
limited to some Asian countries. It noted with concern that agricultural
export earnings had declined in a majority of developing countries primarily
because of depressed prices. As a consequence, the terms of trade of
developing countries' agricultural exports had deteriorated in 1987,
particularly in Africa and in Latin America and the Caribbean. Increasing
international prices had been recorded in 1988 for several commodities.
However, prices of some other commodities of major interest to developing
countries had remained extremely depressed.







- 6 -


23. The Council noted that flows of external assistance to agriculture
had been erratic in recent years. Concessional multilateral commitments had
risen significantly in 1987, but only in relation to the low level of the
previous year. In real terms, such commitments had shown little growth in
1987, compared to 1984-86. At the same time, non-concessional commitments
had fallen sharply in 1987 from their unusually high level of 1986. The
Council, recalling that the major donor countries had enjoyed a protracted
period of economic growth and low commodity prices that had greatly
contributed to the curtailment of inflation, requested that efforts be
reinforced to enhance flows of development assistance to the rural sector,
particularly in low-income countries. In this regard, the Council
particularly emphasized that the success of the United Nations Programme of
Action for African Economic Recovery and Development 1986-1990 (PAAERD),
required in particular an improvement in external economic conditions and
the implementation of appropriate policies by the hard-pressed African
countries themselves.

24. The Council was informed of the changes in the timing and
presentation of the documents comprising The State of Food and Agriculture
(SOFA), as had been discussed and approved at the Fifty-fifth Session of the
Programme Committee (Rome, 19-21 September 1988). In welcoming these changes
which would make the SOFA a more attractive, readable and timely
publication, it noted that they would be introduced in 1989 for the
Twenty-fifth Session of the FAO Conference. The Council also welcomed that
the special chapter of SOFA 1988 would be on natural resource management and
sustainable development, and was informed that the chapter currently being
prepared would incorporate points raised in the Council's discussions.

S The Locust Situation in 1988 and Outlook for 1989

25. The Council noted with great concern the intensification of the
Desert Locust Plague as presented in the Council document and through the
up-dated information provided by the Secretariat. The Council noted that the
plague was affecting many countries in the traditional Desert Locust
invasion area and had now spread over North-West Africa, the Sahelian Zone
of Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, part of the Near East and had even invaded
the Caribbean Islands. As a result of the intensive control campaigns
undertaken, crop losses so far had been limited but this could rapidly
change in the future as the current infestations were likely to become worse
and spread further to other countries. Moreover, it was generally admitted
that the plague would continue for at least another two to three years. Thus
it would constitute a major threat for food security and for an effective
implementation of agricultural development plans in the years to come.

26. The Council expressed satisfaction with the control actions taken by
the countries concerned, by the international donor community and by FAO
through its Emergency Centre for Locust Operations (ECLO). It noted that the
current Desert Locust Control Campaign had already cost some US$ 200 million
and that donor contributions amounted to US$ 120 million, including
considerable assistance from the Organization's Technical Cooperation
Programme, and expressed gratitude for this generous support. It also drew
attention to the assistance provided by countries in North-West Africa, the
Near East and other developing countries to various countries affected.
However, the Council also emphasized that current control efforts were
inadequate to reduce the overall development of the plague and welcomed the


5 CL 94/2-Sup.2; CL 94/PV/6; CL 94/PV/16; CL 94/PV/17.






- 7 -


initiatives for the establishment of an international control task force to
eliminate large-scale Desert Locust populations in strategic areas. All
possible resources and very substantial additional donor support would be
required.

27. The Council expressed concern with the extensive use of pesticides in
the control campaign. Although the need for this was recognized, it was
stressed that new products should be evaluated and used. The criteria for
the evaluation of new pesticides should include cost effectiveness and the
minimization of environmental impact. The Council also emphasized the need
to develop and introduce alternative methods of control, in particular
biological control.

28. The Council emphasized the continued need for effective coordination
of the various activities to be undertaken. It fully recognized the unique
and central role of FAO in this matter and urged that maximum support be
given to the Organization to implement this complex task. It noted that such
coordination would require close collaboration with existing national and
regional structures, the international donor community and other relevant
organizations. The Council stressed the need for effective information
distribution.

29. The Council stressed the need to take control actions in a timely,
preferably preventive, manner. Assistance should be provided, when possible,
well in advance of locust invasions and hence the need for joint advance
planning of the locust campaigns. In that respect, it recognized the
difficulties encountered in view of the magnitude of the plague, the large
number of countries involved and the great amount of resources needed.
Various countries now affected had very limited experience and lacked the
capabilities to deal with Desert Locust control operations.

30. While recognizing the importance of concentrating major efforts on
the emergency control campaigns, the Council drew attention to the medium-
and long-term needs. National and regional organizations and infrastructures
should be strengthened to improve Desert Locust control. Research should be
undertaken on matters such as improved monitoring and forecasting of Desert
Locust populations, including bio-modelling and use of satellite data,
environmental impact monitoring and improved chemical control. The Council
stressed the importance of the effective use of meteorological data and
noted the collaboration between ECLO and the National Meteorology Service of
Algeria on this matter.

31. The Council noted that in addition to Desert locusts, the African
migratory locust and the red locust continued to be a threat to agriculture
in countries in Eastern and Southern Africa. The Council was informed about
the specific needs of certain countries and regional organizations to
improve their control capacity.

32. The Council also noted the recent session of the Commission for
Controlling the Desert Locust in the Eastern Region of its Distribution Area
in Southwest Asia held in Teheran in November 1988.

33. The Council drew attention to the various recommendations on Desert
Locust and grasshopper control included in a number of resolutions adopted
in different international fora. Reference was made to resolutions by the
United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) (Resolution 41/185 of December 1986),
the Economic and Social Council (Resolution 1988/3 of May 1988), the







- 8 -


Conference of Ministers of the Economic Commission for Africa
(Resolution 1988/2 of April 1988), the Fifteenth FAO Regional Conference for
Africa (Resolution 2/88), the Third Ministerial Conference on Food Security
and Agricultural Development of the Ministers of the Islamic Conference,
held in Islamabad in October 1988, and the International Conference on the
Locust Peril held in Fez in October 1988.

34. These resolutions expressed appreciation for the international
support received, appealed for further resources, recommended strengthening
national and regional structures and highlighted the need for data
collection, diffusion of information and research and training. In addition,
the resolutions expressed strong support for activities undertaken by FAO.

35. The Council expressed its support for these resolutions. The
resolutions demonstrated the international character of the locust problem,
the need for institutional strengthening and increased control efforts, both
at the national and international level, the importance of mobilizing
resources by all parties concerned, and the need for close cooperation at
all levels. Furthermore, the resolutions confirmed the central coordinating
role and responsibility of FAO and the need to provide the Organization with
the necessary resources for this task.

Report of the Thirteenth Session of the Committee on World Food Security
(Rome, 13 19 April 1988)

36. The Council considered the report of the Thirteenth Session of the
Committee on World Food Security (CFS) and endorsed its conclusions and
recommendations. The Council expressed concern that since the Thirteenth
Session of the Committee the food security situation had worsened as cereal
stocks fell below the minimum level considered necessary to safeguard food
security resulting from declines in global cereal production for two years
in succession. The Council noted that as a result of tighter supplies and
higher prices in world grain markets, many low-income food-deficit countries
could face difficulties in financing food imports in 1988-89 and called on
donor countries to make all efforts to maintain the volume of food aid
shipments.

37. The Council regretted that the per caput food consumption in many
low-income food-deficit countries was at or below that of 15 years earlier,
thus worsening the problem of hunger and under-nutrition. The Council
underlined the necessity to reverse these unfavourable trends, and urged
that the highest priority be accorded to the development of the food and
agricultural sectors of the low-income food-deficit countries and to the
formulation of a suitable policy famework in which to accomplish it. While
noting that the primary responsibility for achieving national food security
rested with the countries themselves, the Council requested the
international community to support the efforts of developing countries with
adequate technical and financial assistance. In this context, the Council
recognized that sustained economic growth supported inter alia by adequate
financing and growing and liberalized international trade was an
indispensable precondition for improving food security, particularly in
developing countries. The Council stressed the important role of regional
and sub-regional cooperation in increasing food production and in achieving
food security.


6 CL 94/10; CL 94/PV/6; CL 94/PV/7; CL 94/PV/16; CL 94/PV/17.







- 9 -


38. The Council expressed concern that the food security situation in
many developing countries was severely affected by adverse external economic
factors, particularly by restrictions on access to markets, the heavy burden
of external debt servicing, low prices for export products, deteriorating
terms of trade, as well as by the development of substitute products. It
suggested that future documents assessing the food security situation should
include more information on, inter alia, the negative consequences for food
security of external debt and protectionism. The Council urged that
appropriate action be taken to ensure that the debt service payments of
developing countries did not hamper the development of the food and
agricultural sectors and the performance of the overall economies of these
countries. Many members emphasized the need to establish a new international
economic order and to implement the World Food Security Compact.

39. The Council noted with concern the devastating impact of recent
floods and hurricanes on food security and agricultural production in
several countries, particularly Bangladesh. It reaffirmed the need for
continued and increased assistance to countries affected by such natural
disasters. The Council noted the holding of the Special Meeting on
Assistance to Bangladesh convened by the UN Secretary-General in New York on
16 November 1988.

40. The Council expressed its concern that the protectionist policies
adopted by a number of developed countries continued to be detrimental to
global economic growth and food security. The Council urged concerted action
to bring the cereals market into a better balance in the long-term interests
of both producing and consuming countries, and to enhance export market
access in order to improve the foreign exchange earning ability of
developing countries. The Council expressed the hope that the Uruguay Round
of Multilateral Trade Negotiations would be successful in leading to
increased discipline and greater liberalization of agricultural trade.

41. The Council noted that many developing countries were undertaking
structural adjustment programmes. It recognized that these programmes could
have a negative impact on food security, especially on the poor, and
requested that special measures be taken to prevent or overcome such effects
when and where they occurred. The Council requested the Secretariat to
analyse the impact of structural adjustment programmes and to identify
possible measures to avoid a negative impact on food security, especially on
the poor. In this connection, it noted that in response to the Committee's
request, the Secretariat was carrying out an analysis of the effects of
stabilization and structural adjustment programmes on food security for
consideration by the Committee at its next session.

42. The Council stressed that improving access to food by the poor was of
vital importance. It underlined the need for further research and analysis,
especially for the development of specific indicators to identify the target
groups, more precise measurements of the cost effectiveness and viability of
different interventions, and in-depth case studies of different country
experiences. It suggested that an exchange of views and experiences on
measures to improve access to food at the regional level would be valuable.

43. The Council welcomed that the Committee had started considering
national food security policies and programmes of selected countries. In
this connection, it noted that case studies of Tanzania and Niger had been
discussed by the Committee at its Thirteenth Session. The Council endorsed
the decision of the Committee to continue to examine national food security







- 10 -


case studies at its future sessions. It agreed with the Committee's
suggestion that future case studies should aim at providing an in-depth
analysis of the reasons why certain policies had greater success than
others, and should attempt to draw recommendations concerning domestic
policy changes required, as well as external constraints affecting the
implementation of domestic policies.

44. The Council was informed of efforts being made in the Latin American
and Caribbean region to address the problem of poverty, which had worsened
in recent years in the face of adverse external developments. It noted with
satisfaction that an International Conference on Absolute Poverty had been
held at the end of August 1988 in Cartagena, Colombia, which had made useful
recommendations. The Council was also informed of decisions taken by the
South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) and the
Organization of Islamic Conference in establishing regional food reserves to
enhance food security for their member countries.

45. Some members referred to the role played by transnational
corporations (TNCs) in agricultural production, marketing of food and
agricultural products, research and transfer of technology in many
countries, and suggested that regular assessments of their activities in the
food and agricultural sector be carried out by the CFS. Some other members
stated that this subject had been considered by the Committee at its Twelfth
Session and as the role of transnational corporations was analysed on a
continuing basis by the United Nations Centre on Transnational Corporations,
there was no need for regular assessments of TNCs by FAO.

46. The Council noted the arrangements made to enable the Food Security
Assistance Scheme (FSAS) to carry out its expanded mandate, in particular
the widening of its terms of reference to reflect the broader concept of
food security, the creation of an upgraded Steering Committee and the
provision to establish Country Task Forces. There was general agreement that
an enhanced policy advisory role for the FSAS in regard to the three
elements embodied in the broader concept of food security would be an
effective way for FAO to help countries in their efforts to strengthen food
security. Several members stated that these arrangements would merit further
examination during the ongoing review of FAO.

47. Many members stressed that in the formulation of domestic policies in
developing countries the FSAS should also analyse the impact of the external
economic factors, which affected the food security of developing countries.
The need for FSAS to give greater attention to the elimination of food
insecurity among the lowest income groups and the ECDC (Economic Cooperation
among Developing Countries) and TCDC (Technical Cooperation among Developing
Countries) activities in promoting food security was also underlined.

48. In view of the deterioration in the current world food security
situation, the Council welcomed the decision of the Director-General in
consultation with the Chairman, to convene the Fourteenth Session of the
Committee in April 1989. Most members felt that, in view of the great
importance of the subjects discussed by the Committee and the volatility of
the world food security situation, the Committee should continue to hold
annual sessions. Some members, while agreeing with the important role of the
Committee in food security matters, felt that there was merit in considering
the holding of only one session of the Committee in each bienium. These
members felt that the savings realized could be usefully devoted to
operational activities, and that, in those years when the Committee would






11 -




not meet, an assessment document could be considered by the Committee on
Agriculture (COAG) or circulated to the members of the CFS. Some of these
members also suggested that, if a radical deterioration in the world food
security situation were to occur, additional sessions of the Committee
should be convened. It was also suggested that the question of the frequency
of the Committee's sessions could be considered by the Programme and Finance
Committees.






- 12 -


ACTIVITIES OF FAO AND WFP

Report of the Ninth Session of the Committee on Forestry
(Rome, 9-13 May 1988)

49. The Council endorsed the report of the Ninth Session of the Committee
on Forestry, which reflected the general consensus on the importance of
forestry in socio-economic development and in environmental conservation for
present and future generations. It agreed in particular with the Committee's
recommendation that FAO allocate an increased share of its Regular Programme
budget to forestry activities. Some members emphasized that if FAO was to be
able to effectively respond to the many and urgent requests from the Member
Nations concerning the forestry sector, its financial crisis must be solved.

50. The Council confirmed its full support to the Tropical Forestry
Action Plan (TFAP) as an excellent framework for the coordination of
national and international action in forest development and conservation.
The interdisciplinary approach of the TFAP was commended as a model which
could be applied to other sectors such as agriculture. The Council
recommended that TFAP be brought to the attention of the Committee on
Agriculture. It recognized the importance of strengthening FAO's
coordinating capacity in consonance with the good response received so far
to the TFAP from the member countries and the international community. It
was informed of action taken by FAO to that effect. Some members recommended
that the Council invite regional development banks to participate more
actively in the Tropical Forestry Action Plan.

51. The Council emphasized the contribution of wildlife to food security
and rural development. It endorsed the Committee's recommendation to
incorporate wildlife management and utilization in national development
plans and to give it a higher priority in FAO's programmes.

52. The Council furthermore recognized that the international community
should also be aware of its responsibility towards developing countries and
help create an economic environment that would allow them to accomplish
socio-economic development without having to resort to activities that might
endanger their ecological systems in general and their forestry resources in
particular.

53. The Council recognized the contribution of forest-based small-scale
enterprises to rural development and the stabilization of rural communities
through the generation of income and employment. It also noted their
beneficial role in the conservation and development of forest resources
through their enhanced value for local communities.

54. The Council stressed the importance of proper forest harvesting
techniques to prevent environmental deterioration. It supported the
Committee's recommendation that FAO give increased emphasis to technical
assistance in forest harvesting operations and to harvesting methodologies
of non-wood forest products.


7 CL 94/8; CL 94/16; CL 94/PV/7; CL 94/PV/8; CL 94/PV/16; CL 94/PV/17.






- 13 -


55. The Council recognized the important contribution that forestry could
make to sustained agricultural development, particularly with respect to
soil conservation, watershed management and control of desertification. It
also encouraged FAO to increase the coordination of agricultural and
forestry activities, including the incorporation of farm forestry in its
programmes.

Venue of the Tenth World Forestry Congress 1991

56. The Council noted that five countries Burkina Faso, Equatorial
Guinea, France, Italy and Tanzania had offered to host the Tenth World
Forestry Congress to be held in 1991. The Council agreed that the delegates
of the prospective host countries consult amongst themselves with a view to
arriving at a consensus to be announced before the end of the Council.

57. When the Council resumed its discussion on this subject, the
delegates of France and Tanzania confirmed their candidacies to host the
Tenth World Forestry Congress, while the delegate of Italy withdrew his
country's candidature in order to facilitate the choice. The Council agreed
to postpone a decision on the venue until its Ninety-fifth Session, in order
to provide more time for the two countries and the Secretariat to reach a
consensus.

Aspects of FAO's Policies, Programmes, Budget and
Activities Aimed at Contributing to Sustainable Development

58. The Council considered the document prepared in response to
Resolution 9/87 of the Twenty-fourth Session of the Conference in 1987
regarding FAO policies, programmes, budget and activities contributing to
sustainable development.

59. The Council commended the conciseness of the document which provided
a comprehensive overview of FAO's activities on environment and sustainable
development. However, some members considered that future reporting by FAO
should be more analytical, should be extended to include a wider range of
institutional issues, and should cover field activities financed from the
Technical Cooperation Programme (TCP) and other extra-budgetary funds.

60. The Council noted with appreciation FAO's long involvement in actions
to promote sustainable production systems, as well as the breadth of its
current activities on rational management and conservation of natural
resources to increase agricultural production and to improve the living
conditions of rural people. It considered that FAO's mandate and vast
experience made it the key agency within the UN system to promote
environmentally-sound and sustainable agricultural development.

61. The Council accepted the conclusion of the World Commission on
Environment and Development (WCED) report that overcoming poverty was a
prerequisite for sustainable development. The Council recognized that
desertification and other forms of environmental degradation were not solely
the results of rural and urban poverty. It was agreed that only global,
equitable, inter-dependent and coordinated efforts amongst international
organizations, governments, national institutions and individuals could
provide lasting solutions.


8 CL 94/6; CL 94/PV/8; CL 94/PV/16; CL 94/PV/17.







- 14 -


62. The Council noted that environmental issues in developing countries
were closely related to their economic difficulties and that the political
will on the part of all countries was needed to establish enduring
arrangements to allow them to meet the basic needs of their people and to
preserve their natural resources for future generations.

63. While agreeing that environmental priorities and policies were
sovereign decisions to be made by governments, the Council recognized that
FAO had an important role to play in planning and in providing assistance to
solve problems related to sustainable development at global, regional and
country level. Furthermore, FAO should continue to contribute to the
development of national conservation strategies along with other
international and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). The Council
considered that FAO should give higher priority to wildlife utilization,
alternative pest control strategies, conservation of both plant and animal
genetic resources, promotion of sustainable tropical agriculture, and land
use planning.

64. The Council stressed the importance of forestry, and particularly of
agro-forestry, in sustainable development, and the major role that the
Tropical Forestry Action Plan had to play in this respect.

65. The Council emphasized the importance of people's participation,
including farmers' organizations in sustainable development, and the need
for FAO to create environmental awareness and to support appropriate actions
at grass-root level. The Council welcomed the willingness of one member
country to finance an FAO study on the present and potential role of
farmers' organizations in the protection of the environment and in
sustainable development.

66. The Council's attention was drawn to the fact that pressure on
natural resources resulting from the influx of refugees led in many cases to
environmental degradation. In this connection suggestions were made that FAO
should assist in assessing the impact of refugees on the host country's
environment.

67. The Council noted the very important linkage between energy
conservation, renewable energy technologies and sustainable development,
both in developing and developed countries.

68. The Council was concerned with the rapid rate and large scale of the
degradation of biological diversity. It noted that the next session of the
Committee on Agriculture would discuss issues and consider recommendations
regarding the conservation of animal genetic resources. Some members
requested the Director-General to examine the possibility of expanding the
scope of the Commission on Plant Genetic Resources and the related Fund to
encompass both plant and animal genetic resources conservation. A few
members, however, believed that such an examination was premature. Close
cooperation with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the
International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources
(IUCN) was requested in the implementation of the UNEP Governing Council
Decision 14/26 (June 1987) on the Rationalization of International
Conventions on Biological Diversity. The development of any umbrella
convention on biological diversity should be based on existing international
agreements and funding mechanisms.







- 15 -


69. The Council considered that past development efforts had not dealt
adequately with the problem of environmental degradation. It felt that
environmental concerns and sustainable development should be taken into
account in a continuous forward-looking process in the programmes and
activities of FAO through an integrated and multidisciplinary approach.
Therefore, the Council requested FAO to further strengthen its internal
coordination mechanisms on environment and sustainable development. The
Council urged FAO within its specific mandate and its limited financial
resources, to progessively translate the concept of sustainable development
into practical and operational policies and programmes in the agricultural,
forestry and fisheries sectors including natural resources management,
conservation, technology development and delivery, private and public
investment in the rural sector to promote growth beyond the subsistence
level, policy reform, institution building and grass-root participation in
development planning and management.

70. The Council noted that most developing countries found themselves
considerably strained in providing the necessary resources for their ongoing
development programmes. Additional funds for environmental protection would
put further strain on limited national resources. It called upon donors to
take into account the need for external resources to support incorporation
of environmental concerns and to strengthen national capabilities in the
application of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) as they make their
assistance allocations.

71. The Council re-emphasized the need for effective FAO collaboration
and coordination with its international, multilateral and bilateral partners
for the promotion of environmentally sound and sustainable agricultural and
rural development, particularly with the World Bank, the Regional
Development Banks, UNDP (United Nations Development Programme) and IFAD
(International Fund for Agricultural Development), as well as with
international NGOs.

72. The Council noted that there would be a number of opportunities
in 1989 to discuss environment and sustainable development issues in various
meetings of FAO's governing bodies. The main opportunities would be given in
COAG during considerations of proposals for the Programme of Work and Budget
(PWB) 1990-91 and under the items on Preservation of Animal Genetic
Resources and People's Participation in Agricultural and Rural Development;
at the Ninety-fifth and Ninety-sixth Sessions of the Council in the context
of the PWB 1990-91 and the Report of COAG; and finally at the Twenty-fifth
Session of the Conference under the item on State of Food and Agriculture
1989 which would contain a special chapter on sustainable development, the
Reports from the Council, the PWB 1990-91, and the Review of the Regular
Programme 1988-89 under its chapter on "Support to member countries in
Conservation and Amelioration of the Environment and the Introduction of
Environmental Considerations into FAO Projects and Programmes". The Council
noted that at its next session on the item Summary Programme of the Work and
Budget 1990-91, a substantive discussion could be held on FAO's plans and
strategies to enhance the concept of sustainable development. Some members
stressed the importance of the provision of a brief outline by the
Secretariat on this issue to facilitate the discussion.







- 16 -


Plan of Action for the Integration of Women in Development

73. In accordance with the decision taken at the Twenty-fourth Session of
the FAO Conference in 1987, the Council reviewed the Plan of Action for the
Integration of Women in Development and the Summary of the Expert
Consultation on Experiences of Institutional Changes Concerning Women in
Development, as requested in Resolutions 3/87 and 4/87. The Council thanked
the Director-General for the comprehensive Plan of Action as well as for
having convened the Expert Consultation. The Council appreciated the Plan of
Action presented by the Director-General, unanimously approved it and agreed
that it be implemented in a step-by-step process. In this respect, it was
pointed out that the Plan should be flexible enough to be adjusted according
to the specific conditions of the countries.

74. The Council expressed its satisfaction with the fact that the Plan of
Action embodied the two-pronged approach recommended by the Conference:
women-specific projects and programmes as well as those where women's
concerns were integrated.

75. The Council also recommended that FAO identify concrete priorities
and a timetable of activities for the implementation of the Plan of Action.
In this context, the Council recommended that priority be given to the
training of FAO staff on means for addressing women in agriculture and rural
development in FAO's activities including programmes and projects and their
planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. Special attention
should also be paid to strengthening the technical aspects and the
institutional linkages between the Regular Programme and field projects, to
reorienting and strengthening the curricula of training programmes for
agriculture and home economics, and to developing information on
gender-issues which would be used to improve the design and implementation
of agricultural and rural development projects to benefit rural women.

76. The Council also recommended that high priority be given to the
strengthening of the Women in Agricultural Production and Rural Development
Service (ESHW) including filling all vacant staff positions. It was also
recommended that all technical divisions of FAO participate fully in
including WID (Women in Development) concerns in their programme of work and
that focal points, with clear responsibilities, be designated in appropriate
technical divisions.

77. The Council also stated that Member Governments should take into
consideration the full integration of women in their development programmes.
It was also indicated that FAO should provide assistance to Member
Governments in introducing WID concerns in policy formulation, in
development projects and particularly in training decision-makers. To this
end, it was recommended that strong central focal points in related
ministries of government be promoted.

78. It was also stated that in those countries which so requested,
research should be continued on the juridical-and legal situations that
affected women in their activities as rural producers. The Council also
stressed the promotion of employment opportunities for rural women and of
working through women's groups and organizations. The Council noted that


9 CL 94/13; CL 94/13-Sup.l; CL 94/PV/9; CL 94/PV/10; CL 94/PV/17.







- 17 -


women played a very important role in agricultural production, particularly
in developing countries. It therefore urged that ways of encouraging rural
women's access to credit programmes, training, marketing, and extension
services be promoted.

79. The Council also recommended a closer collaboration with the sister
agencies within the UN system, other international organizations, national
agencies and NGOs and that efforts be made for the best and most efficient
use of existing data studies, guidelines, and training programmes related to
agricultural and rural development.

.80. The Council stated that the implementation of the Plan of Action
should take place within the mainstream of FAO activities and should be
funded from the Regular Programme, paying due attention to the
implementation of other key aspects of FAO core programmes. However, this
should not preclude the use of such extra-budgetary resources which could
become available during the course of implementation. The Council stated
that the Programme of Work and Budget 1990-91 should take into consideration
the implementation of the Plan of Action. It asked FAO to prepare an updated
document that would guide the Organization in clarifying more specific
action areas needed to be presented to the next Conference, taking into
account the views expressed in the debate, with cost estimates that would
particularly reflect the work to be carried out using Regular Programme
resources and extra-budgetary funds. Systematic monitoring of progress was
also considered to be important as implementation of the Plan was
undertaken.

81. The Director-General's representative indicated that the Plan of
Action was requested by the Conference. As it embodied important policies
and programmes which went well beyond the present biennium, he considered
that it should be referred to the Twenty-fifth Session of the Conference.
Some members indicated that the report on this agenda item should be brought
to the attention of the experts assisting the Programme Committee and the
Finance Committee in reviewing the objectives and roles of FAO. It was also
indicated that those activities that would be accommodated in the Programme
and Budget proposals for 1990-91 would be given high priority as requested.
The Council expressed the view that the training programme should be
completed by 1991 and that the Plan of Action should become fully operative
by 1995.

82. A draft resolution, presented by the delegations of Mexico,
Argentina, Algeria, Colombia, Cuba, Nicaragua, Philippines, Spain and the
United Kingdom, received general support from the Council. Identified in it
were basic guidelines and priority areas to implement the Plan of Action.
The Council requested the Conference to approve the Plan of Action, taking
into account the views expressed by the Council, and adopted the following
resolution:







- 18 -


Resolution 1/94

PLAN OF ACTION FOR INTEGRATION OF WOMEN
IN AGRICULTURAL AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT


THE COUNCIL,

Recalling Conference Resolutions 3/87 and 4/87, 12/85, 4/83, 14/77, 10/75
and Council Resolution 2/66,

Convinced that women's key role in rural areas and in food-related processes
requires that special efforts be made by Governments and by FAO in order to
ensure that such women have an equitable share in the benefits of
legislative, social, economic and technological progress,

Appreciating the holding of an Expert Consultation on Experiences of
Institutional Changes concerning Women in Development, as requested in
Conference Resolution 4/87, and taking note of its conclusions,

Thanking the Director-General for submitting the Plan of Action for
Integration of Women in Development in response to Conference Resolution
3/87,

1. Endorses the Plan of Action for Integration of Women in Development
in FAO's substantive areas of competence, and urges the
Director-General that all units concerned perform these tasks in
accordance with the guidelines contained in Annex II;

2. Requests the Director-General to implement as soon as possible all
such features of the Plan of Action as are intended to make the staff
of the Organization, both at Headquarters and in the field, aware of
the content of this Plan. In this respect it considers priority
should be accorded to the following activities, which can be carried
out with existing resources;

(a) Bringing up to date FAO's operational and administrative
processes, as referred to in paragraphs 1 b) and 4 a) and b) of
Resolution 10/75, paragraph 2 of Resolution 12/85 and paragraph 5
of Council Resolution 2/66, in line with the terms of the Plan of
Action;

(b) Establishing basic guidelines for action to be taken by the
various units of the Organization at Headquarters and in the
field, ensuring that special attention be paid to the specific
needs and issues arising from the integration of women in all its
areas of competence, in accordance with the Plan of Action;

(c) Drawing up a two-year training programme for the professional
staff of FAO concerned, both at Headquarters and in the field,
aimed at achieving significant improvements in the attention paid
to women's special place in agricultural and rural development.
This programme should be based on the guidelines in the Plan of
Action and should incorporate a methodology to include the
specific issues of women in all aspects of FAO's activities;







- 19 -


(d) Adopting all such measures as may be required to increase the
access of women to professional posts at all levels, in order to
make progress toward reaching the target established by the
United Nations of a 30 percent share of the total by 1995,
without affecting the principles of professional quality and
equitable geographical distribution. Special efforts should be
made to encourage the promotion of women in all positions within
the Organization;

(e) Designating an officer responsible for matters concerning Women
in Development in every technical unit of the Organization, who
will also coordinate with the Women in Agricultural Production
and Rural Development Service, and with IDWG/WID
(Inter-divisional Working Group on Women in Development);

(f) Ensuring, in collaboration with Governments, that the Sixth World
Food Survey for the 1990s and the World Census of Agriculture
1990, include an analysis of data according to gender.

3. Requests the Director-General, when preparing the Programme of Work
and Budget for the 1990-91 biennium, to give special consideration to
the need to allocate resources for the implementation of the Plan of
Action, with the expectation that the training programme could be
completed by 1991 and the Plan of Action could be fully operational
in 1995;

4. Requests that FAO's main Committees include on the agenda of the next
sessions an examination of the issues arising from the participation
of women in the sectors for which these Committees are responsible,
with a view to making specific recommendations for action in order
that FAO may pay due attention to these issues;

5. Asks Governments to make all possible efforts to contribute to the
implementation of the Plan of Action for the Integration of Women in
Development in FAO's main fields of competence, complementing the
tasks of FAO with regard to the planning and execution of the Plan of
Action;

6. Urges member countries to put forward suitable women candidates for
posts falling vacant in the Organization;

7. Requests the Director-General to present a report on progress
achieved in fulfilling this Resolution to the Ninety-sixth Session of
the Council.

World Food Programme

- Thirteenth Annual Report of the Committee on F8od Aid Policies and
Programmes of the UN/FAO World Food Programme

83. In presenting the Thirteenth Annual Report of the Committee on Food
Aid Policies and Programmes (CFA), the Executive Director of the World Food
Programme (WFP) underlined that 1987, the Programme's 25th year of operat-
ions, had been an exceptional year with many remarkable accomplishments. He
pointed out that in 1987 the Programme had been called on to meet the needs

10 CL 94/9; CL 94/PV/ll; CL 94/PV/16; CL 94/PV/17.







- 20 -


of about 35 million people, of which nearly 15 million received emergency
food aid, and that some 20 million people would benefit from new development
projects approved. As a result of this high-level activity, WFP had shipped
a record amount of 2.4 million tons of food in 1987. He emphasized that the
Programme was always looking for new ways to improve the effectiveness of
food aid, to find new and innovative ways of using food aid, to speed up
food deliveries, to rationalize the distribution and to streamline the
Programme.

84. The Executive Director emphasized that in 1987 WFP had shipped more
food than ever before in its history. Requirements for emergency relief
increased and consequently there was a considerable strain on emergency
resources. It appeared that in 1988 pressure on these resources would
probably continue at the same level as in 1987. He went on to state that for
that reason it was becoming increasingly clear that despite the generous
response by donors to WFP's call for additional resources, the International
Emergency Food Reserve was not providing a sufficient volume of food to meet
the needs of victims of both natural and man-made disasters. He also drew
the attention of the Council to the recent CFA approval of a WFP Plan of
Action for Africa with.an expected investment level of more than US$ 1 800
million for the period 1986-90; to the record quantity of food purchases
made in 1987, three-quarters of which were made in developing countries; and
to the commitment of WFP to promote measures to combat environmental
degradation.

85. Regarding WFP's Headquarters Accommodation which was contingent upon
the signing of a Headquarters Agreement for the World Food Programme, he
voiced the hope that negotiations on the agreement, prepared on the IFAD
model and almost finalized, could be resumed forthwith. He thanked the
Italian Government for its generous offer, and its goodwill and patience.

86. The Director-General's Representative, in pointing out that the
Thirteenth Annual Report of the CFA was of interest to FAO, drew the
Council's attention to certain points which the Director-General wished to
be highlighted. He stated that the resource position of the IEFR had been of
particular concern.to the Director-General. The year 1987 was the first in
the Reserve's history that did not finish with a positive balance. In this
connection, he particularly referred to the Director-General's earlier
suggestions to transform the Reserve into a legally-binding Convention and
to create stand-by pledges of 1.5 million tons of cereals to be mobilized
only when required. With respect to the WFP study on triangular
transactions, he stated that FAO had already supplied data collected by the
Global Information and Early Warning System (GIEWS) and that the
Director-General looked forward to a constructive discussion on this subject
as soon as possible in the hope that guidelines for promoting triangular
transactions could be eventually developed.

87. Regarding estimates of emergency food aid requirements, which WFP had
presented to the 1987 autumn session of the CFA, he mentioned that emergency
requirements for the needs of refugees and displaced persons could be
estimated with some precision in advance, but estimates of requirements
resulting from natural disasters could only be made on the basis of the food
supply situation assessments at the time of the main crop harvest each year
in individual countries. On the basis of data collected by the GIEWS, FAO
had, by the end of each year, preliminary estimates of the aggregate food
aid needs for the following year, which could be used for presentation to
the CFA. As far as the development of WFP's International Food Aid







- 21 -


Information System (INTERFAIS) was concerned, he added that FAO was
interested in this data collection effort and expressed the hope that
INTERFAIS would complement, and not duplicate, the already developed FAO
data bank on food aid. In conclusion, the Director-General's Representative
confirmed that as the awareness of environmental considerations had been
growing in recent years, FAO and WFP had collaborated usefully in that field
and had been conducting an appraisal of the potential environmental impact
of selected WFP projects, with a view to minimize or avoid environmental
degradation.

88. Noting with satisfaction that WFP shipments of food had increased in
1987 to a record level of 2.4 million tons, thus directly benefitting
approximately 35 million people, the Council commended WFP on its
record-setting achievements in 1987 which demonstrated that food aid could
be, and was, an effective development resource.

89. The Council, however, expressed regret for the unprecedented need for
emergency food assistance in 1987 and for the fact that the resources of the
IEFR had been exhausted by November, making it necessary to draw in advance
against 1988 contributions. Some members raised the point as to whether the
IEFR provided the right mechanism to deal with such a magnitude of
unpredictable emergency situations, although its set target had been
exceeded repeatedly in recent years. The Executive Director informed the
Council that between other donors and IEFR, emergency needs were being met.
Since the IEFR was very difficult to manage, however, he was thinking of
certain changes to make it more effective, which he would propose to the CFA
in future.

90. Members expressed satisfaction with the critical contribution of WFP
in getting emergency food aid to people in need throughout the world. They
made particular reference to WFP trucking operations in Ethiopia, overland
transport of food to southern Sudan and Malawi, its coastal shipping service
in Mozambique and its initiative in coordinating food aid to refugees,
including the Agreement with the Office of the United Nations High
Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to provide food aid to emergency
operations in Pakistan, Somalia, and the Islamic Republic of Iran. The
Council also noted with concern the recurrence of incidents of insecurity
experienced by food aid convoys in some countries.

91. The Council supported the continuation of WFP assistance to
low-income, food-deficit countries, in particular the high level of
assistance to sub-Saharan Africa. Given the recent fall in the proportion of
WFP commitments to low-income, food-deficit countries, a few members
emphasized that this trend should be reversed. It was also recognized that a
number of middle-income countries were in need of food aid to address their
pockets of poverty and to ensure that their policy reforms did not bear
heavily on the poor. Hope was also expressed that the commitment level to
development projects would increase in 1988 to the levels of 1985 and 1986.
The Executive Director, however, cautioned the Council that WFP assistance
was expressed in food tonnage, while most pledges were expressed in monetary
terms. In view of the recent rise in food prices, the pledges made available
to WFP would have less purchasing power in 1988 and 1989, resulting in a
consequent decrease in commitment levels.







- 22 -


92. The Council expressed its appreciation for the recent CFA approval of
the WFP Plan of Action for Africa, which had a projected expenditure
totalling more than US$ 1 800 million of food aid of which well over USS
1 500 million was slated for sub-Saharan Africa during the period 1986-90
for the UN Programme of Action for African Economic Recovery and
Development. It also noted that in 1987 WFP had devoted 37 percent of its
development resources to sub-Saharan Africa.

93. The Council welcomed WFP's increasing recognition of the importance
of the role of women in development activities. It urged WFP to enhance the
approach to ensure the effective participation of women in WFP-assisted
projects, both as beneficiaries and agents of development.

94. The Council welcomed the fact that environmental improvement
continued to be of major importance to WFP, and that it had become one of
the largest providers of assistance for that purpose, involving more than
100 operational WFP-assisted projects in 1987 with a total cost of over
US$ 1 200 million.

95. Successes in the areas of environment and women in development
indicated that project food aid could be used in innovative ways, such as
for research and extension projects.

96. One member expressed the need for better projects and acceleration in
project cycle implementation. It expressed its regret that the evaluation
services were in its opinion somewhat downgraded. It was recognized,
however, that progress had been made in 1987 in a training package which
included a major focus on project design. The Executive Director assured
that there was no question of downgrading WFP's highly-regarded evaluation
service, and the emphasis was now more on the use of built-in monitoring and
evaluation methodology to improve project design and implementation. He
also informed the Council that considerable progress had been made in the
speedy implementation of the new project cycle to improve the quality of
WFP-assisted projects.

97. One member raised the problems encountered in some projects where
funds generated by food sales were not meeting the objectives of the
project. It was noted that these problems were being addressed and that the
guidelines approved by the Twenty-third Session of the CFA on the
"Management of funds generated by food-assisted projects" were being put
into practice. These guidelines were also considered useful by bilateral
donors for their projects. The whole question, however, was related to the
deteriorating economic situation of the developing countries which did not
have the resources, particularly in Africa, to support implementation of
project objectives.

98. Some members stressed the need for more regional cooperation,
particularly in the field of food security where WFP could make a valuable
contribution. References were made in this connection to the Third
Ministerial Conference of the Organization of Islamic Conference, and the
initiative of Southern African Development Coordination Conference
countries. The Executive Director pledged WFP's collaboration with all
agencies, including regional bodies, and welcomed the recent initiative of
the Islamic Conference. He said that WFP was second to none in its record of
collaboration with agencies, including World Bank, UNIDO (United Nations







- 23 -


Industrial Development Organization), ILO (International Labour
Organisation), WHO (World Health Organization), UNEP and of course, FAO
which was the major contributor of technical assistance to
agriculture-related WFP projects.

99. The Council welcomed the record quantity of food purchases made in
1987, three-quarters of which were in developing countries, which
contributed positively to south-south cooperation efforts. The Executive
Director informed the Council that the share of developing countries had
increased to 80 percent in 1988. The Council also appreciated WFP's
initiative in undertaking a major study on triangular transactions and local
purchases to ensure that all feasible avenues were explored to maintain and
increase their volume.

100. In response to concern expressed by some members regarding the use of
ships from developing countries for the transport of WFP commodities, the
Executive Director assured the Council that every effort was being made to
ensure maximum utilization of developing country vessels, subject of course
to project exigencies, rates and service competitiveness.

101. Noting the development of the new International Food Aid Information
System by WFP, the Council invited all concerned with food aid, including
FAO, to continue to cooperate with the Programme in its implementation by
providing timely and accurate data and information.

102. The Council commended the Programme on the speedy and efficient
reorganization of the WFP Secretariat following the management review, as
well as the introduction of the Unified Service, which had a positive impact
on staff morale and efficiency. It also expressed satisfaction with WFP's
low level of administrative expenses, one of the lowest for any development
assistance agency.

103. It was noted with concern that there had been delays in the
negotiations for a Headquarters Agreement for WFP, while the staff faced
serious accommodation problems which adversely affected its morale and
efficiency. In this connection the Council was advised by the Representative
of the Host Country that it had expected to conclude negotiations before the
end of this year. It would then have looked for a suitable building. His
country, however, could not influence the pace of the ongoing negotiations
because that was now a matter to be decided within the UN family. He stated
that in the meantime, in a spirit of good will, the Italian authorities had
paid the bulk of the rent on WFP's present premises.

104. The Legal Counsel described the status of progress made on the
negotiations for the Headquarters Agreement for WFP. A first draft of the
Agreement had been prepared and a round of negotiations had been held with
the Italian Government in July. During these negotiations, a number of
changes to the draft had been suggested by the Italian authorities which had
given rise to some concern and the need for further reflection on the
substance of the proposed modifications. The Legal Counsel had discussed
these concerns with the UN Legal Counsel in New York. He said that at least
some of the original reasons for urgency in concluding a separate WFP
Headquarters Agreement were no longer operative in that such an Agreement
was, for example, no longer required to facilitate payment of rent for the
existing WFP accommodation. The Legal Counsel stressed the importance of
Headquarters Agreements and the need for care in their negotiation. He
pointed out that WFP was presently functioning under the FAO Headquarters







- 24 -


Agreement. While he appreciated the concern expressed by some Council
members for a speedy conclusion of an agreement, he said that it was
necessary to resolve all outstanding problems satisfactorily before entering
into a binding agreement. It was hoped that the problems could be resolved
in due course in consultation with the UN Legal Counsel.

105. In conclusion, the Executive Director, thanking the Council for the
very positive and constructive debate and for the generous support extended
to the World Food Programme, said that in all the seven years he had
attended Council sessions, without exception, the remarks of this Council
had been an encouragement for WFP.

- Election of Five Members of the Cmmittee on
Food Aid Policies and Programmes

106. The Council elected the following five Member Nations to the
Committee on Food Aid Policies and Programmes for a term of office of three
years (1 January 1989 to 31 December 1991): Congo, France, Germany (Federal
Republic of), Mexico, Zambia.
12
Recent Developments in the UN System of Interest to FAO

107. The Council expressed its appreciation for the careful and objective
preparation of the document. Some members suggested that a more analytical
approach would have enhanced its usefulness. It was also suggested that the
most important issues and events, and the parts of the document requiring
action by the Council should be highlighted.

108. The Council noted with satisfaction FAO's cooperation with other UN
organizations. The Council underlined the importance of enhanced
coordination among the organizations of the UN system, and among the
Rome-based organizations -- WFC, WFP, FAO and IFAD -- in particular. The
Council urged FAO to continue to seek ways to improve this cooperation. The
Council further noted that as was the case with FAO, reviews had been
undertaken or were underway in a number of multilateral institutions,
including the multilateral development banks.

109. The Council agreed that its consideration of operational activities
for development would be subsumed under its discussion under Agenda
Item 13.

110. The Council expressed its support for the Cyprus Initiative Against
Hunger adopted by the World Food Council (WFC) at its Fourteenth Ministerial
Session held in Nicosia, Cyprus, from 23 to 26 May 1988, and noted with
satisfaction the establishment of a Consultative Group which would meet for
the first time in Paris on 19 and 20 December 1988. It called for the early
implementation of the Initiative and noted with satisfaction FAO's
willingness to cooperate with WFC, and others, in this regard.



11 CL 94/11; CL 94/PV/11; CL 94/PV/16; CL 94/PV/17.

12 CL 94/12; CL 94/PV/10; CL 94/PV/16; CL 94/PV/17.


13 See paras. 141 to 151 below.







- 25 -


111. The Council noted the work undertaken at the Uruguay Round of the
Multilateral Trade Negotiations. It expressed appreciation for the technical
support extended by FAO to the Secretariat of the General Agreement on
Tariffs and Trade and the Negotiating Groups on Agriculture, Tropical
Products and Natural Resource-Based Products. The Council urged FAO to
continue to provide technical assistance to interested developing countries
in connection with their preparations for the negotiations. The Council
hoped that the mid-term review of the Uruguay Round, to be held in Montreal
in early December 1988, would yield positive results.

112. The Council noted the status of implementation of the UN Programme of
Action for African Economic Recovery and Development 1986-90 and the outcome
of the meeting of the Ad Hoc Committee-of-the-Whole of the General Assembly,
held in September 1988, on the mid-term review and appraisal of PAAERD. It
expressed its concern with the insufficient progress made in the economic
recovery and development of Africa. In this connection, the Council strongly
urged all concerned -- the African countries, developed countries,
international organizations and others -- to fulfil their responsibilities
for the implementation of PAAERD. It called for maximum mobilization of
resources for Africa, and underlined the importance of the implementation of
the recommendations of the Advisory Group on Resource Flows to Africa.

113. The Council noted the assistance provided by FAO in the formulation
of PAAERD. It expressed satisfaction with the role being played by FAO in
its implementation and agreed that Africa should continue to be the regional
priority for FAO, taking into account the needs of other developing regions.

114. The Council considered matters related to science and technology for
development, with particular reference to Resolution 4(ix) of the
Intergovernmental Committee on Science and Technology for Development (IGC),
adopted at its Ninth Session in August 1987, which dealt with policy
guidelines for the harmonization of activities of the organizations of the
UN system in this area. In compliance with the request made to the
intergovernmental bodies of the UN system by the IGC, the Council considered
the report of the Secretary-General in this regard (A/CN.11/84 of 12 June
1987) on the basis of paragraphs 169 to 174 of document CL 94/12. It noted,
in particular, the information provided in paragraphs 173 and 174, and was
in full agreement with the views expressed therein. Accordingly, the Council
decided that this section of its report, together with the above paragraphs,
constituted its response to Resolution 4(ix) of the Intergovernmental
Committee on Science and Technology for Development.

115. The Council, noting the importance of the agricultural sector in the
economies of countries undertaking structural adjustment programmes,
stressed the need to take into account the impact of such programmes on the
sector. The Council noted the role FAO should play as an agricultural policy
adviser, as requested by Member Governments. It urged FAO to coordinate
closely in the field with other bilateral and multilateral agencies in
identifying and counteracting any possible negative effects which such
adjustment programmes might cause in the agricultural sector, especially in
the poor areas, where and whenever this occurred in the developing countries
concerned.

116. The Council approved the proposed new title of the FAO/IAEA Joint
Division: "Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and
Agriculture".







- 26 -


117. The Council noted with satisfaction the special plan of cooperation
for Central America formulated by the UN Secretary-General, in close
cooperation with UNDP, and in close consultation with the governments of the
region and appropriate organs and organizations of the UN system. The
Council expressed appreciation for FAO's cooperation in this undertaking.

118. Some members asked the UNDP to intensify, when convenient, its policy
of stimulating governments to execute some projects. It also noted that the
process of arriving at new agency support cost reimbursement modalities had
begun, and that FAO was fully participating in this process. Some members
Stated that the process would include, inter alia, a broad look at the
UNDP/Specialized Agency relationships as they had evolved in the
implementation of UNDP operational activities for development. A question
was raised about the methods by which UNDP held FAO accountable for the
implementation of UNDP projects. The Secretariat answered that FAO had no
standard Basic Agreement with UNDP, but pointed out that the relationship
was governed by the project documents signed by the parties concerned, that
is, the governments, UNDP and the implementing agencies.

119. The Council noted with concern that UNDP and the World Bank were
increasingly executing technical assistance projects including those falling
within the competence of specialized agencies such as FAO. An appeal was
made to avoid duplication and to make full use of the capacity and technical
knowledge of specialized agencies.
14
Progress Report on World Food Day Activities

120. The Council noted with satisfaction the myriad of activities which
were organized at national, regional and international level, in more than
140 Member Nations all over the world to mark the observance of World Food
Day in 1988. It also expressed its satisfaction for the continuous effective
support extended by the Secretariat to national observances.

121. It recognized the usefulness of the theme selected by the
Director-General for 1988 to focus public attention on the obstacles faced
by rural youth and the support they needed to realize their full potential
as producers and as individuals. FAO's contribution to the worldwide
observance of World Food Day, despite present financial constraints, was
appreciated by the Council.

122. The Council supported the Director-General's decision to choose "Food
and the Environment", an extremely topical subject for developed and
developing countries alike, as the theme for 1989.


14 CL 94/INF/4; CL 94/PV/10; CL 94/PV/16; CL 94/PV/17.






- 27 -


PROGRAMME, BUDGETARY, FINANCIAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS

Reports of the Fifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth Sessions
of the Programme Committee

123. In considering the reports of the two sessions of the Programme
Committee held in 1988, the Council noted the Committee's decision to
suspend its normal cycle of programme reviews pending the outcome of the
general review of the Organization, which the Committee was charged with
carrying out jointly with the Finance Committee. In order to devote more
time to the Special Joint Sessions on the Review of FAO, the Committee had
somewhat shortened its regular sessions. However, in the time remaining it
had had in-depth discussions on several important subjects, and the Council
welcomed the detailed reports which the Committee had presented on these
discussions.

124. The Council concurred with the Committee's views regarding the UN
Programme of Action for African Economic Recovery and Development (PAAERD)
and placed particular stress on the fact that the success of the Programme
depended on a massive mobilization of resources from within and outside the
region. The important contribution of FAO to the implementation of PAAERD
was also highlighted.

125. With regard to the consequences of the financial situation for
implementation of the Programme of Work and Budget 1988-89, the Council
shared the Programme Committee's regret that it had been necessary to
initiate programme adjustments for a total of US$ 20 million, in 1988. It
took note of the Committee's acceptance of the Director-General's proposals,
and received further information on the approach and the criteria pursued by
the Director-General in preparing them.
16
Progress Report on the Review of FAO 16

126. The Council received with appreciation the report of the Programme
and Finance Committees on progress in implementing Conference Resolution
6/87 on Consideration of a Review of Certain Aspects of FAO's Goals and
Operations. By this resolution the Conference had given a mandate directly
to the two Committees, working jointly and assisted by a small number of
experts, to undertake the review. The Committees' conclusions and
recommendations were to be submitted by the Director-General, together with
his views and comments, to the Council, which was to transmit them together
with its views to the Twenty-fifth Session of the Conference.

127. The Council commended the Chairman of the Programme Committee on his
clear and detailed presentation of the progress report, which had two parts:
the first of these, of an historical and informative nature, covered
arrangements made by the two Committees to carry out the Review and to
report to the Council in 1989; the second was the result of the Committees'
deliberations on the reform of the programme budget process and was
presented to the Council for discussion and decision at its current session.





15 CL 94/3; CL 94/4; CL 94/PV/12; CL 94/PV/13; CL 94/PV/17.


16 CL 94/4; CL 94/PV/12; CL 94/PV/13; CL 94/PV/17.







- 28 -


(a) Reform of the Programme Budget Process

128. The Council noted that the Programme and Finance Committees had
reached a consensus on the.following text: "After an in-depth review of the
steps already undertaken in this regard in the United Nations and other UN
agencies, as well as the debate onthe matter at the Twenty-fourth Session
of the FAO Conference, the Committees decided:

(a) to request the Director-General to prepare a brief document of
about five pages indicating the budget level he intends to use in
the preparation-of the Programme of Work and Budget 1990-91,
together with the main activities to be undertaken;

(b) the document will be made available to the members of the
Committees two weeks prior to the Joint Session which will be
convened in January 1989 to give early consideration to the document
prepared by the Director-General;

(c) the Joint Session will make recommendations for the
Director-General's consideration on the level of the budget and the
main activities of the Programme for 1990-91.

The Director-General had indicated his readiness to comply with the above
request."

129. The Council was informed by the Legal Counsel that the General Rules
of the Organization did not require the Director-General to prepare an
outline Programme of Work and Budget. However the Rules would not preclude
him from complying with such a request on a voluntary and experimental
basis. For the procedure to be established on a long-term basis, on the
other hand, it would be highly desirable for the Conference to amend the
General Rules. He also referred to a similar situation in connection with
the introduction of the process of the Summary Programme of Work and Budget
in 1973, after which the Conference had amended the General Rules in 1975.

130. Several members questioned the usefulness of the proposed procedure.
They pointed out that the addition of a further step in the process of
formulating and approving the Programme of Work and Budget for the next
biennium implied additional costs in a time of unprecedented financial
stringency, and might result in a pressure for limiting the budget level.
Moreover, they pointed out that the introduction of this additional step
would not be in accordance with the established principle by which, in order
to arrive at the proposed budget level and the Programme of Work and Budget,
the comments and recommendations of all main Committees had to be taken into
account. A number of members pointed out that for the procedure to be
institutionalized it would be necessary for the Conference to amend the
General Rules.

131. Most members welcomed the proposal. They noted that it was along
lines similar to measures adopted in some other UN bodies, and was designed
to facilitate the participation of Member Nations at an early stage in the
process of identifying the priorities and making recommendations on the
budget level to be used in the preparation of the Programme of Work and
Budget for 1990-91.







- 29 -


132. In conclusion, the Council approved, on an experimental basis, the
proposal put forth by the two Committees for the preparation of the
Programme of Work and Budget 1990-91.

(b) Arrangements for the Review

133. The great majority of the members of the Council welcomed the fact
that the Committees had agreed with the Director-General that a Study of
FAO's Field Operations was appropriate and should be included in the Review.
They also welcomed the Management Review that the Director-General had
proposed and the Committees had agreed to. While the Study on FAO's
Objectives, Role, Priorities and Strategies and the Study of FAO's Field
Operations were being carried out with the assistance of independent
experts, the Management Review had been assigned to management consultant
firms.

134. The Council noted the expeditious manner in which the two Committees
had reached a consensus at their first Special Joint Session in May 1988,
both on the terms of reference of the studies and on the selection of
13 high-level experts. The Council expressed satisfaction with the
Committees' choices, noting the experts' distinction, proven competence and
wide range of experience, and stressed its high expectations regarding their
contribution to the review process.

135. The Council was informed that the experts had begun their work in
Rome in the late summer, had been briefed on their terms of reference by the
Chairmen of the two Committees, and had received all necessary documentation
and assistance from the Secretariat. Following this, visits had been
undertaken by experts studying FAO's Objectives, Role, Priorities and
Strategies to four international funding agencies, to 12 UN bodies and to
one international research institute. The experts were accompanied by
relevant senior FAO staff on these visits. Those dealing with field
operations had joined the other experts for some of these visits, and had
also carried out field missions in Brazil, Chile (including the Regional
Office for Latin America and the Caribbean), China, Ethiopia and Senegal.
They were further scheduled to visit Turkey, another international research
institute, the International Centre for Agricultural Research in the Dry
Areas (ICARDA) and the Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific in Bangkok.
The countries to be visited had been selected on the basis of agreed
criteria, which included regional coverage, size of the field programme and
mix of funding sources, diversity in subject matter coverage, and the
possibility of focusing on such issues as emergency operations, new
dimensions, TCDC, environmental problems and collaboration with NGOs. A
suggestion was also made that the experts visit the Regional Office for
Africa.

136. The Council was informed that for the management review a tender had
been issued in August 1988, calling for two studies, one on the
Organization's accounting policies and one on its personnel policies and
procedures, and four specific reviews, of treasury operations, buildings
maintenance, computer facilities and printing systems. It was also informed
that seventeen bids had been received and carefully evaluated, following
which the short-listed firms had been interviewed in Rome. Particular
attention had been paid, in making the final choice, to the quality of the







- 30 -


bids, the reputation of the firms involved, and the professional competence
of the individuals who would carry out the work. Two of the three firms
selected had already begun their work. Some members regretted that the
tender had not included firms in developing countries.

137. The Council noted that the timetable involved the submission of the
reports of the two expert groups and of the management consultants to a
special Joint Session of the Programme and Finance Committees in May 1989.
The Council was informed by the Chairman of the Programme Committee that it
would receive a report at its June 1989 Session. The need to have a
substantive discussion on this issue at the June Session was stressed by
some members. Nevertheless the Council agreed that an in-depth debate could
oply be held at the November Session. The Council recognized that the
Committees would require time, after their May session, to synthesize their
findings and recommendations and finalize their report in the autumn for
presentation to the Council in November. The possibility of extending that
session by one or two days was mentioned.

p38. The Council stressed its own interest, and that of all Member
nations, in the review process. The Council agreed that the experts and
Consultants, and the Committees, should be allowed the freedom necessary to
complete the tasks assigned to them. Some members emphasized the need to
ensure that the parts of the Review should complement each other and urged
contacts between the experts and the Consultants. Some members made
suggestions on the content of the Management Review. The Council was
informed that the Review was expected to identify areas for more subsequent
detailed analysis. Some members requested that the proceedings of the
Council on this item be provided to the experts.

139. The Council recognized that it was ultimately the responsibility of
the two Committees to prepare their own report, drawing on the three studies
and on the comments of the Director-General, in order to fulfill the mandate
entrusted to them. The Council noted with satisfaction the statement of the
Chairman of the Programme Committee that this task was being undertaken with
utmost seriousness and in scrupulous adherence to the terms of Resolution
6/87. Many members urged that in accordance with Resolution 6/87, the
Committees should devote maximum attention to the need to make progress
towards the establishment of a new international economic order within the
framework of FAO.

140. In conclusion the Council reiterated that the purpose of the Review
was to strengthen the Organization's capability to better serve its Member
Nations, to make FAO's programmes more responsive to the challenges of the
future and to enhance efficiency. The Council welcomed the consensus which
had emerged within the Programme and Finance Committees early in the process
of carrying out the Review, and expressed the strong hope that this
consensus would be maintained through the successive stages of the review
process.







- 31 -


UN System Operational Activities for Development

141. The Council considered the views of the Programme Committee on the
report on the case studies of operational activities at country level (the
Jansson report). Although this report was not distributed as a working
document of the Council, and therefore there was no request for it to be
debated, the views of some Member Nations which had studied the report in
depth were heard. The Council, in general, endorsed the views of the
Programme Committee. The Council emphasized that the report presented a fair
and balanced assessment of the difficulties and problems facing such
activities, even though the sample examined (eight countries) was relatively
small.

142. The Programme Committee had been in general agreement with the
conclusions and recommendations of the Jansson report, with the exception of
recommendation "g" of the report. The Council, in general, endorsed the
Programme Committee's view that, while it was important for Trust Fund
projects to be well-coordinated, this did not necessarily require the
channelling of Trust Fund resources through UNDP.

143. The Council noted that the content and conclusions of the Jansson
report were closely linked to the issues and considerations currently being
examined by the experts assisting the Committees in the Review of FAO, in
particular those studying the Organization's field programmes. It was
emphasized that, in carrying out their work, these experts would need to
take the findings of the Jansson report into account. In this connection,
the Council noted with satisfaction that Mr Jansson himself was one of the
experts.

144. The Council noted that the Programme Committee's comments on the
Jansson report had been submitted to the United Nations Economic and Social
Council (ECOSOC) in July 1988. A number of members, while agreeing with the
Programme Committee's comments, wished to offer additional views on the
contents and recommendations of the Jansson report, and to have these
conveyed to the Director-General for Development and International Economid
Cooperation (DG/DIEC) for further submission to ECOSOC and as an input to
his forthcoming Triennial Policy Review of the Operational Activities of the
UN system. These members raised the issues of the role of the Resident
Coordinators, programming at country level, the harmonization of operational
procedures, co-location of the system's country offices, support costs, and
the importance of building recipient government capacity.

145. With regard to the role of the Resident Coordinators, it was noted
that there was scope for further improvement within existing mechanisms,
bearing in mind differing country circumstances and that the governments
bore the overriding responsibility in this regard. A few members referred in
particular to the Jansson report's recommendation that, in countries with
particularly large UN system development programmes, the assignment of the
Resident Coordinator could be separated from that of the UNDP
Representative. Some did not agree with this approach.

146. The advantages of joint and integrated programming approaches were
stressed by some members, in particular in connection with UNDP-sponsored
Roundtable processes, Nat CAP (National Technical Cooperation Assessment and
Programming exercises, and UNDP Country Programmes. In all such cases, the
Council emphasized that FAO and UNDP should consult at the earliest stages
and FAO should be in a position to make available its full range of
expertise and capacities to recipient countries where food and agriculture







- 32 -


was often the predominant sector. The importance of policy and
sectoral-based advice was also emphasized, and in particular support and
training for improved sectoral and sub-sectoral coordination as reflected in
the Programme Committee's comments. Particular stress was laid on the need
for FAO to assist the recipient countries in building up their capacity to
plan agricultural and rural development programmes and coordinate external
assistance, including those cases where structural adjustment was being
undertaken. Some members felt that a greater decentralization of design and
implementation of projects at country level would help strengthen
governments' capacity, and transfer technical and management expertise.

147. Several members noted current weaknesses in UNDP Country Programming,
as described in the Jansson report. They expressed the view that to be
useful for purposes of coordination, country programmes should be more
closely linked with overall national planning and should contain substantive
analysis provided by Specialized Agencies such as FAO. They also stressed
that, as UN system assistance normally comprised only a minor share of total
development assistance in a given country, such programming should take due
account of bilateral assistance as well as that provided by development
financing institutions. The Council noted that UNDP was currently
undertaking a thorough analysis of its country programming practices and
underlined the importance of FAO's full participation in this exercise.

148. Several members emphasized the importance of haromizing operational
procedures, as advocated in the Jansson report. It was recognized that,
while scope existed for further work in this direction, progress had
recently been achieved in such key areas as reporting, evaluation, and
standardization of project documents which, in appropriate cases, could be
utilized for Trust Fund as well as for UNDP projects. There was also
progress with regard to administrative procedures, fellowships, and
procurement where FAO was cooperating within the framework of the
Inter-Agency Procurement Services Unit (IAPSU). The role of the Consultative
Committee on Substantive Questions (Operational Activities) (CCSQ(Ops)) and
FAO's active contribution to that Committee, was underlined in this
connection.

149. In noting the Programme Committee's appreciation of the advantages of
common premises for the system's field offices (co-location), the Council
agreed with that Committee on the need for a pragmatic case-by-case approach
to this matter, taking full account of the wishes of host governments which
sometimes preferred FAO Representations to be located within or near the
relevant agricultural ministry. The view was expressed that "co-location" in
and of itself did not necessarily ensure better country-level coordination
and cooperation among the organizations of the system and that, in many
cases, what counted most was the quality and capacities of the individual
representatives concerned. A few members said they felt that what was needed
was integrated use of UN system resources to achieve common national
objectives. Because of the co-location issues, one member requested
information on the cost of FAO's individual country offices.

150. Several members raised the issue of support costs in relation to the
efficiency and quality of operational activities. Some members expressed the
view that present support cost arrangements had become increasingly
inadequate given the changing needs of countries for technical cooperation,
It was noted that, in accordance with UNGA Resolution 42/196 and subsequent
decision 88/50 of the UNDP Governing Council, UNDP was undertaking an
examination of new support cost arrangements to apply from the beginning of
its Fifth Programming Cycle (1992). In recognizing that adequate and







- 33 -


appropriate support cost reimbursements were essential to ensure the
efficacity of FAO's field activities, the Council noted with satisfaction
that FAO was actively cooperating with UNDP and other agencies in the
preparation of these "successor arrangements" for support costs, and that
the FAO Governing Bodies would be duly consulted with a view to their
deciding on the measures to be accepted.

151. The Council was informed that the views expressed by it on this item
would be conveyed to the United Nations in compliance with the request
contained in UNGA Resolution 42/196.

Reports of the Sixt-second and Sixty-third Sessions of the
Finance Committee

152. The Council reviewed the two reports of the Finance Committee and
noted the information regarding the implementation of the Programme of Work
and Budget and the resulting evolution of the financial situation. Its
considerations and findings are reported under paras 177 to 187.

153. The Representative of the United States of America announced that a
US payment of US$25 million had been delivered to FAO. He also said that his
President intended to submit to the US Congress, in January 1989, a request
for appropriation of the full amount of US obligations to UN organizations,
including FAO, for 1989 payments to those organizations. Finally, he said
that his President had directed his government to devise a plan regarding
the payment of all arrears due to UN organizations, including FAO. The
Council welcomed this announcement.

154. The Council also recalled its earlier expression of appreciation of
the efforts made by a number of members, despite their economic
difficulties, to meet their obligations.

Extension of Terminal Payment Fund Coverage

155. The Council endorsed the approval given by the Finance Committee for
an extension of the use of the Terminal Payment Fund to cover Repatriation
Grant payments arising from the Support Cost (Trust Fund) Programme, in
addition to those arising from the Trust Fund Programme proper.

Support Costs from UNDP and Trust Fund Programmes

156. The Council confirmed its support for the actions tending to improve
the level of reimbursement of actual support costs incurred by the
Organization in implementing extra-budgetary programmes. In this regard, the
Council urged funding sources to consider the acceptance of appropriate
project servicing charges when requested by the Director-General.

157. The Council supported the proposal that a comprehensive report be
made to the next Conference on arrangements regarding the level of support
costs, which would be submitted to the Council for its prior consideration.







17 CL 94/3 paras 3.4 3.10 and 3.46 3.121; CL 94/4, para. 4.69 4.83;
CL 94/PV/12; CL 94/PV/17.








- 34 -


S Miscellaneous Income: Treatment for Assessment Purposes

158. The Council considered the report of the Finance Committee regarding
the treatment of Miscellaneous Income for assessment purposes. It noted the
Report's comments on the possible impact of changing the current practice of
deducting estimated income when calling for the payment of assessed
contributions. Such a change would contribute to the financial soundness of
the Organization. However, this would entail a one-time increase in the
level of the net payment for assessed contributions from Member Nations.

159. The Council requested the Finance Committee to keep the matter under
review, taking into account the views expressed during the discussion and to
take suitable action.

18
Personnel Matters

160. The Council noted that decisions taken by the Forty-second Session of
the UN General Assembly (1987) on the recommendations of the International
Civil Service Commission (ICSC) had moderated to some extent the general
deterioration in the conditions of service of staff in the Professional and
higher categories.

161. The Council noted that the recommendations of ICSC to the Forty-third
Session of the General Assembly (1988) were still subject to review by the
Fifth Committee. It also noted that if these recommendations were adopted by
the General Assembly, the dependency allowance for a child and for a
secondary dependant would increase with effect 1 January 1989, and the
education grant would increase with effect from the school year in course on
1 January 1989.

162. The Council also noted that ICSC had been requested by the
Forty-second Session of the General Assembly to undertake a comprehensive
review of conditions of service in the Professional and higher categories in
order to provide a sound and stable basis for the remuneration of these
categories. It also noted that the preliminary report of the Commission to
the Forty-third Session of the General Assembly had covered a large number
of areas, including the identification of highest paid national civil
services, post adjustment, and the effect of inflation and currency
depreciation on the remuneration amounts.

163. The Council was informed of the developments in conditions of service
of the staff, which were reviewed by the Finance Committee. It noted that a
further increase in the salaries for the General Service category was
granted based on the current methodology which kept General Service staff
salaries in line with salaries paid by leading employers on the local
market, while salary adjustments for the Professional and higher categories
continued to be frozen. The salary situation for Professional staff and
above had not improved in spite of the cost-of-living survey conducted in
November 1987. The Council shared the concerns expressed by the Finance
Committee over the deterioration in salaries for this latter category which
affected the ability of the Organization to recruit and retain
highly-qualified Professional staff.


18 CL 94/4 paras 4.69 4.88; CL 94/PV/12; CL 94/PV/17.







- 35 -


164. On pension matters, the Council was informed that the Forty-second
Session of the UN General Assembly had approved the increase in the rate of
contribution to the Pension Fund to 22.20 percent on 1 July 1988, and to
22.50 percent on 1 July 1989. It was also informed that a study on the UN
pension system was being undertaken by the UN Joint Staff Pension Board at
the request of the General Assembly.

S Statistics of Personnel Services

165. The Council noted that the Finance Committee had reviewed in detail
the Statistics of Personnel Services and had expressed its satisfaction with
the improvements introduced that led to greater transparency and a better
understanding of the staff resources of the Organization. The Council
endorsed the Finance Committee's request that the Secretariat continue to
refine the statistics, providing in particular more details on temporary
services.

Financial Position of the Organization
19
Financial Situation and Future Prospects


(a) Status of Contributions to the Budget

166. The Council noted the status of contributions at 11 November 1988,
compared to the same date in 1987, as well as the details of receipts in
1988 and outstanding contributions of all Member Nations as shown in
Appendix E to this Report.

































19 CL 94/4, paras 4.12 4.38; CL 94/LIM/1; CL 94/PV/2; CL 94/PV/3;
CL 94/PV/16; CL 94/PV/17.






- 36 -


Amounts outstanding at 1 January


Current assessments
Contributions in arrears


Total


1988

US$


240 920 000.00
93 876 857.21

334 796 857.21


(for comparison)'

1987
a/b/
US$


c/ 198 575 000.00 c/
78 069 434.69


276 644 434.69


Receipts 1 January to 11 November


Current assessments
Contributions in arrears

Total


157 168 156.23
37 561 450.58

194 729 606.81


131 100 629.30
47 694 669.46

178 795 298.76 d/


Amounts outstanding at 11 November


Current assessments
Contributions in arrears

Total


83 751 843.77
56 315 406.63 b/

140 067 250.40


67 474 370.70
30 374 765.23

97 849 135.93


a/ Appendix E sets out full details of receipts during 1988
(US$194 729 606.81) and outstanding contributions of all Member
Nations.
b/ Contributions in arrears include arrears payable under Conference
authorizations by instalments due in 1988 (in 1987 in comparative
figures) and in future years (on 1 January 1988, US$48 100.58 due in
1988 and US$267 834.98 due in future years).
c/ Of which US$600 000.00 relates to the Tax Equalization Fund.
d/ Receipts include the release on 1 January 1987 of cash surplus of
1984-85 biennium: US$17 354 871.34 applied to current assessments
(8.73%) and US$11 744 610.66 to arrears.




(b) Current Assessments (details of amounts received and amounts
outstanding are listed in Appendix E)

167. The month-end cumulative percentages of 1988 assessments received
during the eleven months of 1988, as compared to receipts during the
preceding four years, is shown in the following statistics.






- 37 -


Percentages of Current Assessments Received
(Cumulative year to date)

1988 1987 a/ 1986 1985 b/ 1984
% % % % %

January 7.01 10.41 10.37 24.69 6.28
February 20.62 24.25 15.89 28.25 8.73
March 31.10 32.40 24.50 30.95 14.21
April 33.94 44.75 30.26 37.31 27.09
May 43.51 50.38 36.10 47.89 30.92
June 53.03 61.00 40.67 51.35 51.90
July 54.38 63.25 62.48 59.63 55.42
August 60.96 63.78 63.00 60.14 57.44
September 61.89 64.47 63.40 63.33 60.66
October 65.20 65.77 64.75 73.52 86.34
November 65.23 c/ 66.15 65.86 91.35 91.44
December 66.17 66.96 92.50 92.60


a/ Includes US$17 354 871.34 (8.73% of 1987 assessments) as distribution
of the cash surplus of the 1984-85 biennium applied as of 1 January
1987.
b/ Includes US$41 005 487.00 (20.72% of 1985 assessments) as
distribution of the cash surplus of the 1982-83 biennium applied as
of 1 January 1985.
c/ Receipts at 11 November; preceding years at month end as well as at
31 December.




168. At 11 November 1988, the position of Member Nations (and the number
of Member Nations with arrears) with comparative figures at the same date
during the preceding four years, was as follows:

Number of Member Nations

Current Assessments Arrears

% Paid in Part No
Received Full Paid Payment Total

1988 65.23 73 31 54 158 43
1987 a/ 66.16 91 19 48 158 41
1986 66.50 74 23 61 158 54
1985 b/ 92.40 85 19 54 158 41
1984 92.00 78 23 55 156 53


a/ To facilitate comparisons, applications of the cash surplus (9.20%)
to the current assessments of 80 Member Nations are excluded from the
Number of Member Nations.
b/ To facilitate comparisons, applications of the cash surplus (20.72%)
to the current assessments of 84 Member Nations are excluded from the
Number of Member Nations.






- 38 -


Percentages of Current Assessments Received
(Cumulative year to date)





100 i

90



70

60

--- 7 ----+-




30

20

10 1


Jan Feb Mr Apr May JuL Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

1988 -1987-- -/-/-








169. Receipts at 11 November 1988 of the 1988 assessments were more
favourable than those of 1986, but less favourable than those of 1984,
comparable years without a cash surplus distribution.

170. As at 11 November 1988, only 73 Member Nations had paid their
assessments in full, while 31 Member Nations had made only a partial
payment, leaving 54 Member Nations who had made no cash payment at all in
1988.

(c) Contributions in Arrears (Appendix E sets out details of amounts
outstanding)

171. The Council was informed that, at 11 November 1988, a total amount of
US$56 315 406.63 of arrears of contributions remained outstanding, including
US$42 410 211.57 overdue from the largest contributor. As at 11 November
1988, 79 Member Nations had made cash payments, of which 19 had paid their
arrears in full. Amounts of more than US$1 million were due from eight
Member Nations, totalling US$53 359 579.59 and representing 94.7 percent of
arrears outstanding.







- 39 -


(d) Replenishment of the Special Reserve Account and Advances to the
Working Capital Fund

172. The Council noted that, of the total amounts due at 1 January 1988
a
amounting to US$12 309 000.00 and US$3 742 050.00 respectively, 71 Member
Nations had made cash payments as at 11 November 1988, leaving balances of
US$4 581 022.57 and US$1 351 243.12, respectively, outstanding on
11 November 1988.

(e) Future Prospects

173. The Council was informed that it was not possible to prepare a
realistic cash-flow forecast for 1989 in view of the lack of information
from Member Nations as to the expected timing and amount of contribution
payments. It noted that while such information was always requested by the
Organization, it was rarely received. The Council recognized that if the
same irregular contribution pattern experienced in 1988 were repeated during
1989, the Organization could expect to be in a cash deficit position at
various times in 1989.

(f) Need for All Member Nations to Pay Contributions

174. Notwithstanding the positive response made by many Member Nations to
the Director-General's special appeal in July 1988 for payment of their
arrears and outstanding contributions, 85 Member Nations made no payment, or
only partial payment of 1988 assessed contributions, and 43 Member Nations
owed arrears for 1987 and prior periods. In this connection, information
available regarding the receipt of assessments due from the largest
contributor also continued to be of great uncertainty.

175. The Council emphasized the responsibility of every Member Nation,
irrespective of the amount of its assessed contribution, to fulfill its
financial obligation to the Organization as called for in the Financial
Regulations, including payment of contributions when assessed.

176. The Council appealed to all Member Nations with outstand ig21
contributions and particularly to those which were in arrears, to

a Of which US$224 350.00 of credits applied as follows: US$72 475.00
against 1987 arrears and US$151 875.00 against 1988 assessments.

20 The delegation of the United States of America stated that it supported
paragraph 176 as submitted by the Drafting Committee, and objected to the
attempts of Cuba and Colombia to alter the impression of concern about
payment by each and every country which was in arrears into an erroneous
impression of concern solely about US payments.

The United States of America noted that FAO document CL 94/LIM/1 reported
that, as of 11 November 1988 (a date which preceded a US payment of
$25 million to FAO) a large number of member countries had failed to pay
their assessed contributions. Many of the outstanding contributions, as a
percentage of the amount owed in 1988, were proportionately greater than
the outstanding contributions of the United States of America.

Countries other than the United States of America which had outstanding
contributions were: Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahrain, Benin,
Bolivia, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burma, Burundi, Cape Verde, Central
(cont.)







- 40 -


remit the amounts due as a matter of urgency, in order that the Organization
could fulfill its mandate. It further urged all Member Nations to pay their
1989 assessed contributions, and also to inform the Organization in advance
as to the timing and amount of payment as early as possible. This would
permit the preparation of a reliable 1989 cash-flow forecast which was
required to manage the financial situation in a prudent and efficient
manner.

Consequences of the Financial Situation and Possible Measures to
Ensure Implementation of the Programme of Work and Budget 1988-89

177. The Council expressed its concern with the financial situation faced
by the Organization and noted the cash-flow forecast of 1988 showing that
the shortfall of available cash could be in the amount of US$2 million to
US$5 million at year-end.


20 (cont.)
African Republic, Chad, Chile, Comoros, Congo, Cook Islands, Costa Rica,
C6te d'Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic Kampuchea, Dominican Republic, Ecuador,
El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Greece,
Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, India,
Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Israel, Kuwait, Laos,
Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania,
Mauritius, Mexico, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama,
Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Qatar, Romania, Samoa, Sao Tome and
Principe, Saudi Arabia (Kingdom of), Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone,
Somalia, St Christopher and Nevis, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Sudan,
Suriname, Syria, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, United Arab
Emirates, Uruguay, Venezuela, Yugoslavia and Zaire.

The countries other than the United States of America in arrears were:
Argentina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cape Verde, Central African Republic,
Chad, Comoros, Congo, C6te d'Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic Kampuchea,
Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Grenada,
Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Israel, Liberia,
Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nigeria, Paraguay, Peru, Poland,
Romania, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, St
Christopher and Nevis, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Syria,
Tanzania, Turkey, Uganda and the United Arab Emirates.

Expressed as a percentage of 1988 outstanding contributions, the
outstanding contributions of the following countries exceeded those of
the United States of America: Argentina (195%), Burundi (337%), Cape
Verde(265%), Central African Republic (290%), Comoros (240%), Congo
(174%), C6te d'Ivoire (231%), Cuba (205%), Democratic Kampuchea (561%),
Dominican Republic (271%), Equatorial Guinea (313%), Guatemala (273%),
Guinea-Bissau (263%), Iran (Islamic Republic of) (242%), Liberia (235%),
Libya (259%), Nigeria (305%), Paraguay (261%), Peru (265%), Poland
(189%), Romania (497%), Sao Tome and Principe (313%), Senegal (191%),
Sierra Leone (250%), Suriname (313%), Syria (251%), Tanzania (251%),
Turkey (182%) and Uganda (293%).

21 The delegations of Colombia and Cuba stated that the above text
misinterpreted their position which was that the timely payment of
contributions would permit the normal operations of FAO.

22 CL 94/4, paras 4.22 4.38; CL 94/PV/2; CL 94/PV/3; CL 94/PV/16;
CL 94/PV/17.







- 41 -


178. The Council was informed that at 11 November 1988, US$83.7 million or
34.8 percent of the 1988 assessments, remained unpaid. Also, the amount owed
for 1987 and prior year arrears, US$56.3 million at 11 November 1988, was
the highest in history for 11 November of any year. It was further informed
of the deficit of expenditure over income in the amount of US$46.8 million
carried over from the past biennium with zero balance in the Working Capital
Fund and the Special Reserve Account. The deficit was expected to increase
at year-end by another US$8 million to US$10 million.

179. The Council noted that the financial results projected for 1988
showed a continuation of a serious financial condition compelling the
Director-General to institute a US$20 million slow-down in expenditure. The
deficit caused by the excess of expenditure over income was expected to be
somewhat lower for 1988 than for 1987 because of the forced slow-down in
expenditures coupled with the receipt of US$15 million from the generous
contribution of the Italian Government to support the TCP Programme.
However, at year-end there would be a substantial increase in the amount of
arrears to be carried over to 1989. Some members suggested that information
regarding the breakdown of budget appropriation and expenditure by major
programmes, similar to that provided in Conference document C 87/LIM/41, be
available to the wider membership at the present Council session. The
Secretariat clarified the difficulties of meeting this request, and
subsequently agreed that this information would be provided to the Finance
Committee. The Council noted the situation on the matter.

180. Members of the Council stated their concern for the seriousness of
the ongoing financial condition and invoked Member Nations to pay all
outstanding contributions with urgency. The Representative of the United
States of America announced that the US Government had informed the
Director-General the previous week that the United States had initiated
action to pay US$25 million to FAO shortly. The Council noted that call
letters to Member Nations for the payment of contributions for 1989
assessments were intended to be despatched in early December 1988 with a
view to payments of contributions due on 1 January 1989.

181. While recognizing that all Member Nations bore the same
responsibility to pay their contributions in a timely manner, the Council
considered that the severe financial difficulties suffered by the
Organization were due to the lack of timely payments of assessed
contributions by many Member Nations. The greatest impact to the financial
situation was caused by delays in payment of its contribution by the major
contributor. The Council welcomed information from the Representative of the
United States of America that its President intended to submit to the
US Congress, in January 1989, a request for appropriation of the full amount
of US obligations to UN organizations for the US fiscal year 1990. The
Council was also informed by the Representative of the United States of
America that the President had asked for a plan regarding payment of all
arrears due to UN organizations.

182. The Council, in general, clearly stated its support for the manner in
which the Director-General had managed the implementation of the Programme
of Work and Budget for 1988 through budgetary savings and cuts, slow-downs
in expenditure and entering into contracts for the forward purchase of Lire.
The Council also welcomed the assistance from receipt of a generous
extraordinary contribution from the Host Government. Such actions were
necessary for the Organization to plan its work even though it could only be
accomplished at a reduced level during 1988. Some members sought advice on







- 42 -


the rationale adopted by the Secretariat in effecting cost savings. The
Council noted that the subject had been considered by the Programme
Committee at its Fifty- fourth Session in May 1988, and was included in its
report.

183. The Council regretted that it had been found necessary to reduce FAO
services by US$ 45 million over 1987 and 1988, which had affected all
beneficiaries, particularly developing countries. Furthermore it weakened
the Organization's capacity at a time when demand for its services continued
to increase.
23
184. The Council recalled that at its Eightieth Session, by Resolution
2/80, confirmed by Conference Resolution 14/83, it had given a standing
authority to the Director-General to borrow in view of the deterioration in
the timing of the payment of contributions. It had taken this decision after
noting the recommendations of the Finance Committee and of the Committee on
Constitutional and Legal Matters (CCLM).

185. In this regard, the Director-General informed the Council that he had
taken all possible measures to ensure prudent management of the financial
crisis, whilst taking account of his legal mandate to implement fully the
Programme voted by the Conference. He further confirmed that he could not
envisage further budgetary reductions without damaging the Organization's
vital staff resources, and that he would use his authority to borrow should
the cash flow situation further deteriorate. The Director-General indicated
that in such an instance he would first make recourse to internal borrowing
before resorting to commercial banks for the provision of lines of credit
for temporary coverage of any cash shortage during 1989. In any event the
Director-General would keep the Finance Committee fully informed.

186. A few members of the Council, while showing concern for the financial
situation, stated that the Organization should manage within its means even
if this meant further reductions of expenditure and they indicated strong
opposition to external borrowing. The Council in its large majority,
however, felt strongly that in the present financial situation it was for
the Director-General to exercise the authority to borrow under the most
favourable conditions.

187. The Council, in general, agreed that no further budget cuts should be
made for 1989, as it was felt that such cuts would damage the Organization
and reduce staff resources to the detriment of future capacity to cope with
the mandate and the expectations of Member Nations. The Council concluded
that bearing in mind the views expressed in the debate, the Director-General
should, in conformity with the mandate given to him by the Conference, take
any measures he deemed necessary to carry out the Programme of Work and
Budget approved by the Conference.


23 CL 80/REP, paras 73 85.







- 43 -


24
Audited Accounts

(a) Regular Programme 1986-87
(b) United Nations Development Programme 1986-87
(c) World Food Programme 1986-87

188. The Council reviewed the reports on the above accounts. It noted that
in the Report for each of the three Programmes, the External Auditor had
expressed the opinion that the financial statements presented fairly the
financial position at 31 December 1987 and the results of the operations for
the period then ended; that they were prepared in accordance with the stated
accounting policies which were applied on a basis consistent with that of
the preceding financial period; and that the transactions were in accordance
with the Financial Regulations and legislative authority.

189. With regard to the Regular Programme accounts, the Council noted the
External Auditor's Report on the Control of Manpower and the Summary and
Conclusions contained within the Report and agreed with the importance given
to this subject. The Council was informed that a copy of the External
Auditor's Report dealing with manpower had already been provided to the
Management Consultants reviewing personnel activities.

190. The Council further noted the External Auditor's suggestions
regarding the administration of Trust Fund projects and that, resources
permitting, the Organization intended to put them into effect, including the
review of the UNDP's guidelines on project administration with a view to a
possible standardization of field project procedures.

191. With regard to the UNDP accounts the Council noted that the External
Auditor had made several constructive suggestions for improvements in
project formulation and evaluation, procurement and progress reports. The
Council also noted with satisfaction that, subject to the availability of
funds, the Organization intended to implement the Auditor's recommendations.

192. The Council, in general, endorsed the views of the Finance Committee
to the effect that the reports of the External Auditor on the Regular
Programme and UNDP accounts be communicated to the experts involved in the
ongoing Review of FAO and that a progress report on the implementation by
the Secretariat of the Auditor's suggestions be presented to the Finance
Committee.

193. In his opening statement, the Executive Director of WFP stated that
he was not going to comment on the substance of the part of the Finance
Committee's report which dealt with the certification of the WFP accounts,
paragraphs 4.43 to 4.52, since the Finance Committee had decided to consider
this matter at its 1989 Spring Session. He welcomed the Finance Committee's
decision since the review was intended to encompass "the manner in which the
Member Nations intended the Joint Report to be interpreted". He also
indicated that the CFA would no doubt take into account the comments of both
the Finance Committee and the Advisory Committee on Administrative and
Budgetary Questions (ACABQ).






24 C 89/5 and C 89/5-Corr.1; C 89/6; C 89/7 and C 89/7-Corr.1 (English
only); CL 94/4 paras 4.39 4.57; CL 94/PV/14; CL 94/PV/17.







- 44 -


194. In referring to the second part of the Finance Committee's report,
paragraphs 4.53 to 4.56, the Executive Director stressed that these comments
related to the management of development projects and not to the financial
accounts which had not been commented on or qualified by the External
Auditor. He further underlined that he had encouraged the External Auditor
to undertake such audits since it was of great help to him, as the person
responsible for the management of the Programme, to have as much information
as possible about aspects of the running of this very large and complex
operation.

195. The Executive Director further stated that he had felt impelled to
make his intervention to dispel any misunderstanding on the External
Auditor's findings. He wished the Council members to know that the External
Auditor had informed the Finance Committee that he did not consider his
report on the management of WFP development projects to be unduly critical
or significantly different from his comments on the management of FAO and
its Trust Funds.

196. The Executive Director pointed out that the CFA had yet to examine
the External Auditor's report and that further information on all the
matters would be given at that time, including progress in implementing the
findings and conclusions.

197. Several members, while recognizing the difficulty under which the
Programme worked and the progress that had been made through the
introduction of the new Project Cycle, urged the Programme to consider the
findings of the External Auditor with the utmost seriousness, especially as
they concerned reporting and projects involving counterpart funds, and to
respond to the recommendations with alacrity. The Executive Director
reminded the Council that, in fact, the recommendations were few in number
and that the External Auditor himself had indicated that corrective actions
were in most cases underway. He assured the Council, however, that the WFP
Secretariat would provide due attention to the resolution of the problems
noted.

198. Questions were raised concerning the system for establishing
priorities for new activities, and the proportion of the global portfolio
accorded to different regions. The Executive Director described the
principles which governed the portfolio allocation process, and noted that
the regional balance was fairly stable over time and reflected a consensus
in the CFA concerning its appropriateness.

199. Some members stated their intention to recommend that at the next CFA
session, the WFP be asked to undertake an assessment during 1989 of the
project cycle reforms. The results would be available for presentation to
the CFA Spring 1990 Session and in time to facilitate the broader review of
reporting and monitoring which the Finance Committee had asked the External
Auditor to undertake in his next report.

200. The Council noted the necessity of continued close collaboration
between FAO and WFP. Some members noted that it was particularly important
that food aid policies should be applied in conformity with world and
national strategies and priorities in the context of food security plans and
should be carefully orchestrated with FAO and guided by policies evaluated
by the Committee on Food Security (CFS). Other members, however, underlined
the importance of general policy issues regarding food aid being dealt with
under the aegis of the CFA.







- 45 -


201. Several members drew attention to the fact that, as had been noted in
the minutes of the Finance Committee, the Executive Director, rather than
the Director-General, had for the first time certified the WFP biennium
accounts. The Executive Director and the representative of the FAO both
explained their respective views of the circumstances which led to this
fact.

202. The Council noted the Chairman of the Finance Committee's description
of his Committee's deliberations in this regard, and agreed that it was
appropriate for the next Finance Committee Session to take this matter under
further consideration. The Council agreed that it was in the interest of
all, but especially of the poorest countries, that the difficulties which
had arisen between the Organization and the Programme be resolved with
respect for relevant statutes and standards. Some members called the
Council's attention to the possible implications of the issue on the
juridical linkage between FAO and WFP and noted that, in their opinion, this
linkage should not be altered.

203. The Council endorsed the Finance Committee's recommendation and
agreed to forward the following resolution to the Conference for adoption:

DRAFT RESOLUTION FOR THE CONFERENCE

AUDITED ACCOUNTS


THE CONFERENCE,

Having considered the report of the Ninety-fourth Session of the Council,

Having examined the following audited accounts and the External Auditor's
Report thereon:

Regular Programme 1986-87 C 89/5, C 89/5-Corr.l
United Nations Development Programme 1986-87 C 89/6
World Food Programme 1986-87 C 89/7, C 89/7-Corr.l

Adopts the above audited accounts.

Examination of the Proposal made by the Nineteenth Regional Conference
for the Near East n the return to the Region of the Regional Office
for the Near East

204. The Council considered a report from the Director-General on a
preliminary proposal for the return of the Regional Office for the Near East
to the Region.

205. The Council recalled Conference Resolution 20/79 on the Regional
Office for the Near East and action pursuant to that Resolution by which the
Regional Office in Cairo had been closed and the Office had continued
implementing the regional programmes for the Near East from FAO
Headquarters.


25 CL 94/17; CL 94/PV/14; CL 94/PV/17.







- 46 -


206. The Council took note of the desire of the Member Nations attending
the Nineteenth FAO Regional Conference for the Near East (Muscat,
Oman, 13-17 March 1988) that the Regional Office for the Near East be
returned to the region and of the request to the Director-General to include
this issue in the Provisional Agenda for the forthcoming Twenty-fifth
Session of the Conference of FAO, to be held in November 1989. The Council
recognized that since the decision of the closure of the Office in Cairo had
been taken by the Conference, its eventual reopening would also have to be
decided upon by the Conference.

207. The Council fully endorsed the desire of the Member Nations of the
Near East Region that the Regional Office should return to the Region. It
agreed that while programmes for the Region had been implemented effectively
from Headquarters, the quality of implementation and the impact of the
programmes would be significantly enhanced if the Office were to operate
once again in the Region.

208. The Council noted the interest of the Government of the Arab Republic
of Egypt to resume the provision of host facilities for the Office. The
Council generally expressed appreciation for this offer. At the same time,
it did not wish to exclude consideration of any other offer that might be
made by any other Government of the Near East Region and felt that it would
be desirable for them to be consulted in the matter. It requested the
Director-General to take the necessary measures for this consultation.

209. The Council noted some preliminary estimates in connection with the
return of the Office to the Region, relating to the relocation of staff and
dependants and acquisition of furniture and equipment. It was recalled that
when the Office had been moved to Rome, a number of Member Nations of the
Region had provided voluntary contributions to help finance the cost of that
relocation and that the unutilized balance of these funds might be agreed to
by the same governments for the return of the Office to the Region.

210. The Council noted that the Director-General would consult the
governments which had provided voluntary contributions for the relocation of
the Office in Rome on whether they would agree to their share of the
unutilized balances being used for the return of the Office to the Region.
The Council agreed that the Director-General should submit a full proposal
on the return of the Office to the Region to the Council, for forwarding to
the Conference at its Twenty-fifth Session in November 1989. In this
connection a few members referred to the relevance of the Review of FAO
currently underway.

211. The Council noted that the proposals of the Director-General for the
Programme of Work and Budget for 1990-91 would include budgetary provision
for the relocation of the Regional Office in the Region so that, if the
proposal were accepted by the Conference, the transfer of the Office could
be effected during the forthcoming biennium.

First Report on Uscheduled and Cancelled Sessions in the
1988-89 Biennium

212. The Council recalled that the Director-General reported to it once a
year on the unscheduled sessions approved and on the sessions cancelled.


26 CL 94/7; CL 94/PV/15; CL 94/PV/17.






- 47 -


213. The Council noted between 1 January and 1 October 1988,
12 unscheduled sessions had been approved and 45 sessions had been
cancelled. Details are given in Appendix F to this report.

214. The Council expressed its deep regret that the current financial
difficulties affecting the Organization had led to the cancellation of so
many sessions, depriving Member Nations of their usefulness. It again
expressed the hope that this situation would be transitory and that
implementation of approved programmes under the Regular Programme would be
resumed.

Revised Calendar of 1988-89 Sessions7of the Council and of those
Bodies which report to the Council

215. The Council considered proposals for a revised calendar of sessions
for 1988-89, both as regards its own sessions as well as the sessions of
those bodies which report to it.

216. After a searching debate, the Council concluded as follows:

(a) that a Joint Session of the Programme and Finance Committees
would be held in January 1989, at dates and for a duration to be
determined by the Director-General in consultation with the
Chairmen of the two Committees;

(b) that the Sessions of the Programme and Finance Committees in May
1989 would have to be extended by one week and that the precise
dates be determined by the Director-General in consultation with
the two Chairmen;

(c) that the Ninety-fifth Session of the Council would be convened on
Monday 19 June 1989 to conclude on 30 June 1989;

(d) that the Fifty-seventh Session of the Committee on Commodity
Problems would be postponed by one week and would be convened
from 3 to 7 July 1989.

217. The revised Calendar of Sessions for 1988-89 of the Council and of
those Bodies which report to it is given in Appendix G to this report.


27 CL 94/14; CL 94/PV/15; CL 94/PV/17.







- 48 -


CONSTITUTIONAL AND LEGAL MATTERS

Report of the Fifty first Session of the Committee on constitutional
and Legal Matters

Requests for Convening a Special Session of the Finance Committee

218. The Council recalled that the issue of the interpretation of Rule
XXVII.8(b) of the General Rules of the Organization (GRO) had arisen
following receipt in February and March 1988 of a number of requests by
various Member Nations of the Organization for the convening of a special
session of the Finance Committee by the Director-General. Several of these
requests had specified time limits within which the session should be
convened. The relevant part of Rule XXVII.8 GRO reads as follows:

"The Finance Committee shall hold sessions as often as necessary,


(b) on the call of the Director-General acting on his own initiative
or in pursuance of a request submitted in writing to him by five or
more Member Nations."

219. The Council noted that, following an informal meeting between the
Director-General and representatives of the interested Member Nations held
in March 1988 to discuss the convening of the Special Session, the
Director-General had decided to refer the matter of the interpretation of
Rule XXVII.8 GRO and its possible improvement to the Committee on
Constitutional and Legal Matters (CCLM) under Rule XXXIV.3 GRO with a view
to clarifying the position for the future. As three of the requests which
had specified time limits had been subsequently withdrawn, at that stage
there was no longer an immediate issue with respect to the convening of the
Special Session.

220. The Council also noted that in its consideration of the issue placed
before it, the CCLM had the benefit of the views expressed on the matter by
the Sixty-second Session of the Finance Committee in May 1988.

221. The Council noted, further, that although Rule XXVII.8 GRO did not
refer to the possibility that Member Nations could specify a date in their
requests for the convening of a Special Session, it did seem implicit that
Member Nations could, in making their request, also express the wish that
the Session be convened within a specific period of time. The legal
implications of the specification by Member Nations of a date for convening
the meeting was a matter for interpretation. Any such interpretation would
have to be based on the principle of what was reasonable in the light of the
particular circumstances of any given case.

222. The Council bore in mind that two possible approaches for clarifying
the matter for the future had been considered by the CCLM. On the whole, the
CCLM had preferred the solution of inserting a new provision in the Rules of
Procedure of the Finance Committee to the alternative of amending Rule
XXVII.8(b) GRO, since this was a simpler and more flexible solution that did
not require action by the FAO Conference. This was also the approach which
had been favoured by the Finance Committee itself.


28 CL 94/5; CL 94/PV/15; CL 94/PV/17.






- 49 -


223. The Council also bore in mind that the CCLM had felt that, in
addition, it would be desirable to expand the scope of the provision to
include the analogous situation of the convening of a session of the Finance
Committee on the call of the Chairman acting in pursuance of a request
submitted by three members of the Committee under paragraph (a) of Rule
XXVII.8 GRO.

224. The Council noted that the solution' proposed by the CCLM was logical,
simple but complete, and sufficiently flexible to meet the requirements.

225. The Council, therefore, endorsed the recommendation contained in
paragraph 13 of the Report of the CCLM and recommended that the Finance
Committee adopt the following provision for inclusion as a new paragraph
l(bis) in Rule II of its Rules of Procedure:

"Where the required number of requests for the calling of a session
of the Finance Committee is received under Rule XXVII.8(a) or (b) GRO
and such requests indicate that the session should be called on a
specified time limit, the Chairman and the Director-General shall
consult each other and the members of the Committee with a view to
the calling of the session on the date or within the time limit
specified, bearing in mind the pertinent factors, including the
context and urgency of the request, the availability of the Chairman
and the majority of the members of the Committee, conflicting meeting
schedules and the preparations necessary for convening the session.

Any session called pursuant to such requests shall be called as soon
as possible and at the latest within a period which shall not exceed
50 days from the date of receipt of the third request under
sub-paragraph (a) or the fifth request under sub-paragraph (b)."

226. With regard to the minimum number of requests required, the Council
considered that it would be premature to reconsider this now. The matter
could be kept under review and examined by the CCLM at a later date, should
this prove necessary.

Procedure for Election Chairmen and Members of the Programme
and Finance Committees

227. The Council recalled that the question of the procedure for the
election of the Chairmen and members of the Programme and Finance Committees
had first arisen at its Eighty-ninth Session in November 1985, when the
members of the Finance Committee were elected. No member from the Region of
North America was elected. This had given rise to a discussion concerning
the interpretation of Rule XXVII.3(c)(ii) GRO which governed the procedures
for the election of members of the Committee. Consequently, the Council had
referred the matter to the Committee on Constitutional and Legal Matters.

228. In the course of 1986 and 1987, the matter had been considered
several times by both the CCLM and the Council and a number of solutions had
been envisaged. Finally, in 1987, on the proposal of the CCLM, endorsed by
the Council, the Conference had adopted a Resolution calling on members of
the Council to bear in mind, when electing members of the Programme and
Finance Committees:


29 CL 94/15; CL 94/PV/15; CL 94/PV/17.






- 50 -


(i) the need for just and equitable representation of the various
regions;

(ii) the fact that all regions that so wish should, in fact, be so
represented; and

(iii) the importance of rotation among the countries in each Region.

229. However, a similar problem regarding the distribution of membership
had arisen at the Ninety-third Session of the Council in November 1987, this
time in the context of the election of members of the Programme Committee.
On this occasion, only one Member Nation from Africa had been elected.
During the discussion which then took place, many Council members stated
that the Region of Africa was under-represented. Following these discussions
the Council had agreed to review, at its Ninety-fourth Session, those parts
of Rules XXVI and XXVII GRO that related to the election of Members of the
Programme and Finance Committees "in order to guarantee appropriate regional
representation on each Committee." The Council had also expressed the view
that, in the light of its discussions, the CCLM should prepare the
appropriate legal provisions for submission to its June 1989 session.

230. The Council noted that the document before it highlighted the
principal aspects of the discussions which had taken place at the sessions
of the CCLM, the Council and the Conference, and revealed that the issue was
an extremely complex one and one which raised sensitive political issues.

231. In the ensuing discussion, the view was expressed by many members
that the key to resolving the kind of problem which had arisen was to
improve coordination within and among regions. Resolution 11/87 adopted by
the Twenty-fourth Session of the Conference on 26 November 1987 had already
addressed the problem in affirming, inter alia, the need for just and
equitable representation of the various regions on the Programme Committee
and the Finance Committee. These members did not see the necessity of
referring the matter again to the CCLM, or at least of not doing so until
the political aspects had been sorted out first by the regional groups.

232. In this context, a number of members underlined the complexity of the
issues involved, the difficulty of finding a mathematical solution and the
danger that any mathematical solution would be inflexible and might not be
suitable to meet constantly evolving situations. There was also the danger
that modification of the existing rules might have undesirable repercussions
for other Statutory Bodies.

233. On the other hand, many members expressed the view that Africa was
presently under-represented on the Programme Committee; this demonstrated
clearly that coordination among regions was not satisfactory and that
Conference Resolution 11/87 was not sufficient to guarantee just and
equitable representation of the various regions. Consequently, the matter
should be referred once again to the CCLM.

234. These members favoured a solution based on a change in the General
Rules. In this context, some members referred to one of the solutions
mentioned in paragraph 8 of document CL 94/15, whereby separate elections
would be held for each Region seeking representation on the Committees,
according to a precise allocation of seats among the various Regions.






- 51 -


235. In view of the fact that many members had expressed the wish to refer
the matter to the CCLM for further study, the Council requested the CCLM to
review the matter once again and to report to the Council at its next
session. In so doing, it was underlined that the basis for reaching an
effective solution was that of regional understandings. Care had to be taken
to give due regard to the consequences which any proposals might entail for
other bodies of FAO. Finally, the CCLM should seek the most effective and
desirable means of achieving the objective of just and equitable
representation, taking full account of the various views expressed by the
Council, without prejudice to the type of solution which the CCLM might
recommend.

African Forestry Commission: Change of Title to African Forestry
and Wildlife Commission

236. The Council approved the change of name of the "African Forestry
Commission" to the "African Forestry and Wildlife Commission". The Council
was informed by the Secretariat that the change of title did not entail any
change in the terms of reference of the Commission.
31
Invitations to Non-Member Nations to Attend FAO Sessions

237. In accordance with paragraph B-1 of the "Statement of Principles
relating tothe Granting of Observer Status to Nations", the Council took
note of the request made by the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR)
to attend as an observer the Ninety-fourth Session of the Council and agreed
to its participation. The Council welcomed this participation and expressed
the wish that this country, a founding nation of FAO, would soon exercise
its right of membership in the Organization.

238. The Council agreed to the Director-General's proposal to invite the
German Democratic Republic, Liechtenstein and the USSR to attend as
observers the Third Session of the Commission on Plant Genetic Resources to
take place in Rome from 17 to 21 April 1989 (AGP-725).

239. In accordance with paragraph B-2 of the aforementioned Statement of
Principles, the Council was informed that since its Ninety-third Session,
the Director-General, on being so requested, had invited the USSR to attend
as observers the following sessions:

Fifteenth Session of the European Inland Fisheries Advisory
Commission, GBteborg, Sweden, 31 May 7 June 1988 (FI-727).
Eleventh Session of the Fishery Committee for the Eastern
Central Atlantic (CECAF) (FI-740) and the Eighth Session of its
Sub-Committee on Fishery Development, Douala, Cameroon,
5 9 December 1988 (FI-743).
Twenty-fourth Session of the Intergovernmental Group on Jute,
Kenaf and Allied Fibres of the Committee on Commodity Problems,
New Delhi, India, 2 4 November 1988 (ESC-712).







30 CL 94/19; CL 94/PV/15; CL 94/PV/17.


31 CL 94/INF/8; CL 94/PV/1; CL 94/PV/16; CL 94/PV/17.






- 52 -


240. The Council was also informed that the Director-General had invited
the Byelorussian Soviet Socialist Republic, the German Democratic Republic,
the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic and the USSR to attend as observers
the Sixteenth FAO Regional.Conference for Europe, Cracow, Poland, 23 26
August 1988 (CC-709).

Changes in Representation of Member Nations on the Programme and
Finance Committees

241. As provided for in Rule XXVI-4(a) of the General Rules of the
Organization (GRO), the Council was advised that Mr Earl William Weybrecht
had been designated as the new Government Representative of Canada on the
Programme Committee.

242. The Council was also informed that His Excellency Roberto E. Dalton
had replaced His Excellency Carlos O. Keller Sarmiento as the Representative
of the Argentine Republic at the Fifty-fifth Session of the Programme
Committee and the Second Special Joint Session of the Programme and Finance
Committees.

243. As provided for in Rule XXVII-4(a) GRO, the Council was advised that
His Excellency Gian Luigi Valenza had been designated as the new Government
Representative of Italy on the Finance Committee.

244. The Council was also informed that Mr Alan Charles Smart had been
designated as the new Government Representative of Australia on the Finance
Committee.

245. The Council was again advised that His Excellency Fred J. Eckert had
been designated as the new Government Representative of the United States of
America on the Finance Committee.

246. The Council took note of the changes, welcomed the new members and
thanked the outgoing ones for their valuable services.


32 CL 94/INF/9; CL 94/PV/15; CL 94/PV/17.







- 53 -


OTHER MATTERS

Date and Place of the Ninety-fifth Session of the Council

247. The Council decided that its Ninety-fifth Session should be convened
in Rome from 19 to 30 June 1989.


33 CL 94/14; CL 94/PV/15; CL 94/PV/17.










APPENDIX A


AGENDA FOR THE NINETY-FOURTH SESSION OF THE COUNCIL


INTRODUCTION PROCEDURE OF THE SESSION

1. Adoption of the Agenda and Timetable

2. Election of Three Vice-Chairmen, and Designation of
the Chairman and Members of the Drafting Committee

3. Statement by the Director-General


WORLD

4.

5.


FOOD AND AGRICULTURE SITUATION

State of Food and Agriculture 1988

Report of the Thirteenth Session of the Committee
on World Food Security (Rome, 13-19 April 1988)


ACTIVITIES OF FAO AND WFP

6. Report of the Ninth Session of the Committee on
Forestry, including date and venue of the Tenth
World Forestry Congress 1991 (Rome, 9-13 May 1988)

7. Aspects of FAO's Policies, Programmes, Budget
and Activities Aimed at Contributing to
Sustainable Development

8. Plan of Action for the Integration of Women in
Development

9. World Food Programme

9.1 Thirteenth Annual Report of the Committee
on Food Aid Policies and Programmes of the
UN/FAO World Food Programme

9.2 Election of Five Members of the Committee
on Food Aid Policies and Programmes

10. Recent Developments in the UN System of Interest
to FAO

11. Progress Report on World Food Day Activities






- A2 -


IV. PROGRAMME, BUDGETARY, FINANCIAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS


12. Financial Position of the Organization

12.1 Financial Situation and Future Prospects

12.2 Consequences of the Financial Situation
and Possible Measures to Ensure Implementation
of the Programme of Work and Budget 1988-89

13. Reports of the Fifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth Sessions
of the Programme Committee, including a Progress Report
on the Review of FAO

14. Reports of the Sixty-second and Sixty-third Sessions
of the Finance Committee

15. Audited Accounts

15.1 Regular Programme 1986-87

15.2 UNDP 1986-87

15.3 World Food Programme 1986-87

16. Examination of the Proposal made by the Nineteenth
Regional Conference for the Near East on the return
to the Region of the Regional Office for the Near
East

17. First Report on Unscheduled and Cancelled Sessions in
the 1988-89 Biennium

18. Revised Calendar of 1988-89 Sessions of the Council
and of Those Bodies which Report to the Council


V. CONSTITUTIONAL AND LEGAL MATTERS


19. Report of the Fifty-first Session of the Committee
on Constitutional and Legal Matters

20. Other Constitutional and Legal Matters, including:

20.1 Procedure for Election of Chairmen and
Members of Programme and Finance Committees

20.2 African Forestry Commission: Change of Title
to African Forestry and Wildlife Commission

20.3 Invitations to Non-Member Nations to attend
FAO Sessions






- A3 -


20.4 Changes in Representation of Member Nations
on the Programme and Finance Committees


20.5 Other Questions


MATTERS

Date and Place of the Ninety-fifth Session of the Council


Any Other Business


RY 23.11.88


OTHER

21.


22.











33

APPENDIX B
ANNEXE B
APENDICE B


icq _FI j.J j..a Ip3JJ -i~aLi


LIST OF DELEGATES AND OBSERVERS
LISTE DES DELEGUES ET OBSERVATEURS
LIST DE DELEGADOS Y OBSERVADORES


Independent Chairman
President ind6pendant
President Independiente


Vice-Chairmen
Vice-Presidents
Vicepresidentes

ALLJ1 11'-J w,&L
Chairman of the Drafting Committee
President du Comit6 de r6daction
President del Comit4 de Redacci6n


Lassaad Ben Osman
O*uc* r Jl91


Rudolf de PourtalBs (Suisse)
Bashir El Mabrouk Said (Libya)
(I Pwf1) -xe- WJjI_)tJI _>^-
Gerard Phirinyane Khojane (Lesotho)


Yousef Ali Mahmoud Hamdi (Egypt)
(I-U) i J L-






- B2 -


MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL
MEMBRES DU CONSEIL
MIEMBROS DEL CONSEJO


ALGERIA ALGERIE ARGELIA A't"

Representant
Mile Faouzia BOUMAIZA
Premier Secretaire
Repr6sentant permanent adjoint
aupr&s de la FAO
Rome J-*" L 11




ARGENTINA ARGENTINE tu

Representante
Fidel BRACERAS
Subsecretario de Agricultura
Secretaria de Agricultura, Ganaderia
y Pesca
Buenos Aires

Suplentes
Roberto E.E. DALTON
Ministro Plenipotenciario
Representante Permanente ante la FAO
Roma

Victor E. MACHINE
Ministro Consejero Agricola
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma

Sra. Monica DEREGIBUS
Primer Secretario
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma

Sra. Susana MERINO
AsesoLa, Consejeria Agricola
Embajada de la Republica de Argentina
Roma


AUSTRALIA AUSTRALIE

Representative
A.D. Duncan CAMPBELL
Ambassador
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome


AUSTRALIA AUSTRALIE (Cont'd)

Alternates
Paul R. BRYDEN
Principal Executive Officer
International Organizations Section
Multilateral Relations Branch
Department of Primary Industry
and Energy
Canberra

Michael J. RYAN
Counsellor (Agriculture)
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome

Angus MACDONALD
Counsellor (Development Assistance)
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome





BANGLADESH

Representative
Waliur RAHMAN
Ambassador
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome


Alternates
F.A. Shamim AHMED
Counsellor
Alternate Permanent
to FAO
Rome

A.K.M. Fazley RABBI
Counsellor
Alternate Permanent
to FAO
Rome


Representative





Representative


Masood AZIZ
First Secretary
Embassy of Bangladesh
Rome





- B3 -


BRAZIL BRESIL BRASIL

Representative
Joao Augusto de MEDICIS
Ambassador to FAO
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome


Alternates
Marcelo Leonardo da SILVA VASCONCELOS
Counsellor
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome

Igor KIPMAN
Second Secretary
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome



CAMEROON CAMEROUN CAMERUN

Repr6sentant
Antoine ESSOME
Secretaire general
Ministere de l'agriculture
Yaound6


Suppleants
Dang MEKOULA
Secr6taire permanent
Comite national permanent de la FAO
Ministere de l'agriculture
Yaound6

Thomas YANGA
Deuxieme Conseiller
Repr6sentant permanent adjoint
auprbs de la FAO
Rome



CANADA

Representative
Earl W. WEYBRECHT
Minister Counsellor
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome

Alternates
F. Warren J. MAJOR
Director.
Multilateral Programs Branch
Agriculture Canada
Ottawa


CANADA (Cont'd)

Alternate
Real LALANDE
Counsellor (Agriculture)
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome

Associates
I. FERGUSON
Deputy Director
International Affairs Section
United Nations Affairs Division
Department of External Affairs
Ottawa

H. HERMENS
Institutional Development Officer
Food Aid Coordination and
Evaluation Centre
Canadian International Development
Agency
Hull


CHINA CHINE 1

Representative r
Li ZHENHUAN
Counsellor
Deputy Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome


(sOE (4(fgf P),A (f


Alternates '
Dong QINGSONG
Division Chief
Foreign Affairs Department
Ministry of Agriculture
Beijing







Zhou QIJIANG
Second Secretary
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome

'Aml







- B4 -


CHINA CHINE (Cont'd)


Advisers "t 'J
Gong JIANCHUN
Third Secretary
Alternate Permanent
to FAO
Rome


Representative


Liao CHONGGUANG
Official
Foreign Affairs Department
Ministry of Agriculture
Beijing


COLOMBIA COLOMBIE


Representante
Gonzalo BULA HOYOS
Embajador ante la FAO
Representante Permanente
Roma


ante la FAO


Suplentes
Sra. Olga Clemencia FERNANDEZ
Primer Secretario
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma

Srta. Mery HURTADO
Tercer Secretario
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma





CUBA

Representante
Juan NUIRY SANCHEZ
Embajador
Representante Permanente ante la FAO
Roma


CUBA (Cont'd)

Suplentes
Sra. Miriam INZAULGARAT
GARCIA DE PEREZ
Segundo Secretario
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma

Pedro REYNALDOS DUENAS
Tercer Secretario
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma


Asesores
Sra. Ma. Josefina FERNANDEZ ALVAREZ
DE ARIZONES
Agregado Diplomftico
Representaci6n Permanente ante la FAC
Roma

Sra. Ana Maria NAVARRO
Asesora
Representaci6n Permanente ante la FAC
Roma


EGYPT EGYPTE EGIPTO .

Repr6sentant r^
Mrs Hoda EL MARASSY
Ambassador
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome



..j-JI
LakJ JJJt ^a J pIJJI J^^J|_,



Alternate
Yousef Ali Mahmoud HAMDI
Agricultural Counsellor
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome

CJU.A- J J> CAL -LS_


tuJ .Lt-J! p21 AJI J ..J.







- B5 -


EGYPT EGYPTE EGIPTO (Cont'd)

Adviser .
Mahmoud MOHAMMADI
Second Secretary
Embassy of Egypt
Rome

S L




FINLAND FINLANDE FINLANDIA


Representative
Antti NIKKOLA
Director,
Chairman of Finnish FAO
Ministry of Agriculture
Helsinki


Committee
and Forestry


Alternates
Ms Anna-Liisa KORHONEN
Director,
Development Cooperation
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Helsinki

Hannu HALINEN
Minister Counsellor
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome

Ms Gunilla KURTEN
Counsellor
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome

Leo GRANBERG
Senior Adviser
Bureau for International Affairs
Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry
Helsinki


FRANCE FRANCIA


Repr6sentant
Georges EGAL
Ambassadeur
Repr&sentant
de 1'OAA
Rome


permanent aupres


Suppl6ants
Philippe PIOTET
Secr6taire general
Comit6 interministeriel pour
l'alimentation et l'agriculture
Paris


FRANCE FRANCIA (Cont'd)


Suppl&ants
Bernard LEDUN
Charge de Mission
Minist&re des affaires
Paris


6trang&res


Mme Evelyne SENGSUWAN
Conseiller
Sous-direction des affaires
multilat6rales
Ministere de la cooperation et du
d6veloppement
Paris

Jean-Luc GRAEVE
Conseiller
Repr6sentant permanent adjoint
aupres de 1'OAA
Rome

Jean Pierre POLY
Attache scientifique
Representation permanent aupres
de la FAO
Rome





GABON

-Representant
Mme Ivone DIAS DA GRACA
Deuxieme Conseiller
Repr6sentant permanent adjoint
aupr&s de la FAO
Rome





GAMBIA GAMBIE

Representative
Saikou SABALLY
Minister of Agriculture
Banjul

Alternates
Amadou S. TAAL
Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Agriculture
Banjul

A.K. NJIE
Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Water Resources,
Fisheries and Forestry
Banjul







- B6 -


GERMANY, FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF
ALLEMAGNE, REPUBLIQUE FEDERAL D'
ALEMANIA, REPUBLICAN FEDERAL DE

Representative
Gerhard LIEBER
Head of Division
International Agricultural Org.
Federal Ministry of Food,
Agriculture and Forestry
Bonn


Alternates
Alois BAIER
First Counsellor
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome

Giesberg GRAF VON WESTPHALEN
Head of Division
Financial, Budgetary and Administrative
Questions of the UN Specialized
Agencies
Federal Ministry of Finance
Bonn

Christoph JESSEN
Assistant Head of Division
Federal Foreign Office
Bonn

Hartmut STALB
Assistant Head of Division
Federal Ministry of Food,
Agriculture and Forestry
Bonn

Mrs Eva Kerstin KLEIN
Third Secretary
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome


Adviser
Mrs Karola FABER
Secretary of Staff
Federal Ministry of Food,
Agriculture and Forestry
Bonn



GUINEA GUINEE

Repr6sentant
Abdoul Karim CAMARA
Chef de Cabinet
Ministire de l'agriculture et des
resources animals
Conakry


GUINEA GUINEE (Cont'd)


Adjoint
Ibrahima KABA
Conseiller
Repr6sentant permanent adjoint
aupres de la FAO
Rome




HUNGRY HONGRIE HUNGRIA

Representative
Jeno REDNAGEL
Vice Minister
Ministry of Agriculture and Food
Budapest

Alternates
Istvcn DOBOCZKY
Counsellor
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome

Mrs Maria GALVOLGYI
Senior Officer
National FAO Committee
Ministry of Agriculture and Food
Budapest

Associates
Andras SZABO
Senior Officer
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Budapest

Ferenc FEKETE
Counsellor
Ministry of Agriculture and Food
Budapest

Zoltan KALMAN
Assistant to the Permanent
Representative to FAO
Rome





INDIA INDE

Representative
Premananda TRIPATHY
Additional Secretary
Department of Agriculture and
Cooperation
Ministry of Agriculture and Rural
Development
New Delhi







- B7 -


INDIA INDE (Cont'd)

Alternates
Akbar Mirza KHALEELI
Ambassador
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome


V.K. SIBAL
Minister (Agriculture)
Deputy Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome



INDONESIA INDONESIE

Representative
Nusjirwan ZEN
Secretary General
Ministry of Agriculture
Jakarta


Alternates
Nyoman ARDHA
Head, International Organizations
Division of FAO
Bureau for Foreign Relations
Ministry of Agriculture
Jakarta

Jafri JAMALUDDIN
Agricultural Attach6
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome


TRYONO
Secretary of the Minister
Forestry Department
Jakarta


of Forestry


Adviser
Rachadi ISKANDAR
Ambassador
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome


IRAN, ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF
IRAN, REPUBLIQUE ISLAMIQUE D'
IRAN, REPUBLICAN ISLAMICA DEL

Representative
Taghi SHAMEKHI
Adviser to the Minister of Agriculture
Director of Forests and Rangeland
Research Institute
Teheran


IRAN, ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF
IRAN, REPUBLIQUE ISLAMIQUE D'
IRAN REPUBLICAN ISLAMICA DEL

Alternate
Hamid SHAHIAN JAHROMI
Director of FAO Affairs Bureau
Ministry of Agriculture
Teheran



IRAQ 3 ----

Representative -
Mohammed Said Kadim AL-SAHAF
Ambassador
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome
,jL ..O 11 4>I S f a.j .LS.


...b t aJ I At lJ tlitJ J J-)-

Alternate -j-"
Tawfik A.H. AL MESH-HEDANI
Counsellor (Agricultural Affairs)
Alternate Permanent Representative
to.FAO
Rome J J1 i y


al l 1 JI s



ITALY ITALIE ITALIA

Repr6sentant
Gian Luigi VALENZA
Ambassadeur aupres de la FAO
Repr6sentant permanent aupres
de la FAO
Rome

Suppliants
Mme Anna Teresa FRITELLI ANNIBALDI
Ministre Conseiller
Repr6sentant permanent adjoint
aupres de la FAO
Rome

Aldo Maria MAZIO
Premier Secr6taire
Representant permanent adjoint
aupres de la FAO
Rome

Mme Ginevra LETIZIA
Ministere des affaires 6trangeres
Rome







- B8 -


ITALY ITALIE ITALIA (Cont'd)

Suppl6ants
Mme Elena MAMMONE
Bureau des Relations internationales
Ministire de l'agriculture et des
forces
Rome

Manlio MARIANI
Minist&re de l'agriculture et des
forces
Rome

Mne Angela SARCINA
Ministere du Bilan
Rome

Francesco STELLA
Ministere du Bilan
Rome

Antonio MOLFESE
Minitere de la Sant6
Rome


JAPAN JAPON

Representative
Sumiji NAKAZAWA
Minister
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome

Alternates
Noboru SAITO
Assistant Director
International Cooperation Division
International Affairs Department
Economic Affairs Bureau
Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry
and Fisheries
Tokyo

Masahiko YASUMURO
Senior Official
Economic Affairs Division
United Nations Bureau
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Tokyo


Satoshi WAKUNO
First Secretary
Alternate Permanent
to FAO
Rome

Masayuki KOMATSU
First Secretary
Alternate Permanent
to FAO
Rome


Representative





Representative


KENYA

Representative
D.R. KAMAU
Deputy Secretary
Ministry of Livestock Development
Nairobi

Alternates
Andrew ROSANA
Charge d'Affaires
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome

Stanley Munkindia GUANTAI
Counsellor (Agriculture)
Embassy of Kenya
Rome

Joseph ANGWENYI
Assistant Chief Conservator of Forests
Ministry of Environment and
Natural Resources
Nairobi

Adviser
Benson MBOGOH
Senior Agriculture Officer
Ministry of Agriculture
Nairobi



LEBANON LIBAN LIBANO o0 -

Repr6sentant
Khalil MAKKAWI
Ambassadeur
Repr6sentant permanent aupres
de la FAO
Rome
5sLj JLJ-


ink-JteaJOE stat rLm


Supplant
Amin ABDEL
Inspecteur
Inspection
Beyrouth


MALEK
general de l'agriculture
central

i U JI IL s I


-^Jl fb .t .-- *J II






- B9 -


LEBANON LIBAN LIBANO (Cont'd)

Supplants o L I
Mounir KHORAYCH
Conseiller
Repr6sentant permanent adjoint
aupres de la FAO
Rome



a-xl -


Farid ABBOUD
Conseiller
Representant
aupris de la
Rome


permanent adjoint
FAO


-,)L ..l II




LESOTHO

Representative
Gerard Phirinyane KHOJANE
Ambassador
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome

Alternate
Masuhla LETEKA
Counsellor
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome




LIBYA LIBYE LIBIA L--

Representative t
Bashir EL MABROUK SAID
Minister Plenipotentiary to FAO
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome
i. j I jJ I


LJ I t *1JJ L.,,l. pI1aJI Jd,..JI_


LIBYA LIBYE LIBIA (Cont'd)

Alternates O4;L 1-J"
Mansour EL-MABROUK SEGHAYER
Director-General of Technical
Cooperation
General Authority of Agricultural
Production
Tripoli


"j;J I l--I C -l 1-iL-Jl IJ J1


Abduljlil YOUSSEF
Agricultural Counsellor
People General Committee
Tripoli

JI J. I 11.i

..L. JI ..AJI .i.'1 .. II




MADAGASCAR

Repr6sentant
Apolinaire ANDRIATSIAFAJATO
Ambassadeur
Repr6sentant permanent aupres de la FAO
Rome

Suppl6ants
Achille RAHARISON
Directeur de la Vulgarisation agricole
Ministere de la production agricole,
de la r6forme agraire et du
ravitaillement
Tananarive


Raphael RABE
Conseiller
Representant
de la FAO
Rome


permanent adjoint aupres


MALAYSIA MALAISIE MALASIA

Representative
Datuk Puvanarajah THIAGARAJAH
Deputy Secretary-General
Ministry of Agriculture
Kuala Lumpur

Alternate
Datuk Ismail bin BUDIN
Ambassador
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome






- B10 -


MALAYSIA MALAISIE MALASIA (Cont'd)

Alternates
Bahar MUNIP
Agricultural Attach&
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome

Mohd Zulkifli bin MOHAMMED
Assistant Agricultural Attach6
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome



MEXICO MEXIQUE

Representante
Jose Ram6n LOPEZ PORTILLO
Ministro Plenipotenciario ante la FAO
Representante Permanente ante la FAO
Roma

Suplentes
Carlos VIDALI CARBAJAL
Director General de Asuntos
Internacionales
Secretaria de Agricultura y Recursos
Hidraulicos
Mexico

Raul LOPEZ-LIRA NAVA
Segundo Secretario
Representante Permanente Alterno ante
la FAO
Roma

Asesores
Sra. Margarita LIZARRAGA
Consejera para Asuntos Pesqueros
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma

Sra. Evangelina BELTRAN PIMIENTA
Subdirectora de Organismos de Naciones
Unidas Direcci6n General de Asuntos
Internacionales
Secretaria de Agricultura y Recursos
Hidraulicos
Mexico



NICARAGUA

Representante
Danilo VALLE
Director Ejecutivo P.A.N
Ministerio de Desarrollo Agropecuario
y Reforma Agraria
Managua


NICARAGUA (Cont'd)


Suplentes
Sra. Dona Laurie CORDUA CRUZ
Embajador ante la FAO
Representante Permanente ante la FAO
Roma

Fenton ARELLANO GRAHAM
Consejero
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma


NIGER

Repr6sentant
Douramane MOUSSA
Secr6taire d'Etat
Ministere de l'agriculture et de
1'environnement
Niamey


Suppl6ants
Haladou SALHA
Ambassadeur
Repr6sentant permanent aupres de
la FAO
Rome

Sidibe OUSSEINI
Direction de la vulgarisation et
de la promotion cooperative
Ministere de l'agriculture et de
1'environnement
Niamey


PAKISTAN

Representative
Jamal A. KHAN
Ambassador
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome


Alternate
Mohammad Saleem KHAN
Agricultural Counsellor
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome


PERU PEROU

Representante
Washington ZUNIGA TRELLES
Embajador ante la FAO
Representante Permanente ante la FAO
Roma






- B11 -


PERU PEROU (Cont'd)

Suplente
Amador VELASQUEZ
Consejero
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma


PHILIPPINES FILIPINAS

Representative
Apolonio V. BAUTISTA
Deputy Minister
Ministry of Agriculture and Food
Manila

Alternates
Horacio CARANDANG
Agricultural Attach6
Deputy Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome

Denis LEPATAN
Second Secretary
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome

Ms Maria Luisa GAVINO
Agricultural Analyst
Embassy of the Philippines
Rome

3r--"JI 141-_Wl I JI
SAUDI ARABIA, KINGDOM OF
ARABIE SAOUDITE, ROYAUME D'
ARABIA SAUDITA, REINO DE


Representative t
Atif Y. BUKHARI
Ambassador
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome
S. J ""J V JJ A


LIe>*-J A>J-I ti alJ

*..h..ll cSJJ


SPAIN ESPAGNE ESPANA

Representante
Angel BARBERO MARTIN
Representante Permanente Designado
ante la FAO
Roma


SPAIN ESPAGNE ESPANA (Cont'd)

Suplentes
Santiago MARRACO SOLANA
Director General de ICONA
Ministerio de Agricultura,
Pesca y Alimentaci6n
Madrid

Jaime GARCIA Y BADIAS
Consejero Adjunto de Agricultura,
Pesca y Alimentaci6n
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma

Asesors
Clavijo MORENO MOYA
Asesor T6cnico de la Secretaria
General Tecnica
Ministerio de Agricultura, Pesca
y Alimentaci6n
Madrid

Carlos BAEZ EVERTSZ
Director de Organismos Tecnicos
Direccion General de Organismos y
Conferencias Internationales
Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores
Madrid


SWITZERLAND SUISSE SUIZA

Repr6sentant
Hans POPP
Directeur supplant
Office federal de l'agriculture
D6partement federal de l'economie
publique
Berne

Suppl6ants
Mme Francesca POMETTA
Ambassadeur
Repr6sentant permanent aupres de
la FAO
Rome

Roger PASQUIER
Chef des affaires multilat6rales
Direction de la coop6raton au
d6veloppement et de l'aide
humanitaire (DDA)
D4partement f6d6ral des affaires
6trangeres
Berne

Rudolf de POURTALES
Ministre
Repr6sentant permanent adjoint
aupres de la FAO
Rome






- B12


SWITZERLAND SUISSE SUIZA (Cont'd)

Adjoint
Igor MARINCEK
Secr6taire, Comit6 national suisse
de la FAO
Office f6d6ral de l'agriculture
Departement f6d6ral de 1'6conomie
publique
Berne

Conseiller
Mme Susanna POPP-FURRER
Secr6taire
Office federal de l'agriculture
D6partement federal de l'economie
publique
Berne



THAILAND THAILANDE TAILANDIA

Representative
Vanrob ISARANKURA
Agricultural Counsellor
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome

Alternates
Thana THONGTAN
Director, Foreign Agricultural
Relations Division
Office of the Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Agriculture and
Cooperatives
Bangkok

Mrs Marasee SURAKUL
Assistant Secretary-General
National FAO Committee
Ministry of Agriculture and
Cooperatives
Bangkok


Pisar LUETONGCHARG
First Secretary
Alternate Permanent
to FAO
Rome


Representative


TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO
TRINITE-ET-TOBAGO
TRINIDAD Y TABAGO

Representative
Winston RUDDER
Acting Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Food Production,
Marine Exploitation, Forestry and
the Environment
Port of Spain


TURKEY TURQUIE TURQUIA

Representative
Omer ZEYTINOGLU
Minister Counsellor
Permanent Representative Designate
to FAO
Rome

Alternate
Hasim OGUT
Director-General of
Projects and Implementation
Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry
and Rural Affairs
Ankara


UNITED KINGDOM ROYAUME-UNI
REINO UNIDO

Representative
R.G. PETTITT
Head, United Nations and
Commonwealth Department
Overseas Development Administration
London

Alternates
Michael McGILL
Assistant Desk Officer
Overseas Development Administration
London

Ray ALLEN
FAO Desk Officer
Overseas Development Administration
London

James AITKEN
Head, FAO Section
United Nations and Commonwealth
Department
Overseas Development Administration
London

John Redman GOLDSACK
Minister
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome


Mrs Patricia WEST
Principal Officer
Ministry of Agriculture,
and Food
London


Fisheries


Heather MERRETT
Assistant Desk Officer
United Nations and Commonwealth
Department
Overseas Development Administration
London






- B13 -


UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
ETATS-UNIS D'AMERIQUE
ESTADOS UNIDOS DE AMERICA

Representative
Fred J. ECKERT
Ambassador
United States Representative to the
United Nations Agencies for Food
and Agriculture
Rome


Alternates
E. Wayne DENNEY
International Relations Adviser
International Organization Affairs
Office of International Cooperation
and Development
Department of Agriculture
Washington D.C.

Mrs Joan DUDIK-GAYOSO
Director, Office of International
Development Assistance, Bureau of
International Organization Affairs
Department of State
Washington D.C.

Advisers
John COOK
Office of International Development
Assistance, Bureau of International
Organization Affairs
Department of State
Washington D.C.

Steven HILL
United States Mission to the
United Nations Agencies for
Food and Agriculture
Rome

Ms Teresa D. HOBGOOD
Office of United Nations Systems Budget
Bureau of International Organization
Affairs
Department of State
Washington D.C.

David W. JOSLYN
Attach (Food Aid)
United States Mission to the
United Nations Agencies for Food
and Agriculture
Rome

Mrs Roberta.VAN HAEFTEN
Attache (Food and Agricultural Affairs)
United States Mission to the
United Nations Agencies for Food
and Agriculture
Rome


UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
ETATS-UNIS D'AMERIQUE
ESTADOS UNIDOS DE AMERICA

Advisers
D. MAXWELL
Director
Office of Donor Coordination AID/PPC
Department of State
Washington D.C.

Richard M. SEIFMAN
Attach (Development Affairs)
United States Mission to the
United Nations Agencies for Food
and Agriculture
Rome



VENEZUELA

Representante
Sra. Mercedes FERMIN GOMEZ
Embajador ante la FAO
Representante Permanente ante la FAO
Roma

Suplentes
Sra. Maria Isabel CASELLAS
Consejero
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma

Alberto MURILLO MORANTES
Consejero
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma



YUGOSLAVIA YOUGOSLAVIE

Representative
Luka RADOJICIC
Assistant to the President of
Federal Committee for Agriculture
Belgrade

Alternates
Florijan KOVAC
Minister Plenipotentiary
Charge d'Affaires a.i.
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome

Ms Ljiljana VELASEVIC
Counsellor for Multilateral Cooperatioi
Federal Committee for Agriculture
Belgrade







- B14 -


YUGOSLAVIA YOUGOSLAVIE (Cont'd)


Alternates
Marinko DOMLJANOVIC
First Secretary
Alternate Permanent
to FAO
Rome


Representative


Nino MALJEVIC
Third Secretary
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome

ZAIRE

Repr6sentant
Mme Sango Ya TAMBWE
Ministre Conseiller
Representant permanent adjoint aupres
de la FAO
Rome

ZAMBIA ZAMBIE

Representative
Namukolo MUKUTU
Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Water, Lands and
Natural Resources
Lusaka


ZAMBIA ZAMBIE (Cont'd)

Alternates
Mike Malikana LISWANISO
Ambassador
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome


R. MULELE
Director of Agriculture
Department of Agriculture
Ministry of Agriculture and
Cooperatives
Lusaka




Advisers
E.D. MUYANGA
Director of Fisheries
Ministry of Agriculture and
Cooperatives
Lusaka


T.F.F. MALUZA
First Secretary
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome


OBSERVERS FROM MEMBER NATIONS NOT MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL
OBSERVATEURS D'ETATS MEMBRES NE SIEGEANT PAS AU CONSEIL
OBSERVADORES DE LOS ESTADOS MIEMBROS QUE NO SON MIEMBROS DEL CONSEJO


AFGHANISTAN AFGANISTAN


Said ABDULLAH
Second Secretary
Embassy of Afghanistan
Rome




ANGOLA


Manuel DOMINGOS NOGUEIRA
Deuxieme Secr6taire
Repr6sentant permanent adjoint
aupres de la FAO
Rome


AUSTRIA AUTRICHE

Herman REDL
Director
Federal Ministry
and Forestry
Vienna


of Agriculture


Ernst ZIMMERL
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome

BELGIUM BELGIQUE BELGICA

Antoine SAINTRAINT
.. Ambassadeur
Repr6sentant permanent aupres
de la FAO
Rome


crL-JI ui Lirl c;L~t~ u;J1


"L."91 J_3-% J 3 :,,.1







- B15 -


BOLIVIA BOLIVIE

Julio PANTOJA SALAMANCA
Embajador
Representante permanent ante la FAO
Roma

Hernando ARMAZA PEREZ
Ministro Consejero
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma


BULGARIA BULGARIE

Jeko Kostadinov DIMITROV
Minister Plenipotentiary to FAO
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome


Yuli MINCHEV
Counsellor
Deputy Permanent
to FAO
Rome


BURKINA FASO

Amado PITROIPA
Ambassadeur
Representant pe
de la FAO
Rome


Representative


!rmanent aupr~s


Fulgence TOE
Reprisentant permanent
aupres de la FAO
Rome


adjoint d6sign6


BURMA BIRMANIE BIRMANIA

U SAN MAUNG
Ambassador
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome


BURUNDI

Vital BARANYITONDEYE
Directeur g6enral de l'agriculture
Ministtre de l'agriculture et de
1'1levage
Bujumbura

Joseph GAHUNGU
Conseiller
Ministtre des relations ext6rieures
et de la cooperation
Bujumbura


CAPE VERDE CAP VERT CABO VERDE

Mme Maria de LOURDES DUARTE
Attach agricole
Repr6sentant permanent adjoint
aupres de la FAO
Rome

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC
REPUBLIQUE CENTRAFRICAINE
REPUBLICAN CENTROAFRICANA

Theodore BAGUA-YAMBO
Ministre du d6veloppement rural
Bangui

Gabriel MBANGAS
Ambassadeur en Italie
Rome

Yerima MANDJO
Secr6taire C-Gnral
Ministare du d6veloppement rural
Bangui

Aristide CESTARO
Conseiller 6conomique du Chef de 1'Etat
Pr6sidence de la R6publique
Bangui

CHILE CHILI

Juan Luis NILO
Segundo Secretario
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma

CONGO

Michel MOMBOULI
Conseiller
Repr6sentant permanent adjoint
aupres de la FAO
Rome

Mme Alice NIOMBELA-MAMBULA
Premier Secr6taire
Ambassade du Congo
Rome

COSTA RICA

Carlo di MOTTOLA BALESTRA
Embajador ante la FAO
Representante Permanente ante la FAO
Roma


Sra. Yolanda GAGO PEREZ
Ministro Consejero
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma







- B16 -


COSTA RICA (Cont'd)

Francisco MORA FALLS
Consejero
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma


COTE D'IVOIRE

Konan Daniel YOMAN
Conseiller
Repr6sentant permanent adjoint aupres
de la FAO
Roma


CYPRUS CHYPRE CHIPRE

Fotis POULIDES
Ambassador to FAO
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome

George F. POULIDES
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome

Harris ZANNETIS
Agricultural Officer
Ministry of Agriculture and Natural
Resources
Nicosia

Chrysanthos LOIZIDES
Agricultural Attach6
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome


CZECHOSLOVAKIA TCHECOSLOVAQUIE
CHECHOSLOVAQUIA

Svatopluk STAMPACH
Special Adviser to the
Minister of Agriculture and Food
Prague

Ilja.HULINSKY
Ambassador to FAO
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome


DENMARK DANEMARK DINAMARCA

John GLISTRUP
Counsellor
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome


DENMARK DANEMARK DINAMARCA (Cont'd)

Steen SONDERGAARD
Agricultural Attach6
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome

John PONTOPPIDAN
Head of Section
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Copenhagen

Victor HJORT
Head of Section
Ministry of Agriculture
Copenhagen



DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF KOREA
REPUBLIQUE POPULAIRE DEMOCRATIQUE
DE COREE REPUBLICAN POPULAR DEMOCRATIC
DE COREA

LI JONG HYOK
Ambassador to FAO
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome

CHA CHOL MA
Attache to the Permanent
Representative to FAO
Rome


DOMINICA DOMINIQUE

McDonald P. BENJAMIN
Ambassador
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome

Mrs Hannelore BENJAMIN
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome


DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
REPUBLIQUE DOMINICAINE
REPUBLICAN DOMINICANA


Guido D'ALESSANDRO
Embajador
Representante Permanente
Rome


ante la FAO


Sra. Jeannette A. GUZMAN LULO
Primer Secretario
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma







- B17 -


ECUADOR EQUATEUR

Roberto PONCE ALVARADO
Ministro
Representante Permanente Adjunto
ante la FAO
Roma

Lantaro POZO MALO
Segundo Secretario
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma


EL SALVADOR

David H. TREJO
Embajador
Representante Permanente ante la FAO
Roma

Sra. Maria Eulalia JIMENEZ
Consejero
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma



ETHIOPIA ETHIOPIE ETIOPIA


Assefa YILALA
Counsellor
Alternate Permanent
to FAO
Rome

Mrs Emebet SAHLE
Third Secretary
Alternate Permanent
to FAO
Rome


Representative





Representative


GHANA


Godfrey ABULU
Regiona Deputy Minister
Ministry of Agriculture
Accra


of Agriculture


Joseph TURKSON
Minister Counsellor
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome

William ASANTE
Acting Regional Director of Agriculture
Ministry of Agriculture
Accra


GREECE GRECE GRECIA

Michel-Akis PAPAGEORGIOU
Director-Coordinator for
Economic Affairs
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Athens

Dimitri FRANTZESKAKIS
Ambassador
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome

Dimitrios DADIOTIS
Expert Adviser
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Athens


HAITI

Mme Gessie MERLET DQNATO
Conseiller
Repr6sentant permanent adjoint aupres
de la FAO
Rome



HONDURAS

Sra. Concha Marina RAMIREZ DE LOPEZ
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma

Sra. Mayra REINA DE TITTA
Agregada
Embajada de Honduras
Roma

Ricardo CASTILLO
Embajada de Honduras
Roma



IRELAND IRLANDE IRLANDA

Patrick 0, RYAN
First Secretary (Agriculture)
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome



ISRAEL

Ilan HARTUV
Minister Counsellor (Economic Affairs)
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome







- B18 -


ISRAEL (Cont'd)

Zeev BOKER
Second Secretary
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Embassy of Israel
Rome

Nuriel SHAPIRA
Research Assistant to the
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome

KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
REPUBLIQUE DE COREE
REPUBLICAN DE COREA

Koo-Bum SHIN
Agricultural Attach6
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome

Jang Bae YOUN
Assistant Agricultural Attach6
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome

LIBERIA

Dahn V. BORH
Agricultural Counsellor
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome

Kronyanh WEGFUR
First Secretary
Embassy of Liberia
Rome

MALTA MALTE


Abraham BORG
Second Secretary
Alternate Permanent
to FAO
Rome


Representative


NAMIBIA NAMIBIE

Mwinda NALISHUWA
Third Secretary
Embassy of Zambia
Rome

Steven GLEASON
Secretariat of the
Programme Management Officer
United Nations Council for Namibia
New York


NETHERLANDS PAYS-BAS RAISES BAJOS

Frederik Ch. PRILLEVITZ
Minister Plenipotentiary to FAO
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome

C.B. HOUTMAN
Head, Multilateral Affairs Division
Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries
The.Hague

A.H. COPPER
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome


P.A.L. DE RIJK
Ministry of Agriculture
The Hague


and Fisheries


NIGERIA

Jaafaru LADAN
Minister (Agriculture)
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome

Filibus BATURE
Assistant Director
Federal Ministry of Agriculture,
Water Resources and Rural Development
Lagos




NORWAY NORVEGE NORUEGA

Mrs Birgit SCHJERVEN
Head of Division
Ministry of Development and
Cooperation
Oslo

Nils Ragnar KAMSVAG
First Secretary
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome



PANAMA

Horacio MALTEZ
Consejero Agricola y de Pesca
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma







- B19 -


PANAMA (Cont'd)

Sra. Mitzila BOUTET
Representante Permanent Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma

Sra. Delia CHEVALIER VILLAMONTE
Ministro Consejero
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma

POLAND POLOGNE POLONIA

Jozef WIEJACZ
Ambassador
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome

Tadeusz STROJWAS
First Secretary
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome

Mrs Malgorzata PIOTROWSKA
Secretary
Polish National FAO Committee
Warsaw

PORTUGAL

Jose Eduardo MENDES FERRAO
President of the Portuguese
National FAO Committee
Lisbon

Jorge COIMBRA MARTINS
Attach (Economic Affairs)
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome

Oscar PETINGA
Director, International Information
Cooperative Services
Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries
and Food
Lisbon

Antonio MAGALHAES COELHO
Adviser
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Lisbon

RWANDA

Dismas NSENGIYAREMYE
Secretaire general
Ministere de l'agriculture, de
l'6levage et des forces
Kigali


RWANDA (Cont'd)

Anastase NZIRASANAHO
Chef de division
Ministere de l'agriculture, de
l'6levage et des forts
Kigali



SAO TOME AND PRINCIPLE
SAO TOME-ET-PRINCE
SANTO TOME Y PRINCIPLE

Ant6nio A. AFONSO DIAS
Deuxieme Secretaire
Ambassade de Sao Tom&-et-Principe
Bruxelles


SENEGAL

Assane FALL
Directeur de Cabinet du
Ministre du d6veloppment rural
Dakar

Youssouph BARO
Ambassadeur
Repr6sentant permanent design aupres
de la FAO
Rome

Louis GOMIS
Conseiller
Repr6sentant permanent adjoint
aupres de la FAO
Rome

Abdon Karim SIDIBE
Conseiller technique
Ministere du d6veloppement rural
Dakar



SOMALIA SOMALIE JLUaJI

Abbas MUSSE FARAH
Ambassador to FAO
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome ^


i,.!.-.. II tf~j Jt U (^IJ JI Ji-^JIJ
SRI LANKA

Representative
M.G. HEWAGE
Minister Counsellor
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome







- B20 -


SUDAN SOUDAN ot -JI

Gamal Mohamed AHMED
Counsellor (Agricultural Affairs)
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome


("selat JI '_a) r>.. Li
*.a-..l CJ J s1JJI J...J11



Issam Eldin M. EL SAYED
Counsellor
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome

j-11 cJe I, sC..,






Hassan Abbas EL-TOM
Director
Plant Protection Department
Ministry of Agriculture
and Natural Resources
Khartoum




6. l 1 _,I 1> j i.,



Charles REED
Consultant
Ministry of Agriculture
and Natural Resources
Khartoum







.SWEDEN SUEDE SUECIA

Tommie SJOEBERG
Head of Section
Ministry of Agriculture
Stockholm

Goran WIDE
Counsellor
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Stockholm


SWEDEN SUEDE SUECIA (Cont'd)

Mrs Astrid BERGQUIST.
Counsellor (Agricultural Attach6)
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome


Sture THEOLIN
Counsellor
Alternate Permanent
to FAO
Rome


Representative


TANZANIA TANZANIE

Hamisi MWINYIGOHA
Minister plenipotentiary
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome




TUNISIA TUNISIE TUNEZ y-.j

Mohamed ABDELHADI
Ministre Plnipotentiaire
Repr6sentant permanent auprts
de la FAO
Rome



-...j ,.,-:, _J ,,,1 ,..u.,ll



Ridha BEN RABAH
Stagiaire de l'Ecole national
d'administration aupres de la
Representation permanent aupres
de la FAO
Rome



ol-..




UGANDA OUGANDA


Mansoor SIMBWA-BUNNYA
Counsellor
Alternate Permanent Representative
to FAO
Rome










URUGUAY

Gustavo SOMMA RIBA
Segundo Secretario
Representante Permanente Alterno
ante la FAO
Roma





VIET NAM

Huynh-C8ng TAM
Ambassadeur
Repr6sentant permanent aupres
de la FAO
Rome

Nguyen Chi THANH
Troisieme Secretaire
Repr6sentant permanent adjoint
aupres de la FAO
Rome


- B21 -


YEMEN ARAB REPUBLIC
REPUBLIQUE ARABE DU YEMEN
REPUBLICAN ARABE DEL YEMEN


^alaJI JE-^JI, :,JI JJI



I i'. 9I A I a LI.


YEMEN, PEOPLE'S DEM. REPUBLIQUE OF -
YEMEN, REPUBLIQUE DEM. POPULAIRE DU -
YEMEN, REP. DEMOCRATIC POPULAR DEL


Anwar Mohammed KHALED
Ambassador to FAO
Permanent Representative to FAO
Rome
_J" L^ t


L .


OBSERVERS FROM UNITED NATIONS MEMBER STATES
OBSERVATEURS D'ETATS MEMBRES DES NATIONS UNIES
OBSERVADORES DE LOS ESTADOS MIEMBROS DE LAS NACIONES UNIDAS


UNION OF SOVIET SOCIALIST REPUBLICS
UNION DES REPUBLIQUES SOCIALISTS SOVIETIQUES
UNION DE LAS REPUBLICAN SOCIALISTS SOVIETICAS


A.E. ROUKHLIADA
Ambassade de 1'Union des
socialists sovi6tiques
Rome

A.I. NIKIFOROV
Ambassade de 1'Union des
socialists sovi6tiques
Rome

L.A. FOKINE
Ambassade de 1'Union des
socialists sovietiques
Rome


R6pubiiques




R6publiques




R6publiques


F.F. LITVINOV
Ambassade de 1'Union des REpubliques
socialists sovietiques
Rome

S. SOUKHAREV
Troisieme Secr6taire
Ministtre des affaires 6trangeres
Moscou







- B22 -


HOLY SEE -


SAINT-SIEGE SANTA SEDE


The Most Rev. A. FERRARI-TONIOLO
Permanent Observer to FAO
Vatican City

Vincenzo BUONOMO
Vatican city

Lelio BERNARDI
Vatican City


Aldo CORAZZA
Vatican City


Rev. F. Aloysius FONSECA, S.J.
Vatican City

Mons. Biagio NOTARANGELO
Vatican City


SOVEREIGN ORDER OF MALTA
ORDRE SOUVEPAIN DE MALTE
SOBERANA ORDEN DE MALTA

Clemente BRIGANTE COLONNA
Representant adjoint aupris de la FAO
Rome





C I L~ J1 i i 1I


REPRESENTATIVES OF UNITED NATIONS
REPRESENTANTS DES NATIONS UNIES ET
REPRESENTANTES DE LAS NACIONES UNIDAS


AND SPECIALIZED AGENCIES
INSTITUTIONS SPECIALISEES
Y ORGANISMOS ESPECIALIZADOS


UNITED NATIONS NATIONS UNIES
NACIONES UNIDAS


Gerald Ion TRANT ,
Representative of the
Secretary-General
World Food Council
Rome

Filippo ALESSI
Secretary of the Council
World Food Council
Rome


OFFICE OF THE UNITED NATIONS HIGH
COMMISSIONER FOR REFUGEES
HAUT COMMISSARIAT DES NATIONS UNIES
POUR LES REFUGEES
OFICINA DEL ALTO COMISIONADO DE LAS
NACIONES UNIDAS PARA LOS REFUGLADOS

Mrs Laura CARUGNO
Programme Assistant
Rome

Mrs Antonella PRANDI GESULFO
External Relations Assistant
Rome







- B23 -


UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME
PROGRAMME DES NATIONS UNIES POUR LE
DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAM DE LAS NACIONES UNIDAS PARA
EL DESARROLLO

Eugene YOUKEL
Director
European Office
Geneva

Evlogui BONEV
Principal Officer, External Relations
Geneva


WORLD FOOD
CONSEIL MONDIAL DE
CONSEJO MUNDIAL DE


COUNCIL
L'ALIMENTATION
LA ALIMENTACION


Gerald Ion TRANT
Executive Director
Rome

Filippo ALESSI
Secretary of the Council
Rome

Ephraim DLAMINI
Economic Affairs Officer
Rome




WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME
PROGRAMME ALIMENTAIRE MONDIAL
PROGRAM MUNDIAL DE ALIMENTOS

James INGRAM
Executive Director
Rome

R.C. CHASE
Assistant Executive Director
Rome

M. EL MIDANI
Director,
External Relations Division
Rome

C.D. PAOLILLO
Director,
Evaluation and Policy Division
Rome

D. SINTOBIN
Director,
Resources and Transport Division
Rome


WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME
PROGRAMME ALIMENTAIRE MONDIAf-
PROGRAMA MUNDIAL DE ALIMENTOS
(Cont'd)


F.G. HOLDER
Associate Director,
Operations Department
Rome

Q.H. HAQUE
Chief, External Relations and
CFA Secretariat Service
Rome .

D.J. SHAW
Economic Adviser,
Evaluation and Policy Division
Rome

Tun MYAT
Special Assistant to the
Executive Director
Rome

Mrs M.G. IURI
Officer-in-Charge,
Management Services Division (Finance)
Rome

A. BRLNMAN
Chief, Internal Audit
Rome

B.G. KASS
Senior External Relations Officer,
External Relations and
CFA Secretariat Service
Rome

Y. KETEMA
Policy Adviser (African Affairs)
Office of the Executive Director
Rome

P. WINNUBST
Chief, WFP/NGO Liaison Unit
External Relations Division
Rome




INTERNATIONAL LABOUR ORGANIZATION
ORGANISATION INTERNATIONAL DU
TRAVAIL
ORGANIZATION INTERNATIONAL DEL TRABAJO


G.M. CORBANI
Assistant Director
Rome







- B24 -


WORLD BANK
BANQUE MONDIALE
BANCO MUNDIAL


Marius VERAART
Cooperative Programs Coordinator
Central Operations Department
Washington D.C.





INTERNATIONAL FUND FOR AGRICULTURAL
DEVELOPMENT
FONDS INTERNATIONAL DE DEVELOPPEMENT
AGRICOLE
FONDO INTERNATIONAL DE DESARROLLO
AGRICOLA


Enrique ter HORST
Assistant President
Rome


Bouna Semou DIOUF
Chief
External Relations Division
Rome


INTERNATIONAL FUND FOR AGRICULTURAL
DEVELOPMENT
FONDS INTERNATIONAL DE DEVELOPPEMENT
AGRICOLE
FONDO INTERNATIONAL DE DESARROLLO
AGRICOLA
(Cont'd)

Muntasir LABBAN
External Relations Officer
Rome

Salah TAYYIB
External Relations Division
Rome




INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY
AGENCE INTERNATIONAL DE L'ENERGIE
ATOMIQUE
ORGANISMO INTERNATIONAL DE ENERGIA
ATOMIC


Bjoern SIGURBJOERNSSON
Director, Joint FAO/IAEA Division of
Isotope and Radiation Applications of
Atomic Energy for Food and Agriculture
Vienna


EUROPEAN ECONOMIC COMMUNITY
COMMUNAUTE ECONOMIQUE EUROPEENNE
COMUNIDAD ECONOMIC EUROPEA


Giampiero SCHIRATTI
Directeur
Bruxelles

Gian Paolo PAPA
Conseiller au Secr6tariat general
Rome

Uwe HESSE
Secretariat du Conseil
Bruxelles


Jean-Jacques RATEAU
Administrateur principal
Bruxelles

Mlle Sara GUALANDI
Attach
Rome

L. DENIL
Secretaire
Bruxelles




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