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Title: Commercial ornamentals weed control guide
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084575/00001
 Material Information
Title: Commercial ornamentals weed control guide
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Conover, Charles Albert,
Publisher: Agricultural Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida,
Copyright Date: 1967
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Bibliographic ID: UF00084575
Volume ID: VID00001
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Resource Identifier: 213814111 - OCLC

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Copyright
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
Full Text
ORNAMENTALS WEED CONTROL GUIDE ORNAMENTALS WEED CONTROL GUIDE *
CIRCULAR 30, COM M ERCIAL MAY 1967


ORNAMENTALS



































Use of trade names in this publication is solely for the
purpose of providing specific information. It is not a
guarantee or warranty of products named and does not
signify approval to the exclusion of others of suitable
composition.






















COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914)
Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida,
and United States Department of Agriculture, Cooperating
M. O. Watkins, Director









Ornamentals Weed Control Guide

Charles A. Conover 1


Good weed control is essential to
profitable plant production in Flor-
ida, and in many cases constitutes
a major portion of production
costs.
Within recent years use of chem-
icals (herbicides) to control weeds
has attained great importance in
producing many agronomic and
vegetable crops. Although use of
herbicides on ornamental crops has
not been as widespread, a con-
siderable amount of research con-
cerning their effectiveness on these
crops is available. As producers
become aware of the savings to be
realized through elimination of
hand labor, herbicide use with or-
namentals should increase rapidly.
The information in this circular
is based on sandy soil conditions
found in Florida. Effectiveness of
herbicides may vary considerably
on different soils due to organic
matter content and other factors;
therefore, growers should proceed
with caution and treat only a small
portion of their total acreage the
first year. As experience is accumu-
lated on application methods, rates,
and expected results, growers may
elect to increase the acreage
treated.
This guide has been developed
to supply growers with available
information on weed control in or-
namental crops. Recommendations
are based upon research investiga-
tions carried out by University of
Florida personnel in the Agricul-


tural Experiment Stations and Ag-
ricultural Extension Service. Lit-
erature describing each chemical
is available from the manufacturer.
For details on local applications or
restrictions on use of chemical
weed control practices, see the
county agricultural agent.

Chemical Weed Control
Principles
Preemergence applications
Application of a preemergent
herbicide before weeds appear is
effective in killing germinating
weed seed at or near the soil sur-
face. However, most preemergence
herbicides are not effective against
established annual or perennial
weeds.
Herbicides applied to the soil sur-
face must be uniform to be most
effective. Therefore, smooth soils
free of clods, trash, and plant res-
idues provide the best treatment
surface. Soil moisture level at, or
close to, that necessary for seed
germination is most satisfactory
for best results when preemergence
materials are applied, since applica-
tion to dry soils may severely re-
duce effectiveness.
Treated soil should not be dis-
turbed after herbicide application
unless the specific herbicide is to
be incorporated. If soil is disturbed,
weed seeds may germinate; there-
fore, cultivation should be delayed
as long as possible.


1 Prepared in cooperation with personnel of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations.
Special thanks go to Dr. W. E. Waters for his valuable assistance.








Postemergence applications
With this method, herbicides are
applied after weeds have germin-
ated. It is effective in controlling
germinated weeds and may be sub-
stituted for cultivation after pre-
emergence herbicides lose effec-
tiveness. Postemergence herbicides
also may be used to control estab-
lished perennials such as Bermuda-
grass and Florida betony.
Postemergent herbicides may
kill weeds by foliar contact or ab-
sorption and translocation within
the plant, or by both methods.
Those that kill primarily by foliar
contact act more rapidly than those
that must first be absorbed and
translocated within plant tissue;
however, the latter types usually
are more effective.
Weeds sprayed with materials
such as 2,4-D or dalapon should
not be disturbed until the herbicide
has had sufficient time to be trans-
located or regrowth may occur.
Best weed control usually will be
obtained with postemergent herbi-
cides if they are applied when
weeds are young and actively grow-
ing.
Method of Application
Sprayers
Most herbicides can be applied
easily and economically as sprays.
Many types of sprayers may be
used, provided they have sufficient
pump capacity and tank agitation.
Low pressure sprayers (those
developing 20 to 50 pounds pres-
sure per square inch) should be
used with ornamental crops to re-
duce spray drift. These sprayers
produce a coarse, large droplet
that does not drift as easily as fog


or mist type sprays. When apply-
ing preemergent herbicides, the
use of low volumes (20 to 40 gal-
lons per acre) usually gives good
results. However, when postemer-
gence applications are being made,
larger volumes (50 to 100 gallons
per acre) must be used to pene-
trate foliage and obtain complete
coverage.
Wide angle fan nozzles are best
suited for herbicide applications
since they can be operated close to
the ground, provide uniform dis-
tribution, and reduce spray drift.
When drift is a problem to suscep-
tible crops located nearby, herbi-
cides should be applied when there
is little or no wind.
Distributors
Many producers are now man-
ufacturing granular formulations
of some herbicides which are use-
ful where spray drift is a problem;
moreover in some instances, they
are more effective than liquid for-
mulations.
Many types of distributors can
be used provided they can be cali-
brated and adjusted to evenly dis-
tribute herbicides over the desired
area.
Calibration and Rate
Some herbicides are available un-
der different brand names and at
various concentrations. Suggested
rates are based on acid equivalent
of 2,4-D type herbicides or active
ingredient of other herbicides.
If the recommended rate of a
granular herbicide is 6 pounds per
acre and the formulation contains
50 percent active ingredient, apply
12 pounds per acre. The rate is
computed as follows:








Amount of material required =
recommended rate 1
% active ingredient
Calibration of sprayers or distri-
butors is an important factor in
successful weed control since ap-
plication rates of herbicides are ex-
tremely critical. Weeds will not be
controlled if the rate is too low, but
an excessive rate will injure or kill
the crop.
Probably the simplest method
to calibrate a sprayer is: Fill it
with water and spray a given area
at the same speed and pressure
and under the same conditions of
application which are encountered
in the field. Then measure the
amount of water needed to refill
the tank to the original level. Di-
vide the amount sprayed by that
part of an acre covered to deter-
mine gallons applied per acre.
For example if 12 gallons were
needed to fill the tank after one-
half an acre had been sprayed, the
spray had been applied at the rate
of 24 gallons per acre. Mix the
amount of herbicide recommended
per acre with enough water to
make a total solution equal to the
number of gallons the sprayer will
apply per acre. If a certain chem-
ical is to be sprayed at 6 pounds
active ingredient per acre, then add
this amount to enough water to
make a total of 24 gallons of solu-
tion.
When making band applications,
be careful to consider only the ac-
tual area sprayed per acre in cali-
brating the sprayer. If a certain
chemical is to be applied at the


rate of 1 pound active ingredient
per acre, the broadcast application
of a material containing 4 pounds
active ingredient per gallon of for-
mulation would be enough to treat
4 acres. But, if this material is ap-
plied in 14-inch bands on 42-inch
rows, only 14/42 or 1/3 of the land
area is being treated and 4 pounds
would be enough to treat 12 acres
-3 times as much as in a broad-
cast application, still at the rate
of 1 pound per acre for the area
treated.
Much additional information on
calibration can be found in Florida
Agricultural Extension Circular
275, "Calibration of Pestcide Ap-
plicators".
Cleaning the Sprayer*
It is almost impossible to clean a
sprayer that has been used for
spraying herbicides. Hormone-type
weed killers cannot be removed
completely from wooden tanks or
corroded metal parts. Never use
this equipment for other purposes
-such as application of insecti-
cides, fungicides and liquid fertili-
zers, and never allow spray solution
to remain in the tank for long
periods.
Although the sprayer can be
used for other purposes only with
considerable risk of damaging
crops, when it is absolutely neces-
sary there are several cleaning
agents that can be used. While soap
or detergent may be used to remove
non-hormone type weed killers,
hormone-type weed killers, such as
2,4-D, require chemical cleaning.


*Reprinted from Vegetable weed control guide, Circular 196A, Florida
Agricultural Extension Service.








To remove water-soluble salt
formulations, use one of the fol-
lowing in 100 gallons of water:
1 gallon of household ammo-
nia.
5 lbs. sodium carbonate (sal
soda).
2 lbs. sodium hydroxide (lye).
To remove oil-soluble emulsion
formulations, use either one of the
following in 95 gallons of water.
2 lbs. sodium hydroxide (lye).
5 lbs. sodium carbonate (sal
soda), plus 5 gallons of kero-
sene and 1 lb. of detergent.
Fill the tank and system with
the cleaning solution and allow to
stand for at least 2 hours. Drain
the solution out through the boom
and nozzles and rinse thoroughly
with water. Re-fill the tank with
water, then drain and flush before
using again.
If sprayer has been used for cop-
per spraying, do not use for DNBP
until after it has been cleaned with
1 gallon of vinegar in 100 gallons
of water. Allow the cleaning solu-
tion to stand in the tank, pump,
hose and boom for 2 hours; then
drain and rinse thoroughly with
water.

Precautionary Measures
Read the Label
Before using any herbicide, be-
come thoroughly acquainted with
directions on the label. These safe-
ty precautions must be followed,
since many weed control chemicals
are poisonous and potentially dan-
gerous to man.
Use of Herbicides Without Crop
Label Clearance
Many herbicides are listed in this


publication that do not have label
clearance (label registration) for
the crop or rate listed. In these
cases the user assumes all liability
for damage or injury to the crop
on which he may use these mate-
rials.
These herbicides are listed for
the information of growers of spe-
cific crops where few or no herbi-
cides have label clearance or where
those with clearance may provide
marginal weed control. To date,
materials listed in this manner
have provided good weed control
without crop injury in experimen-
tal work or in general grower
usage. However, these listings are
not to be construed to be recom-
mendations by any staff member of
the Florida Agricultural Experi-
ment Station or Florida Agricul-
tural Extension Service.
Know the Chemical
Before using any herbicide the
user should become familiar with
the potential hazards to handlers;
restrictions on rates, timing and
crops; possible problems associated
with spray drift; susceptibility of
crop and weeds to the herbicide;
and any other problems specific
to the herbicide being used.
Use Proficient Personnel
Herbicides can seriously injure
or kill crops if improperly used and
for this reason only trained person-
nel should be assigned to work with
these materials. Do not assume
your laborers know how to handle
herbicides-MAKE SURE!

Selection of Herbicides
Since both crops and weeds may









be susceptible or resistant to vari-
ous herbicides, take care to select
a herbicide that will do the job
properly. Generally, producers of
ornamental crops should use herbi-
cides that do not present serious
problems from spray drift, person-
nel safety or crop tolerance.
High concentrate herbicides us-
ually cost more per gallon but less
per pound of active ingredient than
low concentrate materials. Granu-
lar materials usually are more ex-
pensive per pound of active ingre-
dient than liquid formulations of
the same compound.

Herbicides for Ornamental Crops
The following table lists herbi-
cides that have provided good weed
control in Florida experiments. Al-


ways check the label for recent
changes regarding crops and rates
approved by the Department of
Agriculture and the Food and Drug
Administration.
Chemicals and rates listed with-
out parentheses have been tested
thoroughly and are suggested for
use. Those in parentheses have not
been thoroughly tested or do not
have label clearance and therefore,
can only be listed for trial pur-
poses.
Before any attempted wide-scale
usage-even of a suggested herbi-
cide-growers should test the her-
bicides on a small scale for one or
more seasons. Only by limited in-
itial use can growers familiarize
themselves with problems inherent
with herbicide applications.


Terminology
Active Ingredient-the percent of herbicidal chemical in a product.
Band Application-application to a continuous restricted area, such as in or
along a row rather than over an entire field.
Broadcast Application-application over an entire area, rather than just to rows,
beds or middles.
Directed Application-application to a restricted area such as a row, bed or
at the base of plants to prevent foliage contact.
Herbicide-a chemical used for killing or inhibiting growth of undesirable plants.
Incorporation-mixing a herbicide into soil by mechanical means or in some cases
irrigation to achieve better weed control.
Lay-by-time of last cultivation.
Non-directed-application without regard to contact with crop foliage.
Non-selective-a herbicide equally toxic to almost all plant species.
Preplant-herbicide application before the crop is planted.
Preemergence-herbicide application prior to emergence of weeds (directions will
indicate whether this application is pre or postemergent to crop).
Postemergence-herbicide application after emergence of weeds and directly onto
weeds (direction will indicate whether herbicide must be used preemergence to
crop or whether crop can be shielded from herbicide).
Rate-the amount of active ingredient of a herbicide applied to a unit area
(usually stated in pounds per acre).
Selective Herbicide-a chemical that is more toxic to some plant species than
others.
Spray Drift-movement of airborne spray particles from the intended area of
application.







HERBICIDES FOR ORNAMENTAL CROPS
Time of Application Time of Application Lbs/Acre
to Crop to Weeds Active Ingredients


Annuals
and
Perennials


Amiben
Weedone Garden'
Weeder

Dacthal


Diphenamid
Dymid or Enide


EPTC
Eptam

Trifluralin
Treflan


Caladiums (Atrazine)'


(CDDA +CDEC)
(Randox +
Vegadex)


Postemergence



Postemergence


At transplanting
or postemergence



Postemergence


Preplant to
seedlings or
postemergence

Preemergence, or
in spike stage
before 1st leaf
unfurls


Pre or post-
emergence


Preemergence


Preemergence


Preemergence


Preemergence


Preemergence


Preemergence, or
postemergence to
small weeds



Preemergence


Irrigate after application. Do
not disturb treated soil.*


7% to 12 Use directed spray where
possible; however, foliage
contact will not cause injury.
Irrigation or rainfall after
application improves activ-
ity.*


6 to 8


5 to 6


1



(3)


(3+3)


Shallow cultivation does not
reduce effect. Apply to moist
soil, use irrigation after ap-
plication or incorporate to a
depth of 1 to 1% inches.*

Must be incorporated into
soil immediately after appli-
cation.*

Must be soil incorporated to
obtain satisfactory weed con-
trol.*

No label clearance. Will in-
jure crops if applied later
than spike stage. Rainfall or
irrigation necessary for acti-
vation. Do not apply more
than once to a crop.

No label clearance. Up to 4
applications per season per-
missable. Monthly reapplica-
tion may be necessary for
good weed control.


Crop*


Chemical


Remarks





Caladiums (Paraquat + CDAA Preemergence
(Cont'd) + CDEC) (Paraquat or in spike
+ Randox + stage before
Vegadex) 1st leaf unfurls


(DNBP + Diesel 0
(Dow General,
Dow Premerge,
Sinox)


(Simazine)


Chrysan-
a themums
(Field
..Grown)






Easter Lilies
(Bulb pro-
duction)


Dacthal



Trifluralin
Treflan




(Diuron)
(Karmex)


il) Preemergence or
in spike stage
before 1st leaf
unfurls


Pre or post-
emergence


Preplanting or
postemergence


Preplanting or
postemergence




Preemergence and
or at layby


Postemergence


Postemergence





Preemergence



Preemergence



Preemergence





Preemergence


(% +3+3)


(3 + 5 gal. oil)





(3)



10 to 12



1





(1 to 3)


No label clearance. Use if dry
conditions occur. Diquat un-
necessary if applied preemer-
gence to weeds. Treatment
kills existing weeds and also
provides preemergence weed
control. Diquat will kill crop
if emerged.
No label clearance. If Dow
General 5 EC or Sinox W 5
EC is used a surfactent is
not needed, but 1 qt. surfac-
tent per 100 gal. is needed
with other formulations.
No label clearance. Up to 3
applications per season per-
missable. Rainfall or irriga-
tion necessary for activation.
Do not use in chrysanthemum
houses unless a soil fumigant
has failed. See remarks under
"Annuals and Perennials".
Do not use in chrysanthemum
beds unless a soil fumigant
has failed. Suggest use of
granular material. Must be
incorporated. Provides mar-
ginal weed control.
No label clearance. Use direc-
ted spray when layby appli-
cation is made. Apply to wet
soil or irrigate lightly after
application. Use lower rate
on light and sandy soils, and
higher rates on heavy soils.


1 Italics indicates trade names.
2 Chemicals and treatments in parenthesis have not been thoroughly tested or do not have label clearance, and therefore are listed only for trial purposes.
*Cheek label for cleared species.








Crop*


Chemical


Easter Lilies (Simazine)"
(Bulb pro-
duction)
(Cont'd)



Diquat


Fern
-. (Asparagus
0 plumosus)

Leatherleaf
fern and
Asparagus
plumosus
Foliage
Plants








Gladiolus
(Flowering
Sized Corms)


Time of Application Time of Application Lbs/Acre
to Crop to Weeds Active Ingredient


Preemergence and
or at layby





Preemergence


(Paraquat) Preemergence


Diuron
Karmex'


(Simazine)


Preemergence
(after mowing)


Preemergence






Postemergence



Postemergence


Preemergence


Pre or postemergence Preemergence


(Atrazine) Postemergence


(Simazine)
(Amiben)
(Vegiben)


Postemergence
Preemergence or
at layby


Preemergence-
postemergence to
very small weeds






Preemergence
Preemergence


(1 to 3)


(1/2)


3



(2)


(2 to 3)








(2 to 3)
(4)


Remarks


No label clearance. Use direc-
ted spray when layby appli-
cation is made. Rainfall or
irrigation necessary for acti-
vation. Use lower rate on
light sandy soils and higher
rates on heavy soils.
Use prior to crop emergence
to kill weeds-See remarks
under "General Weed Con-
trol".
No label clearance at present
-See remarks under "Gen-
eral Weed Control".
Treat only established fern.
Rainfall or irrigation should
occur within 7 days after ap-
plication for best results.
No label clearance. Light irri-
gation after application in-
creases activity. Use granu-
lar formulation.
No label clearance. Use non-
directed spray. Tested only
on Philodendron oxycardium,
P. panduraeforme, P. pertu-
sum, Scindapsus aureus and
Syngnium podophyllum. Do
not use on foliage plants that
have or will receive a nema-
ticide application.
(Same as for Atrazine above)
No label clearance. Apply to
wet soil or irrigate within 7
days. Use directed spray.






Gladiolus Dichlobenil Preemergence and
(Cont'd) Casoron or at layby


Preemergence and
or at layby


Preemergence and
or at layby


Preplant, pre-
emergence or at
layby




Preplant, pre-
emergence or at
layby

Preemergence or
at layby



Preemergence


Preemergence or
at layby


Preemergence


Preemergence



Preemergence


10 to 12


Dacthal



Diuron
Karmex


Preemergence






Preemergence



Preemergence




Postemergence


Preemergence


1 lb. preemer-
gence + 1 lb. at
layby or 1%1 lb.
peremergence or
2 lbs. at layby


1 Italics indicates trade names.
2 Chemicals and treatments in Darenthesis have not been thoroughly tested or do not have label clearance, and therefore are listed only for trial purposes.


Use directed or non-directed
spray.

Marginal control may be ob-
tained under some conditions.
See remarks under "Annuals
and Perennials".
Use directed spray. Check
supplemental label. Rainfall
or irrigation should occur
within 7 days after applica-
tion for best results. Do not
exceed 2 lbs. total per crop.
Must be soil incorporated.
Very difficult to get good
weed control at label rate.
Use directed spray for layby
applications. More effective
on grasses than broadleaf
weeds.
No label clearance at this
rate. Use as directed spray
and soil incorporate.

No label clearance at this
rate. Apply as a directed sur-
face spray. Do not incorpor-
ate. Apply to wet soil only.

Will kill crop if applied after
it emerges. See remarks un-
der "General Weed Control".
No label clearance. See re-
marks under "Gladiolus
Flowering Sized Corms".


Trifluralin
Treflan


(Trifluralin)
(Treflan)


(Trifluralin)
(Treflan)



Diquat


(Amiben)


Gladiolus
(Cormels)







Time of Application Time of Application Lbs/Acre
to Crop to Weeds Active Ingredient


Dacthal


Preemergence or
at layby


(Simazine)' Postemergence


Dichlobenil
Casoron'


Dacthal


Postemergence










Postemergence


Preemergence


Post or Pre-
emergence


Preemergence










Preemergence


10 to 12


(5000 parts
per million)


4 to 6










10 to 12


Gladiolus
(Cont'd)


Crop*


Chemical


Marginal control may be ob-
tained under some conditions.
See remarks under "Annuals
and Perennials".



No label clearance. Treat only
mature plants. A 5000 ppm
solution may be obtained by
using /2 ounce or 2 level
tablespoons of 80% wettable
Simazine per gallon of water.
Tested only on Vanda, Cat-
tleya, Dendrobium, Phalae-
nopsis and Phaius. Plants
and pots may be sprayed or
dipped.



Use directed spray. Do not
use more than 2 applications
a year. May cause damage
during cool weather or on ex-
tremely light soils. Apply 1
inch of irrigation water after
application. Will volatize rap-
idly if applied to hot dry
soils.



Provides marginal weed con-
trol under some conditions.
See remarks under "Annuals
and Perennials".


Orchids


Remarks


Roses






Roses Diphenamid
(Cont'd) Dymid or
Enide


Simazine


Trifluralin
Treflan


(Trifluralin)
(Treflan)


Diquat


Postemergence




Postemergence


Postemergence


Postemergence


Postemergence


(Paraquat) Postemergence


Woody
Nursery
Stock
(Field
Grown)


Dichlobenil
Casoron


Postemergence


Preemergence




Preemergence


Preemergence


Preemergence


Postemergence





Postemergence



Preemergence


6 to 8


(3 lbs. incorpor-
ated, 4 to 6 lbs.
surface sprayed)


( )



4 to 6


Use directed spray. Up to 3
applications a year permis-
sible. Provides 4 to 6 weeks
weed control. Effectiveness
reduced by heavy irrigation.
Apply only to 1 year old
transplants or older. Apply
to wet soils for best results.
Does not provide satisfactory
weed control in mulched
roses.
No label clearance at this
rate. Use shallow incorpora-
tion. Apply 1/ inch of water
after surface spray applica-
tions.
Contact herbicide, use as a
directed spray. Use shields to
protect plants, as herbicide
contact will kill contacted
portion. See remarks under
"General Weed Control".
No label clearance at present.
More effective than Diquat.
See remarks under "General
Weed Control".
Irrigation or rainfall after
application improves weed
control. Registered for use on
broad and narrow-leafed
woody ornamentals. Can be
applied 4 weeks after trans-
planting.*


1 Italics indicates trade names.
2 Chemicals and treatments in parenthesis have not been thoroughly tested or do not have label clearance, and therefore are listed only for trial purposes.
*Check label for cleared species.







Time of Application Time of Application Lbs/Acre
to Crop to Weeds Active Ingredient


Woody
Nursery
Stock
(Field
Grown)


Dacthal






Diphenamid
Dymid or
Enide'



EPTC
Eptam



Herban
Norea


Simazine





Trifluralin
Treflan



(Trifluralin)'
(Treflan)


Postemergence






Postemergence





Postemergence




Postemergence



Postemergence





Postemergence




Postemergence


Preemergence






Preemergence





Preemergence




Preemergence



Preemergence





Preemergence




Preemergence


10 to 12





6 to 8





5 to 6




3



2





% to 1




(4)


Crop*


Chemical


Irrigation or rainfall after
application improves weed
control. Marginal weed con-
trol may occur under some
conditions.*


Shallow cultivation does not
reduce effect. Apply to moist
soil or use irrigation after
application.*


Must be incorporated into
soil immediately after appli-
cation.*


Shows promise on many
woody ornamentals.


Rainfall or irrigation is need-
ed to move herbicide into soil.
Do not use until transplants
have been set for one year.*


Must be soil incorporated.
See remarks under "Gladiolus
Flowering Sized Corms".*


No label clearance at this
rate. Must be surface spray-
ed. Do not incorporate.


Remarks





Woody
Nursery
Stock
(Container)


General
Weed
Control
around
greenhouses,
or as a post-
emergence
herbicide to
weeds, pre-
emergence to
crop.


(Paraquat) Preemergence


Do not apply over
planted crop
Preemergence


Postemergence


Postemergence






Postemergence


A nonselective contact weed
killer. Slightly translocated.
Apply as a directed spray to
weeds to be killed. Do not al-
low spray to contact any crop
as injury will occur. Little
residual soil activity. A wet-
ting agent will improve kill-
ing action.


(%)





8 to 12


No label clearance at pres-
ent. Somewhat more activity
than Diquat. Little residual
soil activity. A wetting agent
will improve killing action.


A nonselective contact weed
killer. Apply as a directed
spray to weeds to be Killed.
Do not replant area for 4 to
6 weeks.


NONE
CLEARED


Diquat


Preemergence


Dalapon
Dowpon


1 Italics indicates trade names.
2 Chemicals and treatments in parenthesis have not been thoroughly tested or do not have label clearance, and therefore are listed only for trial purposes.
*Check label for cleared species.







Time of Application Time of Application
to Crop to Weeds


Preemergence Pre or post-
emergence


Crop*


General
Weed
Control
around
greenhouses,
etc.
(Cont'd)


Weed
Control
by Soil
Steriliza-
tion


1 Italics indicates trade names.


Chemical


DNBP
Premerge-
Sinox1






Methyl
Bromide



Vorlex




EP-201


Brozone




Trizone


Vapam
VPM


Preplant




Preplant




Preplant


Preplant




Preplant


Preplant


Lbs/Acre
Active Ingredient


1% to 2







2 to 3 lbs/100
square feet



40-50 gal/acre




40-50 gal/acre


500-600 lbs/acre




200-225 lbs/acre


75 gal.


Remarks


Use nondirected spray pre-
emergence to crop, directed
spray postemergence. Do not
use when temperature is
above 85 F.




Apply under gastight cover.
48 to 72 hours waiting period
before planting.


Inject in moist soil and use
a water seal or cover with a
polyethelene cover.


Same as for Vorlex above


Apply under gastight cover.
Check label for aeration
period.


Same as for Brozone above


Same as for Vorlex


Preemergence
(after soil
preparation)


Preemergence
(after soil
preparation)


Preemergence


Preemergence




Preemergence


Preemergence




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