• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Copyright
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Procedure of the session
 Major trends and policies in food...
 Activities and programmes of the...
 Constitutional and administrative...
 Appendix A: Agenda
 Appendix B: List of delegates and...
 Appendix C: List of documents
 Appendix D: Statement by the...
 Appendix E: Revisions and...
 Appendix F: Statement of contr...
 Appendix G: Election procedure
 Appendix H: Agreement between FAO...
 Appendix I: Convention on early...
 Appendix J: Convention on assistance...
 Appendix K: Scale of contribut...
 Appendix L: Contributions of member...
 Back Cover














Title: Report of the Conference of FAO
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084642/00001
 Material Information
Title: Report of the Conference of FAO
Physical Description: v. : ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations -- Conference
Publisher: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Place of Publication: Rome
Publication Date: 1971-
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Food -- Congresses   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Congresses   ( lcsh )
Genre: international intergovernmental publication   ( marcgt )
conference publication   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 16th (1971)-
General Note: Latest issue consulted: 28th session (1995).
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Bibliographic ID: UF00084642
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 07706087
lccn - 97648196
 Related Items
Preceded by: Report of the ... session of the conference

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
    Copyright
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Procedure of the session
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Major trends and policies in food and agriculture
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
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        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Activities and programmes of the organization
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
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    Constitutional and administrative matters
        Page 68
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        Page 70
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        Page 84
    Appendix A: Agenda
        Page A-1
        Page A-2
        Page A-3
        Page A-4
    Appendix B: List of delegates and observers
        Page B-0
        Page B-1
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        Page B-91
        Page B-92
        Page B-93
    Appendix C: List of documents
        Page C-1
        Page C-2
        Page C-3
        Page C-4
        Page C-5
        Page C-6
    Appendix D: Statement by the Director-general
        Page D-1
        Page D-2
        Page D-3
        Page D-4
        Page D-5
        Page D-6
        Page D-7
        Page D-8
    Appendix E: Revisions and guidelines
        Page E-1
        Page E-2
        Page E-3
        Page E-4
        Page E-5
        Page E-6
        Page E-7
        Page E-8
    Appendix F: Statement of contributors
        Page F-1
        Page F-2
        Page F-3
        Page F-4
        Page F-5
        Page F-6
    Appendix G: Election procedure
        Page G-1
    Appendix H: Agreement between FAO and UNIDO
        Page H-1
        Page H-2
        Page H-3
        Page H-4
    Appendix I: Convention on early notification of a nuclear accident
        Page I-1
        Page I-2
        Page I-3
        Page I-4
        Page I-5
        Page I-6
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        Page I-8
        Page I-9
        Page I-10
    Appendix J: Convention on assistance in the case of a nuclear accident
        Page J-1
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        Page J-13
        Page J-14
    Appendix K: Scale of contributions
        Page K-1
        Page K-2
        Page K-3
        Page K-4
        Page K-5
    Appendix L: Contributions of member nations
        Page L-1
        Page L-2
        Page L-3
        Page L-4
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        Page L-11
    Back Cover
        Page L-12
        Page L-13
Full Text

C 89/REP


REPORT

of the

CONFERENCE OF FAO


Twenty-fifth Session
Rome, 11-29 November 1989


FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS




r '


ktj--


Independent Chairman: Antoine Saintraint


Angola-
Argentina-
Australia'
Brazi["
Cameroon-
Canada-
Chinae
Colombia'
Congo-
Cuba-
Czechoslovakia-
Egypt*
Ethiopia-
Finland
France'
Gabon-'


Germany, Federal Republic of
Ghana-*
Greece-
Guinea'
India*
Indonesia"
Iran, Islamic Republic of
Iraq"
Italy'
Japan"
Kenya'
Korea, Republic ofr
Lebanon"
Lesotho*
Ubya"
Madagascar-
Malaysia"


Mexico"
Morocco"*
Netherlands"'
Nicaragua"
Nigeria'
Pakistan*
Peru'
Philippines*
Poland-
Portugal"*
Saudi Arabia, Kingdom of
Thailand"
Trinidad and Tobago'
United Kingdom'
United States of America"*
Venezuela"


* Term of office unS! 31 December 1990.
* Term of office at conclusion of Twenty-sixl Session of the Conference, November 1991.
"* Term of office untI 31 December 1992.






COUNCIL

(as from 1 January 1991)


Independent Chairman: Antoine Saintraint


Angola'
Argentina*
Australia"*
Brazil"
Cameroon"
Canada"
Cape Verde-*
China*
Co!ombia"
Congo'
Ccsta Rica"'
Cdte dlvoire-"
Cuba"
Czechoslovakia*
Egypt"
Ethiopia*


France"*
Gabon"
Germany, Federal Republic of
Ghana"
Greece'
India"*
Indonesia'
Iraq*
I'a'y"'
Japan*
Kenya"
Korea, RepubF'c of
Lebanon"
Ubya"
Madagascar"
Malaysia*
Mexico"


Moroccoo
Netherlandse
Nicwagua*
Pakistan~
Phl,'pplnes-
Fc!and-
Portugal'
Saudi Arabra. Kingdom cf*-
Sudan~
Sweden-
Tha'aid*
Trindad and Tobago-
Unt:ed Kincdom"'
Un.:e-d Sates of America'
Venezuefa
Zarnbia-


Term of o'fce un.! cold.s'cn C! Tweny-sxrfr Ses~cr c'tne Cc!'e'erce, ?f ;erCee 1.99.
Term of otce unt!31 December 1992.
Term of c~fce u'ti ccnd:s cn o ne Twen yiseventi Sess:oi of te Ccnfe~ence. Nc.verrmer 1903.


COUNCIL

(until 31 December 1990)





C 89/REP


REPORT

of the

CONFERENCE OF FAO


Twenty-fifth Session
Rome, 11-29 November 1989














FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
Rome, 1989





















































P-90
ISBN 92-5-102931-8







All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a
retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechani-
cal, photocopying or otherwise, without the prior permission of the copyright owner.
Applications for such permission, with a statement of the purpose and extent of the
reproduction, should be addressed to the Director, Publications Division, Food and
Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Via delle Terme di Caracalla, 00100
Rome, Italy.


FAO 1990


The designations employed and the presentation of material in this
publication do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on
the part of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United
Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or
area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers
or boundaries.






- iii -


TABLE OF CONTENTS


Paragraphs


INTRODUCTION

Sixteenth McDougall Memorial Lecture

Presentation of the B.R. Sen Awards for 1988 and 1989

Presentation of the A.H. Boerma Award 1988-89

Tribute to late President Rene Moawad of Lebanon

Tribute to late President Ahmed Abdallah Abderemane of Comoros

In Memoriam


PROCEDURE OF THE SESSION

Election of the Chairman and Vice-Chairmen of the Conference

Appointment of the General Committee and the Credentials
Committee

Adoption of the Agenda

Arrangements for the Session and Allocation of Agenda Items

- Establishment of Commissions and Appointment of their
Chairmen and Vice-Chairmen

- Resolutions Committee of the Conference

- Right of Reply

- Verbatim Records

- Verification of Credentials

- Voting Rights

- Informal Meeting of Observers from International
Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs)

Admission of Observers

- Observer from the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics

- Liberation Movements

- Intergovernmental and International Non-Governmental
Organizations


1 12

1

2 7

8 and 9

10

11

12


13 34

13 and 14


15

16

17


18 20

21 23

24

25

26 and 27

28


29

30 34

30 and 31

32


33 and 34







- iv -


MAJOR TRENDS AND POLICIES IN FOOD AND AGRICULTURE

Statements by Heads of Delegations in the General Discussion

World Food and Agriculture Situation

- The State of Food and Agriculture (SOFA)
(Resolutions 1/89, 2/89 and 3/89)

- International Agricultural Adjustment: Progress Report
on Guidelines 7, 8 and 12

- World Food Day

Preparations for an International Development Strategy for
the Fourth UN Development Decade FAO's contribution

Progress Report on the GATT Multilateral Trade
Negotiations (Uruguay Round) and Implications for FAO

Commission on Plant Genetic Resources and the International
Undertaking: Progress Report (Resolutions 4/89 and 5/89)

International Code of Conduct on the Distribution and Use of
Pesticides: Introduction of the "Prior Informed Consent"
Clause (Resolution 6/89 and Appendix E)

Plan of Action for the Integration of Women into Agricultural
and Rural Development (Resolution 7/89)



ACTIVITIES AND PROGRAMMES OF THE ORGANIZATION

Review of the Regular Programme 1988-89

Programme of Work and Budget 1990-91 and Medium-Term Objectives

- Context

- Programme Budget Process

- Approach

- Priorities

- Programme Activities

- Financial Framework

- Budget Level (Resolution 8/89 and Appendix F)

Review of Field Programmes 1988-89


Paragraphs


35 129

35

36 63


36 52


53 62

63


64 84


85 97


98 109



110 120


121 129



130 272

130 148

149 184

149 154

155 and 156

157 160

161 167

168 172

173 179

180 184

185 197













Conclusions of Review of Certain Aspects of FAO's Goals and
Operations

- FAO's Objectives, Role, Priorities and Strategies

- FAO's Field Operations

- Technical Cooperation Programme (Resolution 9/89)

- Relations with other Institutions

- Resource Implications

- Conclusion (Resolution 10/89)

- FAO Management Review

United Nations/FAO World Food Programme

- WFP Proposed Pledging Target (Resolution 11/89)

Relations and Consultations with International Organizations

- Recent Developments in the UN System of Interest to FAO

- International Conference on Nutrition

- Relations with Intergovernmental and International
Non-Governmental Organizations



CONSTITUTIONAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS

Constitutional and Legal Matters

Statutory Report on Status of Conventions and Agreements,
and Amendments thereto

- Multilateral Treaties deposited with the Director-General

Procedure for Election of the Chairmen and Members of the
Programme and Finance Committees (Appendix G)

Confirmation of the Agreement between FAO and UNIDO (Appendix H)

FAO's Accession to the Convention on Early Notification of a
Nuclear Accident and to the Convention on Assistance in the
case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency
(Appendices I, and J)


Paragraphs



198 241

205 217

218 2Z9

230 and 231

232 and 233

234 238

239 and 240

241

242 250

242 250

251 272

251 263

264 269


270 272



273 327

273 290




273 276


277 281

282 285


286 290







- vi -


Administrative and Financial Matters

Audited Accounts (Resolution 12/89)

Scale of Contributions 1990-91 (Resolution 13/89 and
Appendix K)

Return of the Regional Office for the Near East to the Region
(Resolution 14/89)

Status of Contributions (Appendix L)

- Payment of Assessed Contributions (Resolution 15/89)

Measures to deal with Problems of Delayed Payment of Assessed
Contributions

Level of Support Costs from UNDP and Trust Fund Programmes

Headquarters Accommodation

Personnel Matters

- Statistics of Personnel Services

- Allowance for the Chairman of the Appeals Committee

Staff Commissary Support Cost Reimbursement (Resolution 16/89)

Treatment of Profit and Loss on Exchange (Resolution 17/89)



APPOINTMENTS AND ELECTIONS

Election of Council Members

Appointment of the Independent Chairman of the Council
(Resolution 18/89)

Appointment of Representatives of the FAO Conference to the
Staff Pension Committee



OTHER MATTERS

Date and Place of the Twenty-sixth Session of the Conference


Paragraphs



291 327

291 293


294 296


297

298 and 299

300 304


305 307

308 312

313 317

318 and 319

320

321

322

323 327



328 332

328 and 329


330 and 331


332



333

333






- vii -


APPENDICES

A Agenda for the Twenty-fifth Session of the Conference

B List of Delegates and Observers

C List of Documents

D Statement by the Director-General

E Revision of Articles 2 and 9 of the International Code of Conduct on the
Distribution and Use of Pesticides and Guidelines on the Operation of
Prior Informed Consent

F Statement of the Computation of Contributions for 1990 and 1991

G Procedure for Election of the Chairmen and Members of the Programme and
Finance Committees (Resolution 11/87)

H Agreement between the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United
Nations and the United Nations Industrial Development Organization

I Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident

J Convention on Assistance in the case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological
Emergency

K Scale of Contributions 1990-91

L Assessed Contributions of Member Nations to the Budget








INTRODUCTION


Sixteenth McDougall Memorial Lecture 1

1. The sixteenth in the series of lectures at regular Conference sessions in
memory of Frank Lidgett McDougall, a founding father of the Organization, was
delivered by His Excellency Giorgio Ruffolo, Minister for the Environment of
the Republic of Italy.

Presentation of the B.R. Sen Awards for 1988 and 1989 2

2. The awards, which honour the name of Mr B.R. Sen, Director-General of FAO
from 1956 to 1967, are conferred annually. They are given to the field officer
who has made the most outstanding contribution to development in an
agricultural sector of the country or countries to which he or she has been
assigned.

3. The Award for 1988 was presented to Mr Henry R. Stennett, a citizen of
Jamaica, in recognition of his achievements in Nepal in the fields of
watershed management and conservation education, and forestry sector
development. His professional competence and dedication had contributed
decisively to the success of large-scale projects which included assistance in
the drafting of soil conservation legislation, in the preparation of watershed
development plans at the national level, and in the protection of hydropower
facilities and sources of water supply through watershed management.

4. His Majesty's Government of Nepal, in endorsing the selection of
Mr Stennett for a Sen Award, confirmed the success of his efforts.

5. The Award for 1989 was presented to Mr Everest Santiago Funes, a citizen
of Argentina, for his contribution to communication development in Mexico. It
was largely due to his technical ability and initiative that a project on
communication and training financed by the World Bank to provide assistance to
Mexico's Integrated Rural Development Programme for the Tropical Wetlands had
been so successful.

6. The rural communication system developed by Mr Funes had applied a
multi-media approach and had made use of traditional media, community radio,
video, slidesets and simple illustrated printed materials. A great number of
audio-visual programmes had been produced for training at grass-roots level,
for situation analysis, and for establishing links between rural communities
and national institutions and sectors.

7. The Government of Mexico, in endorsing the selection of Mr Funes for a
Sen Award, acknowledged that the communication system had been instrumental to
the success of the national rural development programme for the tropical
wetlands.




1/ C 89/INF/9; C 89/LIM/1; C 89/PV/3; C 89/PV/19.
2/ C 89/INF/6; C 89/PV/2; C 89/PV/19.






-2-


Presentation of the A.H. Boerma Award 1988-89 3

8. The A.H. Boerma Award is presented biennially to a journalist or
journalists whose work has helped to focus public attention on important
aspects of the world food problem and thereby contributed towards increasing
public support for measures leading to its solution.

9. On this, the sixth occasion, the Award for 1988-1989 was presented to
Mr Federico Fazzuoli from Italy for his national television programme "Linea
Verde". It was pointed out that this programme's in-depth coverage of a wide
range of environmental, food and agricultural problems at the national and
international level, including topics of particular importance to FAO, had
helped to create greater awareness of such issues.

Tribute to Late President Rene Moawad of Lebanon 4

10. The Conference observed one minute of silence in memory of the President
of the Republic of Lebanon, Mr Rene Moawad, who was assassinated by terrorist
actions seventeen days into his Presidency. The Conference praised the
courage of Mr Moawad in his many efforts to seek a peaceful solution to the
political situation of his country, and asked the Representative of Lebanon to
express the deepest condolences of all the Member Nations of FAO to the
Lebanese people for Mr Moawad's untimely and unfortunate death. The
Representative of Lebanon thanked the Conference for its many expressions of
sorrow in this especially trying moment for his country, and noted that the
hope for peace in Lebanon would override this treacherous and criminal act.

Tribute to Late President Ahmed Abdallah Abderemane of Comoros 5

11. The Conference observed a minute of silence in memory of His Excellency
Ahmed Abdallah Abderemane, President of the Islamic Federal Republic of the
Comoros, who had died on 26 November 1989.

In Memoriam 6

12. The Conference observed one minute of silence in memory of those staff
members who had died in the service of the Organization since the Conference
had last met.










3/ C 89/INF/7; C 89/PV/2; C 89/PV/19.
4/ C 89/II/PV/13; C 89/PV/16-Rev.1; C 89/III/PV/1; C 89/PV/19.
5/ C 89/PV/18; C 89/PV/21.
6/ C 89/PV/20; C 89/PV/21.






-3-


PROCEDURE OF THE SESSION


Election of the Chairman and Vice-Chairmen of the Conference 7

13. The Council nominated and the Conference elected John Charles Kerin
(Australia) as Chairman of the Twenty-fifth Session of the Conference.

14. The Conference approved the appointment of the three Vice-Chairmen of the
Conference recommended by the Nominations Committee, as follows:

Abdel Magid Al Gaoud (Libya)
Charoen Kanthawongs (Thailand)
Gonzalo Bula Hoyos (Colombia)


Appointment of the General Committee and
the Credentials Committee 8

15. The Nominations Committee recommended and the Conference approved the
following appointments:

Members of the General Committee

China Finland Lesotho
Fiji India Panama
United States of America

Members of the Credentials Committee

Australia El Salvador Netherlands
Canada Greece Uganda
Cyprus Mauritania Yemen Arabic Republic

Adoption of the Agenda 9

16. The Conference adopted its Agenda as amended by the General Committee,
and as given in Appendix A to this report.

Arrangements for the Session and Allocation of Agenda Items 10

17. The Conference adopted the arrangements and timetable proposed by the
Ninety-sixth Session of the Council, as amended by the General Committee.

Establishment of Commissions and Appointment of their Chairmen
and Vice-Chairmen 11

18. The Conference concurred with the Council's recommendations to establish
three Commissions to consider and report upon Parts I, II and III of the
Agenda.


7/ C 89/12; C 89/LIM/1; C 89/LIM/2; C 89/PV/1; C 89/PV/19.
8/ C 89/12; C 89/LIM/2; C 89/PV/1; C 89/PV/19.
9/ C 89/1; C 89/LIM/6; C 89/PV/2; C 89/PV/19.
10/ C 89/12; C 89/LIM/1; C 89/LIM/6; C 89/PV/2; C 89/PV/19,
11/ C 89/12; C 89/LIM/6; C 89/LIM/25; C 89/PV/2; C 89/PV/5; C 89/PV/19.






-4-


19. In accordance with Rule VII-1 and Rule XXIV-5(b) of the General Rules of
the Organization (GRO), the Ninety-sixth Session of the Council had nominated
the following Chairmen of the Commissions:


Commission I
Commission II
Commission III


: J.A. de Medicis (Brazil)
: J. Tchicaya (Congo)
: R. de Pourtalts (Switzerland)


20. The Conference appointed the foregoing officers and, taking into
consideration the proposals of the General Committee, in accordance with Rule
XIII-2 GRO, also appointed:


Vice-Chairmen of Commission I:


Vice-Chairmen of Commission II:


Vice-Chairmen of Commission III:


E. Detraux (Belgium)
A. Sulaiman (Iraq)

C.C. Thomsen (Denmark)
A.K.M. Fazley Rabbi (Bangladesh)

G. Lamptey (Ghana)
G. M. Ahmed (Sudan)


- Resolutions Committee of the Conference 12

21. The Conference endorsed the recommendation of the Ninety-sixth Session of
the Council to establish a Resolutions Committee of seven members, one from
each FAO region, and appointed the following:


Africa
Asia
Europe
Latin America and
the Caribbean
Near East
North America
Southwest Pacific


S Algeria
S India
: Germany, Federal Republic of

: Nicaragua
S Lebanon
: United States of America
: Australia


22. The Conference agreed to the recommendation of the General Committee that
the Resolutions Committee be chaired by the Representative of the Asia region,
Mr V.K. Sibal (India).

23. The Conference approved the functions of the Resolutions Committee and
the criteria for the formulation of resolutions, as given in document C 89/12,
Appendix D.

- Right of Reply

24. The Conference confirmed the decision taken at its eleven previous
sessions to the effect that, when a member wished to reply to criticisms of
his Government's policy, he should preferably do so on the afternoon of the
day on which such criticism had been voiced after all those wishing to
participate in the discussion had had an opportunity to speak.


12/ C 89/12, Appendix D; C 89/LIM/6; C 89/PV/2; C 89/PV/19.






-5-


- Verbatim Records

25. As provided for in Rule XVIII-1 GRO, Verbatim Records were kept of all
Conference Plenary and Commission meetings. The Conference endorsed the
recommendation of the General Committee that statements could be inserted in
the verbatim records when time did not permit them to be delivered, taking
into consideration, however, the conditions laid down by the General Committee.

- Verification of Credentials 13

26. The credentials of delegations of 150 Member Nations were found valid.
Seven Member Nations did not send a delegation to the Conference. One Member
Nation had not registered.

27. The credentials of the United Nations and other Organizations of the
United Nations (UN) System were found in order as prescribed under
Rule 111-2 GRO.

- Voting Rights 14

28. The Conference noted that, in accordance with Article III-4 of the
Constitution, 14 Member Nations at the beginning of the session had no right
to vote in the Conference, as the amount of their arrears of contributions to
the Organization exceeded the amount of the contributions due from them for
the two preceding calendar years. Subsequently, four of these Member Nations
regularized their position. Information had been received from nine Member
Nations indicating that their failure to pay was due to conditions beyond the
control of each of these Member Nations. Therefore, the Conference agreed
that voting rights should be restored to nine Member Nations (Antigua and
Barbuda, Burundi, Comoros, Dominican Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Guatemala,
Romania, Sao Tome and Principe, and Sierra Leone) for the duration of the
Twenty-fifth Conference Session. In the case of the other Member Nation
(Democratic Kampuchea) it had not registered to attend the Conference and had
not responded to correspondence sent to it concerning the payment of arrears,
consequently the Conference had no basis on which to restore its right to
vote. Furthermore, the Conference emphasized the need for all Member Nations
to pay their contributions and any arrears as soon as possible.

- Informal Meeting of Observers from International Non-Governmental
Organizations (NGOs) 15

29. The Ninety-sixth Session of the Council had suggested that, as was the
practice at previous sessions of the Conference, an informal meeting of
representatives of international non-governmental organizations admitted as
observers to the Twenty-fifth Session of the Conference should be convened on
Tuesday 14 November 1989. The Conference accepted this proposal. The meeting
elected Mrs Giuseppina Pela (International Federation of Agricultural
Producers) as Chairman, and the report of its deliberations was communicated
to the Conference.


13/ C 89/12; C 89/LIM/2; C 89/LIM/6; C 89/LIM/7; C 89/LIM/26; C 89/PV/2;
C 89/PV/3; C 89/PV/13; C 89/PV/19.
14/ C 89/12; C 89/LIM/6; C 89/LIM/28; C 89/LIM/36; C 89/PV/2; C 89/PV/10;
C 89/PV/15; C 89/PV/19.
15/ C 89/12; C 89/LIM/6; C 89/INF/1; C 89/PV/2; C 89/PV/19.





-6-


Admission of Observers 16

- Observer from the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR)

30. The Conference confirmed the invitation sent by the Director-General to
the Government of the USSR to attend the session in an observer capacity.

31. The Conference expressed its satisfaction at the presence of the USSR as
an observer at its session. It further recognized that this was a step
forward in the right direction and hoped that the USSR would move from the
status of a founding member to becoming a full Member Nation of FAO. The
Conference supported the current contacts on this subject with the authorities
of that State and requested the Director-General to continue and intensify his
efforts.

- Liberation Movements

32. The Conference approved the invitations issued by the Director-General to
the Palestine Liberation Organization and those African Liberation Movements
(African National Congress of South Africa and Pan Africanist Congress of
Azania) recognized by the OAU (Organization of African Unity) to attend the
session as observers.

- Intergovernmental and International Non-Governmental Organizations

33. The Conference approved the list of international organizations to which
the Director-General had extended a provisional invitation to the Conference
session, and invited the representatives of those organizations to participate
in the activities of the Conference as observers.

34. The Conference concurred with the recommendation of the General Committee
that, in accordance with Rule XVII-3 GRO, the International Confederation of
Free Trade Unions, the International Cooperative Alliance, the International
Federation of Agricultural Producers, the International Federation of
Plantation, Agricultural and Allied Workers, the World Confederation of Labour
and the World Federation of Trade Unions should be granted speaking time to
address the Plenary.





















16/ C 89/13; C 89/13-Sup.1; C 89/LIM/6; C 89/LIM/28; C 89/PV/2; C 89/PV/10;
C 89/PV/19.











MAJOR TRENDS AND POLICIES IN FOOD AND AGRICULTURE

Statements by Heads of Delegations in the General Discussion

35. The General Discussion was opened by the Director-General. The
text of his statement is given in Appendix D to this report. Following
this, 139 speakers participated in the discussion: the Independent Chairman
of the Council; His Excellency Hissene Habre, the President of the Republic
of Chad, who spoke in his capacity as current Chairman of the Permanent
Interstate Committee for Drought Control in the Sahel (CILSS); the
Director-General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA),
Mr Hans Blix; Heads of Delegations, of which 95 were Ministers or
Vice-Ministers; the Permanent Observer of the Holy See to FAO;
representatives of three UN bodies: United Nations Conference on Trade and
Development (UNCTAD), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), United
Nations Environment Programme (UNEP); the International Fund for
Agricultural Development (IFAD); the European Economic Community (EEC), the
Organization of African Unity (OAU), the Palestine Liberation Organization
(PLO), the Centre on Integrated Rural Development for Asia and the Pacific
(CIRDAP); and observers from five international non-governmental
organizations which had consultative status with FAO. The statements of five
Member Nations were inserted in the records.

World Food and Agriculture Situation

- The State of Food and Agriculture (SOFA) 18

36. The Conference reviewed the world and regional food and agricultural
situations in the light of the Director-General's report, the State of Food
and Agriculture 1989 and its supplement, and was broadly in accord with its
assessment. The Conference also had before it the Director-General's report,
Sustainable Development and Natural Resources Management, as the basis for
its discussions towards progressively translating sustainable development
into practical and operational policies and programmes, within the context
of agricultural and rural development.

37. The Conference welcomed the continued economic growth registered at
the global level in 1988 but noted that growth in 1989 was likely to fall
back to the 1985-87 average. It expressed concern that world economic growth
was unevenly distributed among the various geographic and economic regions.
The industrialized countries had recorded uninterrupted economic growth
since their recovery from the recession of 1982. However, economic growth in
the developing countries had remained much below the average for earlier
decades and had been led by the developing countries in Asia. By contrast,
economic growth in the African and Latin America and Caribbean regions
remained depressed. Such slow growth and asymmetry in economic progress had



17/ C 89/LIM/6; C 89/PV/4; C 89/PV/5; C 89/PV/6; C 89/PV/7; C 89/PV/8;
C 89/PV/9; C 89/PV/10; C 89/PV/11; C 89/PV/12; C 89/PV/13; C 89/PV/14;
C 89/PV/21.

18/ C 89/2; C 89/2-Sup.1; C 89/2-Sup.2; C 89/INF/14; C 89/LIM/34;
C 89/LIM/34-Sup.l; C 89/LIM/44; C 89/LIM/41; C 89/LIM/43; C 89/INF/16;
C 89/LIM/27-Rev.1; C 89/LIM/29; C 89/LIM/29-Sup.l; C 89/I/PV/2;
C 89/I/PV/3; C 89/I/PV/4; C 89/I/PV/5; C 89/I/PV/13; C 89/I/PV/14;
C 89/I/PV/15; C 89/I/PV/16; C 89/I/PV/17; C 89/PV/21.







- 8 -


repercussions on agriculture by restraining demand for food and agricultural
products in domestic markets of economically depressed regions. This
situation was exacerbated by rising inflationary pressures on food prices
and low rates of agricultural investment.

38. The Conference underlined the continued deleterious effect on growth
prospects for most developing countries of two unresolved issues on the
international agenda: namely international debt and trade protectionism. The
Conference recognized that international debt and the associated outflow of
resources from debtor to creditor countries, remained an oppressive burden
for many developing countries despite some initiatives taken on debt relief
or restructuring. Although sound macro-economic and sectoral policies had an
important role to play in restoring economic growth in debtor countries,
implementation was seriously constrained by the magnitude of their debt
burden.

39. The Conference also stressed that the inability of debtor countries
to service their external debt was closely linked to the access of their
export commodities and products to markets. It agreed that the progressive
reduction of trade protectionism was important to the restoration of more
broadly based economic growth. The Conference recognized that both developed
'and developing countries could derive significant benefits from the
liberalization of agricultural commodity markets and related adjustments in
agricultural support measures. In this connection, the Conference stressed
the need for special and differential treatment for developing countries,
expanded market access for agricultural and tropical products and
substantial and progressive reductions in trade-distorting support and
protection. It noted that the Uruguay Round of Multilateral Trade
Negotiations had reached a critical stage with definitive negotiating
proposals being tabled. The Conference looked forward to a successful
outcome of these negotiations in line with the objectives set out in the
Mid-Term Review of the Uruguay Round. However, some Member Nations were of
the view that it was primarily up to the GATT (General Agreement on Tariffs
and Trade) to take a position on the measures to be taken with a view to
improving trade practices with regard to agriculture.

40. The Conference noted with concern that global food and agricultural
production had increased at exceptionally low rates in 1987 and 1988. It
further noted that despite the marked increase in production in 1989, cereal
production would be below consumption for the third consecutive year. As a
consequence cereal stocks would be drawn down to a level that FAO considered
to be the minimum to maintain world food security. The Conference considered
that increased cereal production, where economically sound, would be needed
inter alia to restore stocks to safe levels. However, it stressed that great
care was needed to ensure adequacy of supplies without generating burdensome
stocks.

41. The Conference agreed that developments in the short-term situation
should be seen in the context of long-term trends. In this connection, it
noted with concern the slowdown in the growth of world per caput staple food
production and an outright decline in many developing countries, especially
in Africa.

42. The Conference expressed concern over the prevailing weakness of
international prices of several agricultural commodities of major export
interest to developing countries, particularly the sharp decline in the
price of coffee and the continued depressed price of cocoa. It noted,
however, that by contrast, prices for several major food commodities had






- 9 -


increased. It agreed that higher cereal prices, although without reaching
satisfactory levels, had benefited exporters and should provide an incentive
for production in the long term, but had imposed additional burdens on
food-deficit countries. The Conference also expressed concern that higher
prices had led to significant reductions in food-aid flows in 1988/89. It
therefore welcomed statements by some major donors announcing higher
commitments of food aid for 1989/90 than had been estimated earlier.

43. The Conference underlined the importance of implementing appropriate
agricultural policies as a key element for agricultural development and for
ensuring food security. The transfer of appropriate technology and
availability of inputs and markets were also important elements,
particularly for developing countries. Underlining that food security should
not be equated necessarily with national self-sufficiency in food, the
Conference stressed the importance of reducing rural and urban poverty in
order to ensure access to food and to attack hunger and malnutrition. It
agreed that FAO had important roles to play in providing technical
assistance and policy advice to increase supplies of food and other
agricultural, forestry and fishery products, and enhance access to food and
raise rural purchasing power.

44. Some Member Nations drew the attention of the Conference to the
deteriorating agricultural situation of the Palestinian people in the
occupied territories and its relation to the negative effects on
agricultural production and hence the food security of the Palestinian
people.

45. The Conference appreciated the forthcoming publication of FAO's
manual on the new methodology for estimating human energy requirements, as
it would usefully complement food balance sheets as a basis for sound
nutrition policies. The Conference suggested that, in future SOFA documents,
cereal utilization estimates be included and that greater attention be given
to substitute products. It was also suggested that the ratio of cereal
stocks to consumption to ensure a minimum level of world food security, be
reviewed in the light of new developments, including changing trade
patterns.

46. The Conference welcomed the continued expansion in world fish
production and trade of recent years, an expansion which had been shared by
both developed and developing countries. It urged continued support for
developing countries, particularly in Africa, which required increased
assistance to enable them to derive greater benefits from their marine and
inland fishery resources, including the development of aquaculture.

47. The Conference noted the serious concern expressed by some Member
Nations over the increasing use of large-scale pelagic driftnets,
particularly in the South Pacific Ocean. It noted that this issue was also
being currently considered in the UN General Assembly, which had draft
resolutions before it. Some Member Nations stated that already there was
sufficient evidence of the negative impact of large-scale high seas
driftnets to warrant the international community supporting an immediate ban
on their use. They also stressed that this action should not be delayed
pending the outcome of any further analysis. However, some other Member
Nations were of the view that little scientific evidence was available on
this issue to justify a ban on the use of large-scale pelagic driftnets and
referred to measures that had already been taken by some countries. The
Conference agreed that FAO was the most appropriate technical organization
to study this matter. The Conference noted the steps already taken by FAO






- 10 -


and agreed that this issue should continue to receive the Organization's
close attention. The Conference recommended that, as far as it was feasible,
and in the light of the outcome of the UN General Assembly's debate on the
above-mentioned draft resolutions, FAO should undertake further action,
including analytic scientific work, to improve the information available.
The Secretariat should report on progress in this matter to the next session
of the Committee on Fisheries.

48. Welcoming FAO's continued efforts to translate the concept of
sustainable development into operational actions, the Conference urged that
FAO should continue to integrate environmental issues into its programmes
and field activities as a contribution to evolving a strategy for
sustainable agricultural development. It agreed that limited availability of
resources, both technical and economic, in the developing countries and
consumerism in the developed countries were the main causes of environmental
degradation, and that the reduction of poverty was an essential prerequisite
for sustainable development in developing countries. The Conference
expressed serious concern over natural resource degradation including soil
erosion, deteriorating water quality, loss of genetic resources,
deforestation and the threat of global climatic change. It recognized the
need for technical and financial assistance to enable developing countries
to implement environmentally sound policies consistent with development
objectives. An environment of peace and international respect for
sovereignty over national natural resources also were essential elements of
a global sustainable development strategy.

49. Lamenting the prevailing rapid rates of loss of forests in general
and natural forests in particular as they contained irreplaceable genetic
resources, as well as providing regional and global benefits in stabilizing
climate and the atmosphere, the Conference was of the view that embargoes on
international trade in timber products were not a useful method for slowing
deforestation. The formulation and implementation of appropriate national
forestry policies were more important and it urged that countries should
increasingly adopt the Tropical Forestry Action Plan (TFAP) which was
co-sponsored by FAO, as a means to implement national plans in the forestry
sector. It urged that progress made in this area be regularly monitored and
evaluated. It further underlined the importance of fully integrating
forestry and agricultural production activities wherever feasible.

50. The Conference welcomed FAO's continued collaboration with other
agencies such as UNEP in preparation for the UN Conference on the
Environment and Development in 1992. Recognizing that FAO was the key agency
within the UN System to promote environmentally sound agricultural
development, it urged that FAO take primary responsibility in formulating a
World Strategy for Sustainable Agriculture for the 1992 Conference.







- 11 -


51. The Conference adopted the following Resolutions:

Resolution 1/89

PROVISION OF TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE TO THE PALESTINIAN PEOPLE 19 20 ( )


THE CONFERENCE,

Recalling the Economic and Social Council resolution 1989/96 of
26 July 1989,

Recognizing that the policies and practices of the Israeli occupation
authorities impede the basic requirements for the development of the economy
of the occupied Palestinian territory, including the agricultural sector,

Affirming the importance of supporting the agricultural sector in the
occupied Palestinian territory,

Expressing its opposition to the Israeli confiscation of Palestinian land
and expropriation of Palestinian water resources:

1. Stresses the need for providing the Palestinian people with the
assistance necessary for their economic development in close
cooperation with the Palestine Liberation Organization;

2. Requests the Director-General to send a mission to study and
evaluate the situation of the agricultural sector in the occupied
Palestinian territory, taking into consideration the conditions of
the farmers under the existing occupation policies and practices,
and to prepare a report comprising possible technical interventions
to be executed by FAO;

3. Requests the Director-General to organize a symposium on the
Palestinian agricultural sector;

4. Requests the Director-General to include the occupied Palestinian
territory in future FAO programmes and activities, and in line with
the present cooperation and coordination between the Palestine
Liberation Organization and other UN Agencies;

5. Calls for free access of FAO staff and experts to the occupied
Palestinian territory;

6. Requests the Director-General to report to the FAO Council in its
next session and to the FAO Conference in its Twenty-sixth Session
on the progress achieved in the implementation of the present
resolution.

(Adopted 29 November 1989)


* See footnotes on the next page







- 12 -


19/ The delegation of the United States of America stated that it deplored
the introduction of political resolutions into the technical Specialized
Agency, FAO. It supported provision of technical assistance to the
Palestinian people, including by Agencies like FAO, but could not
support this resolution which served a primarily political purpose. It
regretted that the sponsors of this resolution had rejected several
means by which they could have achieved their purported purpose, in
favour of a resolution had rejected several means by which they could
have achieved their purported purpose, in favour of a resolution which
contained an unbalanced attack upon a Member Nation of FAO, and which
would decrease, rather than increase, the chances for successfully
implementing an FAO programme.

Noting the explanations of vote, the delegation of the United States
of America understood that a majority of those wished simply to urge
technical assistance for the Palestinian people, and that only a small
minority wished to politicize FAO by inserting false and inappropriate
rhetoric in the resolution. It rejected the notion that the language of
this resolution represented the will of FAO as a whole. It called upon
those who insisted on politicization to desist, as it was apparent that
such actions would cause serious harm to this Organization.

20/ The Arab Group, which had sponsored this draft resolution, paid tribute
and expressed its appreciation and gratitude to all the Member Nations
who had supported this resolution. It was confident that the support by
the Member Nations of the content and intention of this resolution was
testimony to a full understanding of the situation in the agricultural
sector in the occupied Palestinian land.

The Arab Group reiterated once more that the minority who had
introduced this resolution had no intention whatever to politicize the
work of this Organization. As was mentioned in Commission I, this Group,
or this minority, which belonged to this Organization and to the UN
System as a whole, was always against any resolution that politicized
the Organization and Specialized Agencies. This was especially true as
this Organization was a pioneer in the field of agriculture, and there
were millions who were starving and dying every day.

The Arab Group stressed that it did not intend to introduce this
resolution as a politicization of the work of the Organization, and it
called upon the Organization not to enter into such a politicization,
but to concentrate its efforts towards introducing appropriate
assistance in the Palestinian Arab Territories.







- 13 -


Resolution 2/89


TROPICAL FORESTRY ACTION PLAN


THE CONFERENCE,

Noting that as of November 1989, 67 tropical countries were involved in
TFAP activities, ranging from a request for TFAP implementation to the
preparations for project execution,

Noting that so far eight round tables, marking the end of the planning
phase and the beginning of the implementation phase, have been held
during which the donor community has committed itself to funding a
substantial number of projects,

Noting also that the international community has welcomed the TFAP as the
worldwide framework for action to promote the sustainable use and
conservation of tropical forests, and to enhance the proper management of
forest lands,

Recognizing the lead role of FAO as Coordinating Agency for TFAP and
appreciating the efforts that the Organization has made to mobilize
human resources and funds in order to facilitate and firmly establish the
TFAP,

Recognizing also the efforts of the donor community to provide additional
funds for supporting the coordinating role of FAO and appreciating its
commitment to the TFAP process,

Recognizing the important contribution that the TFAP could make to
sustainable development of the countries concerned and in relation to
global issues such as climate change and conservation of biodiversity,

Recognizing the huge world population increase, and the dependence of
rural people on tropical forests and the need for sustainable forest
development to satisfy their growing requirements,

Aware that

a) human resources development is critically important in project
preparation and implementation in many tropical countries;

b) project preparation capacity, both in and outside the tropical
countries, is insufficient for the speedy implementation of the
priority projects identified in the National Forestry Action Plans;

c) external factors and the economic environment of the beneficiary
countries constitute serious limitations to the successful
implementation of TFAP;

d) TFAP activities at the country level are the responsibility of the
national authorities and the methods adopted must allow for
self-sustainable follow-up action;







- 14 -


Confirming that the TFAP Coordinating Unit has a supportive task with
regard to coordinating the collective effort, monitoring the process and
continuously evaluating the impact of TFAP on tropical forestry
development and conservation,

1. Requests donor governments and agencies to provide more means for
the implementation of the TFAP and to strengthen the national
capabilities for the development and conservation of their tropical
forests;

2. Invites the Director-General to foster training and extension
courses to develop national capabilities for the formulation and
implementation of programmes and projects within the framework
of TFAP;

3. Urges tropical countries and the major development banks and
agencies to increase their project preparation capacity, in order to
reduce the time lapse between the end of the planning phase and the
implementation of the first projects;

4. Recommends to governments, donors and international financial
organizations:

a) to accord higher priority to the forestry sector by providing
stronger budget support, for strengthening national
institutional capacity, especially in developing countries, to
implement forestry programmes as a basis for sustainable
development;

b) to promote the further integration of forestry with other
disciplines and sectors in the implementation of TFAP;

c) to increase the afforestation efforts through TFAP as a means
not only to control erosion and desertification and to provide
timber and fuelwood, but also to protect the environment and
combat global warming;

5. Requests the Director-General to continue to accord high priority to
the coordination and implementation of the TFAP;

6. Urges all participants in TFAP to provide the means to advance the
implementation of the Plan as rapidly as possible.


(Adopted 29 November 1989)






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Resolution 3/89


FAO ACTIVITIES RELATED TO SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT


THE CONFERENCE,

Recalling the UN General Assembly Resolution 42/186, on the Environmental
Perspectives to the Year 2000 and Beyond, and Resolution 42/187, on the
report of the World Commission on Environment and Development,

Considering that the above-mentioned resolutions underline that insufficient
attention given to the environmental impact of agricultural policies,
priorities and practices has been causing extensive environmental damage,
such as, inter alia:

soil degradation, deforestation and desertification;

loss of land productivity, soil and water pollution and hazard to
human health caused by excessive and improper use of agricultural
chemicals;

genetic erosion and increased vulnerability of crops to diseases
and pests due in part to over-reliance on the use of high-yielding
varieties,

Recalling Resolution 9/87 entitled "FAO activities related to the World
Commission on Environment and Development (WCED)", requesting FAO to give
greater attention to sustainable development,

Endorsing the statement by the Governing Council of the United Nations
Environment Programme on Sustainable Development adopted by consensus at its
Fifteenth Session,

Bearing in mind that in Article 1 of FAO's Constitution, inter alia, states
that "the Organization shall promote and, where appropriate, shall recommend
national and international action with respect to the conservation of
natural resources and the adoption of improved methods of agricultural
production",

Considering that FAO is in the process of improving its Global System as a
mechanism for the safe conservation, sustainable use and availability of
genetic resources, that is fully complementary with sustainable development,

Agreeing that in order to promote sustainable development, FAO must in all
its relevant activities look to the long term as well as the short term, and
make sure that the environment and the productive capacity of natural
resources are enhanced and conserved, not impaired or destroyed,

Underlining that FAO should play a leading international role as the centre
of excellence within the UN System in several subsectors related to
environment and sustainable development, and FAO should contribute actively
in further international agreements on biological/genetic diversity;
tropical forestry, fisheries and other environmental matters,






- 16 -


Agreeing that there is a need to stimulate inter-agency cooperation and
coordination and to identify opportunities for synergetic efforts in order
to achieve sustainable development, the goal being to create economic and
social development and at the same time take environmental considerations
fully into account,

Welcomes the proposal of making increased allocations in the Programme of
Work and Budget to activities related to sustainable development:

Decides that:

1. the Organization shall intensify its inter-disciplinary work to
ensure integration of environmental considerations in all relevant
FAO activities and further priority should be given to activities
associated with sustainable development under the technical and
economic programmes;

2. FAO in the future must give higher priority to the prevention of
environmental degradation which affects agriculture, fisheries and
forestry, and strive for projects and programmes which have greater
compatibility with sustainable and environmentally sound
development;

3. FAO should strengthen cooperation with other organizations of the
UN System in pursuing sustainable development, including
conservation and management of biological/genetic diversity, and
increase its efforts in assisting governments in the formulation of
conservation strategies, particularly in developing countries;

4. FAO should further collaborate fully with the Secretary General of
the United Nations in the preparations for the United Nations 1992
Conference on Environment and Development and should respond
affirmatively to the UNEP proposal for a joint FAO/UNEP meeting on
sustainable agriculture as part of the preparation for this
Conference;

5. the Director-General shall report to the Ninety-eighth Session of
the FAO Council in November 1990 on the implementation of this
resolution.

(Adopted 29 November 1989)

52. The Conference was informed that the approved Programme of Work and
Budget for 1990-91 did not include financial provisions for the new
activities resulting from the adopted Resolution on "FAO Activities Related
to Sustainable Development". The costs for the full implementation of these
additional activities to the Organization in the next biennium were
estimated at approximately US$ 580 000 and were unlikely to be absorbed
within the approved budget. Therefore, FAO required and would do its best to
mobilize extra-budgetary resources of this magnitude. Some Member Nations
felt that it was too early to make such an assessment.






- 17


- International Agricultural Adjustment:
Progress Report on Guidelines 7, 8 and 12 21

53. The Conference reviewed progress in International Agricultural
Adjustment under Guidelines 7, 8 and 12 on the basis of the Director-General's
Progress Report and was broadly in accord with its assessment. The Conference
recalled that it had decided at its Twenty-fourth Session in 1987 that full
progress reports on International Agricultural Adjustment would be prepared
every four years but that it had decided to review, on an exceptional basis,
progress under the above three guidelines also at its Twenty-fifth Session.

54. Concerning Guideline 7, the Conference noted that progress to achieve
its objectives, notwithstanding some policy reforms undertaken by some
countries, had been disappointingly slow. It noted that support and
protection measures, particularly in some developed countries, which distorted
resource use and international agricultural trade, and impeded market access,
had continued at high levels. The Conference recognized that the objectives
of Guideline 7 were similar to those of the Uruguay Round of Multilateral
Trade Negotiations as agreed for agriculture in the Mid-Term Review in Geneva
in April 1989. It stressed that the Uruguay Round represented a unique
opportunity for progress toward a fair and market-oriented agricultural
trading system and urged all participants to make the utmost efforts for the
Negotiations to come to a successful conclusion.

55. Several Member Nations informed the Conference of the proposals which
their governments had submitted for negotiation in the Uruguay Round,
including both agriculture and tropical products. They stressed the
importance for agreement to be reached on all aspects of the Negotiations,
including on sanitary and phytosanitary regulations. Several Member Nations
provided information on the concessions so far made on tropical products.
However, several other Member Nations stressed that much remained to be done
to achieve the objectives of the negotiations on tropical products,
particularly in their processed and semi-processed forms. A number of Member
Nations stressed the need for domestic concerns to be taken into account in
the Multilateral Trade Negotiations such as food security, social
considerations, environmental factors and special and differential treatment
for developing countries. In their view, the scope, extent and country
coverage of policy reforms should fully reflect these concerns.

56. In particular, many Member Nations pointed out that most developing
countries needed to promote their agricultural and rural sectors, inter alia
through infrastructure development and implementation of appropriate incentive
policies for farmers. Such factors meant that these countries should not be
expected to dismantle crucial policy measures. In this connection, it was
also pointed out that input subsidies could, in certain circumstances, also
contribute toward production and productivity improvements in developing
countries.

57. In relation to recent initiatives to reduce trade barriers within North
America and within the European Economic Community, it was suggested that the
Secretariat should analyse the implications for trade, particularly for
developing countries.

58. On Guideline 8 the Conference agreed with the assessment that recent
years had been particularly unfavourable for International Commodity
Agreements and that many developing countries had suffered significant losses

21/ C 89/18; C 89/I/PV/5; C 89/I/PV/6; C 89/I/PV/14; C 89/PV/21






- 18 -


of export revenues due to pronounced price declines for some of their major
agricultural exports, most notably coffee and cocoa. Some Member Nations,
deploring this situation, urged that increased efforts be made to revitalize
International Commodity Agreements as a means for achieving the objective of
greater stability in world markets at prices remunerative to producers and
fair to consumers. These Member Nations, however, stressed that the
mechanisms used to achieve these aims should be flexible and responsive to
changing market conditions, in order to ensure the long-run viability of such
agreements. Some other Member Nations, however, questioned the
appropriateness and efficiency of International Commodity Agreements with
market regulation provisions as a policy instrument to achieve stabilization
objectives, and stressed that in their view, trade liberalization was the best
approach for achieving greater stability in world markets.

59. The Conference welcomed the coming into force in June 1989 of the Common
Fund for Commodities which could make an important contribution to the
objectives of Guideline 8. In particular, it stressed the important role that
FAO's Intergovernmental Commodity Groups should play in relation to the Second
Account activities of the Fund, by drawing up, sponsoring and undertaking
follow-up action on commodity development projects.

60. The Conference noted that the relatively tight supply conditions and
increased prices in the world cereals markets in 1988/89 posed problems of
access to food supplies at accessible prices by importing countries,
particularly the low-income ones, as Guideline 8 required. It further noted
that cereal import bills had increased, food aid shipments had declined from
the relatively high levels of earlier years, and the resource position of the
International Emergency Food Reserve (IEFR) remained difficult. The
Conference urged that appropriate action be taken to make progress towards the
achievement of this objective of Guideline 8.

61. On Guideline 12, the Conference regretted that total net foreign
resource flows to the developing countries had declined in recent years and
that the target of the Guideline for external assistance to agriculture
remained unfulfilled. In particular, it regretted the fact that there was a
significant net outflow of resources from the developing countries on their
long-term debt account. The Conference noted that the share of agriculture in
total Official Development Finance had been maintained at around one fifth of
the total.

62. The Conference drew attention to the inter-relationships between trade,
debt and aid. It stressed the need for the declining trend in resource flows
to the developing countries to be reversed and urged donors to make all
efforts to achieve the Guideline's target of external assistance to
agriculture as soon as possible. The Conference noted that preliminary data
showed that aid for all purposes from the members of the Development
Assistance Committee (DAC) had increased significantly in 1988 from the levels
of 1987. Some Member Nations reported that they had increased their foreign
aid allocations and continued to give appropriate priority to agriculture in
their allocations.






- 19 -


- World Food Day 22

63. The Conference heard an FAO Secretariat statement regarding World Food
Day. The statement announced the decision of the Director-General to have
"Food for the Future" as the theme for 1990. It was the firm decision of FAO
to continue supporting the worldwide observance of World Food Day, in keeping
with resolutions 1/79, 7/81, 5/83 and 2/87 as well as the ideas contained in
document C 87/29 "World Food Day Assessment (1981-1987) and Future
Directions". The FAO Secretariat wished to encourage Member Governments and,
non-governmental organizations to work with FAO in 1990 to help World Food Day
become an avenue through which food production systems throughout the world
can be directed toward long-term sustainability in the future. The Secretariat
also expressed its support for the Global Confederation of World Food Day
Non-Governmental Organizations as an important vehicle in strengthening the
tripartite collaboration between FAO, Governments and non-governmental
organizations.

Preparations for an International Development
Strategy for the Fourth UN Development Decade -
FAO's Contribution 23

64. The Conference discussed the subject of FAO's contribution to the
preparation of the International Development Strategy (IDS) for the Fourth
UN Development Decade and to the Special Session of the UN General Assembly
devoted to International Economic Cooperation, in particular to the
Revitalization of Economic Growth and Development of the Developing Countries.
It noted that the UN General Assembly was to consider the IDS towards the end
of 1990 and that the Special Session was to be held from 23'to 27 April 1990.

65. The Conference noted that the UN General Assembly resolution on the IDS
had invited, among others, the specialized agencies of the UN System to
include in their agendas during 1989 items regarding their contributions to
the preparations of the IDS and had requested their executive heads to
contribute effectively to the preparatory process for the Strategy by
providing all appropriate inputs, including relevant documentation, using
comprehensive analytical studies. It also noted that the UN General Assembly
had requested the UN Secretary-General to carry out appropriate high level
consultations, including consultations with eminent personalities, for the
preparation of his report to the UN General Assembly Preparatory Committee on
the Special Session. In this context, FAO had been consulted and requested
to provide appropriate inputs.

66. The Conference noted that the Council had been informed of these matters
at its Ninety-fifth Session in June 1989. The Conference endorsed the Council
conclusions which emphasized the particular importance of FAO's contribution
to the IDS and the Special Session, as the food and agriculture and the rural
sector had a vital role to play in revitalizing economic growth and in
achieving the objectives in the areas of nutrition, poverty alleviation,
development of human resources and the environment.

67. The Conference noted that FAO had already made contributions, both at
the Secretariat level through the ACC (Administrative Committee on
Co-ordination) and its appropriate subsidiary bodies as well as to the two
sessions, June and September 1989, of the UN General Assembly ad hoc Committee
of the Whole for the preparation of the IDS.

22/ C 89/I/PV/6; C 89/I/PV/14; C 89/PV/21.
23/ C 89/19; C 89/I/PV/6; C 89/I/PV/7; C 89/I/PV/8; C 89/I/PV/14;
C 89/I/PV/17; C 89/PV/21.







- 20 -


68. The Conference supported FAO's active involvement in the preparation of
the IDS. It noted that the UN General Assembly had recently adopted a
resolution (A/C.2/44/L.11) which recommended to the ad hoc Committee of the
Whole for the Preparation of the IDS to adopt an outline annexed to the
resolution as a basis for elaboration of the IDS. The outline referred
explicitly to the food and agriculture sector and policies in both the chapter
on the reactivation and acceleration of broad durable economic growth and in
the chapter on priority aspects of development.

69. The Conference reviewed document C 89/19 "Long-term Strategy for the
Food and Agriculture Sector" and noted that it was an outline and preview of
the contents of the full FAO Strategy document. It had been prepared by an
FAO-wide Task Force especially set up by the Director-General for this
purpose. It also noted that a full FAO Strategy document would be prepared by
the Task Force, taking into account the Conference discussions and
recommendations. The full FAO Strategy document was to serve as a basis for
making further contributions to the preparatory work in the UN for the Special
Session and the IDS as well as to the relevant General Assembly sessions
themselves, as appropriate.

70. The Conference welcomed the Director-General's initiative to set up the
above-mentioned FAO-wide Task Force. It agreed that the full FAO Strategy
document should be based, inter alia, on elaboration of the findings and
recommendations of existing FAO global and regional studies ("Agriculture:
Toward 2000" and the regional studies on Africa, Latin America and the
Caribbean and Europe) as well as on the existing FAO or FAO-sponsored sectoral
strategies, plans of actions and undertakings. These would include the World
Conference on Agrarian Reform and Rural Development (WCARRD) Programme of
Action, the Guidelines and Targets for International Agricultural Adjustment,
the TFAP, the Strategy for Fisheries Management and Development, the Plan of
Action for the Integration of Women in Development, the International Code of
Conduct on the Distribution and Use of Pesticides, and others. The Conference
agreed that the full FAO Strategy document be submitted to the Ninety-eighth
Session of the Council in November 1990.

71. The Conference considered that the document under review was
analytically sound and sufficiently comprehensive, and expressed its support
for the suggestions contained in the document. The Conference considered that
the document provided a good basis for further work for the development of the
full FAO Strategy document and that it focused appropriately on the main
themes, viz. Economic Growth and Agriculture, Poverty Alleviation and Human
Resources Development, and Natural Resources, Environment and Sustainability.
Many Member Nations made suggestions for improvements, mainly in terms of the
relative emphasis to be placed on the different aspects of the Strategy. Some
Member Nations referred to studies and strategies of other organizations which
contained useful material that could be drawn upon in preparing the FAO
Strategy, including studies and strategies concerned with ECDC (Economic
Cooperation among Developing Countries) and TCDC (Technical Cooperation among
Developing Countries).

72. The Conference stressed that the elimination of war and civil strife,
the pursuit of peace, and the respect for human rights were essential elements
of the IDS and essential preconditions for achieving development objectives.

73. The Conference stressed that the International Development Strategies of
the previous UN Development Decades had failed to meet their objectives, while







- 21 -


the decade of the 1980s had been a period of serious slow down in growth rates
for a great many developing countries. It considered that the main reasons for
such failure were the inadequate progress, or even outright deterioration, in
international economic relations coupled with trade protectionism, growth of
debt, high interest rates, weak commodity markets, adverse terms of trade in
international markets, decline in overall resource flows to the developing
countries, significant negative flows on their long-term debt account,
inappropriate domestic policies of both developing and developed countries,
and inability of developing countries to adapt their export products to meet
the demand in the markets of developed countries.

74. The Conference agreed that the IDS for the 1990s should emphasize the
importance of sound domestic economic policies, taking into account country
and regional diversities, as well as the need for significant progress towards
the creation of a supportive international economic environment, particularly
in tackling the debt problem, reversing the negative flow of resources from
the developing countries, increasing financial and technical assistance and
creating a market-oriented trading system. The Conference recognized that food
aid would continue to play a vitally important role, both as a means of
resource transfer aimed at promoting development, and improving nutrition as
well as for emergency purposes.

75. The Conference agreed that the Uruguay Round of Multilateral Trade
Negotiations provided a unique opportunity for policy reform in agriculture,
particularly in the developed countries, that would lead to a market-oriented
agricultural trading system as a major component of the IDS for the 1990s.
The Conference recognized that in this context certain domestic concerns
including food security needed to be taken into account as well as special and
differential treatment of the developing countries.

76. The Conference recommended that the FAO Strategy should focus on a
limited number of major issues. The document should be succinct and
concentrate on issues on which FAO was particularly qualified to contribute,
taking into account the contributions to the IDS of other parts of the UN
system.

77. The Conference agreed that the IDS should not contain many and detailed
quantitative targets and that whatever targets were included should be
realistic as to the prospects for their achievement. In this connection many
Member Nations considered that the IDS should include a target for ODA
(Official Development Assistance). They urged all countries to intensify
their efforts to meet the existing ODA target, as some countries had already
done. A few Member Nations stated that their governments could not associate
themselves with targets for growth of ODA.

78. The Conference stressed that the FAO Strategy should recognize that
revitalization of growth, particularly in agriculture and the rural sector,
was inter-dependent with, and often a prerequisite for, progress in the areas
of poverty, nutrition and human resources development. At the same time, the
existence of trade-offs, both among objectives and intertemporally, should be
acknowledged. The Conference noted that elimination of poverty and
undernutrition would take longer than one decade to achieve and, therefore,
there was all the more reason for the IDS to emphasize the immediate
initiation of appropriate policy action. The Conference agreed that policies
for agriculture and rural development should emphasize an enhanced role for
women, people's participation, and equitable access to productive assets,
inputs and services.







- 22 -


79. The Conference agreed that macro-economic policies should be designed to
strengthen rather than counteract the incentives for agricultural development
provided by means of sectoral policies. It also agreed that structural
adjustment policies for correcting macro-economic disequilibria would need to
put greater emphasis on growth-generating aspects by removing constraints and
bottlenecks to growth. It emphasized that such policies should be designed,
sequenced and implemented in such a way that social costs, in particular
adverse effects on nutrition, health and education, were minimized in order to
safeguard the human resources potential on which development depended.

80. The Conference agreed that the role of the public sector in economic
life needed to be viewed from a pragmatic standpoint, taking into account the
widely differing national circumstances, experiences and capabilities. It
considered that the FAO Strategy should emphasize both an enhanced role for
the private sector, including producers' organizations, and also the need to
upgrade the efficiency of public administration which had an important role to
play in promoting infrastructure, education and training and research and
extension.

81. The Conference agreed that the FAO Strategy should attach high priority
to issues of natural resources, environment and sustainable development and
agreed with the approach adopted in the document on this subject. It accepted
the need for a clear distinction to be made between the strategic approaches
required for areas endowed with different natural resources, for example
between those of marginal and high potential areas. The Conference emphasized
the importance of comprehensive approaches both in the integration of
environmental concerns with sectoral policies and in the sub-sectoral
integration of crops, livestock, forestry and fisheries.

82. The Conference recommended that the FAO Strategy should have among its
top priorities the promotion of agricultural research and development, parti-
cularly as regards the intensification of rainfed agriculture through
ecologically sound and sustainable technologies and improved utilization of
indigenous livestock breeds which were well adapted to adverse agro-ecological
conditions.

83. The Conference also underlined several other aspects of the FAO Strategy
as deserving particular attention. These included special attention to the
needs of Sub-Saharan Africa; food security; agro-forestry; fisheries
management, including the development of artisanal fisheries and aquaculture;
off-farm rural economic activities, related to agriculture or not, as a key
component of rural development efforts; and population policies.

84. The Conference stressed that within the framework of a policy of
integrated agricultural and forestry activities, FAO should accord priority in
allocating funds to agroforestry projects, which would be one form of salutary
action to prevent deforestation and improve fallow land.

Progress Report on the GATT Multilateral Trade Negotiations
(Uruguay Round) and Implications for FAO 24

85. The Conference stressed that the Uruguay Round of Multilateral Trade
Negotiations under the GATT was of fundamental importance for achieving a fair
and market-oriented agricultural trading system. It therefore welcomed the


24/ C 89/23; C 89/25; C 89/I/PV/1: C 89/I/PV/14; C 89/PV/21.






- 23 -


agreements reached in the Mid-Term Review of the negotiations by the Trade
Negotiations Committee (TNC) in April 1989 which enabled the Uruguay Round
negotiations to be resumed. In particular, it noted with satisfaction that
the agreement on agriculture aimed to achieve substantial and progressive
reductions in support and protection, resulting in correcting and preventing
restrictions and distortions in world agricultural markets. The Conference
also noted with satisfaction that the approach adopted by the TNC for the
negotiations on agriculture included both long-term elements for the reform of
agricultural policies and short-term elements as well as arrangements on
sanitary and phytosanitary regulations.

86. The Conference noted in particular that the Mid-Term Review called for
harmonization of national regulations on sanitary and phytosanitary
regulations and measures as a long-term goal, on the basis of appropriate
standards established by relevant international organizations including the
FAO/WHO Codex Alimentarius Commission and the International Plant Protection
Convention (IPPC). In this connection, the work programme adopted also
embodied, inter alia, the objectives of: strengthening GATT Article XX so that
measures taken to protect human, animal or plant life or health were
consistent with sound scientific evidence and use suitable principles of
equivalency; improving notification procedures; improving the multilateral
dispute settlement process within the GATT in order to provide the necessary
input of scientific expertise and judgement, relying on relevant international
organizations; and providing technical assistance to developing countries
regarding sanitary and phytosanitary measures.

87. The Conference emphasized the important pivotal role of FAO in these
areas, particularly through the Codex Alimentarius Commission (CAC) and the
International Plant Protection Convention. The Conference expressed its
appreciation for the long-established and valuable work of the CAC in
harmonizing food standards and related rules for international food trade, for
FAO's activities in relation to the IPPC, and for the Organization's technical
assistance provided to developing countries on sanitary and phytosanitary
measures.

88. The Conference fully endorsed the support provided by FAO to the Uruguay
Round negotiations, including support to the GATT secretariat in relation to
agriculture, tropical products and natural resource-based products, technical
assistance provided to participating countries, particularly developing
countries, and participation in the negotiations, including those on sanitary
and phytosanitary regulations. The Conference urged that such support should
continue and, where appropriate, should be intensified.

89. The Conference noted that certain strengthening of FAO activities
regarding Codex would be needed. It welcomed the plans of the
Director-General to create a special unit within the Food Quality and
Standards Service to expedite cooperation between Codex and GATT with regard
to food standards, additives, veterinary drug and pesticide residues in foods
which could constitute sanitary barriers to trade. The Conference emphasized
that FAO had a unique role to play in providing independent advice and
assistance to GATT in these areas.

90. The Conference recognized the basic role of the International Plant
Protection Convention in the field of plant quarantine and that many of the
issues raised in the GATT negotiations were covered in the Convention. It





- 24 -


noted with satisfaction the actions taken by the Director-General, at the
request for technical assistance by the Director-General of GATT, to address
harmonization within the field of plant quarantine.

91. The Conference noted the results of the Technical Consultation between
the Regional Plant Protection Organizations, convened by the Director-General
in September 1989, and considered its recommendations. The Conference agreed
on the necessity to establish a secretariat within FAO for the International
Plant Protection Convention to address all issues related to harmonization and
information exchange in the area of plant quarantine. The Conference
carefully considered the proposed programme of work of the secretariat and
agreed that it should have, as the main components, the development of
harmonized guidelines for pest risk assessment, harmonized plant quarantine
principles with which phytosanitary laws and regulations should be consistent,
and harmonized plant quarantine procedures. The Conference further agreed that
the secretariat for the IPPC should be supported by a panel of experts on
harmonization and plant quarantine and be entrusted with the organization of
regular Technical Consultations between Regional Plant Protection
Organizations.

92. The Conference noted the role that the Asian and Pacific and the
Caribbean Plant Protection Commissions, which were FAO Statutory Bodies, would
have in the harmonization at a regional level. It also noted the need to
establish a Plant Protection Commission for the Near East region.

93. The Conference discussed the recommendation of the Technical
Consultation held in September 1989 regarding the establishment of a technical
global body in the field of plant quarantine. It was felt that a decision at
present to establish such a global body would be premature and that first
experience should be gained of the functioning of the arrangements set out
above, as proposed by the Director-General.

94. The Conference called on the FAO Member Governments that were not yet
contracting parties to the IPPC to adhere to the Convention as soon as
possible and stressed the necessity for wider acceptance of its amendments so
that the amended version of the Convention could enter into force.

95. The Conference stressed the need for providing technical assistance to
developing countries to enable them to meet international harmonization rules
and procedures for sanitary and phytosanitary measures.

96. The Conference was informed that it would be desirable to begin phasing
into FAO's programme of work with the minimum of delay the additional
activities envisaged in relation to the Codex and the IPPC, so as to enable
the Organization to respond to possible requests concerning harmonization of
regulations and dispute settlement which may arise in the GATT context. In
this connection, the Conference noted that the Uruguay Round negotiations
would be completed by the end of 1990 and that it was expected that the
implementation of the agreed results would begin shortly thereafter.

97. As regards the financing of these additional activities, the Secretariat
informed the Conference that the implementation would be contingent on the
Conference's decisions regarding the Programme of Work and Budget for 1990-91,
and the timely payment of all contributions, or on the possibilities of
raising additional extra-budgetary resources from interested countries.







- 25 -


Commission on Plant Genetic Resources and the
International Undertaking: Progress Report 25

98. The Conference noted with appreciation the spirit of cooperation and
increasing consensus developed during the last years in the FAO debates on
plant genetic resources and expressed its satisfaction with the progress made
by the Commission on Plant Genetic Resources and the considerable and growing
acceptance of the International Undertaking. The Conference recognized the
pioneering work of FAO in developing a unique Global System on Plant Genetic
Resources which includes: a framework, the International Undertaking; an
intergovernmental forum, the Commission; and a financial mechanism, the
International Fund for Plant Genetic Resources.

99. The Conference recognized the role of the Commission as an
intergovernmental forum where discussions took place and consensus was sought
for the continuous development of the Global System on Plant Genetic
Resources. In this context, it noted with satisfaction some of the new
elements that at the request of the Commission and within the framework of the
Undertaking are currently being prepared or considered by FAO in cooperation
with the appropriate institutions. These included: the periodical publication
of a report on the State of the World Plant Genetic Resources, the
establishment of a Global Information and an Early Warning System, the
establishment of a network of ex situ base collections under the auspices or
jurisdiction of FAO, the establishment of a network on in situ protected
areas, the development of a Memorandum of Understanding with the International
Board for Plant Genetic Resources (IBPGR), and the development of a Code of
Conduct for international collectors of germplasm and a Code of Conduct on
Biotechnology as it affected the conservation and use of plant genetic
resources. It also noted that the Commission had requested FAO,
in cooperation with relevant organizations, to continue to monitor actively
the evolving new biotechnologies, in line with the International Undertaking.
The Conference recognized that many of these developments were likely to
influence for years to come policies, programmes and activities of FAO and
other international organizations.

100. The Conference welcomed information from various Member Nations on
plant genetic resources activities undertaken in their country and their
willingness to cooperate with FAO on matters of joint interest. In that
respect, the need to provide technical assistance to many developing countries
was emphasized and the useful role of the International Fund was underlined.
However, several Member Nations expressed the view that the financing of the
Fund should continue on a voluntary basis. Other Member Nations felt that it
was necessary to plan financing for the Fund.

101. The Conference stressed that maximum cooperation should be ensured
with various regional and international organizations working on plant genetic
resources, in particular IBPGR, and encouraged the Secretariat to develop
appropriate arrangements for this. It welcomed the progress made on the


25/ C 89/24; C 89/LIM/29; C 89/LIM/37; C 89/I/PV/8; C 89/I/PV/9; C 89/I/PV/14;
C 89/I/PV/15; C 89/I/PV/17; C 89/PV/21.







- 26 -


development of a Memorandum of Understanding for cooperation with the IBPGR
and the active role played in this by the Commission and its Working Group.

102. The Conference drew attention to the importance of biotechnology in
this field for agricultural development in developing countries. However, it
stressed that most of the research on biotechnology was undertaken in the
industrialized countries and was therefore mainly oriented to their needs.
The Conference encouraged FAO to initiate and implement appropriate action to
ensure that all countries would draw the full benefit of the various research
and development activities on this matter. This should include the
development of appropriate technologies that fit the needs of agriculture in
developing countries. With regard to the application of the new
biotechnologies, some Member Nations emphasized that it would be necessary to
provide information on a timely basis through FAO's early warning system on
plant genetic resources when the use of these new biotechnologies might
involve a risk, or have a negative impact, on member countries.

103. The Conference noted the global importance of animal genetic resources
and emphasized the importance for FAO also to be actively involved in this.
Several Member Nations supported the results of the FAO Expert Consultation
held in Rome from 26 to 28 September 1989, in which it was proposed to set up
institutional, legal and financial mechanisms comparable to those existing for
plant genetic resources. Others, however, considered that the present
arrangements for plant genetic resources provided an adequate framework and
should be amended to include animal genetic resources.

104. The Conference noted that the Ninety-fifth Session of the Council had
extensively reviewed the report and recommendations made by the Third Session
of the Commission on Plant Genetic Resources, held in Rome from 17 to 21 April
1989.

105. The Conference welcomed in particular the text for two complementary
draft resolutions aimed to improve the participation of countries in the
International Undertaking. The first one, presented by the Delegation of
Spain, was based on the text prepared by the Commission for an agreed
interpretation of the International Undertaking. The second one was prepared
by the Commission and regarded farmers' rights. The draft resolutions,
preserving the principle of unrestricted availability of germplasm, recognized
the rights of both donors of technologies and donors of germplasm to be
compensated for their contributions through the simultaneous recognition of
plant breeders' and farmers' rights. The Conference recognized that both
resolutions were intended to lay the basis for an equitable and lasting global
system for sharing the costs and benefits of the world's plant genetic
resources for present and future generations.

106. During the debate on these two resolutions, a few countries made
specific proposals for amendments, but it was recognized that such changes
needed further detailed review before they could be considered. A number of
countries expressed their intention to join the Undertaking or to withdraw
their reservations should the resolutions be adopted. The Conference agreed
that the proposed amendments should be included in a document to be prepared
by the Secretariat to be considered by the next session of the Working Group
and the Commission for possible submission to the next Council and Conference
Sessions.





- 27 -


107. The Conference, recognizing that these resolutions were the final
result of wide-ranging and intensive discussions and negotiations among many
countries, including a non-member of FAO, some non-members of the Commission
and some that did not adhere to the Undertaking, expressed its satisfaction
with the draft resolutions.

108. The Conference adopted the following two resolutions:







Resolution 4/89


AGREED INTERPRETATION OF
THE INTERNATIONAL UNDERTAKING



THE CONFERENCE,

Recognizing that:

plant genetic resources are a common heritage of mankind to be
preserved, and to be freely available for use, for the benefit of
present and future generations,


Further recognizing that:

(a) the International Undertaking on Plant Genetic Resources constitutes
a formal framework aimed at ensuring conservation, use and
availability of plant genetic resources,

(b) some countries have not adhered to the Undertaking and others have
adhered with reservation because of possible conflict of certain
provisions of the Undertaking with their international obligations
and existing national regulations,

(c) these reservations and constraints may be overcome through an
agreed interpretation of the Undertaking which recognizes Plant
Breeders' Rights and Farmers' Rights,

Endorses the agreed interpretation set forth hereinafter which is intended
to lay the basis for an equitable and therefore solid and lasting, global
system and thereby to facilitate the withdrawal of reservations which
countries have made with regard to the International Undertaking, and to
secure the adherence of others:


AGREED INTERPRETATION

1. Plant Breeders' Rights as provided for under UPOV (International
Union for the Protection of New Varieties of Plant) are not
incompatible with the International Undertaking;






- 28 -


2. a state may impose only such minimum restrictions on the free
exchange of materials covered by Article 2.1 (a) of the
International Undertaking as are necessary for it to conform to its
national and international obligations;

3. states adhering to the Undertaking recognize the enormous
contribution that farmers of all regions have made to the
conservation and development of plant genetic resources, which
constitute the basis of plant production throughout the world, and
which form the basis for the concept of Farmers' Rights;

4. the adhering states consider that the best way to implement the
concept of Farmers' Rights is to ensure the conservation, management
and use of plant genetic resources, for the benefit of present and
future generations of farmers. This could be achieved through
appropriate means, monitored by the Commission on Plant Genetic
Resources, including in particular the International Fund for Plant
Genetic Resources, already established by FAO. To reflect the
responsibility of those countries which have benefitted most from
the use of germplasm, the Fund would benefit from being supplemented
by further contributions from adhering governments, on a basis to be
agreed upon, in order to ensure for the Fund a sound and recurring
basis. The International Fund should be used to support plant
genetic conservation, management and utilization programmes,
particularly within developing countries, and those which are
important sources of plant genetic material. Special priority should
be placed on intensified educational programmes for biotechnology
specialists, and strengthening the capabilities of developing
countries in genetic resource conservation and management, as well
as the improvement of plant breeding and seed production.

5. It is understood that:

(a) the term "free access" does not mean free of charge, and

(b) the benefits to be derived under the International
Undertaking are part of a reciprocal system, and should be
limited to countries adhering to the International
Undertaking.


(Adopted 29 November 1989)


Resolution 5/89

FARMERS' RIGHTS

THE CONFERENCE,

Recognizing that:

a) plant genetic resources are a common heritage of mankind to be
preserved, and to be freely available for use, for the benefit of
present and future generations,





- 29


b) full advantage can be derived from plant genetic resources through
an effective programme of plant breeding, and that, while most such
resources, in the form of wild plants and old landraces, are to be
found in developing countries, training and facilities for plant
survey and identification, and plant breeding, are insufficient, or
even not available in many of those countries,

c) plant genetic resources are indispensable for the genetic
improvement of cultivated plants, but have been insufficiently
explored, and are in danger of erosion and loss,

Considering that:

a) in the history of mankind, unnumbered generations of farmers have
conserved, improved and made available plant genetic resources,

b) the majority of these plant genetic resources come from developing
countries, the contribution of whose farmers has not been
sufficiently recognized or rewarded,

c) the farmers, especially those in developing countries, should
benefit fully from the improved and increased use of the natural
resources they have preserved,

d) there is a need to continue the conservation (in situ and ex situ),
development and use of the plant genetic resources in all countries,
and to strengthen the capabilities of developing countries in these
areas,

Endorses the concept of Farmers' Rights (Farmers' Rights mean rights arising
from the past, present and future contributions of farmers in conserving,
improving, and making available plant genetic resources, particularly those
in the International Community, as trustee for present and future
generations of farmers, for the purpose of ensuring full benefits to
farmers, and supporting the continuation of their contributions, as well as
the attainment of the overall purposes of the International Undertaking) in
order to:

a) ensure that the need for conservation is globally recognized and
that sufficient funds for these purposes will be available;

b) assist farmers and farming communities, in all regions of the world,
but especially in the areas of origin/diversity of plant genetic
resources, in the protection and conservation of their plant genetic
resources, and of the natural biosphere;

c) allow farmers, their communities, and countries in all regions, to
participate fully in the benefits derived, at present and in the
future, from the improved use of plant genetic resources, through
plant breeding and other scientific methods.

(Adopted 29 November 1989)

109. The Conference also decided that the two resolutions were to be
annexed to the International Undertaking.







- 30 -


International Code of Conduct on the Distribution
and Use of Pesticides: Introduction of the "Prior
Informed Consent" Clause 26

110. The Conference reviewed the proposals for the introduction of Prior
Informed Consent (PIC) in the International Code of Conduct on the
Distribution and Use of Pesticides, in response to Resolution 5/87 adopted in
its Twenty-fourth Session. It welcomed the actions taken by the
Director-General to develop an acceptable modality for PIC and to submit an
amended text for Articles 2 and 9 of the Code of Conduct, as well as
Guidelines for the implementation of the PIC procedure. It noted with
appreciation the financial contribution of one member country and the
effective cooperation of various experts in the development of the procedures.

111. The Conference expressed full satisfaction with the proposals made and
with the consensus reached. It noted the effective cooperation between FAO
and UNEP which had resulted in compatible and complementary proposals
concerning the integration of PIC procedures in the International Code of
Conduct and in the London Guidelines for the Exchange of Information on
Chemicals in International Trade. The Conference welcomed the proposed joint
programme between FAO and UNEP for the implementation of the PIC procedure and
indicated that this was an excellent example of inter-agency cooperation
making efficient use of limited resources.

112. The Conference agreed that the introduction of PIC would enhance the
protection of health and environment and also the effectiveness of the Code
and re-emphasized full support for its implementation. It stressed the
overall importance of active information exchange and emphasized the need for
early action by countries concerned to designate focal points for this.
Information exchange, as proposed under PIC, would require the full commitment
and cooperation of all exporting and importing countries.

113. There was general agreement that pesticide use would increase in
developing countries and that infrastructures and technical capabilities in
many countries would require substantial strengthening. The Conference,
therefore, stressed the importance of technical assistance to developing
countries to enable them to implement the PIC procedure as well as other
provisions of the Code. Several Member Nations indicated that they had
already begun to provide such assistance.

114. The Conference expressed the view that implementation of biological
control and integrated pest management programmes should be further promoted
as an effective means to reduce pesticide use.

115. The Conference recognized the problems caused by substantial stocks of
outdated pesticides in many developing countries. It noted that assistance
would be required from exporting countries and from industries to alleviate
this situation.



26/ C 89/20; C 89/I/PV/10; C 89/I/PV/11; C 89/I/PV/15; C 89/I/PV/17;
C 89/PV/21.





- 31 -


116. Many Member Nations expressed concern about the voluntary non-binding
nature of the present version of the Code and felt that it may not provide an
adequate framework for the full realization of all objectives of the Code. It
was proposed that the Secretariat should explore the possibility of
establishing a legally binding instrument and report on progress through COAG
(Committee on Agriculture) and Council to Conference.

117. Many Member Nations proposed to broaden the criteria of the Guidelines
to include other pesticides under the PIC procedure. In particular, the
following categories of pesticides were proposed for review and possible
inclusion and were widely supported:

pesticides in international trade that were never submitted for
registration;

pesticides submitted for registration but rejected for reasons of health
or the environment;

pesticides voluntarily withdrawn from registration by manufacturers for
reasons of health or the environment.

118. Furthermore, suggestions were made for additional changes and
amendments to Article 9 of the Code and the proposed Guidelines. Proposed
additions are underlined in the text below, proposed deletions appear within
brackets.

Code

Article 9.1 The Government of any country that takes action to ban or
severely restrict the use or handling of a pesticide in order to protect
health or the environment should notify FAO as soon as possible but not later
than six months after the action of the action it has taken. FAO will notify
the designated national authorities in other countries of the action of the
notifying Government.

Article 9.2 The purpose of notification regarding control action is to
give competent authorities in other countries the opportunity to assess the
risks associated with the pesticides, and to make timely and informed
decisions as to the importation and use of the pesticides concerned, after
taking into account local, social, public health, economic, environmental and
administrative conditions.

Article 9.5 Provision of information regarding exports should take place
at the time of the first export following the control action, and should recur
in the case of any significant development of new information or condition
surrounding the control action. It is the intention that the information
should be provided prior to export or at the time of export at the latest.

Article 9.10.1 Decide (on future acceptability) to accept or ban the
importation of that pesticide in their country and advise FAO as soon as that
decision has been made.






- 32 -


Guidelines

Step 3 Notification of Control Actions 4th paragraph
Severely restricted a limited ban means a pesticide for which virtually
all registered uses have been prohibited by final Government regulatory action
for health or environmental reasons, but specific registered use or uses
remain authorized or a pesticide for which Government regulatory action in
force permits only specific registered use.

Step 4 Selecting pesticides to be included in the PIC procedure
FAO will, in cooperation with UNEP/IRPTC and other relevant organizations,
review all notifications to ensure conformity with the definitions.
Pesticides will be included in the PIC procedure when FAO is advised by a
Government that it has taken final control action consistent with the
definition of banned or severely restricted for health or environmental
reasons in the Code of Conduct on the Distribution and Use of Pesticides or
that a manufacturer has voluntarily withdrawn a pesticide. Member countries
will notify FAO of any pesticide that is not registered in their country but
is still traded.

Additionally, an FAO Expert Panel will consider the problem of acutely
hazardous pesticide formulations, i.e. those that pose particular handling
problems, to determine if there exists a need for a list of such products to
supplement the pesticides already subject to the PIC procedure. This Panel
should include national pesticide registrars and representatives from WHO and
UNEP. They may call upon expertise as they deem necessary and will review
formulations which are included in WHO Class 1(A) and in addition they will
keep the issue of acutely hazardous pesticide formulations under continuing
review after completion of their initial task. If the Panel concludes that
there are acutely hazardous pesticide formulations of concern to developing
countries that are not already included in the PIC procedure, a supplemental
list of such formulations will be recommended for inclusion.

Step 6 Footnote to paragraph 1. (An import order by a Government designated
official authority will be assumed to have the consent of the Government and,
thus, to have precedence over the PIC procedure).

Step 6 paragraph 5. National Control on Imports. At the time an interim
or final decision to ban importation for health or environmental reasons is
made, the national agency responsible for controlling imports will be
instructed to take the relevant import control actions. Where it exists,
(local) production for domestic use will also be subjected to the control
action. Importing countries would take all necessary measures to prohibit
importation and (local) production for domestic use.

Step 8 Actions to be taken by exporting countries
National authorities of exporting countries would inform the appropriate
authorities and the pesticide export industry of decisions by importing
countries. Governments would (implement) take appropriate (procedures)
measures, within their (authorities) authority and legislative competence
designed to (help) ensure that exports do not occur contrary to the decision
of the participating importing country.






- 33 -


119. The Conference agreed that it was essential to maintain a consensus on
the proposals made for the inclusion of PIC in the Code. The Conference,
therefore, decided that additional changes and amendments should not be
included in the Code and Guidelines at this stage but should first be
considered by the appropriate Panel of Experts and subsequently submitted
through COAG and Council to Conference for its review and decision, together
with a progress report on the implementation of the Code and PIC.

120. In order to provide for immediate implementation of the PIC procedure,
the Conference adopted the following Resolution:



Resolution 6/89


INCLUSION OF PRIOR INFORMED CONSENT IN THE
INTERNATIONAL CODE OF CONDUCT ON THE
DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF PESTICIDES


THE CONFERENCE,

Considering Resolution 5/87 of the Twenty-fourth Session of the Conference in
which it was decided that "in the Code of Conduct on the Distribution and Use
of Pesticides" the principle of "prior informed consent" should be
incorporated within the next biennium,

Taking note of the action taken by the Director-General to implement the
Conference decision which included an Expert Consultation and a Government
Consultation, which had reached general agreement on the operation of the
Prior Informed Consent procedure and of the amendments required for the
inclusion of Prior Informed Consent in the Code,

Noting the decisions of the Governing Council of UNEP to amend the "London
Guidelines for the Exchange of Information on Chemicals in International
Trade" to include Prior Informed Consent, and the emphasis placed by the
Governing Council on the necessity of cooperation between UNEP and FAO on the
implementation of Prior Informed Consent,

Considering the recommendations of COAG to Council and the recommendations of
the Council to the Conference,

1. Decides to amend Articles 2 and 9 of the Code as indicated in Section A
of Appendix E;

2. Authorizes the Director-General to establish a programme to implement
Prior Informed Consent procedures, as outlined in Section A of
Appendix E;

3. Requests the Director-General to seek to establish such a programme
jointly with UNEP.


(Adopted 29 November 1989)







- 34 -


Plan of Action for the Integration of Women
into Agricultural and Rural Development

121. The Conference considered the Plan of Action for the Integration of
Women in Development and the Progress Report on its implementation. It
recalled that preparation of the Plan ha been requested by the
Twenty-fourth Session of the Conference and was subsequently approved by
29
the Ninety-fourth Session of the Council which had also requested the
Conference to approve the Plan. The Conference also noted that the Progress
Report was prepared upon the request of the Ninety-fourth Session of the
Council for its Ninety-sixth Session but was forwarded by the Council
directly to the Conference for its consideration as it could not discuss it
due to lack of time.

122. The Conference noted with satisfaction the approval of the Plan by
the Ninety-fourth Session of the Council and endorsed the Plan unanimously.
In doing so the Conference observed that the Plan was a comprehensive,
multi-disciplinary document designed to guide the Organization and its
Member Nations in an area where national and international action was much
needed. It agreed that the implementation of the Plan required efforts by
both Member Nations and FAO. The Conference requested the Secretariat to
monitor the implementation of the Plan and to report, at the departmental
and country level, on its progress to the Conference in 1991.

123. The Conference endorsed specifically the objectives and the strategy
of the Plan. It confirmed FAO's three basic functions with regard to women
in development, namely (1) the general assessment and monitoring of the
women in development situations and needs, (2) elaboration and promotion of
suitable policies and (3) the preparation, support and implementation of
appropriate programmes. It approved the Plan's thrust towards raising
women's agricultural productivity and income-producing capacity and
emphasized the need for supporting and promoting women's contribution to
agricultural and rural development, including forestry and fisheries, and
their participation in population programmes..

124. The Conference appreciated the general direction and substantive
concerns of the Plan. It recognized the usefulness of the linkages of the
Plan to the Nairobi Forward-Looking Strategies and the UN System Wide
Medium-Term Plan. The Conference stressed that legislative action was a
precondition of advancement and consequently merited particular attention
but recognized that attitudinal changes and the improvement of
socio-economic conditions were also required. The Conference emphasized that
activities covered by the Plan of Action should particularly aim at
strengthening the production and income producing roles of women as an
integral part of the family. In this connection it noted the increasing
number of women heads of rural households all over the world and underlined
the necessity to design special programmes to assist them. It recognized the
useful role of sociological and anthropological expertise for adequately
assessing the country-specific social and cultural factors.



27/ C 89/14; C 89/14-Sup.1; C 89/LIM/37; C 89/I/PV/1l; C 89/I/PV/12;
C 89/I/PV/13; C 89/I/PV/15; C 89/I/PV/17; C 89/PV/21.

28/ C 87/REP, Resolution 3/87.


29/ CL 94/REP, Resolution 1/94.






- 35 -


125. As to the approach to be taken in considering issues on women in
rural and agricultural development, the Conference underlined the advantages
of integrating women in development concerns into FAO's mainstream
programmes and projects. The Conference recommended full integration of
women in development concerns into the work of the Organization as well as
in national activities, while recognizing that positive discrimination and
thus specific projects or project components aimed at women might be
needed to achieve certain objectives. The Conference noted that special -
treatment of women in development concerns could result in their
marginalization and agreed therefore that women in development concerns
should be systematically integrated in the on-going work of the
Organization.

126. The Conference stressed the fundamental importance of the active
role of governments in implementing the Plan of Action. In this connection
it noted several key areas requiring urgent attention, such as, the
elaboration of national policies on women in development, and the
modification of legislative measures to improve women's access to land,
credit, extension, rural services, and improved technology. Special emphasis
was placed on training of rural women as a prerequisite for their full
participation in development.

127. As regards the Progress Report, the Conference commended the
progress achieved since the approval of the Plan of Action by the Council in
November 1988. It agreed with the priorities proposed in the Progress Report
and noted that, in accordance with the Council recommendation, the highest
priority was proposed to be given to training FAO staff in women in
development. Other priorities specifically endorsed included policy advice
to Member Nations, project development and monitoring, preparation of
guidelines and manuals, reorientation of home economics and agricultural
curricula, data collection, and population education. The Conference also
endorsed the administrative priorities proposed in the Progress Report
including the strategy to increase the access of women, especially those
from developing and underrepresented countries, to professional posts in FAO
with a view to making progress towards reaching the UN target of 30 percent
by 1995, and to encourage the promotion of women within the Organization,
without affecting the principles of professional quality and equitable
geographic distribution. The Conference recognized that the Plan would be
implemented by Regular Programme resources, to be complemented by
extra-budgetary funds, as indicated in the Progress Report

128. The Conference welcomed the collaboration that FAO had established
with other agencies and institutions within the UN System in order to share
experiences in promoting programmes and projects for rural women and to
avoid unnecessary duplication. The Conference stressed the importance of
involving NGOs in the implementation of the Plan of Action. It emphasized
the need to strengthen the participatory approach and to link closely the
programmes for women with the FAO People's Participation Programme.


30/ The Representative of the Director-General stated that the
implementation of the Plan of Action would require the availability of
Regular Programme and extra-budgetary funds. As indicated in the
Progress Report, the estimated requirements for the coordinating unit
to implement the Plan amounted to US$ 2.7 million of Regular Programme
and US$ 780 000 of extra-budgetary resources in the 1990-91 biennium.
The full implementation of the Plan was contingent on and subject to
the availability of these Regular Programme and extra-budgetary funds.







- 36 -


129. The Conference adopted the following Resolution:


Resolution 7/89

MEASURES FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION AND FOLLOW-UP OF THE
PLAN OF ACTION FOR INTEGRATION OF WOMEN IN DEVELOPMENT



THE CONFERENCE,

Recognizing the vital role of women in agricultural production and rural
development,

Recalling Conference Resolution 3/87 which, inter alia, requested the
Director-General to prepare a Plan of Action for the Integration of Women in
Development,

Recalling also Council Resolution 1/94 which endorsed the Plan of Action,
defined certain key issues and requested the Director-General to present a
Progress Report on implementing it,

Noting with appreciation the information provided in the Progress Report on
implementing the Plan of Action,

1. Approves the Plan of Action for the Integration of Women in
Development, as endorsed by the Council;

2. Endorses the priorities and programmes as identified in the Progress
Report for implementing the Plan of Action during 1990-1995;

3. Requests the Director-General to make efforts to maintain the level
of resources allocated for this sub-programme within the Regular
Programme, and to:

(a) continue efforts to integrate women (especially rural women)
into all aspects of FAO's regular programmes and field
activities;

(b) carry out the two-year staff training plan, as envisaged in the
Progress Report;

(c) make all efforts to achieve significant results in the
execution of the priorities; and

(d) implement the strategy suggested in the Progress Report to
increase the access of women to professional posts at all
levels, without affecting the principles of professional
quality and equitable geographical distribution;

4. Requests Member Governments to make all efforts to implement the
Plan of Action on Women in Development and to inform periodically on
progress achieved in this field at national level and in the rural
environment, as a part of reporting on WCARRD progress;






37 -




5 Urges Member Governments to provide extra-budgetary resources in
order to contribute to the implementation of the Plan of Action as
suggested in the Progress Report;

6. Requests the Director-General to present to the Conference in 1991 a
report on the progress made in implementing the Plan of Action.


(Adopted 29 November 1989)






- 38 -


ACTIVITIES AND PROGRAMMES OF THE ORGANIZATION


Review of the Regular Programme 1988-89 31


130. The Conference considered the Review of the Regular Programme 1988-89
to be a comprehensive, useful and informative document and welcomed the
further improvements made in its format, presentation and content. It was
observed that a comparable Review did not exist in other agencies of the
United Nations. In particular, the Conference appreciated the consolidated
quantitative information on programme implementation (Part I, Chapter Four),
the highlighting of successful or innovative activities (Part I, Chapters One,
Two and Three) and the coverage of interdisciplinary activities under Major
Programme Agriculture. It also noted with regret the adverse effects of
budgetary cuts on programme implementation under Major Programmes Agriculture,
Fisheries and Forestry.

131. While the focus of the Review was on Regular Programme activities, the
Conference appreciated the inclusion of key achievements of field projects in
the performance of Programmes, Sub-programmes and cross-sectoral topics. It
recognized that this integrated approach helped underline the organic link
between Regular and Field Programme activities, especially in the in-depth
reviews of Sub-programmes (Part II) and of special subjects (Part III) in
which the thrust of the analysis was on the assessment of effects and impact.

132. In appreciating the informative and analytical content of the Review,
the Conference desired that the document be made even more evaluative, with
particular emphasis on quality assessment of programme achievements and on the
analysis of impact, including the influence of FAO's activities on national
programmes, where appropriate. This would facilitate more effective feedback
from evaluation to future programming.

133. The Conference noted that Part I of the Review had highlighted key
achievements in the implementation of the Major Programmes. It also noted the
adverse effects on the implementation of technical programmes resulting from
budgetary cuts and programme adjustments. It expressed serious concern about
these adverse effects, including the erosion of FAO's technical staff
strength, the reductions in training activities, work months used for the
technical backstopping of field projects and in the number of meetings and
important publications. The Conference agreed that such cuts and adjustments
had rendered the orderly implementation of the Regular Programme difficult and
had affected FAO's capacity to respond to urgent requests for assistance from
member countries.

134. Among the wide range of activities covered in Part I of the Review,
the Conference emphasized the importance of plant and animal genetic
resources, prevention of food losses, land and water conservation, integrated
pest management, locust centre, seed development, role of women in
development, TFAP, development of small-scale fisheries and aquaculture,
global information and early warning systems, training of national
professional and para-professional staff, biotechnology and Codex
Alimentarius, and support to the Uruguay Round.


31/ C 89/8; C 89/LIM/17; C 89/II/PV/1; C 89/II/PV/2; C 89/II/PV/3;
C 89/II/PV/16; C 89/PV/20.






- 39 -


135. The Conference reiterated its support for the TCP (Technical
Cooperation Programme). The majority of Member Nations urged an increase in
the share of TCP in the overall budget. Some Member Nations considered that
the treatment of TCP in the Review was insufficient and urged that future
Reviews should include a substantive section on the structure and achievements
of the TCP.

136. The Conference considered that the in-depth reviews of the four
Sub-programmes included in Part II of the Review were frank and useful, and
appreciated that these reviews had raised key issues which indicated the way
for further improvements in the planning and implementation of the
sub-programmes. It noted the positive achievements of Sub-programme 2.1.2.6
(Food and Agriculture Industries) in improving indigenous processing
technologies for grains, fruits and vegetables and in the development of
sericulture and apiculture. All these activities were supporting rural
development and contributing to rural income generation. The Conference
supported the conclusions which emphasized, in particular, the importance of
vertical integration and increased cooperation with other UN agencies,
especially UNIDO (United Nations Industrial Development Organization).

137. The Conference agreed that Sub-programme 2.1.7.2 (Situation and
Outlook) performed a unique function consonant with FAO's constitutional
mandate and welcomed the qualitative improvements made in the State of Food
and Agriculture and the Commodity Review and Outlook. It supported the merger
of the World Food Report into SOFA and noted with satisfaction the timely
publication of SOFA.

138. The Conference expressed satisfaction with the contributions of
Sub-programme 2.2.3.1 (Fisheries Policy and Planning) in strengthening
national planning and management capabilities in the sector of fisheries
through improved data collection, training of national staff in fisheries
planning and management and assistance to recipient countries through
multidisciplinary advisory missions. It encouraged FAO to further strengthen
this effort, particularly in the socio-economic and environmental aspects of
fisheries and in the development of aquaculture, and concentrate research on
small fishing boats.

139. The Conference recognized the critical role of Sub-programme 2.3.3.1
(Forestry Training and Institutions) in the development of manpower and
institutions serving the forestry sector. It noted that these activities made
particularly useful contributions to the work of the Tropical Forestry Action
Plan.

140. The Conference welcomed the inclusion of the two special subjects in
Part III of the Review. Both subjects, which highlighted cross-sectoral
issues, were of great importance for the future orientation of FAO's work in
policy analysis and the use of natural resources on a sustainable basis.
Consequently, their inclusion in the Review was useful and timely.

141. The Conference considered the chapter on Review of FAO's Policy and
Planning Support to Member Countries as a comprehensive coverage of FAO's
activities in policy and strategy formulation at global, regional and country
level, including the strengthening of national institutions in policy analysis
through training and advisory services under field projects.






- 40 -


142. The Conference noted that FAO's activities in policy analysis and
planning were shared among 41 Sub-programmes and the level of expenditures
during 1984-89 amounted to some US$ 82 million from the Regular Budget
(13 percent of the combined budgets of the three technical Major Programmes).
FAO's policy work in terms of advisory missions, meetings and consultations,
training, publication of guidelines and the technical backstopping of field
projects was considered impressive. The Conference appreciated that 40
percent of field projects in policy and planning were funded by TCP.

143. The Conference urged FAO to further strengthen its capacity in policy
analysis and planning with particular focus on sector and sub-sector reviews
and sector and structural adjustment work particularly at the level of the
countries concerned. In connection with the latter, the Conference agreed
that FAO had complementary roles to play in collaboration with other
international agencies, such as IMF (International Monetary Fund) and the
World Bank, especially in avoiding or mitigating any adverse effects of
structural adjustment on food security and rural development concerns. It
also emphasized the need for closer working relationships with IMF and the
World Bank, especially on country macro-economic frameworks, and with the
UNDP. The early involvement of FAO in structural adjustment work was
emphasized.

144. The Conference stressed the multidisciplinary nature of work in policy
analysis and sector and sub-sector reviews. Some Member Nations considered
that this called for a more effective internal working mechanism within FAO,
as well as increased technical assistance to developing countries in these
crucial areas.

145. The Conference appreciated the inclusion of the chapter on FAO Support
to Member Countries in Conservation and Amelioration of the Natural
Environment and Introduction of Environmental Considerations in FAO Projects
and Programmes. It noted with appreciation FAO's traditional role in the use
of natural resources on a sustainable basis. The Conference observed that the
subject was complex and encompassed a large number of activities under 19 Sub-
programmes. The Conference stressed that in the light of international
concern for environmental issues and the rational use of natural resources for
sustainable development, there was a strong justification for increased
allocation of resources in support of environmental aspects of FAO activities,
both from the Regular Programme and extra-budgetary sources.

146. The Conference noted the upgrading of the Inter-Departmental Working
Group on Environment and Energy and welcomed the introduction of systematic
environmental impact assessment in field projects.

147. The Conference stressed the need for a balanced approach in the use of
natural resources. While the concern for preserving the environment was of
crucial importance, there must be equal consideration given to the efficient
use of natural resources to overcome poverty in the developing countries. The
Conference considered that the twin objectives of protecting the environment
and improving the living standard of the rural poor were compatible.

148. The Conference urged the active participation of FAO in the planned
1992 UN World Conference on Environment to the extent that available resources
allowed.






- 41 -


Programme of Work and Budget 1990-91 and
Medium-Term Objectives 32

- Context

149. The Conference recognized the range of external and inte ;.al
challenges confronting the Organization which had a bearing on the Programme
of Work and Budget 1990-91.

150. The Conference agreed that a number of factors, such as the expanding
world population especially in developing countries, the pervasive rural
poverty and malnutrition in many regions, the environmental threats to the
agricultural resource base, the imbalances in the world food and agricultural
system and the burden of external debt called for a determined FAO response
consistent with its three main roles, and an adequate capacity for FAO to
provide the necessary technical assistance and support to needy countries.
The Conference underlined the increased responsibilities which the world
community expected FAO to shoulder through catalytic, supportive and
regulatory actions. These included the facilitation of freer agricultural
trade, the safe use of pesticides and the preservation of natural ecosystems
and genetic resources.

151. Among internal challenges, the Conference reiterated its concern at
the impact of continued financial difficulties due primarily to arrears in the
payment of contributions. The Conference expressed regret that successive
programme cuts made necessary by income shortfalls, particularly contributions
shortfalls in the last two biennia, to some extent had deprived Member Nations
of the Organization's valuable outputs and services. It noted that the longer-
term implications of these reductions were compounded by the difficulties
encountered in the recruitment and retention of qualified staff.

152. The great majority of Member Nations stressed that it was imperative
to restore FAO's capacity to meet extensive requirements for assistance from
its membership. They urged that some expansion of its programmes was now
necessary, in order to meet these expectations and compensate for earlier
forced cuts in programmes and activities. Accordingly, additional resources
had to be provided. Some other Member Nations recognized the need for FAO to
be able to address new situations and adjust its technical capacity
accordingly. They considered, however, that this should not necessarily imply
additional resources but should be effected primarily through reordering of
priorities and redeployment of resources.

153. The Conference agreed that the prime basis for the Organization's
recovery and effective presence on the international scene lay in the prompt
payment of contributions and settlement of arrears. It made a strong appeal
for such payments from Member Nations with contributions outstanding for 1989
and for earlier years and stressed the need for effective and timely action to
be taken by them.


32/ C 89/3; C 89/3-Sup.1; C 89/3-Sup.2; C 89/3-Sup.3; C 89/3-Sup.4
C 89/LIM/18-Rev.1; C 89/LIM/36; C 89/LIM/46; C 89/II/PV/3;
C 89/II/PV/4; C 89/II/PV/5; C 89/II/PV/6; C 89/II/PV/7; C 89/II/PV/13;
C 89/PV/17.






- 42 -


154. Some Member Nations considered that eventual Conference decisions
stemming from the FAO Review would have implications for the programme of work
of the Organization in the next biennium. Accordingly, they urged that a
final position on the budgetary proposals should not be taken until the
budgetary implications of decisions on the Review were known. The majority of
Member Nations did not agree with this approach and stressed that approval of
the Programme of Work and Budget should not be subordinated to consideration
of other issues. They strongly felt that any attempt to link the two outcomes
would not be conducive to dispassionate dialogue and constructive decisions by
the Conference.

- Programme Budget Process

155. The Conference noted that the Council had agreed, at its Ninety-fourth
Session in November 1988, to the introduction, on an experimental basis, of an
additional consultative step to FAO's programme budget process, consisting in
the submission of an Outline Programme of Work and Budget to an early joint
session of the Programme and Finance Committees. The Conference further noted
this development had originated from the FAO Review and that continuation of
the procedure, for at least the 1992-93 Programme of Work and Budget, had been
recommended by the Special Joint Session which had dealt with the Review.

156. The Conference recognized that views had already been expressed by
representatives of Member Nations on the relative merits of this procedure at
sessions of the Programme and Finance Committees and the Council. One current
of opinion was that this additional step had enhanced dialogue among the
membership on budgetary proposals, and that it should be pursued. Another
current was that the true test of the value of this procedure could only take
place at the time of voting on budgetary appropriations. Some also indicated
that if the step of the Outline were to be continued, the elimination of the
Summary should be considered. The Conference agreed that it would revert to
this issue in the context of its consideration of the FAO Review.

- Approach

157. The Conference noted the main features of the Director-General's
proposals, which included the allocation of net additional resources only to
FAO's technical and economic activities, the provision of a net programme
increase of US$ 5.5 million, i.e. 1 percent of the recosted 1988-89 base, the
deliberate absorption of some anticipated cost increases amounting to
US$ 3 million and the further reduction of 25 established posts. This had
resulted in a proposed budget level of US$ 574 million at the budgetary
exchange of Italian Lire 1 235 to US$ 1, adopted by the FAO Conference in
November 1987 for the present Programme of Work and Budget.

158. The Conference expressed appreciation of the Director-General's
efforts, aimed at consensus approval of the Programme of Work and Budget. It
recognized that the Director-General had sought to find a compromise between
the wish of a great majority of Member Nations to see a level of resources
commensurate with requirements and the need to limit the request for
assessments in the light of continuing difficulties experienced by many Member
Nations to meet their financial obligations to the Organization.

159. The Conference was satisfied that the substantive content of the
Programme of Work and Budget duly reflected prior guidance by FAO's Governing
and Advisory Bodies. It noted that this substantive content had been enriched
by and took into account the comments made by the bodies which had examined
the proposals in the form of the Outline and the Summary.






- 43 -


160. The Conference welcomed the further improvements made by the
Secretariat to the format and presentation of the Programme of Work and Budget
document, in order to enhance its clarity and transparency. It encouraged the
continuation of additional improvements where feasible.

- Priorities

161. The Conference endorsed the nine priority areas under Chapter 2:
Technical and Economic Programmes, which were targeted for net additional
resources: policy advice; biotechnology; agricultural data development;
sustainable development; women in development; crop/weather monitoring;
crop protection; aquaculture; and the Tropical Forestry Action Plan. It was
recognized that the listing of these areas did not reflect any ranking of
priorities.

162. With regard to biotechnology, the Conference underlined the expected
contribution of FAO to assisting developing countries in sharing more widely
in the benefits from new technologies and to monitoring the impact of
developments in such technologies on the world food and agriculture situation.

163. The Conference recalled the key role of FAO in the assembly and
dissemination of information regarding food and agriculture. It was
particularly pleased to note, in this connection, the planned resumed
publication of key FAO magazines such as CERES and UNASYLVA.

164. The Conference reiterated the importance it attached to the close
complementarity between the Regular and Field Programmes. Many Member Nations
expressed the hope that adequate extra-budgetary resources would be
forthcoming to permit continued expansion of field activities. The planned
strengthening of country offices under Chapter 3: Development Support
Programmes was considered particularly timely in this respect.

165. Some Member Nations expressed the wish to see a clearer definition of
links between programme elements and established priorities, thereby
facilitating consideration of the programme proposals.

166. In respect of the regional balance, the members of the Latin American
and Caribbean Region expressed concern at the relatively low share of both
Regular Programme and field activities for the benefit of their region and
expressed the hope that this would be redressed in future biennia. In
particular, they requested that a formula should be found to avoid closing
down the AQUILA (Regional Aquaculture Activities for Latin America and the
Caribbean) aquaculture network which, it had been expected, was to continue to
be funded by donor countries.

167. Many Member Nations regretted the suppression of certain programme
elements intended for Africa. The Conference supported the continued priority
given to this region.

- Programme Activities

168. During the discussion, a number of comments were made on selected
programme activities to which Member Nations attached importance. In some
cases, Member Nations expressed regret at the proposed reduced level of
resources for specific activities to which they attached special importance.






- 44 -


169. With regard to Chapter 2: Technical and Economic Programmes, broad
endorsement was given to the substantive thrust and objectives of all
component programmes and sub-programmes. However, several Member Nations
reiterated their particular support to FAO fisheries and forestry activities
and their hope to see these major programmes benefit from higher levels of
resources in future biennia.

170. Many Member Nations gave examples of what they considered the main
components of FAO's broad action in support of sustainable development: inter
alia desertification control, sound management of land and water resources and
the catalytic role of the TFAP.

171. The Conference underlined the expected enhanced contribution of the
FAO/WHO Codex Alimentarius Commission and the International Plant Protection
Convention to furthering the objectives of the Uruguay Round of the GATT and
the facilitation of agricultural trade and stressed FAO's supportive role in
this regard.

172. The Conference recalled its appreciation of the catalytic role and
useful contribution of the Technical Cooperation Programme. The great majority
of Member Nations expressed regret at the reduced share of the TCP in total
appropriations, especially at a time of greater requirements for TCP
assistance and in the light of unsatisfied requests which could not be
accommodated. Many Member Nations expressed the hope that the share of the
TCP in the total budget could be increased to at least 17 percent in further
biennia. A few Member Nations, however, considered that they could not accept
the proposed programme increase for the TCP. Some also mentioned their wish
to see more transparent information on TCP operations in the future. Most
Member Nations, however, expressed their satisfaction with the information
available on the TCP's operations.

- Financial framework

173. The Conference addressed the financial aspects of the Programme of
Work and Budget 1990-91.

174. In connection with the estimate for cost increases, a few Member
Nations questioned the inclusion at this stage of provision for the costs
likely to result, in particular from the decisions of the UN General Assembly
to be taken on the recommendations of the International Civil Service
Commission (ICSC) regarding conditions of service for professional and higher
categories. They referred to the possible use of the Special Reserve Account
when the exact financial implications became known. A number of Member Nations
could not agree to any actions by the Conference which appeared to prejudge
decisions of the UN General Assembly. A few Member Nations noted that the
situation in relation to these costs, if approved, would be monitored by the
Finance Committee, and expressed the view that to the extent that the funds
were not needed for this purpose, they should form part of an eventual cash
surplus at the end of the 1990-91 biennium.

175. The great majority of Member Nations, however, stressed that it was
essential to protect the implementation of the programme eventually approved
by the Conference by including the necessary budgetary provision. They warned
against subsequent cuts due to unbudgeted cost increases, as had often
happened in past biennia. They saw no basis to question the total estimate
which had been calculated according to established methodology and had been
subject to the usual detailed review by the Finance Committee.






- 45 -


176. The Conference noted that the absolute amount of the provision for
cost increases would be revised downwards in the light of the Conference
decision on the budget rate for 1990-91, if based on prevailing exchange rates.

177. Many Member Nations underlined that the net programme increase, as
proposed, had to be considered in the light of the deliberate absorption of
cost increases amounting to US$ 3 million. This would result, in their view,
in a programme increase of only 0.45 percent. A few Member Nations, however,
considered that this link would not be in accordance with established
methodology and the correct programme increase was one percent as stated in
the document.

178. The Conference addressed the proposal to reduce the lapse factor used
for the calculation of cost estimates for established posts, as contained in
document C 89/3-Sup.4 which was submitted as part of the Director-General's
overall budget proposal. Some Member Nations did not consider that any
substantive explanation to justify such a change had been put forward and
pointed out that the current level had operated without problems for many
years. They indicated concern at the additional costs that would arise if this
proposal were accepted, amounting to an addition of US$ 9.3 million to the
proposed Programme of Work and Budget and at the substantial consequential
increase in Member Nations assessed contributions. They also recalled that the
Finance Committee could not reach agreement on this proposal. Some other
Member Nations, while expressing their approval for the Programme of Work and
Budget, specifically supported the proposal to reduce the lapse factor. They
found the proposal reasonable, in view of the practice regarding the
application of the lapse factor in comparable institutions, and, as it would
facilitate the effective and full implementation of the Programme of Work and
Budget. They found the proposal timely and realistic in the context of the
modest increase in the proposed budget level and the prospects of greater
staff stability in the short and medium term. Most Member Nations accepted the
Director-General's budgetary proposals.

179. In conclusion, the Conference agreed to the reduction of the lapse
factor to 3 percent.

- Budget level

180. In the light of the above, the following views were expressed on the
proposed budget level.

181. A few Member Nations reiterated their support for zero real growth and
maximum absorption of non-discretionary cost increases for the organizations
of the UN System. A few of them considered that the level for 1990-91 should
reflect the resources likely to be available to the Organization and stated
that they could not, therefore, join in a consensus on the proposals as
formulated. Some others, who upheld the same position of principle, however,
felt that an eventual consensus could be reached if the impact of Conference
recommendations on the Review could be accommodated within the proposed level.
Some other Member Nations reserved their final position until the time of
voting on the Programme of Work and Budget.

182. A few Member Nations expressed concern about the impact of the
proposed budget level on assessed contributions of developing countries
affected among other factors, by the burden of external debt, but supported
the Director-General's programme proposals.






- 46 -


183. The great majority of Member Nations emphasized that they had expected
a higher programme increase in order to enable FAO to meet more adequately
expressed requirements for its services. They rejected the concepts of zero
growth and enforced absorption of cost increases, which they considered were
tantamount to stagnation and regression, at a time when the Organization had
greatly suffered from exceptional financial difficulties. They supported the
Director-General's proposals despite the modest increase. Member Nations
shared his wish that the Programme of Work and Budget 1990-91 be approved by
consensus, if not unanimously by the Conference.

184. The Conference approved the Programme of Work and Budget and adopted
the following Resolution:

Resolution 8/89

BUDGET APPROPRIATIONS 1990-91

THE CONFERENCE,

Having considered the Director-General's Programme of Work and Budget and the
conclusions of its Commissions:

1. Approves the Programme of work proposed by the Director-General for
1990-91;

2. Resolves that for the financial period 1990-91:

(a) Appropriations 33/ are voted for the following purposes:

US$
Chapter 1 General Policy and Direction 40 605 000
Chapter 2 Technical and Economic Programmes 273 869 000
Chapter 3 Development Support Programmes 88 469 000
Chapter 4 Technical Cooperation Programme 67 767 000
Chapter 5 Support Services 79 654 000
Chapter 6 Common Services 17 836 000
Chapter 7 Contingencies 600 000

Total effective working budget 568 800 000
Chapter 8 Transfer to Tax Equalization Fund 69 200 000

Total Appropriations (Gross) 638 000 000


(b) The appropriations (gross) voted in paragraph (a) above, shall be
financed by assessments on Member Nations, after deduction of
Miscellaneous Income in the amount of US$ 12 000 000, thus
resulting in assessments against Member Nations of
US$ 626 000 000.


33/ Calculated at Lit. 1 335 = US$ 1.







- 47 -


(c) In establishing the actual amounts of contributions to be paid by
individual Member Nations, the assessment of each Member Nation
shall be reduced by any amount standing to its credit in the Tax
Equalization Fund provided that the credit of a Member Nation
that levies taxes on the salaries, emoluments and indemnities
received from FAO by staff members shall be reduced by the
estimated amounts of such taxes to be reimbursed to the staff
member by FAO.

(d) The contributions due from Member Nations in 1990 and 1991 shall
be paid in accordance with the scale adopted by the Conference at
its Twenty-fifth Session, which contributions, after the
deduction of amounts standing to the credit of Member Nations in
the Tax Equalization Fund, result in net amounts payable
totalling US$ 557 500 000 as set out in Appendix F to this Report.

(Adopted 24 November 1989)

Review of Field Programmes 1988-89 34

185. The Conference expressed its appreciation for the quality of the Review,
which it found to be clear, concise and comprehensive. It was noted that the
document represented a significant improvement over such documents in the
past. Some Member Nations expressed the view that a more analytical and
forward-looking approach should be pursued in future, with greater emphasis on
complementarity between the Regular and Field Programmes and full account
being taken of the comparative advantage of the Organization.

186. The Conference welcomed the fact that the field programmes in terms of
current value had continued to expand in the biennium, although it was noted
that this was still below the real volume levels achieved in the early part of
the decade. It was noted that the main area of expansion was UNDP-funded
technical assistance, where renewed emphasis on addressing food and
agricultural issues was welcomed. The Conference commended FAO's close
cooperation with UNDP, and called for this to be further strengthened in
future.

187. The Conference underscored the fact that Trust Fund programmes reflected
both donors' and recipients' confidence and trust in FAO to provide high
quality assistance to tackle critical challenges in agriculture and rural
development. The decline in TCP 1988 expenditures was regretted by many
Member Nations which called for a renewed increase in TCP delivery to meet
urgent needs for short-term emergency and technical assistance.

188. Many Member Nations regretted the fact that the serious financial
liquidity crisis affecting the Regular Programme had strained the
Organization's capacities to support its field programmes.

189. Member Nations welcomed the focus of field programmes on providing
assistance to Africa, which had accounted for 48 percent of all expenditures
during the biennium. At the same time, several Member Nations noted with


34/ C 89/4; C 89/LIM/19; C 89/II/PV/7; C 89/II/PV/8; C 89/II/PV/16;
C 89/PV/20.






- 48 -


concern that assistance to Latin America continued to be under 10 percent of
total expenditures. Several others were of the view that field programme
attention should, cutting across regions, have a direct and responsive nexus
with the magnitude and spread of the problems of underdevelopment. They were
of the view that the flow of assistance should have an equitable relationship
with the extent and distribution of needs. Satisfaction was expressed that
over 50 percent of field activities by value were being undertaken in LDCs
(Least Developed Countries).

190. The Conference noted that applied research and experimentation was an
integral part of numerous field projects in FAO's various disciplines. It
welcomed the rise in assistance for planning and policy advice to around
10 percent of total expenditures in the biennium. Many viewed this as
particularly important in the context of the structural adjustment programmes
which many recipient countries were pursuing. Several Member Nations
expressed regret at the decline in the share of activities aimed at developing
the livestock sector, which was a major part of many developing countries'
economies. Particular appreciation was expressed for the Tropical Forestry
Action Plan, which involved a wide range of field activities in this
high-priority area and could be set as an example to be followed.

191. Progress made in the use of developing country capacities was
emphasized, in particular the use of developing country experts and national
personnel in field projects, and the placement of fellows in developing
country institutions. At the same time, the lack of progress in increasing
the use of developing countries' equipment and inputs was noted with regret,
along with the continued low share of these countries in sub-contracting
activities. The Conference noted that these matters were of system-wide
concern, and that FAO was active in inter-agency fora to identify measures to
improve the situation.

192. The open and frank examination of the performance of FAO's field
projects was welcomed by the Conference, both as reported in surveys by FAO
Representatives and as demonstrated by the objective and critical summary of
individual project evaluation reports by FAO's Evaluation Service. In
particular, appreciation was expressed for the analytical assessment of the
special difficulties in performance faced in LDCs, and for the measures
identified to overcome these. Satisfaction was expressed with the special
assessment of ARPA (Agricultural Rehabilitation Programme for Africa)
projects, many of these funded through TCP, which had indicated needs for
improvement in this particular type of technical and emergency assistance
programme. Some Member Nations called for the further strengthening of
project evaluation work, including thematic evaluation, and greater attention
to.ensure the maximum feedback from evaluation into the design and operation
of future projects. The need for project activities to be cost-effective and
efficient was underscored by several Member Nations.

193. The Conference expressed its continued appreciation for the efficient
and valuable activities of the FAO Investment Centre, which had generated
over US$ 34 000 million in food and agricultural investments in over 100
countries in the past 25 years. The importance of continuing cooperation with
the World Bank was emphasized, as was valuable collaboration with IFAD, the
Regional Development Banks, and the UN Capital Development Fund. Some Member
Nations called for renewed cooperation with private sector investment sources
where appropriate, while recognizing that the activities of the FAO Bankers'
Programme had to be suspended due to the Organization's financial crisis.






- 49 -


194. In particular, the Conference emphasized the importance of links between
investment and FAO's technical cooperation activities, and stressed the need
to strengthen the pre-investment element in field programmes. Member Nations
also underlined the importance of training national personnel in investment
preparation. The critical analysis of problems encountered in investment
preparation activities was noted with appreciation.

195. The Conference expressed strong support for the various concrete
measures taken in field projects to develop human resources and institutional
capacities for food and agricultural development. It was noted with
satisfaction that FAO's field programmes, counterbalancing to some extent the
shortcomings of the Regular Programme in this area, were currently training a
record 70 000 persons each year, and utilizing a rapidly expanding number of
national project directors and experts. Appreciation was also expressed for
rapidly expanding support to government execution in FAO's fields.

196. The spread of TCDC approaches within all FAO's major subject-matter
areas was noted, along with efforts to consolidate and reinforce such
approaches based on experience to date. In particular, the Conference
expressed its support for the efforts of the Regional Office for Latin America
and the Caribbean in promoting fruitful TCDC networks, which provided valuable
experience which could be usefully applied to other regions.

197. Appreciation was expressed for the expanding involvement of NGOs,
including in particular local NGOs, in pursuing 'grass-roots' approaches in
FAO's field projects. Member Nations called for the further strengthening of
such approaches, and the use of NGOs to undertake specific parts of projects
where appropriate, in particular where 'people's participation' was involved.
The Conference fully endorsed the increased attention in field programmes to
women's active role in food and agriculture development, and emphasized that
this important aspect should form a key part of all major field programmes in
future.



Conclusions of the Review of Certain Aspects of
FAO's Goals and Operations 35

198. The Conference agreed that the report of the Programme and Finance
Committees on the Review of FAO's Objectives, Role, Priorities and Strategies
and FAO's Field Operations had faithfully fulfilled the provisions of
Resolution 6/87 as adopted by the Twenty-fourth Session of the Conference. It
expressed its appreciation to members of the Committees for producing a frank,
lucid, in-depth and well-structured report and welcomed the comments of the
Council on the document.





35/ C 89/21; C 89/21-Sup.1; C 89/LIM/20-Rev.1; C 89/LIM/39; C 89/LIM/40;
C 89/LIM/42; C 89/LIM/45; C 89/LIM/46; C 89/II/PV/9; C 89/II/PV/10;
C 89/II/PV/11; C 89/II/PV/12; C 89/II/PV/13; C 89/II/PV/14; C 89/II/PV/15;
C 89/II/PV/17; C 89/II/PV/18; C 89/PV/16; C 89/PV/20.






- 50 -


199. The Conference considered the Review as a milestone in the history of
FAO. It was a broad and complex exercise which had been conducted objectively
and harmoniously. Its conclusions and recommendations were valid, practical
and useful to the future work of FAO. The Conference noted that the valuable
reports of the independent Experts, agreed unanimously by them, had proved
very useful to the Committees and that the Committees had also produced a
unanimous report although its contents showed divergences of views on certain
points. The Conference thanked the Director-General for the support and
assistance given to the Experts and the Committees during the Review process.

200. The Conference expressed appreciation for the comments of the
Director-General, in accordance with paragraph 4 of Resolution 6/87, on the
conclusions and recommendations reached by the Committees. It was pleased to
note that the Director-General was in agreement with most of the
recommendations. On some issues, the Director-General had submitted four
additional recommendations for consideration by the Conference, namely
expanded cooperation with GATT, staff training, creation of a forum for
increased consultation among the Rome-based food organizations and the
possible elimination of the Summary PWB if the step of the new budget Outline,
introduced on an experimental basis, were to be maintained.

201. The Conference noted that while the Council had given its general
endorsement to the findings and recommendations of the Committees' report, it
had highlighted some issues on which Member Nations of the Council had not
reached a common ground. The Conference, accordingly, gave particular
attention to those recommendations on which Member Nations had expressed
different views at the Council.

202. The Conference recognized that the Review was not an end in itself;
that the search for increasing the Organization's efficiency and effectiveness
was a continuing concern of Member Nations and FAO's management; but that the
Review as a distinct exercise in response to Resolution 6/87 had been
concluded. The Conference considered that Member Nations and the Secretariat
should now direct their efforts to implement the recommendations of the
Review, as decided upon by the Conference.

203. The Conference agreed that for a successful conclusion to a complex
exercise of this nature there was a desire on the part of all Member Nations
for a consensus, as evidence of their support for the Organization and in
order to provide guidance to the Director-General in the task of implementing
the decisions of the Conference.

204. The Conference was pleased to endorse the certificate of good health
given to FAO in the reports of the Committees and the Experts. The
Organization was found to be sound, solid, innovative and dynamic, though
there was room for improvement in some aspects of FAO's work. Moreover, the
aim and objectives pursued by FAO over the past four decades had remained
valid and consonant with the Preamble to FAO's Constitution and relevant to
Article I. The Conference agreed that there was no need for any amendment of
FAO's Constitution.

- FAO's Objectives, Role, Priorities and Strategies

205. The Conference endorsed the seven development objectives pursued by
FAO and recognized that these objectives, apart from guiding FAO's broad range
of activities under the Regular and Field Programmes, were pertinent to the
development needs of all Member Nations.






- 51


206. The Conference fully endorsed the three major roles of FAO, namely
(i) centre for collection and analysis of global information on food,
agriculture and nutrition, (ii) international forum and source of policy
advice, and (iii) promoter and provider of technical assistance. These roles
were vital to the needs of Member Nations and essential to FAO's mandate. The
three roles were valid, complementary and, in the view of the great majority
of Member Nations, equally important, and their application to programmes and
activities deserved high priority in the overall work of the Organization.

207. The Conference agreed that, in its information role, FAO was
irreplaceable. As to being the forum for policy formulation and action,
whereas FAO did retain leadership, such as for WCARRD and TFAP, it should
collaborate more closely with other UN agencies and institutions in relation
to activities such as environment and policy work. FAO's role in technical
assistance was of crucial importance to the majority of Member Nations and was
the logical outcome of its two other major roles. It also served as the
direct link with multilateral and bilateral funding agencies.

208. While Member Nations held different perceptions of the relative
importance of each role, the Conference recognized that they were mutually
reinforcing, and the general consensus was that the divergences were not of
such significance as merit causing friction among Member Nations. The
Conference agreed with the Director-General's view that there was no
ready-made solution for achieving an ideal balance among the three major roles
and that the share of resources which could be devoted to each role was
influenced by the changing pattern of development requirements of different
regions and countries.

209. The Conference welcomed the establishment of the World Agricultural
Information Centre (WAICENT). It agreed that the policy advisory role of FAO,
especially at the country level, was extremely important and was likely to
expand in the coming years and that FAO should further strengthen its
capacities for policy analysis, in keeping with the demand for such
assistance. It recognized that policy advice to member countries was a
sensitive and delicate undertaking and would lead to more productive results
only if initiated at the request of the recipient governments. In this
connection, the Conference endorsed the Committees' guidelines for FAO's
involvement in policy-oriented studies. It also favoured FAO's enhanced
participation in the World Bank Consultative Group meetings and UNDP
Roundtable processes. As to the modality of country policy work, a few Member
Nations emphasized the need for a further geographic focus within the
structure of FAO. The Conference did however endorse the opinion of the
Programme and Finance Committees to leave the question to the discretion of
the Director-General.

210. The Conference agreed that FAO's comparative advantage was greatest in
sector and sub-sector reviews related to agriculture, forestry and fisheries
and recommended that FAO be recognized as the lead agency and coordinator for
these activities. It also welcomed the developments in cooperative
arrangements between FAO, IMF, the World Bank and UNDP in structural
adjustment work. The Conference requested member countries to seek FAO's
early involvement in structural adjustment work, and for FAO to make its views
known when it sees scope for improvements in policies which bear on structural
adjustment programmes.






- 52 -


211. The Conference, like the Director-General, was also in agreement with
the Committees' recommendations on: FAO's increased involvement in research
and the transfer of technology in cooperation with the Consultative Group on
International Agricultural Research (CGIAR), biotechnology for the benefit of
developing countries, sustainable development and the protection of the
environment, international agricultural trade in conjunction with the Uruguay
Round of Multilateral Trade Negotiations under the auspices of GATT, TCDC,
ECDC, Codex Alimentarius and plant protection, enhancing the role of women and
young farmers in agricultural and rural development and the continuation of
support to the New International Economic Order (NIEO).

212. The Conference agreed that the current procedure for the preparation
of the PWB was satisfactory. However, a range of views were expressed on the
budget Outline. It was agreed to continue the procedure for one more
biennium. The Conference considered that should the procedure be continued
thereafter, it would be justified to study the possibility of eliminating the
Summary PWB and to bring forward the submission of the full PWB.

213. The majority of Member Nations endorsed the reports' conclusion that
FAO's current practice of priority-setting was satisfactory, as it allowed for
the necessary consultation, in good time, with Member Nations through regional
fora and meetings of the technical committees and Governing Bodies. Some
Member Nations however thought that there was scope for further improvements
in the priority-setting process. The guidelines on priority-setting proposed
in the Committees' report, and agreed to by the Director-General, were
endorsed by the Conference.

214. The Conference agreed that a clear-cut ranking of priorities was a
difficult task. The majority of Member Nations considered that given the
diversity of needs among member countries, any attempt to rank priorities
would be arbitrary and would lead to controversy among membership. Some
Member Nations, however, did not share this view. They expressed the opinion
that, apart from resources being scarce, the ranking of priorities, though a
difficult undertaking, was an essential feature of a programming exercise.
They, therefore, encouraged the Secretariat to try and pursue an approach to
priority ranking, as a measure for improving the impact of the programme.

215. The Conference endorsed the re-introduction of the Medium-Term Plan
covering three biennia. A large majority of Member Nations maintained the
view that the Medium-Term Plan would be of benefit to the Organization
provided Member Nations gave a firm commitment to budget forecasts for the
three biennia. Some Member Nations, however, were convinced that even without
budgetary commitments, the Medium-Term Plan would assist FAO in directing
programme resources toward high priority activities. Several other Member
Nations expressed the view that, in the light of the new provisional procedure
regarding the Outline for the approval of the biennial budget, indicative
budgets for three biennia would suffice, but it was generally recognized that
extra-budgetary forecasts beyond one biennium would be speculative.

216. The Conference noted the efficacy and impact of FAO's Special Action
Programmes and their ability to attract a considerable amount of
extra-budgetary resources. It, therefore, endorsed the recommendation of the
report to establish a small number of new Special Action Programmes of high
priority to Member Nations. In this connection, the Conference noted the
proposal of the Director-General to proceed with a possible new Special Action
Programme on sustainable development.





- 53 -


217. The Conference welcomed the Director-General's recommendation for
staff training to enable them to keep pace with new technology and approaches
to development in different sectors covered by FAO. A few Member Nations were
not fully convinced of the justification for this proposal, particularly in
the present context of resource constraints, or considered that it should be
pursued on a more modest scale.

- FAO's Field Operations

218. The Conference recognized the catalytic importance of FAO's field
operations to Member Nations, recipients and donors alike. In partnership
with member countries, the Field Programme had given concrete expression to
FAO's aims and objectives and made its presence and impact felt in developing
member countries.

219. The Conference endorsed the conclusion of the report that the Regular
and Field Programmes were intertwined both in structure and functions.
Through its technical support, the Regular Programme was making its technical
and analytical work available to field projects and in turn was receiving data
and feedback from the field to strengthen the technical contents of its own
activities and to update its information bases.

220. The Conference was informed that in recent years a number of other
technical and funding agencies had entered the traditional areas of technical
assistance originally handled by FAO and this development had created problems
for the Organization. The majority of Member Nations expressed deep concern
about this development as it was harming the lead role of FAO. Some Member
Nations, however, expressed the view that the main factor determining FAO's
share in multilateral technical assistance was the Organization's
competitiveness and the quality of work produced.

221. The Conference concurred that FAO was making available to governments
its worldwide experience in its field projects and that FAO's performance
compared favourably with that of other agencies. However, the limited
availability of resources had imposed severe restrictions on the Field
Programme and it was important that FAO's capacity to plan and implement
projects be restored.

222. The Conference recognized that the complexity of field operations had
increased significantly in recent years. With new modalities for project
execution, there had been a marked change in FAO's technical cooperation
activities at the country level. A large number of FAO-executed projects were
providing highly specialized short-term services to large size national
projects and programmes. While the Organization had tried its best to cope
with these new modalities, the burden on FAO in terms of staff workload and
financial cost had been heavy, particularly in the light of constraints on the
Regular budget and the declining level of support costs in real terms. In
this connection, the Conference noted with regret that the recent financial
difficulties had affected the level of Regular Programme support to field
projects.

223. The Conference endorsed the view that it was essential to maintain
consistency between the character of the Field Programme and FAO's main
objectives and priorities. It agreed that where appropriate and feasible,
FAO's involvement in field projects should inter alia be based on the
criterion of comparative advantage.






- 54 -


224. The Conference stressed the need for a programme approach as far as
possible in order to provide a coherent focus to field operations and to avoid
a multiplicity of projects with limited impact. While projects should be
related as much as possible to FAO's high priority areas, as defined by the
FAO Governing Bodies, the Conference recognized the need for flexibility to
enable the Organization to respond effectively to governments' specific
requests on their own merits.

225. The Conference gave special attention to the balance between the scope
and size of the Field Programme and the Regular Programme resources available
for administrative and technical backstopping. Some Member Nations endorsed
the view of the independent Experts that the number of field projects,
especially small projects, had increased sharply in recent years and was
affecting the quality of their results. They encouraged FAO to be more
selective in accepting field projects. The majority of Member Nations, while
recognizing that projects should be consistent with the priorities agreed to
by FAO's Governing Bodies, considered however that FAO should also be ready to
respond adequately to a large diversity of country requirements as determined
by their own policies and priorities.

226. The Conference endorsed, without any order of ranking, the
recommendations of the report including inter alia:

(a) the systematic review of field operations by the technical
committees and consideration of their findings and recommendations
by the Joint Session of the Programme and Finance Committees. The
Council would include in its agenda items related to Field
Programme policies and reorientation, while the current practice
of Field Programme review by the Conference would be retained;

(b) reinforcing FAO's staff responsible for field operations and
backstopping;

(c) strengthening FAO's representation in member countries and greater
decentralization of authority to FAO Representatives for field
operations;

(d) securing more Trust Funds, especially in support of the Special
Action Programmes, and streamlining their procedures while
maintaining their multilateral character;

(e) considering the creation of a special facility for project
formulation and identification;

(f) the development of a computerized management information system
for field operations;

(g) strengthening the monitoring and evaluation of field projects;

(h) enhancing the role of governments in project execution, including
increased use of national staff and facilities;

(i) the training of national staff in project formulation, monitoring
and evaluation;


(j) increasing cooperation with NGOs.






- 55 -


227. While differing views were expressed on the recommendation concerning
the possible establishment of a Field Inspection Unit, the Conference urged
the Director-General to strengthen the process of Field Programme evaluation
through the work of the Evaluation Service.

228. The Conference expressed appreciation for the contributions of the
Investment Centre in attracting capital for agricultural and rural development
in the developing countries, especially LDCs and urged further support for its
activities.

229. A number of Member Nations gave support to the Regional Offices and
stated that the focus of their work should be on supporting regional
groupings. They stressed that both Regional and Country Offices had a valid
and effective role. Most Member Nations while recognizing the need to
strengthen FAO representations were of the view that this should not be done
at the expense of weakening the developmental role of the regional set-up.
Some Member Nations agreed with the experts, who, while recognizing that the
Regional Offices were a necessary part of FAO's structure, had expressed
themselves in favour of strengthening the country offices rather than the
Regional Offices. They noted that the Committees had generally supported the
experts' view, though they too had recognized the importance of the Regional
Offices to a majority of Member Nations. A few Member Nations called for a
review of the respective roles of the Headquarters, the regional and the
country offices. Most Member Nations were, however, of the view that such a
review was not called for under Resolution 6/87.

- Technical Cooperation Programme

230. The Conference agreed that the TCP, as a vital element in FAO's field
operations, be maintained in its present form. Most Member Nations stressed
that funds allocated to TCP were inadequate to meet requests and that the
Programme's share in the Regular budget should be progressively increased. A
few Member Nations considered that such an increase was not warranted and that
there should be no prejudgment on future budget levels. They felt that the
matter should not be pressed in view of the Resolution adopted on the Review
of Certain Aspects of FAO's Goals and Operations. They believed that with
better planning by governments, activities now taken up by the TCP could be
financed by other means, thereby relieving the pressure of demands on TCP.
They also felt that reporting on the TCP should be strengthened. Some Member
Nations also supported the increasing use of the TCP for project
identification and formulation. The Conference considered that additional
funds could be made available to TCP on a voluntary basis and requested the
Director-General to contact potential donor countries and other sources for
this purpose.

231. The Conference nevertheless adopted the following Resolution:

Resolution 9/89

INCREASE IN ALLOCATION FOR TECHNICAL COOPERATION PROGRAMME
IN FORTHCOMING BIENNIA


Recalling the basic mandate given to FAO in Article 1-3 of its Constitution
"to furnish such technical assistance as governments may request",







- 56 -


Noting with satisfaction that the Technical Cooperation Programme (TCP) has
enabled FAO to respond promptly to the urgent needs of developing countries
for technical assistance, policy advice, training, mobilization of investment
resources and emergency cases,

Noting with regret that the resources available to TCP have fallen from
14.1 percent of the total budget in 1986-87 to 12.8 percent in 1988-89 and to
11.8 percent in 1990-91,

Considering that in the future significant additional technical assistance
will be required due to the greater difficulties of developing countries to
meet food production targets to feed ever increasing populations, lacking
technology and capital, unable to keep pace with modernization process,

Acknowledging with gratitude the special contribution of the Government of
Italy for TCP in the amount of US$ 30 million for the biennium 1988-89:

1. Reaffirms that TCP is an essential operational tool of the
Organization to provide appropriate and rapid technical assistance to
Member Governments;

2. Urges all Member Governments to assure adequate financial provision
for this programme including through voluntary contributions;

3. Invites the Director-General to make every effort in order to restore
the resources available to TCP to the former level of 14 percent of
the total Regular Programme budget and, if possible, to raise it to
17 percent.

(Adopted 28 November 1989)

Relations with other Institutions

232. The Conference noted that FAO's interaction with the UN specialized
agencies and funding institutions was extensive and on the whole satisfactory.
It noted the satisfactory relationships between FAO and ILO, WHO, IFAD, IAEA,
GATT and UNCTAD. Its inter-action with the World Bank was good, but there
were additional areas for expanding mutual cooperation. Improved coordination
was called for to deal with overlapping of work with six UN agencies (UNEP,
UNICEF, UNDP, UNIDO, WFC and WFP). The report had made some recommendations
on how overlaps with these institutions could be avoided and cooperation
enhanced. These recommendations were endorsed by the Conference. The
Conference agreed on the need for FAO's full association with the
UNDP-sponsored national technical cooperation assessment programmes.

233. The Conference welcomed the Director-General's initiative in
submitting a recommendation for the creation of .an inter-secretariat
consultative mechanism among the Rome-based UN food organizations, to
strengthen coordination.

- Resource Implications

234. The Conference noted that the report of the Committees had included
32 recommendations and 4 additional recommendations were submitted by the
Director-General. In the judgement of the Director-General, out of the
36 recommendations, only 19 called for additional resources. In this






- 57 -


connection, the Director-General had outlined priority expenditures under
three categories amounting to a tentative figure of US$ 26.75 million: 36/

Category 1: ten recommendations for a total of US$ 12.31 million
from the Regular Programme (one recommendation requiring 50 percent
funding from the Regular Programme);

Category 2: four recommendations for a total of US$ 6.05 million
from the Regular Programme;

Category 3: five recommendations for a total of US$ 8.39 million
from extra-budgetary resources.

The majority of Member Nations were in agreement with the priority listing of
recommendations as proposed by the Director-General. Some Member Nations did
not endorse this priority listing, including the categories in which some of
the priorities had been placed.

235. While the Conference agreed that the implementation of the
recommendations could be carried out progressively, differing views were
expressed on the level of additional resources required and methods of
financing. A few Member Nations considered that there should be no assumed
link between reform and funding and stressed that the cost of implementing the
recommendations should be met through the reordering of priorities in the PWB
1990-91 and in subsequent biennia and through savings. Some other Member
Nations were of the opinion that adjustments in the PWB would be insufficient
to absorb all the costs and, therefore, some additional resources from the
assessed budget and/or extra-budgetary sources would be necessary.

236. The majority of Member Nations, however, rejected the idea of any
linkage between the Review and the PWB. In their opinion FAO was in severe
financial difficulties and they were not in favour of adjustments which would
damage the approved programme.

237. Many Member Nations suggested that part of the costs, at least during
the 1990-91 biennium, could be met through voluntary contributions. The
Conference urged Member Nations to make such voluntary contributions known to
the Director-General as early as possible.

238. As most of the recommendations required resource commitment on a
continuing basis, the majority of the Member Nations considered it would have
been justified to provide additional resources under the Regular Programme for
the 1990-91 and 1992-93 biennia.

- Conclusion

239. Taking account however of consultations undertaken on the initiative of
the Chairman of Commission II, the Conference adopted the following Resolution:


36/ C 89/21, page xviii.







- 58 -


Resolution 10/89

REVIEW OF CERTAIN ASPECTS OF FAO'S GOALS AND OPERATIONS


THE CONFERENCE,

Recalling the decision of the Twenty-fourth Session of the Conference in
Resolution 6/87 to request the Programme and Finance Committees to carry
out, with the assistance of experts, and present to the present Session a
review of the role, priorities, objectives and strategies of the
Organization,

Appreciating the initiative of the Director-General at the same time to
commission a review of certain administrative and financial questions
through management consultants and to submit their conclusions and his views
to the Programme and Finance Committees,

Expressing gratitude to the two Groups of Experts which assisted the
Programme and Finance Committees for the quality of their work and of the
reports submitted to the Programme and Finance Committees,

Expressing satisfaction with the efforts of the Programme and Finance
Committees in successfully conducting the Review and with their report as
submitted t 8the Conference in which a consensus was reached on almost all
the issues,

Expressing satisfaction also with the comprehensive and positive views of
the Director-General and noting his categorization of the potential
expenditures involved in implementation of additional programmes and
activities recommended in the Review into three categories, and his
conclusions on the reports of the Management Consultants,

Supporting the conclusion of th experts that the Organization "remains a
solid and dynamic institution" and their views on the continuing validity,
relevance and importance of the objectives, strategies, roles and activities
of the Organization in dealing with the problems of food and agriculture in
the world as a whole and in individual member countries,

Considering that FAO is the Organization within the UN system charged with
providing assistance in the area of food and agricultural development and
requires progressive strengthening in line with the increasing level of
requests from Member Nations while further increasing its effectiveness and
efficiency and the impact of its programmes,

Noting in this connection the need on the part of all organizations of the
UN system to coordinate their efforts, so as to avoid unnecessary
duplication and overlap in the activities within their mandates and to make
the best use of the resources available to them,


37/ C 89/21-Sup.l.

38/ C 89/21.

39/ C 89/21.


40/ C 89/21-Sup.l, para. 7.4.






- 59 -


Welcoming recent international developments towards the fulfilment of
universal membership,

Taking into account the views of Member Nations as expressed during ie
debate on this agenda item at the current session of the Conference,

Further taking into account4 he decisions of the Conference on the Programme
of Work and Budget 1990-91:

1. Reaffirms the commitment of all Member Nations to the principles and
goals enshrined in the Basic Texts and renews their determination to
continue and strengthen their individual and joint efforts to
achieve these;

2. Reiterates the validity and complementarity of the three major roles
of FAO assembling and disseminating information; serving as an
international forum and source of policy advice; and providing
technical assistance to Member Nations and the need to obtain and
maintain a reasonable balance between them, and in the programmes
and activities falling respectively thereunder, in the light of the
requirements of Member Nations and available resources;

3. Recognizes also in this connection that in accordance with its
mandates, an integral part of the goals and priorities of the
Organization must be the increased awareness and concern of Member
Nations to promote and strengthen efforts for sustainable
development, protection of the environment and the proper management
of natural resources in the interests of future generations, the
removal of trade barriers and protectionism affecting world trade in
food and agricultural products, other impediments to the
agricultural development on a sustainable basis of the developing
countries, and the full involvement of women in the development
process;

4. Recognizes further in this connection the particular importance of
strengthening FAO's assistance on request to Member Nations and to
institutions in the formulation of country policy advice and
studies, including where requested, structural adjustment
programmes; strengthening technical cooperation, including TCDC and
the TCP, and the links and consistency between the Regular and Field
Programmes, in accordance with national plans and projects, country
programmes or Statements; and building up national institutional
capacities, including transfer of technology and the results of
research;

5. Considers that so as to be better able to meet the expectations and
requests of Member Nations for its advice and assistance, there is
need to strengthen and support the Organization's objectives, roles
and activities, as well as its effectiveness and impact;

6. Decides to introduce a rolling six-year medium-term plan covering
three biennia which would deal with the setting of priority areas
across the spectrum of the Organization's programmes and activities
and would serve as a basis for priority-setting in subsequent

41/ C 89/REP, paras. 198 to 241.


42/ C 89 REP, paras. 149 to 184 and Resolution 8/89.






- 60 -


biennial Programmes of Work and Budget. It should take into account
the close links between the Regular and Field Programmes and if
possible include a provisional indication of resources by programme;
and requests the Director-General to prepare for the Twenty-sixth
Session of the Conference the first version of such a plan, taking
into account the views of Member Nations in particular those
expressed in Regional Conferences, Council Committees, technical
statutory bodies and in approved Action Plans;

7. Agrees to continue the programme budget process implemented on an
experimental basis for the preparation of the Programme of Work and
Budget 1990-91 for at least another biennium;

8. Requests the Director-General to examine ways and means of
strengthening the effectiveness of FAO field representations in the
light of the resources available and of the views of the Groups of
Experts and the conclusions thereon of the Programme and Finance
Committees and of the Conference;

9. Acknowledges that in the present situation the resources available
under the Regular Programme and from extra-budgetary funds are
likely to be insufficient to meet all the demands on the Regular and
Field Programmes of the Organization and that this situation imposes
a considerable constraint on the capacity of the Organization to
respond to the extent desirable, thereby requiring the Organization
to apply where appropriate and to the extent feasible the criteria
inter alia of comparative advantage and greater selectivity in its
activities;

10. Appeals to all Member Nations to pay their full assessed
contributions to the Regular Programme promptly in order to
re-establish the financial capacity of the Organization and calls
for particular efforts to implement on a phased basis the
recommendations emanating from the review, without impairing the
execution of the other priorities and activities in the Programme of
Work and Budget approved by the Conference;

11. Further appeals to all financing agencies and institutions which are
in a position to do so favourably to consider the provision of
extra-budgetary funds to cover the cost of implementing selected,
appropriate activities;

12. Approves the conclusions and recommendations contained in the report
of the Programme and Finance Committees on the Review, and taking
into account the addition recommendations of the Director-General
in his Views and Comments;

13. Recognizes the need for adequate resources, including the provision
of extra-budgetary funds, to implement the measures proposed in this
Resolution without impairing the execution of other priorities and
programmes in successive Programmes of Work and Budget adopted by
the Conference, and requests the Director-General to implement the
recommendations emanating from the Review as approved by the
Conference on a phased basis to the extent that resources foreseen
above are available;


43/ C 89/21, pp. iii-xviii.






- 61 -


14. Further requests the Director-General to report on implementation to
the Twenty-sixth Session of the Conference through the Council and
the Programme and Finance Committees in accordance with established
practice.

(Adopted 28 November 1989)




240. The Conference recalled that although the Review had been completed,
the dialogue which had been established among Member Nations during its
session had been constructive, and it expressed the hope that this would
continue in order to better support the objectives of the Organization.

FAO Management Review

241. The Conference noted with appreciation the results of the Management
Review Commissioned on the initiative of the Director-General and approved
by the Programme and Finance Committees. It noted the agreement reached in
the Council that matters arising from it would be pursued in the Finance
Committee on the basis of the Conference discussion of the Management
Review.
44
United Nations/FAO World Food Programme (WFP)

WFP Proposed Pledging Target 1991-92

242. In introducing the item, the Executive Director drew attention to
the need for pledges and contributions to fully reach the target if the
present level of activities were to be maintained. The fact that WFP had
come to be relied upon as a major source of development and humanitarian
assistance meant that the level of resources accorded it had a measurable
impact on the world's poorest people. He particularly pointed out the vital
role of the Programme in increasing food security and the magnitude of its
involvement in environmental activities in developing countries. The
Executive Director also referred to WFP's continuing involvement in
humanitarian relief to alleviate suffering caused by civil strife and
natural calamities.

243. The Executive Director noted, however, that increasing food
commodity prices had resulted in declining resources and the Programme was
now forced to reduce the level of its assistance. He stressed that
food-assisted development projects could not be subjected to variations in
resource availability. He was particularly concerned about the reduction in
multilateral contributions while bilateral donations through WFP had
remained stable. He noted that even emergency relief had been subjected to
reductions. Finally, he appealed to donors not to reduce their volume of
multilateral food aid through the Programme only because commodity prices
had risen and stocks had fallen.

244. The Conference commended the efficient management of the Programme.
WFP's staff were congratulated for their efforts to alleviate human
suffering and particular tribute was paid to its field staff for their
dedicated service often under very difficult and dangerous circumstances.




44/ C 89/LIM/5; C 89/LIM/30; C 89/II/PV/14; C 89/II/PV/18; C 89/PV/20.







- 62 -


245. The Conference underlined the importance of WFP as a major source of
assistance to developing countries. Referring to the practical benefits
derived from WFP-assisted activities, it stressed the vital contribution of
food aid to economic and social development directly, and also as a catalyst
for attracting other assistance. The Programme's widespread support for
projects with environmental aspects such as watershed management, soil
conservation and reforestation was particularly welcomed.

246. The Conference further noted with appreciation the extensive
involvement of WFP in emergency relief both for natural calamities and
man-made disasters.

247. The Conference noted with regret that commodity price increases had
led to a reduction in commodity availabilities which in turn would result in
a scaling down of the Programme's activities at a time when many developing
countries faced a precarious economic situation. It appealed to donors to
adopt measures whereby the phenomenon could be avoided.

248. The Conference noted with satisfaction the high volume of the
Programme's food purchases in developing countries, both for use in local
WFP-assisted projects and to assist other developing countries.

249. The Conference considered that the pledging target of US$ 1 500
million for WFP's regular resources for the biennium 1991-92 was realistic
and endorsed it unanimously. It appealed to traditional as well as potential
donors to make every effort to fulfil the target. It particularly stressed
the importance of providing one-third of the total contribution in the form
of cash pledges in order to give the Programme necessary operational
flexibility.

250. The Conference unanimously adopted the following Resolution:


Resolution 11/89

TARGET FOR WFP PLEDGES FOR THE PERIOD 1991-92




THE CONFERENCE,

Recalling the provisions of its Resolution 9/65 that the World Food
Programme is to be reviewed before each pledging conference,

Recalling the provisions of operative paragraph 4 of its Resolution 8/87 of
26 November 1987 that, subject to the review mentioned above, the next
pledging conference should be convened at the latest early in 1990, at which
time governments and appropriate donor organizations should be invited to
pledge contributions for 1991 and 1992, with a view to reaching such a
target as may be then recommended by the UN General Assembly and the
Conference of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations,

Noting that the review of the Programme was undertaken by the Committee on
Food Aid Policies and Programmes of the World Food Programme at its
Twenty-seventh Session and by the FAO Council at its Ninety-fifth Session,

Having considered Resolution 1/95 of the FAO Council as well as the
recommendations of the Committee on Food Aid Policies and Programmes,






- 63 -


Recognizing the value of multilateral food aid as implemented by WFP since
its inception and the necessity for continuing its action both as a form of
capital investment and for meeting emergency food needs,

1. Establishes for the next two years 1991 and 1992 a target for
voluntary contributions of US$1 500 million, of which not less than
one-third should be in cash and/or services in aggregate, and
expresses the hope that such resources will be augmented by
substantial additional contributions from other sources in
recognition of the prospective volume of sound project requests and
the capacity of the Programme to operate at a higher level.

2. Urges State Members of the United Nations and Members and Associate
Members of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United
Nations, and appropriate donor organizations, to make every effort
to ensure the full attainment of the target.

3. Requests the Secretary-General, in cooperation with the
Director-General of FAO, to convene a pledging conference for this
purpose at United Nations Headquarters early in 1990.


(Adopted 28 November 1989)




Relations and Consultations with International Organizations
45
Recent Developments in the UN System of Interest to FAO

251. The Conference noted that the document C 89/9 provided useful
information on the system-wide context in which FAO activities were
undertaken. It underlined that the document should, inter alia, serve the
purpose of highlighting activities undertaken by other UN organizations
which could have an impact on or implications for the work of the
Organization.

252. The Conference expressed considerable interest in the triennial
policy review of the UN system's operational activities for development. It
noted that the UN Director-General for Development and International
Economic Cooperation had now completed preparation of documents for the
triennial policy review and the matter was under consideration by the
Forty-fourth session of the UN General Assembly. It further noted that FAO
was participating actively in the discussion on this subject at the General
Assembly. The Conference expressed the view that FAO should continue to
cooperate closely with the other organizations of the UN System on matters
relating to operational activities for development.

253. The Conference underlined the importance of the "successor" UNDP
support cost reimbursement arrangements to the system-wide operational
activities for development. It noted in this connection that FAO had
actively cooperated with the expert group appointed by UNDP, which had
considered not only financial arrangements but also the basic collaborative
relationships and division of labour between UNDP and the specialized
agencies. It was indicated that the "successor" arrangements should be

45/ C 89/9; C 89/LIM/23; C 89/II/PV/14; C 89/II/PV/18; C 89/PV/20.







- 64 -


concluded expeditiously. In view of the fact that the report of the expert
group was not expected before December 1989, note was taken of the recent
ACC (Administrative Committee on Coordination) decision to bring the issue
of the time-table to the attention of the UNDP Governing Council with a view
to allowing governing bodies of the executing agencies to deal with any
possible budgetary and organizational implications of the proposals advanced
by the expert group.

254. The Conference noted that the Common Fund for Commodities formally
entered into force on 19 June 1989. It took note of the outcome of the first
annual meeting of the Governing Council of the Common Fund held in July
1989, in particular of the election of the Managing Director of the Fund and
its executive directors, and the selection of Amsterdam as the site for its
Headquarters.

255. The Conference recognized that developments concerning the Common
Fund for Commodities were of direct interest to FAO. The Conference agreed
that FAO should develop cooperative arrangements between its
Intergovernmental Commodity Groups and the Second Account of the Fund. In
particular, the Conference endorsed the proposals made by the various
Intergovernmental Commodity Groups and the Sub-Committee on Fish Trade, and
supported by the Council, to encourage the Director-General to approach the
Common Fund, when it became operational, requesting it to designate these
FAO bodies as eligible International Commodity Bodies (ICBs) for sponsoring
and following up, for their respective commodities, projects which might be
financed from the Second Account of the Common Fund. The Conference noted
that the final decisions on the designation of ICBs rested with the
Executive Board of the Common Fund.

256. The Conference underlined the importance it attached to the Second
UN Conference on Least Developed Countries to be held in September 1990 and
to be hosted by France. It urged the international community to demonstrate
its commitment to LDCs in a concrete manner. It encouraged FAO to contribute
to the preparations for the Conference.

257. The Conference took note of the report contained in document C 89/9
on the Fifteenth Ministerial Session of the World Food Council held in
Cairo, Egypt, from 22 to 25 May 1989. It also noted with interest the
conclusions and recommendations adopted by the Ministerial Session as the
Cairo Declaration.

258. The Conference noted with interest the initiatives taken by the
ACC Task Force on Rural Development, in particular, the mechanism by which
member agencies exchanged advance information on their future activities in
the field of rural development, gender-specific reporting and the proposals
of the Task Force Panel on Monitoring and Evaluation to introduce monitoring
and evaluation methodologies in training activities of member agencies.

259. The Conference was informed in document C 89/LIM/23 of a convention
and recommendation on "Safety in the use of chemicals at work" being
prepared by the International Labour Organisation. The document compared
these two instruments to the International Code of Conduct on the
Distribution and Use of Pesticides adopted by FAO Member Governments in
1985, and indicated that there was a considerable area of overlap and
duplication between the instruments of the two organizations. The Conference
was also informed that it was the intention of the Director-General to bring
to the notice of the ILO and the International Labour Conference the dangers
of duplication of instruments in the area of the distribution and use of






- 65 -


pesticides, and the need to ensure the consistency of the two sets of
instruments and preferably the restriction of the ILO instruments, in so far
as pesticides were concerned, to the production and handling of pesticides
"up to the factory gate". It was note that the Conference discussed this
question under Item 10 of the Agenda

260. The Conference, noting UNEP Governing Council decision 15/34
"Preparation of an international legal instrument on the biological
diversity of the planet", which might possibly take the form of a convention
and might be submitted to the proposed 1992 conference on environment and
development, urged that FAO play a key role in the formulation and
negotiations of any eventual legal instrument in this regard. It was pointed
out that FAO was well-qualified to assume this role in view of its
long-standing work on plant, animal, forestry and fishery genetic resources.
Reference was made in particular to the work undertaken within the framework
of the International Undertaking and the Commission on Plant Genetic
Resources which had sought to ensure that socio-economic development
concerns related to the conservation and equitable use of these resources
were taken fully into account.

261. In this context, the Director-General was requested to examine the
possibility of transforming the present International Undertaking on Plant
Genetic Resources into an international convention and to ensure that the
important work already accomplished would not be duplicated or ignored,
thereby facilitating the use of existing structures for implementation of an
eventual legal instrument on biological diversity.

262. The Conference agreed, in light of UNEP Governing Council
decision 15/1, that the Bureau of the Fifteenth Session of the UNEP
Governing Council, its chairman or one of its members, could meet with the
Independent Chairman of the Council or with the Chairman of the Programme
Committee, with a view to develop a more positive and collaborative
relationship.

263. The Conference expressed its satisfaction at the investment support
provided by the FAO Investment Centre to the agriculture sector of the
developing countries. In this connection it noted the close working
relations between FAO and the various multilateral financing institutions
lending for agriculture.

- International Conference on Nutrition47

264. The Conference considered the proposal of the Director-General to
hold an International Conference on Nutrition under the joint sponsorship of
FAO and WHO. It noted that the Administrative Committee on Coordination at
its Session in October 1989 had welcomed the joint initiative of FAO and WHO
to convene the Nutrition Conference. A few Member Nations were of the view
that the case for an intergovernmental level meeting had not been
established. However, the majority did not share this view and the
Conference considered that an international conference on nutrition would be
an important step towards obtaining national and international commitments


47/ C 89/27; C 89/LIM/21; C 89/II/PV/14; C 89/II/PV/18; C 89/PV/20.


46/ See paras 110 to 120.







- 66 -


to implement strategies and actions. The ACC had also invited concerned
agencies and organizations as well as non-governmental organizations to work
in close cooperation with FAO and WHO in this respect, using the mechanism
of the ACC/SCN whenever appropriate.

265. The Conference agreed with the Director-General's proposal to
convene the International Conference on Nutrition in the first half of 1993.
It noted that nutrition problems were widespread in both developed and
developing countries and in some areas they were even worsening. It
emphasized that concerted national and international efforts were needed to
tackle the problems of under-nutrition, and specific nutrition-related
diseases and conditions. It noted that although nutrition programmes were
often successful in narrow technical terms, they had not been effective,
sustainable or widely reproducible at acceptable cost. The Conference
therefore stressed the need for multi-sectoral and multi-disciplinary
approaches that would link food production and supply mechanisms to food
consumption and improved nutrition and health. In this context it welcomed
the fact that the International Conference on Nutrition was proposed to be
jointly organized by FAO and WHO, in cooperation with other interested
agencies and institutions of the UN System.

266. The Conference recognized that the International Conference on
Nutrition would be the first intergovernmental meeting on nutrition on a
global basis. It noted that while adequate scientific and technical
knowledge was available concerning specific nutrition problems and the ways
to overcome them, there was a need for increasing the awareness of
policy-makers so that nutrition objectives and programmes could be
integrated in regional and national development strategies. The Conference
stressed that the International Conference on Nutrition should be oriented
towards developing realistic and cost-effective strategies and action
programmes with a view to mobilize adequate resources to achieve nutrition
objectives. It suggested that the objectives of the International Conference
on Nutrition should reflect these aspects.

267. The Conference suggested that in view of the different nature of
nutrition problems in different regions, the International Conference on
Nutrition should have a regional focus in devising strategies and action
proposals. In this context the Conference noted with satisfaction that
specific nutrition problems and possible measures to overcome them in
different regions would be considered by the forthcoming FAO Regional
Conferences and regional meetings of WHO during 1990. The conclusions and
recommendations of these meetings would provide useful regional inputs for
the International Conference and Nutrition.

268. The Conference agreed that the International Conference on Nutrition
would need to be prepared carefully and thoroughly with the involvement of
all interested UN agencies, other international organizations, regional
bodies and interested non-governmental organizations. The Conference agreed
that the preparatory work should be undertaken utilizing the Administrative
Committee on Coordination Sub-Committee on Nutrition (ACC/SCN), and with the
assistance of experts and of interested member countries. Several Member
Nations expressed their readiness to take part in preparatory activities,
including the provision of experts to assist in the Conference preparations.
Some Member Nations expressed concern that the preparations for the
International Conference on Nutrition in 1993 could strain the resources of
both the Secretariat and of governments in view of the need for the
preparations for the International Conference on Environment and Development
scheduled to be held in 1992.






- 67 -


269. The Conference agreed with the proposals for the organization of the
International Conference on Nutrition contained in document C 89/27. It
decided that the Conference should be convened under the joint sponsorship
of FAO and WHO in Rome during the first half of 1993. It requested the
Director-General to keep the governing bodies fully advised of the progress
in the preparation for the Conference.

- Relations with Intergovernmental and International
Non-governmental Organizations

270. The Conference was informed of some of the more significant
developments concerning cooperation with intergovernmental and international
non-governmental organizations, during the period under review.

271. The Conference was also informed of the Informal Meeting of
Representatives of Non-governmental Organizations attending the Twenty-fifth
Session of the Conference. The meeting had as its central theme: "People's
Participation as a key element in development strategy and the contribution
of INGOs through their rural organizations" which considered ways and means
for increased involvement of the INGOs in FAO's work on people's
participation and the role of women in development.

272. The Conference expected close collaboration with NGOs and INGOs to
continue and that this would provide mutually beneficial results.


48/ C 89/17; C 89/INF/l; C 89/II/PV/14; C 89/II/PV/18; C 89/PV/20.






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CONSTITUTIONAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS


Constitutional and Legal Matters

Statutory Report on Status of Conventions and Agreements, and
Amendments thereto

- Multilateral Treaties deposited with the Director-General49

273. Pursuant to Rule XXI of the General Rules of the Organization, and
in accordance with established practice, the Director-General submitted to
the Conference the biennial Statutory Report reflecting the status of
multilateral treaties concluded within the framework of FAO and deposited
with him; the status of other multilateral treaties concluded outside the
framework of FAO in respect of which the Director-General acts as
depositary; and the status of the Convention on the Privileges and
Immunities of the Specialized Agencies as applied to FAO. The Conference
noted that the Statutory Report followed the same pattern as earlier
reports.

274. The Conference took note of the status of the multilateral treaties
concerned, contained in documents C 89/10 and C 89/10-Sup.l.

275. With respect to the International Plant Protection Convention,
mentioned in paragraphs 19-24 of the Statutory Report, the Conference
recalled that, when approving the amendments to the Convention at its
Twentieth Session (1979) by Resolution 14/79, it had urged the parties to
the Convention to accept the revised text at the earliest possible time. The
Conference noted, however, that 15 acceptance were still required in order
to reach the two-thirds majority of contracting parties (i.e. 63), which was
necessary for the entry into force of the revised text. In view of the
importance of the Convention in strengthening international action against
the spread of pests of plants and plant products in the context of
international trade, the Conference reiterated its appeal to contracting
parties that had not yet accepted the revised text of the Convention to
deposit an instrument of acceptance as soon as possible.

276. The Conference further urged that Member Nations concerned accept the
amendments to paragraph (a), Article 1 of the Plant Protection Agreement for
the Asia and Pacific region, relating to the definition of the region,
approved by the Council in November 1983, in order to bring these amendments
into force as soon as possible.

Procedure for Election of Chairmen and Members of the
Programme and Finance Committees'

277. The Conference noted that the matter submitted to it for information
had been considered by the Council at its Ninety-fifth Session (June 1989)
and that the Committee on Constitutional and Legal Matters (CCLM) had
previously examined the question. The CCLM had explored three possible



49/ C 89/10; C 89/10-Sup.l; C 89/III/PV/l; C 89/III/PV/3; C 89/PV/19.


50/ C 89/LIM/8; C 89/III/PV/l; C 89/III/PV/3; C 89/PV/19.






- 69 -


orientations which could be adopted with a view to ensuring conformity with
Resolution 11/87 on the Procedure for the Election of the Chairmen and
Members of the Programme and Finance Committees, in particular with the
following criteria set out therein:

(a) The need for just and equitable representation of the various
regions on the Programme Committee and the Finance Committee;

(b) that the essential element of such representation was that
all regions that so wish are in fact represented on the
Committees; and

(c) that members of the Council should bear the above in mind, as
well as the importance of securing equitable rotation among
the countries constituting each region, when electing the
Chairmen and members of the two Committees in accordance with
Rules XXVI.3 and XXVII.3 respectively.

278. The Conference noted that the three orientations considered by the
CCLM focused on the possibility of introducing greater degrees of formality
into the procedures for reaching regional understandings amongst and within
the regions.

279. The Conference also noted that the great majority of members of the
Council had not favoured the introduction of measures or amendments which
would formalize the procedures for reaching regional understanding. They had
considered that the present provisions, combined with Resolution 11/87, were
both satisfactory and sufficient. They had underlined that the problems
which had arisen in 1985 and in 1987 were exceptional and that the present
system had been working quite satisfactorily for many years. Each region
should resolve any problems which might arise for it in the manner which it
deemed best.

280. Some Member Nations suggested that a study should be undertaken with
a view to establishing more appropriate regional groupings based on those
used generally in the UN System. Many countries opposed this suggestion on
the grounds that the present regional groupings within FAO were more
appropriate in the context of the specific objectives and functions of the
Organization.

281. In conclusion, therefore, the Conference agreed that it would be
preferable to maintain the flexibility inherent in the present system and
not to introduce any modification hereto. In so doing, it recalled the
necessity of ensuring sufficient consultation and coordination both within
and between regions in order to respect the criteria set forth in
Resolution 11/87, the text of which is given in Appendix G to this Report.
The Conference expressed the hope that in the forthcoming elections to be
held at the next session of the Council this would result in the just and
equitable representation called for in Resolution 11/87. At that time, it
could be seen whether further action would be required.







- 70 -


Confirmation of the Agreement between FAO and UNIDO51

282. The Conference noted that, at its Ninety-fifth Session, in June
1989, the Council had expressed itself in favour of the conclusion of a
formal relationship agreement between FAO and the United Nations Industrial
Development Organization (UNIDO) and that the Conference had already
expressed itself in the same sense in 1987.

283. The Conference further noted that working relations had existed
between FAO and UNIDO since 1969, following the conclusion of an agreement
setting out Guidelines for Cooperation between FAO and UNIDO in the Field of
Industrial Development. The proposal to conclude a relationship agreement
with UNIDO had been occasioned by the fact that UNIDO had become a UN
Specialized Agency in 1985. The agreement itself was a formal relationship
agreement which dealt only in general terms with the division of
responsibilities between FAO and UNIDO. Detailed provisions on this matter
were set out in the 1969 agreement between the Director-General and the
Executive Director of UNIDO, the provisions of which would continue in force
under the new agreement.

284. Several members underlined the interest of concluding an agreement
between FAO and UNIDO with a view to ensuring proper coordination in fields
of activity which they shared and of studying the possibility of
establishing a joint division as had been done with the International Atomic
Energy Agency.

285. In conclusion the Conference confirmed the decision of the Council
to enter into the agreement with UNIDO and expressed the desire that
cooperation between the two organizations be reinforced, for example, by the
creation of a joint division. The text of the agreement is set out in
Appendix H to this report.

FAO's Accession to the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear
Accident and to the Convention on.Assistance in the Case of a
Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency

286. The Conference noted that the matter had been considered by the
Council at its Ninety-Sixth Session and that the two Conventions before it
had both been adopted by the General Conference of the International Atomic
Energy Agency in September 1986 in the wake of the Chernobyl nuclear
accident. This accident had dramatically underlined the global significance
of the release of radioactive contaminants into the environment and the
importance of international cooperation at the level of the UN System. The
Conventions had entered into force in 1986 and 1987 respectively. Both
Conventions were open for accession by international organizations and, in
fact, the World Health Organization had acceded to them in August 1988.

287. The Conference noted further that the Committee on Constitutional
and Legal Matters had concluded that the subject matter of the Conventions
would fall within the competence and constitutional mandate of FAO and that
it would be legally in order for the Council to approve, and the Conference




51/ C 89/LIM/9; C 89/III/PV/l; C 89/III/PV/3; C 89/PV/19.


52/ C 89/LIM/24; C 89/III/PV/l; C 89/III/PV/3; C 89/PV/19.






- 71 -


to authorize, FAO's becoming a party thereto. FAO's accession to the
Conventions would be a symbolic act, above all, confirming its readiness to
cooperate actively with States and other organizations in taking measures
within its field of competence in the case of nuclear accidents.

288. One Member Nation, while not opposed to the accession of FAO to the
two Conventions, considered that this was neither necessary nor useful.

289. The Conference noted that there,was no intention to duplicate
efforts; accession by FAO to the two Conventions would signify the
willingness of FAO to become part of the overall information exchange and
assistance system set up by the Conventions. The costs resulting from
accession would be minimal.

290. In conclusion the Conference noted the Council's approval of FAO's
accession to the two Conventions and decided to authorize FAO to become a
party thereto. The text of the Conventions is given in Appendices I and J to
this report.

Administrative and Financial Matters
53
Audited Accounts5

291. The Conference welcomed the Auditor's report and comments regarding
FAO personnel policies and feedback and monitoring of evaluation findings,
and noted with satisfaction the action taken thus far by the
Director-General.

292. The Conference considered the Report of the Ninety-fourth Session of
the Council regarding the certification of the 1986-87 WFP accounts, and
noted that the Council had agreed that it was in the interest of all, but
especially of the poorest countries, that the difficulties which had arisen
between the Organization and the Programme be resolved with respect for
relevant statutes and standards. The Conference was also advised in this
connection that the reports of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and
Budgetary Questions (ACABQ) and the Finance Committee had been transmitted
to the Committee on Food Aid Policies and Programmes (CFA) for consideration
at its Twenty-eighth Session commencing 11 December 1989.

293. The Conference adopted the following Resolution:

















53/ C 89/5, C 89/5-Corr.l; C 89/6; C 89/7; C 89/7-Corr.l (English only);
C 89/LIM/3; C 89/LIM/31; C 89/III/PV/l; C 89/III/PV/3; C 89/PV/19.






- 72 -


Resolution 12/89

AUDITED ACCOUNTS

THE CONFERENCE,

Having considered the Report of the Ninety-fourth Session of the Council,

Having examined the following audited accounts and the External Auditor's
Reports thereon:


Regular Programme 1986-87
United Nations Development
Programme 1986-87
World Food Programme 1986-87

Adopts the above audited accounts.


Scale of Contributions 1990-91


C 89/5, C 89/5-Corr.l

C 89/6
C 89/7, C 89/7-Corr.1


(Adopted 28 November 1989)


294. The Conference
the methodology of the
take into account the
Member Nation.


noted with concern the impact of the timing used in
UN Committee on Contributions which might not always
most recent changes in economic conditions of each


295. The Conference also took note that the Finance Committee and the
Council had agreed that the FAO proposed Scale of Contributions for 1990-91
be derived again directly rom the UN Scale of Assessments in force for the
three-year period 1989-91.

296. The Conference accordingly adopted the following Resolution:


Resolution 13/89

SCALE OF CONTRIBUTIONS 1990-91

THE CONFERENCE,

Having noted the recommendations of the Ninety-sixth Session of the Council,

Confirming that as in the past FAO will continue to follow the UN Scale of
Assessments subject to adaptation for the different membership of FAO,

1. Decides that the FAO Scale of Contributions for 1990-91 should be
derived directly from the UN Scale of Assessments in force during
1989;

2. Adopts for use in 1990 and 1991 the Scale as set out in Appendix K
of this Report.
(Adopted 28 November 1989)



54/ The Islamic Republic of Iran gave its approval to the Scale of
Contributions subject to the final decision of the Fifth Committee of
the United Nations where the matter was still under consideration.






- 73 -


Return of the Regional Office for the Near East to the Region5

297. The Conference considered documents C 89/26 and C 89/LIM/31 on the
"Return of the Regional Office for the Near East to the Region". It approved
the return of the Regional Offices or the Near East to Cairo, Egypt, and
adopted the following Resolution:

Resolution 14/89

RETURN OF THE REGIONAL OFFICE FOR THE NEAR EAST TO CAIRO, EGYPT

THE CONFERENCE,

Recalling Resolution 20/79 on the Regional Office for the Near East,

Noting with appreciation that since the closure of the Regional Office in
Cairo, the FAO regional programmes and activities have been carried out in
an effective manner through the requisite coordination and cooperation
between the Regional Office and the technical and administrative units at
Headquarters,

Concurring with the view of Member Nations of the Near East Region, endorsed
by the Council at its Ninety-fourth Session, that while programmes for the
Region have been implemented effectively from Headquarters during the past
ten years, the quality of implementation and the impact of the programmes
would be significantly enhanced if the Office were to operate once again in
the Region,

Noting that the cost to the Organization of relocating the Office in the
Region could be covered from the provisions for the Regional Office for the
Near East in the proposed Programme of Work and Budget 1990-91,

Welcoming the generous offer made by the Government of the Arab Republic of
Egypt to resume the provision of host facilities for the Office, and its
agreement to bear the cost of rehabilitation the old premises in Cairo, as
confirmed by the recent Memorandum of Understanding,

1. Decides that the headquarters of the Regional Office for the Near
East be re-opened in its old premises in Cairo, Egypt, as soon as
possible and no later than 1 September 1990;

2. Requests the Director-General to take all necessary measures for the
implementation of this Resolution and conclude negotiations with the
Government of the Arab Republic of Egypt to ensure that complete and
adequate rehabilitation work of the premises of the Office is
carried out according to a mutually agreed timetable so as to permit
the re-installation of the Office to commence no later than
1 June 1990;

3. Authorizes the Director-General, in order to implement these
measures, to make the necessary adjustments in the approved 1990-91
Programme of Work and Budget, in connection with the relocation of
the Office in Cairo;

55/ C 89/26; C 89/LIM/31; C 89/III/PV/2; C 89/III/PV/3; C 89/PV/19.

56/ One Member Nation expressed the view that it was premature to consider
the re-opening.






- 74 -


4. Calls upon all Member Nations, especially those within the Near East
Region, to provide their full cooperation to the Director-General
and the staff of the Organization, and to the Member Nations
concerned, to ensure the smooth and effective implementation of this
Resolution.

(Adopted 28 November 1989)


Status of Contributions 57

298. The Conference noted the status of contributions from Member Nations
to the Budget of the Organization at 22 November 1989 (Appendix L). The
Conference was advised that 28 Member Nations had made no cash payment at all
in 1989, while 46 Member Nations still had arrears outstanding. A total of
US$ 91 636 591.14 of arrears was still outstanding, of which US$ 78 million
was due from the largest contributor.

299. The Conference also noted that the total outstanding current
contributions and arrears at 22 November 1989 was the largest at this date in
the history of the Organization, with an expected tendency to end the current
year without substantial changes in the figures.

Payment of Assessed Contributions

300. The Conference considered the report of the Council as presented in
document C 89/LIM/12 on the subject of the financial situation of the
Organization. In this respect the Conference noted that notwithstanding the
Council's calls for Member Nations to honour their obligations, the rate of
receipt of contributions was still highly unsatisfactory.

301. The Conference noted with concern the information regarding the cash
flow situation which, although it had stabilized over the last few weeks,
could soon become critical again if no significant additional contributions
were received before year-end. In that regard, the Conference was reminded
that the Director-General could be led to use the authorization to borrow,
since no further cash would be available once the Working Capital Fund and the
Special Reserve Account resources were exhausted, for payment of mandatory
expenditure.

302. The Conference concurred with the views of the Council in expressing
its high regard for the managerial ability of the Director-General who, under
difficult financial circumstances, had ensured that the objectives embodied in
the Programme of Work and Budget were met to the maximum extent possible.

303. The Conference regretted that the Council's appeals had not resulted
in the payment of current contributions and arrears.




57/ C 89/LIM/ll; C 89/LIM/12; C 89/LIM/32; C 89/III/PV/2; C 89/III/PV/3;
C 89/PV/19.






- 75 -


304. The Conference consequently adopted the following Resolution:


Resolution 15/89

PAYMENT OF ASSESSED CONTRIBUTIONS

THE CONFERENCE,

Recalling that, in accordance with Financial Regulations 5.5, assessed
contributions to the budget of the Organization by all Member Nations were due
and payable in full within 30 days of the receipt of the communication of the
Director-General, or as of the first day of the calendar year to which they
relate, whichever is the later,

Noting that the requests of the Director-General to Member Nations to remit
all contributions and advances due were sent on 1 December 1988 and that
payments were therefore due as from 1 January 1989,

Noting that by 7 November 1989 only 66.8 percent of the total 1989 assessment
had been collected and that the cumulative total of 1989 contributions
outstanding and of the prior years' arrears amounted to US$ 174.7 million,
which represents 72.4 percent of 1989 assessed contributions,

Regretting that in spite of repeated reminders by the Director-General and
appeals by the Council, the level of unpaid contributions and arrears has
dramatically increased over the last four years,

Being seriously concerned that the amount of unpaid contributions and arrears
due to the Organization is the highest ever experienced by the Organization at
this time of the biennium,

Recognizing the principle of non-discrimination among Member Nations
concerning arrears and unpaid contributions, but at the same time being aware
that the impact on the Organization's finances of non-payment varies with the
considerable differences of the rates of contribution ranging from the minimum
to the maximum rates of assessment, so that non-payment by a few of the
largest contributors is far more serious than in the case of several at the
lower levels of contribution,

Recalling that the Director-General had been obliged to cut programmes and
costs during 1987 and 1988 amounting to some US$ 45 million, and that during
1989 an additional US$ 23 million in unanticipated costs related to staff had
had to be absorbed with additional damage to approved programmes, so reducing
further the capacity of the Organization to respond to the requirements of
Member Nations,

Noting that Council Resolution 2/80 authorizing the Director-General, in case
of need, to borrow monies to the extent necessary had not so far been used:

1. Addresses a solemn request to all Member Nations with current
contributions outstanding and contributions in arrears urgently to
honour their commitments to both the Organization and the other Member
Nations which have contributed in a timely way, so as to ensure
implementation of the Programme of Work and Budget voted by the
Conference;






- 76 -


2. Requests all Member Nations to provide information to the Organization
early each year as to the amount and timing of expected payments;

3. Requests the Council and the Finance Committee to study in depth the
subject of contributions outstanding and in arrears and to submit
recommendations with a view to proposing possible courses of action
and to assess requirements in terms of the legal and other instruments
that would assist the Director-General in his mandatory responsibility
to ensure the implementation of the approved Programme of Work and
Budget in similar adverse financial conditions.

(Adopted 28 November 1989)

Measures to Deal with Problems of Delayed Payment of
Assessed Contributions 58

305. The Conference recalled Resolution 18/87 adopted at the Twenty-third
Session. In this resolution the Conference had decided that the interest
element of any Cash Surplus would be allocated to Member Nations on a weighted
basis, in accordance with the amount and the timing of payment of their
contributions during the financial period.

306. The Conference recalled also that it had requested the Director-
General to report to the Council, and then to the next Conference, on the
adoption of measures, as from the 1990-91 biennium, to comply with the
resolution.

307. The Conference noted that since there was no possibility of a Cash
Surplus for the 1988-89 biennium, there would be no distribution of the
interest income portion of surplus in the 1990-91 biennium and therefore there
were no measures required for adoption at this time.

Level of Support Costs from UNDP and Trust Fund Programmes 59

308. The Conference welcomed FAO's active role in cooperating with the UNDP
expert team, and in inter-agency mechanisms, aimed at the development of new
UNDP support cost "successor arrangements", to come into effect in 1992 at
the beginning of UNDP's Fifth Country Programming Cycle. This matter was
considered very important in view of FAO's extensive field programmes,
including those financed from Trust Funds, for which support cost reimburse-
ment arrangements might also be influenced by the new UNDP "successor
arrangements".

309. The Conference noted that, according to the latest FAO statistics, the
present established support cost reimbursement rate, at 13 percent, was
insufficient to cover the real costs incurred by the Organization in
supporting and servicing field projects, and thus there was a subsidy involved
in costs incurred under the Organization's Regular Programme budget.



58/ C 89/III/PV/2; C 89/III/PV/3; C 89/PV/19.


59/ C 89/LIM/13; C 89/III/PV/2; C 89/III/PV/3; C 89/PV/19.






- 77 -


310. In underlining that the issues involved in determining the most
appropriate UNDP support cost "successor arrangements" had important
system-wide implications, the Conference welcomed the recent ACC decision
(1989/29) calling attention to the timetable for the implementation of the
"successor arrangements". This was important in view of the delay, until
early December, in the preparation of the report and recommendations on this
subject by the UNDP expert team.

311. It was noted that the ACC decision stressed in particular the need- for
this timetable to allow for appropriate review of the implications of proposed
new "successor arrangements" by the governing bodies of the executing
agencies. The Conference thus urged that, as implied in the ACC decision, no
premature decision by the UNDP Governing Council should be taken on the
support cost "successor arrangements".

312. The Conference noted that a detailed and full review of UNDP support
cost "successor arrangements" by FAO's governing bodies should be undertaken
no later than the Ninety-eighth Session of the Council, in November 1990. It
was emphasized that such a review should be preceded by a full discussion of
the subject by the Programme and Finance Committees at their sessions in May
and September 1990. A few Member Nations noted, however, that it was the
intention of the UNDP Governing Council to decide upon such arrangements at
its June 1990 Session in the context of preparation for the fifth programming
cycle and considered it important to adhere to this timetable. It was pointed
out that this schedule of decision-making might require consultation between
the FAO Secretariat and Member Nations in the Programme and Finance Committees
so as to ensure that the interests of the Organization should be adequately
reflected in the decisions to be taken in the UNDP Governing Council.

Headquarters Accommodation 60

313. The Conference was informed of progress made in the three scheduled
phases of the building construction project.

314. Delay with respect to Phase I, the construction of the three-level
parking building, was reported.

315. Progress on Phase II was ahead of schedule and the work schedule of
Phase III was respected.

316. The Conference took note of the reports and expressed its appreciation
to all parties concerned, as well as its hope that the authorities of the Host
Government would find a solution to the specific problems of Phase I.

317. The Conference once more expressed its thanks to the Host Government
for its generous contribution and its progressive actions to improve
Headquarters accommodation.

Personnel Matters 61

318. The Conference noted the developments in conditions of service of the
staff, which had been reviewed by the Council at its Ninety-sixth Session.
With regard to the post adjustment level for Rome, the data showed that in May

60/ C 89/LIM/14; C 89/III/PV/2; C 89/III/PV/3; C 89/PV/19.


61/ C 89/LIM/15; C 89/III/PV/2; C 89/III/PV/3; C 89/PV/19.







- 78


1989 there had been a slight increase due to cost-of-living movements
subsequent to the resumption of the normal operation of the post adjustment
system. The Conference also noted that an increase in the salaries for the
General Service category had been granted, in accordance with the current
methodology which maintained General Service staff salaries in line with
salaries paid by leading employers on the local market.

319. The Conference took note of the recent developments in the activities
of the Consultative Committee on Administrative Questions (CCAQ), the
International Civil Service Commission (ICSC) and the UN Joint Staff Pension
Board, and in particular the information in respect to the comprehensive
review of the conditions of service of the Professional and Higher categories,
and the proposed measures to reduce the actuarial imbalance of the Pension
Fund. It noted that if the recommendations of the ICSC on the comprehensive
review were to be approved by the UN General Assembly with effect 1 January
1990, the estimated cost for the entire UN System would amount to
US$ 90 million per annum, US$ 48 million of which would be charged to regular
budgets, and that costs to FAO's Regular Programme would be approximately
US$ 8 million for the coming biennium. The Conference further noted that the
recommendations of both the ICSC and the Pension Board would be reviewed by
the UN General Assembly at its current Forty-fourth Session, and that the
decisions of the Assembly would be reported to the Finance Committee at its
Spring session in 1990.

- Statistics of Personnel Services

320. The Conference noted that the Council had reviewed in detail the
statistics of Personnel Services which had been prepared for the first time
using the automated personnel computer system, PERSYS (Personnel Management
System), and that the accuracy of the data had been consequently increased.
The Conference also noted the Council's request that efforts be continued for
further improvements in future presentations of personnel statistics.

- Allowance for the Chairman of the Appeals Committee

321. The Conference noted the Council's approval of the Director-General's
proposal to increase the allowance of the Chairman of the Appeals Committee
from US$ 3 500 to US$ 5 000 per annum effective 1 January 1989.

Staff Commissary Support Cost Reimbursement 62

322. The Conference, having noted the recommendation of the Council with
respect to the Staff Commissary support cost reimbursement, adopted the
following Resolution:


62/ C 89/LIM/10; C 89/III/PV/2; C 89/III/PV/3; C 89/PV/19.






- 79 -


Resolution 16/89

STAFF COMMISSARY SUPPORT COST REIMBURSEMENT

THE CONFERENCE,

Having noted that for 1988, in accordance with Resolution 29/71, the Staff
Commissary transferred an amount of Lit. 53 315 000, equivalent to US$ 39 500,
to the Organization in payment for indirect services and facilities made
available to it during the year,

Recognizing that the level of such reimbursement as established under
Resolution 29/71 is not adequate to cover actual related costs incurred by the
Organization,

Decides that with effect from 1 January 1988

1. all actual indirect services rendered, and facilities made available,
by the Organization to the Staff Commissary shall be estimated and
charged as expenses of the Commissary operation; and

2. the equivalent of 0.5 percent of the total sales and any net profits
of the Commissary shall continue to be transferred to the Staff
Welfare Fund as heretofore, for use in accordance with policies and
procedures to be developed jointly by the Director-General and the
Staff.

(Adopted 28 November 1989)

Treatment of Profit and Loss on Exchange 63

323. The Conference reviewed the proposal of the Director-General regarding
the treatment of profit and loss on exchange which had been endorsed by the
Finance Committee at its Sixty-sixth Session and approved by the Council at
its Ninety-sixth Session.

324. The Conference noted that such profit and loss on exchange resulting
from purchases and from re-evaluation of holdings of non-US Dollar currencies
were charged to Chapter 5 of the Budget. It also noted that in the last four
years the Organization had suffered considerable losses on exchange due to the
fall in value and instability of the US Dollar.

325. The Conference recalled its Resolution 13/81 authorizing the
Director-General to use funds in the Special Reserve Account to finance
unbudgeted extra costs due to movements of currency exchange rates. It
therefore considered that the Director-General's proposal to transfer to the
Special Reserve Account the profit and loss on exchange which had previously
been charged to Chapter 5, was consistent with the thrust of Resolution 13/81.

326. The Conference recognized that such a measure would improve the
protection and the conditions of implementation of the Programme of Work and
Budget against uncertainties of exchange rates.


63/ C 89/LIM/16; C 89/III/PV/2; C 89/III/PV/3; C 89/PV/19.






- 80 -


327. The Conference consequently adopted the following Resolution:

Resolution 17/89

TREATMENT OF PROFIT AND LOSS ON EXCHANGE

THE CONFERENCE,

Recalling its Resolution 13/81 on the Special Reserve Account,

Recognizing that the above-mentioned Resolution directs the Director-General
to credit to the Special Reserve Account any savings on staff costs arising
from favourable differences between the Lira exchange rate used in caculating
the budget and the effective UN rate,

Further recognizing that the above-mentioned Resolution authorizes the
Director-General to use the funds in the Special Reserve Account inter alia,
to finance unbudgeted extra costs due to movements of currency exchange rates,

Noting that profits and losses on exchange, arising from the purchase of
non-UN Dollar currencies and from the revaluation of such currencies as a
result of changes in the UN operational rate of exchange, are charged to
Chapter 5 of the Budget,

Recognizing that these profits or losses on exchange can reach substantial
amounts and can either jeopardize the implementation of the Programme of Work
and Budget and/or need to be subjected to an improved budgetary and accounting
process:

1. Decides to deal with profits/losses on exchange under the Special
Reserve Account;

2. Directs the Director-General to credit such profits and debit such
losses on exchange to the Special Reserve Account;

3. Decides that the measure shall be applied to the Regular Programme
Accounts for 1988-89 and in future biennia.


(Adopted 28 November 1989)






- 81 -


APPOINTMENTS AND ELECTIONS


Election of Council Members


328. The Conference elected Nigeria to the Council seat that was vacant
in the Africa Region for the period November 1989 to 31 December 1990. -


329. The Conference also elected the
of the Council:


Period: November 1989


following Member Nations as members



- 31 December 1992


REGION (SEATS)


Cameroon
Gabon
Ghana
Madagascar
Morocco

None

Netherlands
Poland
Portugal


Latin America and the Caribbean (5)


Near East (2)


Brazil
Colombia
Cuba
Mexico
Trinidad and Tobago


Lebanon
Libya


Canada
United States of America


North America (2)


Southwest Pacific


None


64/ C 89/11; C 89/LIM/6; C 89/LIM/22; C 89/LIM/35-Rev.1; C 89/PV/18;
C 89/PV/19; C 89/PV/21.


MEMBERS


Africa (5)






Asia

Europe (3)







- 82 -


Period: 1 January 1991 to


November 1993


REGION (SEATS)


Africa (4)


Asia (3)


Cape Verde
C6te d'Ivoire
Kenya
Zambia

India
Pakistan
Philippines

France
Italy
Sweden
United Kingdom


Europe (4)


Latin America and the Caribbean (1)


Near East (3)


North America


Costa Rica


Egypt
Saudi Arabia (Kingdom of)
Sudan


None


Australia


Southwest Pacific (1)


Annointment of the Indenendent Chairman of


the Council 65
the Council


330. The Conference had before it two nominations for the office of
Independent Chairman of the Council.

331. The Conference, after a secret ballot, appointed Mr Antoine
Saintraint, to the office of Independent Chairman of the Council for a
period of two years up to the end of the regular session of the Conference
to be held in 1991, and adopted the following Resolution:


Resolution 18/89

APPOINTMENT OF THE INDEPENDENT CHAIRMAN OF THE COUNCIL


THE CONFERENCE,

Having proceeded to a secret ballot, in accordance with the provisions of
Rule XII of the General Rules of the Organization:

1. Declares that Mr Antoine Saintraint is appointed Independent
Chairman of the Council for a period of two years, that is until the
end of the regular session of the Conference to be held in 1991;


65/ C 89/15; C 89/LIM/36; C 89/PV/19; C 89/PV/21.


MEMBERS






- 83 -


2. Decides that the conditions of appointment, including the allowances
attached to the office of the Independent Chairman of the Council,
shall be as follows:

(a) An annual allowance of the equivalent of US$ 10 000 to cover the
representation expenses and secretarial assistance in the
Chairman's home station, on the understanding that the
Director-General will provide secretarial assistance when the
Chairman attends sessions of the Council or Conference; one-half
of the allowance shall be payable in US dollars, the balance
being payable, in whole or in part, in the currency of the home
country of the Chairman, or in Italian lire, according to his
desires;

(b) A per diem allowance at a rate equivalent to that for the Deputy
Director-General, while the Chairman is absent from his home
station on Council business, the allowance being reduced to
US$ 20 per diem while the Chairman is in travel status on board a
common carrier other than by sea;

(c) Travel expenses, including the above per diem allowance, shall
be defrayed by the Organization, in conformity with its
regulations and existing practice, when the Chairman attends
sessions of the Council, of the Programme and Finance
Committees, of the Conference, or when he is invited by the
Council or by the Director-General to travel for other purposes.

(Adopted 29 November 1989)

Appointment of Representatives of the FAO 66
Conference to the Staff Pension Committee

332. In accordance with Article 6(c) of the Regulations of the UN Joint
Staff Pension Fund, the Conference appointed three Members and three
Alternate Members to the Staff Pension Committee for the period
1 January 1990 to 31 December 1991 as follows:


(a) Members


(b) Alternate Members


Astrid Bergquist
Counsellor (Agricultural Affairs)
Permanent Representative
of Sweden to FAO

Waleed A. El Khereiji
Alternate Permanent Representative
of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
to FAO

Antonio Garrido Acufla
First Secretary
Alternate Permanent Representative
of Chile to FAO


John P. Lungu
First Secretary
Alternate Permanent Representative
of Zambia to FAO

Bahar Munip
Agricultural Attache
Alternate Permanent Representative
of Malaysia to FAO

Steven D. Hill
First Secretary
Alternate Permanent Representative
of the United States of America
to FAO


66/ C 89/16-Rev.l; C 89/PV/20; C 89/PV/21.






- 84 -


OTHER MATTERS


Date and Place of the Twenty-sixth Session of the Conference 67

333. The Conference decided that its Twenty-sixth Session should be held
in Rome from 9 to 28 November 1991.


67/ C 89/PV/20; C 89/PV/21.









APPENDIX A




AGENDA



INTRODUCTION PROCEDURE OF THE SESSION

1. Election of Chairman and Vice-Chairmen

2. Appointment of General Committee and Credentials Committee

3. Adoption of Agenda

4. Arrangements for the Session and Allocation of Agenda Items

5. Admission of Observers


PART I MAJOR TRENDS AND POLICIES IN FOOD AND AGRICULTURE

6. World Food and Agriculture Situation

6.1 State of Food and Agriculture

6.2 International Agricultural Adjustment: Progress Report on
Guidelines 7, 8 and 12

7. Preparations for an International Development Strategy for the
Fourth UN Development Decade FAO's contribution

8. Progress Report on the GATT Multilateral Trade Negotiations
(Uruguay Round) and Implications for FAO

9. Commission on Plant Genetic Resources and the International
Undertaking: Progress Report

10. International Code of Conduct on the Distribution and Use of
Pesticides: Introduction of the "Prior Informed Consent" Clause

11. Plan of Action for the Integration of Women into Agricultural and
Rural Development






- A2 -


PART II ACTIVITIES AND PROGRAMMES OF THE ORGANIZATION

12. Review of Regular Programme 1988-89

13. Programme of Work and Budget 1990-91 and Medium-Term Objectives

14. Review of Field Programmes 1988-89

15. Conclusions of Review of Certain Aspects of FAO's Goals and
Operations

16. United Nations/FAO/World Food Programme

17. Relations and Consultations with International Organizations

17.1 Recent Developments in the UN System of Interest to FAO
(including the International Conference on Nutrition)

17.2 Relations with Intergovernmental and International
Non-governmental Organizations


PART III CONSTITUTIONAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS

A. Constitutional and Legal Matters

18. Statutory Report on Status of Conventions and Agreements, and
Amendments thereto

19. Other Constitutional and Legal Matters

19.1 Procedure for the Election of the Chairmen and Members of
the Programme Committee and Finance Committee

19.2 Confirmation of the Agreement between the Food and Agriculture
Organization of the United Nations and the United Nations
Industrial Development Organization

19.3 Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident and
Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or
Radiological Emergency: Accession by FAO

B. Administrative and Financial Matters

20. Audited Accounts

21. Scale of Contributions 1990-91

22. Return of the Regional Office for the Near East to the Region






- A3 -


23. Other

23.1

23.2

23.3

23.4

23.5

23.6


PART

24.

25.

26.


PART

27.

28.


Administrative and Financial Matters

Status of Contributions

Report on Measures Adopted to Distribute Cash Surplus

Level of Support Costs from UNDP and Trust Fund Programmes

Headquarters Accommodation

Personnel Matters

Other Matters


IV APPOINTMENTS AND ELECTIONS

Applications for Membership in the Organization 1

Election of Council Members

Appointments

26.1 Appointment of the Independent Chairman of the Council

26.2 Appointment of Representatives of the FAO Conference to
the Staff Pension Committee


V OTHER MATTERS

Date and Plate of the Twenty-sixth Conference Session

Any Other Matters


1/ No applications received.













APPENDIX B
ANNEXE B
APENDICE B


LIST OF DELEGATES AND OBSERVERS

LISTE DES DELEGUES ET OBSERVATEURS

LISTA DE DELEGADOS Y OBSERVADORES


Chairman
President
President

Vice-Chairmen

Vice-Prdsidents
Vicepresidentes
Vicepresidentes


: J.C. Kerin (Australia)


S A.M. Al Gaoud (Libya)
(.*) JL l JI -- I5i J I

: C. Kanthawongs (Thailand)
: G. Bula Hoyos (Colombia)















MEMBER NATIONS
ETATS MEMBRES
ESTADOS MIEMBROS


AFGHANISTAN AFGANISTAN


Delegate
Mohammad GHUFRAN
Minister of Agriculture and Land
Reform
Kabul


Alternates
Sayed Mozafaruddin HASHIMI
President of Planning Department
Ministry of Agriculture and Land
Reform
Kabul


Associates
Shamsher NAZIANI
Charge d'Affaires
Embassy of Afghanistan
Rome


ALBANIA ALBANIE

Dledgu6
Sulejman PEPA
Secretaire general
Ministere de 1'Agriculture
Tirana


Suppleants
Dashnor DERVISHI
Ambassadeur
Repr4sentant permanent aupr&s
de la FAO
Rome


Konstandin DANO
Ingenieur en chef
Direction Gendrale des forts et
des paturages
Tirana


Sali METANI
Fonctionnaire
Ministere de 1'Agriculture
Tirana


Giovalin SHKURTAJ
Conseiller
Ambassade de la R4publique Pop.
Soc. d'Albanie
Rome



ALGERIA ALGERIE ARGELIA Jt.ziJ

D414gu6
Mohamed ROUIGHI
Ambassadeur
Repr4sentant permanent aupres de,
la FAO
Rome






Ij;~ L5



Supplants
Yahia HAMLAOUI
Secr4taire g4ndral
Ministere de l'Agriculture
Alger







-tJSLlJ
,^1_,J






- B2 -


Adjoints
Kamil HADJIAT
Charge de mission
Cabinet du Premier Ministre
Alger



1.L,- JL K







Rabah DEKHLI
Conseiller du Ministre
Ministere de 1'Agriculture
Alger





L i 1.j




Mme Amina BOUDJELTI
Representant permanent adjoint
aupres de la FAO
Rome











Mustapha BENHAMOU
Conseiller technique
Ministere de 1'Agriculture
Alger



_?-... ,J (,j V w


Mustafa CHABOUR
Directeur de l'Elevage
Ministere de 1'Agriculture
Alger





1 7.1 j.




Sid-Ahmed CHENTOUF
Directeur de la planification
Ministere de 1'Agriculture
Alger





LUJI ^I




Sadek MOATI ALLA
Directeur production des plants
Ministere de 1'Agriculture
Alger




.-.ji _l 33IJ






Mile Faouzia BOUMAIZA
Premier secretaire
Reprdsentant Permanent adjoint
aupres de la FAO
Rome






TJa >l S-JJ




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