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Title: Plans for beekeeping, equipment and structures
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084574/00001
 Material Information
Title: Plans for beekeeping, equipment and structures
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Haynie, John D.
Publisher: Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida,
Copyright Date: 1964
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084574
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: 83467601 - OCLC

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Back Cover
        Page 24
Full Text

Circular 272


Plans for


Beekeeping '
Equipment and Structures


JOHN D. HAYNIE
Apiculturist


T. C. SKINNER
Associate Agricultural Engineer


Agricultural Extension Service
University of Florida
Gainesville. Florida


August 1964

















CONTENTS



Plan identification number is listed next to plan title below.

County Agent's Beekeeping Kit: Florida 919 ...................................................................... 3
Frame Wiring Board ........................................................................................................................ 4
Frame Crutch ..... ............................................................ ........................................ 5
Solar Beeswax Extractor: Florida 913 ................................................................................. 6- 7
Comb Honey Uncapping Tank .................................................. ............................................ 8- 9
Honey Extractor: Florida 903 R-2 ........................................................................................ 10-11
Observation Bee Hive: Florida 904 ............. ................... ........................................ 12
Five-Deep Brood Frame Hive: Florida 907 ............................ ........................................... 13-14
How to Build a Low-Cost Bee Hive .................................1... .... ...... .................................... 15-16
Bee Trapping Equipment .................. .................................... .............................................. 17
Portable Honey House: Florida 906 R...................................................................................... ..... 18
Small Honey House, Pole Type: Florida 911 R .............................................................. 19
Honey Extracting and Comb Storage Building: Florida 915 .................................. ........ 20
Beekeeping Demonstration Booth: Florida 905 ................................................................... 21
Honey Display Stand ............................................................................................. .................... 22-23

















































County Agent's Beekeeping Kit


LIST OF TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
1. One single-story hive, knock-down,
according to plans for low-cost beehive on
p. 16.
2. Ten-deep brood frames.
3. One package of brood foundation, 10
sheets.
4. Hammer, nails (three sizes), and wood
glue.
5. Bee smoker, bee veil, hive tool, -spur
embedder apron.


6. Beekeeping bulletins.
7. Antibiotics for the prevention of bee
diseases.
8. Bee repellent to drive bees from honey
supers.
9. Situation: operator may go to the scene
of action and demonstrate how to assemble a
hive and install beeswax foundation sheets in
frames. He is then ready to put a swarm in
the new hive or install a package or make
colony increase from an established colony.















































Frame Wiring Board

1. One side of an electric line coming from a wall plug can be run through a radiant heater cone
element for a reduction in current.
2. Place an empty half spool on each metal peg: The spools enable the wire to be pulled through
the frame easily.
3. The hinged leg raises the wiring board so the outside is on an incline for embedding wire into
the sheet wax foundation. The embedding is done either with low voltage or the spur wheel embedder.





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Frame Crutch


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Solar Beeswax Extractor


The plans of the solar beeswax extractor are modifications
of the Improved Solar Beeswax Extractor designed by Edwin
J. Anderson, Professor of Apiculture, Pennsylvania State

University, University Park, Pennsylvania.

The solar beeswax extractor can be used to melt burr

comb wax capping and any old brood combs that have been


(Continued on next-page)


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Solar Beeswax Extractor


culled from active colonies.
Small batches of wax and single combs can be collected
and melted each day. No unmelted wax will need to wait for
a larger accumulation. Beeswax melted and collected in pan
will harden in cake form and will be ready for market
without further pituI,,,Uu1L F'


,
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LIST OF MATERIALS


Frame for uncapping tank


6 linear feet 2" x 2" lumber
26 linear feet 2" x 4" lumber
1 pound nails, IOd

WAX CAPPING BASKET

I board 30" x 12" x 1"
(Cut board in two pieces-15" each)
1 board Il10" x 1" x 2"
1 piece 3' x 161"--4 or 5 inch mes'i, hardward cloth

HONEY TANK

1 4'3/4" x 8'6 & 3/4" gauge galvanized metal



Comb Honey Uncapping Tank


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Two wax capping baskets
used, leaving a 42-inch space
uncapped combt of honey.




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FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL
EXTENSION SERVICE
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTU R
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
AND USDA COOPERATING
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Honey Extractor














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SINGLE FRAME GLASS


OBSERVATION 'BEHIVF


FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL M"m
EXTENSION SERVICE I DA
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. E.A9- 1 Of fLORIDA
AND USDA 0O FSK SAT I N"a
OBSERVATION BEEAIVE
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Single-Frame Glass Observation Beehive


Purpose and Intent of Observation Hive
1. Observation beehives are a part of
every honey show. 2. Observation beehives
can be used by 4-H Club members and
beekeepers in talks to schools and civic


organizations. 3. 4-H Club members can
enhance their 4-H apiary projects by building
an observation beehive and exhibiting it at
fairs. It provides the teacher with an excellent
portable colony for teaching science.


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Five-Deep Brood Frame Hive


1. The hive is made from economical
and available materials. 2. Few tools are
needed to build it. 3. The hive is made
from materials light in weight, making it
easy to transport. 4. The hive can be used
for rearing queens, making increases, and
requeening colonies. 5. One five-frame hive
is needed for each 10 colonies to keep extra
queens for requeening. 6. It is an excellent
hive for beginners to learn how to handle
bees.
Materials and Method Used in Building
the Five-Deep Brood Frame Hive
Here are some suggestions on how to
make a practical, usable hive. The material
needed to build a five-deep brood frame
hive is often available at low cost. As an
example, 14-inch exterior plywood and
8-inch wide boards make a hive light in
weight and low in cost than a hive made
entirely of 1-inch boards.


Shipping boxes of white pine or other
material may be cut out and used for the
sides, tops and bottom of the hive.
IMPORTANT: Be sure that inside measure-
ments of the hive are followed closely if the
five-deep brood frame hive is made from
material other than indicated in the plans.
The hive and cover should be dipped
in a good wood preservative or given two
coats of the material with a brush before
it is painted.
A saw, hammer, square, brace and bit,
and wood vise are practically all the tools
needed to build a hive. If available, an
electric saw will speed up work when
sawing out the ends of the hive.
Uses of the Hive
The hive is well suited to queen rear-
ing. Queens can be wintered in this small
hive. Some queen breeders sell these over-
(Continued on next page)




















OF TOP


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:'SIDE I. SIDE OUTSIDE
-VIEW OF SIDE


FLORIDA NO. 907
SHEET IOF _.


wintered queens before it is possible to
raise queens in the spring. These over-
wintered queens have not had the oppor-
tunity to lay many eggs in the small hive
through winter and are considered excellent
for requeening colonies early in the spring
before young queens are ordinarily avail-
able.
The beekeeper can take these five-
frame hives to his apiary and remove brood
frames in colonies that are becoming so
crowded the bees might swarm. The hives


are given a queen cell or a laying queen.
When the five-frame colonies become
strong, the bees and combs can be
transferred to a standard hive.
To requeen colonies, transport the five-
frame hive to the apiary. Take two frames
of bees with the queen on the comb and
place them inside a standard hive but near
the outside of the broodnest. In any case,
to requeen successfully, the queen must be
killed in the colony before introducing a
new queen. This method is practical and


a safe way of introducing queens.
The beekeeper should keep one spare
queen in these five-frame hives for every
10 normal colonies operated.
A small colony of bees is much easier
to handle than an ordinary colony. This
gives the beginner an excellent opportunity
to work with a colony and become accus-
tomed to handling bees as the colony
increases in strength. It is easier for the
beginner to find the queen in a small
colony than in a strong colony.











How to Build a Low Cost Beehive


Beehives built by the beekeeper have a
two-fold purpose: (1) they are cheaper than
the manufactured hive, (2) cypress lumber
will last much longer than white pine.
The beekeeper should make the bottom
board, brood body, shallow super, and cover
from cypress lumber and treat the wood with
a 5% pentachlorophenol wood preservative.
The inside equipment of the hive the frames
and sheet wax foundation should be
bought ready made, knocked down, as the
labor involved in making this equipment is not
worth the effort by the beekeeper.


If bees are given more than a bee-sized
space between, above, and around the frames,
they will build extra combs. If the space
between the frames and hive wall is smaller
than a bee-sized space, the bees will glue this
space with propolis (bee glue), making it very
difficult to remove frames for examination.
Follow the illustrated plan and cut hive
parts accurately. Cypress lumber is rec-
ommended for easy cutting and long life. Glue
joints with wood glue to keep out moisture
and increase strength of structure.


IMPORTANT: Before cutting super, rip 6 strips,
(21/"xl"xl"). Use strips as rails on bottom
board. The cost of material for 11 'storv hive
$2.55 plus $.45 for cutting, total around $3.00.
A 11/2-story wood hive, knocked down, is $8.00
manufactured.
List of Materials: 14 linear feet of 1"x10", No. 2
Cypress; 71/2 linear feet of 1"x8", No. 2 Cypress;
1/4 lb. No. 6 cement coated nails; 1 small can of
casine wood glue; 1 pint of '5 pentachlorophenol
(Make pentachlorophenol dilution with mineral
spirits, 1-10); Dressed 1" lumber varying from
5/8" to 3/4" These dimensions are for 3/4" lumber.
HIVE MEASURLEMENTS (all figures in inches)
Bottom Board-Two Cleats 16 1/x1 1/8x1 5/8; one


Board 22 1/2x1x9 1/2; one Board 22 1/2x1x6 3/4;
one Strip '16 1/xlxl; two Strips 22 4x34x'/4.
Brood Body-Two sides 19 15/16x1x9 5/8; two
Ends 16 1/4x1x9 5/8 (rabbet top 5/8 edge 4).
Shallow Super-Two Sides 19 15/16x1x5 7/8; two
Ends 16 1/4x1x5 7/8, (rabbet same as brood
body).
Cover-One Board 22 1/2x1x9 1/2; one Board 22 1/2
xlx6 3/4; two Cleats 16 14x1 7/8x1 5/8.
Hand Holds-In four sides 4" below top of brood
body and 2" below top of shallow super.
Tools Needed-Hammer, saw, square, and 1" wood
chisel. Small table saw, if available, will speed
up saw cuts.





















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Expanded View of 1% Story Beehive Showing Parts in Relative Position








EQUIPMENT NEEDED TO TRAP BEES FROM BUILDINGS


1. Fold screen into cone shape. Sew screen together with separate
wire taken from screen. Screen funnel should cover a circle
one foot in diameter and about 18 inches in length; reduce
the point of opening to slightly larger than the size of a
bee. Screen funnel must cover surface around entrance and
fit tightly.


2. Screen funnel must slope upward to point where
bees escape.

3. Smoke entrance in house where bees emerge
and then tack screen tightly over entrance.

4. Plug all holes three feet above and below
the screen funnel where weather boarding joins
the corner of building.

5. Place hive entrance close to where screen is
tacked to wall.

6. Hive should contain one queen and at least
one frame of unsealed brood from an established
colony in addition to new frames.

7. Type of hive stand will depend on
conditions. It may be a separate
hive stand or brackets nailed
to the building.









Bee Trapping Equipment













































Portable Honey House


This building structure can be used as a
small extracting room and for storing empty
combs which have been removed from
colonies.
The roof of the building can be utilized
to keep several colonies in residential sections
where yard space is limited. The roof apiary
allows persons to walk directly under the bee
line of flight without any bee interference.
The 2-inch by 4-inch boards should be


good, straight western cedar and the sides
should be constructed with five V-crimp
aluminum panels.
Place screen on one or two sides if
building will be used for extracting honey
only. Plywood can be used to block the screen
opening when using the building for fumiga-
ting empty combs.
NOTE: Make roof 8- by 8-feet using -4
inch plywood with suitable roof covering.









Small Honey House


This is an extracting house for about 150 colonies. The 12- by 16-foot building with a 16- by 20-foot
roof provides extracting room inside and storage space on the outside under the 2-foot roof overhang.













































48'-8_


agricultural extension service
U.of F gainesville florida


IFLA.915


Honey Extracting and Comb Storage Building


The size of the building can be enlarged to service 150 to 600 colonies. The
rooms can be extended the long way to meet the operational needs of the
number of colonies desired. See your county agent for complete plans. Ask for
Florida No. 915.

20


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FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL
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COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
AND USOA COOPERATING
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COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914)
Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida,
Flirida State University and United States Department of Agriculture, Cooperating
M. O. Watkins. Director


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