Title: Five-deep brood frame hive
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084573/00001
 Material Information
Title: Five-deep brood frame hive
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Haynie, John D.
Publisher: Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida,
Copyright Date: 1949
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084573
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: 214036397 - OCLC

Full Text






August, 1949


FIVE-DEEP BROOD

FRAME HIVE


1. The hive is made from economical and available materials.
2. Few tools are needed to build it.
3. The hive is made from materials light in weight, making it easy to transport.
4. The hive can be used in rearing queens, making increase, and requeening
colonies.
5. One five-frame hive is needed for each 10 colonies to keep extra queens for
requeening.
6. It is an excellent hive for beginners to learn how to handle bees.


Prepared by
John D. Haynie
Extension Apiculturist


AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


Circular 90












MATERIALS AND METHOD USED IN BUILDING THE
FIVE-DEEP BROOD FRAME HIVE




The material needed to build the five-deep brood frame hive is very often avail-
able and reasonable in price. One can obtain Western apple boxes from almost
any grocery store. If these boxes are carefully taken apart, two of them will build
one five-deep brood frame hive and the ends from one box left over. The boxes
usually come without tops. IMPORTANI: After the ends are cut, place two deep
brood frames between them as aguage to determine the proper space for the frames.
This is necessary as the sides of the apple box are a little short on length.

A saw, hammer, square, brace and bit, and wood vise are practically all the
tools needed to build the hive. If a table saw is available the work can be greatly
speeded up when sawing out the ends of the hive.

The hive, made from apple boxes, is light in weight and easily transported.
This white pine material takes wood preservative readily, thus giving it very
long life. About four ounces of a well recommended wood preservative brushed
on the hive will make it last for years.

USES OF THE HIVE--The hive is well suited to queen rearing and queens
can be wintered in this small hive. Some queen breeders sell these over-wintered
queens before it is possible to raise queens in the spring. These overwintered
queens have not had the opportunity to lay very much in the small hive through
winter and are considered excellent for requeening colonies early in the spring
before young queens are normally available.

The beekeeper can take these five-frame hives to his apiary and remove brood
frames in colonies that are becoming crowded and might swarm. The hives are
given a queen cell or a laying queen. When the five-frame colonies become strong
the bees and combs can be transferred to a regular standard hive.

When colonies are to be requeened the five-frame hive can be transported to
the apiary. Take two frames of bees with the queen on the comb and place them
inside of a standard hive but near the outside of the broodnest. In any case, where
requeening is to be carried on the queen must be killed in the colony before in-
troducing the new queen. This method is practical and a very safe way of intro-
ducing queens.

The beekeeper should keep one spare queen in these five-frame hives for
every 10 normal colonies operated.

A small colony of bees is much easier to handle than a regular colony. This
gives the beginner an excellent opportunity to work with a colony and become
accustomed to handling bees as theoalony increases in strength. Itis much easier
for the beginner to find the queen in a small colony than in a normal strong colony.































EXPLODED
VIEW OF TOP H

END SIDE
VIEWS OF TOP


HANDLE



ENTRANCE- 2 ', .

SIDE INSIDE OUTSIDE
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EXPLODED VIEW OF
FIVE DEEP BROOD FRAME HIVE







COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914)
Agricultural Extension Seiv\ic. University of Florila. Florida State University, and United
States Department of Atriculture, Cooperating. G. Clayton, Director.




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