Title: Feed the family first
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084592/00001
 Material Information
Title: Feed the family first
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Sikes, Anna Mae.
Publisher: Agricultural Extension Service,
Copyright Date: 1941
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084592
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 221976844

Full Text



Circular 52
March. 1941








FEED THE

U FAMILY FIRST



By
ANNA MAE SIKES C
Nutritionist, Florida Agricultural
Extension Service


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YOUR FAM


INCLUDE IN YOUR MEALS EVERY DAY:

MILK
For a growing child, 4 to 1 quart
For an expectant or nursing mother, 1 quart
For other family members, 1 pint or more

LEAFY GREEN OR YELLOW VEGETABLES
1 serving or more

TOMATOES, ORANGES, GRAPEFRUIT-ANY RAW FRUIT
OR VEGETABLE RICH IN VITAMIN C
1 serving or more

POTATOES, OTHER VEGETABLES, OR FRUIT
2 or more servings

EGGS
1 daily (or at least 3 or 4 a week)

LEAN MEAT (beef and pork), POULTRY, FISH
1 serving or more

CEREALS AND BREAD
At least 2 servings of whole-grain products

FATS
Butter (a desirable fat)
Other fats (lard, oil, pork)

SWEETS
As needed to satisfy the appetite


WATER
6 or more glasses






OD PLAN


FOR 365 DAYS EACH PERSON NEEDS:


65 to 91 gallons milk for child; 45 to 65 gallons for adult.


100 to 130 pounds leafy green or yellow vegetables for child;
150 to 180 pounds for adult.


65 to 130 pounds citrus fruit or tomatoes.


60 to 120 pounds potatoes for child; 210 to 300 pounds for
adult.


150 to 300 pounds other fruits and vegetables for child; 300
to 400 pounds for adult.


18 to 30 dozen eggs


26 to 110 pounds of lean meat, poultry or fish for child; 160
to 200 pounds for adult.


80 to 110 pounds of grain for child; 110 to 170 pounds for
adult.


7 to 25 pounds of butter for child; 25 to 50 pounds for adult.


13 to 26 pounds of other fats for child; 26 to 52 pounds for
adult.


26 to 65 pounds of sweets, including jams, jellies, honey and
syrup.







PROTECT THE HEALTH OF YOUR FAMILY AND SAVE MONEY
WITH A PLANNED FOOD SUPPLY

Food costs can be reduced in a variety of ways and still meals
can be adequate and appetizing:

1. Produce your own dairy products. Butter and cheese pro-
vide uses for surplus milk.

2. Have a garden and orchard. Fresh vegetables and fruits
are "protective foods".

3. Can, brine and store surplus products for out-of-season use.

4. Butcher for home use; can or cure some cuts of meat to
provide a variety of meats for later use.

5. Use home produced cereals. Whole grain cereals are
"protective foods".

6. Surplus poultry can be dressed and canned.

7. Use a good supply of the "protective foods", milk, eggs,
fruits, and vegetables.



Other circulars in this series:
51. Fit as a Fiddle
53. Gather Health from Your Own Garden
54. Can and Save--Can and Have
55. Your Poultry and Egg Supply
56. The Good Family Cow Helps Fill the Health Cup
67. Meat-Wholesome, Nourishing




COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914)
AGRICULTURE EXTENSION SasERVI, UNIEsrrY or FLORDA
FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMBN
AND UNITED STATS DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
COOPERATING
WILMON NWE.LL, Director




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