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Title: Music appreciation for rural communities, clubs and homes
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 Material Information
Title: Music appreciation for rural communities, clubs and homes
Alternate Title: Circular 21 ; Florida Agricultural Extension Service
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Phipps, Zadie L.
Publisher: Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: June, 1930
Copyright Date: 1930
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084546
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: 214278861 - OCLC

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Full Text




Circular 21 June, 1930


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914)

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA.
FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN AND UNITED STATES
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATING.
WILMON NEWELL, Director.






Music Appreciation

for

Rural Communities, Clubs

and Homes


BY ZADIE L. PHIPPs.
Director Public School Music Department,
Florida State College for Women.


Bulletins will be sent free upon application to the State Home
Demonstration Department, Tallahassee, Fla.


Circular 21


June, 1930








MUSIC APPRECIATION FOR RURAL SCHOOLS, CLUBS,
AND HOMES
Every lesson in music should mean music appreciation. Whether
the children are singing songs, playing toy instruments, reading stories
in connection with music, or listening to records, the work should be
done in such a way that it would mean the development of intelligent
understanding in music. Starting with page 5 of this material there
is given a complete outline of music appreciation with records. This
system is generally used for a course in Music Appreciation. How-
ever, as fundamental helps the following suggestions are given:
Community Song Books: Every home should possess at least
one community song book giving the old Southern songs, patriotic
songs, folk songs, selections from operas, hymns, etc. If America is
to rank with other countries it must start with "music in the home."
The following paper-covered books may be obtained at rates from 15
to 25 cents each. Several of these may be obtained with more durable
covers at very reasonable prices:
The Gray Book Hall & McCreary Co.
The One Hundred and One Best Songs The Cable Co.
Sociability Songs The Rodeheaver Co.
The Golden Book of Favorite Songs Hall & McCreary Co.
Twice 55 Plus Community Songs C. C. Birchard Co.
Children's Song Books: Delightful songs appealing to the dif-
ferent stages of child life are published for each grade by the follow-
ing companies. The price per book averages about 90 cents:
Silver Burdett Co.
American Book Co.
Ginn & Co.
Hinds, Hayden & Eldredge
C. C. Birchard & Co.
Rhythms for Children: The children march, skip, run, jump,
and dance (according to suggestion included in heading of selection)
in time to the music. Some of the books giving music for the above
rhythms, and also giving directions for folk dances are as follows:
The Music Hour in Kindergarten and First Grade Silver Burdett & Co.
Progressive Teacher's Manual, Vol. I (Folk dances) Silver Burdett & Co.
Music for the Child's World, Vol. II, Hofer Clayton Summy
Rhythmic Action, Plays, and Dances, Moses Milton Bradley
Choice Rhythms for Youthful Dances, Crawford A. S. Barnes
Rhythms of Childhood, Crawford A. S. Barnes
Dalcroze Eurythmics: The following movements to simple
rhythms as given in the music for rhythms, or simple songs which the
children know, are of much help in developing rhythmic movements.
Records for Dalcroze eurhythmics are also furnish by the Victor Talk-
ing Machine Co. A song from the board, or from the book, may first
be studied as to the movement:
quarter note step
half note step, bend
dotted half note step, point front, point back
whole note step, point front, point side, point back
two eighth notes run, run
dotted quarter and eighth note step, half bend, run
dotted eighth and sixteenth note skip








FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION


The order of work should be:
Example:
quarter quarter half quarter two eighths half
1. Children say "step, step, step, bend step run, run step, bend
2. Children say above movements and do.
3. Children do.
Books for Children to Read: These may be read by the children,
or by parents to the children.
SMusic Stories for Boys and Girls Cross
Alice in Orchestralia La Prade
Operas Every Child Should Know Bacon
Prince Melody in Music Land Simpson
Young Folks' Picture History of Music Cooke
Young People's Story of Music. Whitcomb
Putting Young America in Tune Weber
In Music Land Upton
Music lAlbum Perkins
How Music Grew Bauer & Peyser
The Story of Music and Musicians Lillie
(Any of the above may be purchased from Lyon & Healy.)
Music Appreciation: Books which will interest children, parents
and teachers are listed in order of advancement:
Music Appreciation for Every Child Silver Burdett & Co.
Music Stories for Boys and Girls Ginn & Co.
Music Appreciation in the Schoolroom Ginn & Co.
Victor Book of the Operas Victor Talk. Mach. Co.
Manual of Music Appreciation Hinds, Hayden Aldredge
Listening Lessons in Music, Fryberger Silver Burdett & Co.
The Complete Book of Great Musicians Oxford Univ. Press
Introduction to Music Appreciation and History Moyer-Oliver Ditson Co.
What We Hear in Music, Faulkner Victor Talk. Mach. Co.

Toy Bands: The rhythm bands are now used almost universally
in primary and intermediate grades by all public school music teach-
ers. This work need not be confined entirely to the school room. One
or more children in the home may purchase any toy instrument and
use it to good advantage following the rhythm of the selection. Such
instruments as rhythm sticks, triangles, bells, cymbals, tambourines,
etc., make up a well-balanced band. The Manual of Music Apprecia-
tion, Hinds, Hayden and Eldredge (listed above), tells how to make
instruments at home. Manufactured instruments may be purchased
from the following companies, which will also gladly furnish catalogs:
Ludwig & Ludwig
Educational Music Bureau
Drysdale Co.

Books giving instructions for organizing bands and including
music (scores) for the toy instruments are published by:
Silver Burdett & Co.
The Raymond Hoffman Co.
C. C. Birchard Co.
Pictures and Songs: Every child enjoys a picture which visually
brings home the thought of the song. Pictures which can be correlated
with songs may be obtained from:








MUSIC APPRECIATION &

The Perry Pictures Co. $ .01 and .02
University Prints .01%1
Colonial Art Co. .02 to .50
George P. Brown & Co. .01 .01% .02. 04
The Art Appreciation Pub. Co. .50 to $2.00
Art Extension Press .50 (also $3.00 per 100)
Example of work:
Picture Song
Don Baltazar Carlos on Horseback My Fiery Steed


MUSIC APPRECIATION OUTLINE
The following outline for Music Appreciation may be used in any
school starting with either third or fourth grade; it may be developed
for club use; and any part may be used in the home with as many
records as the parents are able to afford. In many eases under certain
headings only a few records are given. The Victor record catalog is
sent free of charge to anyone by the Educational Department, Victor
Talking Machine Co. There the instructor will find a wealth of ma-
terial.
This outline is not intended to be used in the order given; that is,
the instructor should not teach all the rote songs, then all the stories,
etc. The lesson should be varied. As an example of one lesson, the
following is given: Start with a record for quiet listening, then
use a lively rote song, have the children do a certain amount of rhythm
work, and finish with one record for memorization. The work of for-
mer grades should be reviewed at different times by later grades. If
the instructor finds he is not able to finish the material for a certain
grade, he may.discontinue the material at any point and continue in
the next grade. The last pages of this outline may be used in high
school if necessary.

THIRD OR FOURTH GRADE.
ROTE SONGS
A rote song is a song taught by imitation. Many a teacher prefers
to teach a rote song by the use of a record made for that purpose
instead of singing the song herself. These records are intended to be
especially beautiful in tone quality, a quality which the child is urged
to imitate. The following songs are also found in the Hollis Dann
Music Course:
Records
Buttercups Johnstone
The Violet Johnstone
Our Flag Johnstone
Pretty Tulip Johnstone
A Star Child Johnstone
STORIES
Every child loves a story. If he can make a mental picture of cir-
cumstances and events which are happening in the music as the record
is being played, he is quite apt to be interested. Older people appre-
ciate music much more if they know what is taking place. A little








FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION


book of stories called "Music Stories for Boys and Girls" by Cross is
published by Ginn & Co. This furnishes worth-while material for the
following: The teacher tells the story, and plays record at the certain
points which correlate.
Peer Gynt Suite-Grieg
In the Hall of the Mountain King
Ase's Death
Anitra's Dance
Morning
Solveig's Cradle Song
Nutcracker Suite-Tschaikowsky
March
Characteristic Dance
Arab Dance
Waltz of the Flowers
Danse Macabre-Saint Saens (Hallowe'en)
Danse Macabre (Dance of Death)
Hansel and Gretel-Humperdinck
Prelude
Susie, Little Susie
Duet of Gertrude and Peter
Song of the Sleep Fairy
Song of the Gingerbread Children
Closing Hymn
Narcissus-Nevin
Narcissus
William Tell-Rossini
Overture (Part I): The Dawn
Mathilde I Love Thee
Overture (Part II): The Storm
Overture (Part III): The Calm
Overture (Part IV): Finale
Stories-(Details of story told on record)
A Hunt in the Black Forest-Voelker
In a Clock Store-Orth
QUIET LISTENING
Many times children come in from recess in rather a boisterous
manner. By playing a soft record of beautiful character while the
children close their eyes and place their heads on desks, we are accom-
plishing two purposes: The children are resting for the next period
which may or may not be the music period, and they are subcon-
sciously accumulating a knowledge of worth-while melodies.
Cradle Song-Brahms
Traumerei-Schumann
Spring Song-Mendelssohn
To a Wild Rose-MacDowell
To Spring-Grieg
Meditation-Glazounow
DEVELOPING PIANO
With the idea of interesting children who have never studied piano,
in that subject, and encouraging those who are taking piano lessons
to. work more diligently, the following piano records are given:








MUSIC APPRECIATION I

Boating Song-Kinscella
Evening Bells-Kinscella
Little Dutch Dance-Kinscella
Of Br'er Rabbit-MacDowell
From Uncle Remus-Eaver
Rustle of Spring-Barth
Humoresque-Dvorak
HUMMING
The children listen two to three times to a clear, well-defined mel-
ody, then they hum with the record several times. When they have
listened to the record sufficiently, they hum without the record.
Serenade-Schubert
Souvenir-Drdla
Humoresque-Dvorak
Spring Song-Mendelssohn
Scarf Dance-Chaminade
LISTENING TO WELL-KNOWN SONGS
Following is a group of songs which never grow old. They should
be listened to for developing a better tone quality, and as a funda-
mental basis for learning the songs so that groups of young people may
later enjoy singing them in the homes:
The Rosary-Nevin
From the Land of the Sky Blue Water-Cadman
Come to the Fair-Baker
A Perfect Day-Jacobs-Bond
Just a Wearyin' for You-Jacobs-Bond
A Dream-Bartlett
Gypsy Love Song-Herbert
I'll Take You Home Again, Kathleen-Westandorf
I Love You Truly-Jacobs-Bond
INSTRUMENTS
Each year the children should learn to recognize a certain number
of instruments when a record is played which demonstrates the partic-
ular instrument. This work is made much clearer by using the large
pictures of individual instruments which may be purchased from the
Victor Talking Machine Co.
Violin
Rock-a-bye Baby (Traditional)
Sweet and Low-Barnby
Lullaby-Brahms
Humoresque-Dvorak
Nazareth--Gounod
Bells
Adeste Fideles (0 Come All Ye Faithful)-Portugal
Legend of the Bells-Planquette
Evening Bells-Kullak
Piano
The Bee-Schubert
The Minute Waltz-Chopin
Witches Dance-MacDowell
Prelude in C sharp Minor-Rachmaninoff
Cello
Evening Star from "Tannhauser"-Wagner
Berceuse from "Jocelyn"-Godard







FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION


Flute
Habenera from "Carmen"-Bizet
Wind Amongst the Trees-Briccialdi
RHYTHMIC MOVEMENTS
The Victor catalog furnishes records for these rhythms which may
be practiced in any home:
Marching
Skipping
Running
Jumping
High-stepping horses
Flying birds
Wheelbarrow motives
Tip-toe marching
Waltzing
IMAGINATION
To work out the following records children should close their eyes,
and rest head on table or chair. During this time they should listen
quietly while record is being played, and make a mental picture of
what the music seems to describe to them. Though the picture which
the child gives may be far away from what is intended in the music,
imagination ought not to be discouraged:
Whistler and His Dog-Pryor
The Fountain-Zabel
Souvenir-Drdla
Flight of the Bumble Bee-Rimsky-Korsakow
The Little Hunters-Kullak
Witches Dance-MacDowell
Spring Song-Mendelssohn
MEMORIZATION
Each year a certain number of selections should be memorized.
The pupil should be able to give name of selection, source (if any),
and name of composer. A contest should be held in each grade at
the end of the year. These contests should be the stepping-stones for
the high school contest later. The records should be listed from those
used many times in different ways throughout the year:
Witches Dance-MacDowell
The Fountain-Zabel
Souvenir-Drdla
Lullaby-Brahms
Minute Waltz-Chopin
Humoresque-Dvorak
Anitra's Dance-Grieg
Waltz of the Flowers-Tschalkowsky
To a Wild Rose-MacDowell
FIFTH GRADE
The work of one grade should not be dropped at the end of that
particular grade, but at different times topics of the former grades
should be taken up in successive grades for refreshing the memory,
and for illustration.
ROTE SONGS
To be taught from the following records:







MUSIC APPRECIATION

Every-Day Songs
Hand Organ Man-Norwegian Folk Song
Robin Hood and Little John-Old English
Parasol and Fan-Lisle-Gartlan
The Spoiled Violin-Brown-Scott
Hallowe'en
Hallowe'en
Jack o' Lantern
Patriotic
Our Flag
A Patriotic Wish
Thanksgiving
Thanksgiving Song
Christmas
Silent Night
0 Little Town of Bethlehem
Joy to the World
While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks
RHYTHMS
To be performed without guidance; the children skip, dance, or do
what the record suggests to them:
The Wild Horseman-Schumann
Little Dutch Dance-Kinscella
Lullaby-Brahms
Overture, Midsummer Night's Dream-Mendelssohn
Tarantelle-Saint-Saens
Southern Roses-Strauss
LISTENING TO WELL-KNOWN SONGS
(Continued from Fourth Grade)
All Through the Night-Welsh
At Dawning-Cadman.
Hark, Hark the Lark-Schubert
Santa Lucia-(Neapolitan Folk)
Trees-Kilmer-Rasbach
Mocking Bird-Winner
Ave Maria-Gounod
Two Grenadiers-Schumann
INSTRUMENTS
Cornet
(Continued from Fourth Grade)
O Sole Mio-di Capua
Miserere, "I1 Trovatore"-Verdi
Nazareth-Gounod
Clarinet
Coronation March "Le Prophete"-Meyerbeer
Minuet in G-Paderewski
Harp
Old Folks at Home-Foster
To Spring-Grieg
Oboe
Heaven May Forgive You, "Martha"-Flotow
Pipe Organ
In a Monastery Garden-Ketelbey
Hallelujah Chorus, "Messiah"-Handel
Nearer My God to Thee-Mason
Viola
Lullaby-Brahms
Minuet in G-Paderewski








1U FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION

RECOGNIZING INSTRUMENTS IN COMBINATIONS OF TWO
Cello and Piano
Cradle Song-Schubert
Clarinet and Piano.
Waltz-Brahms
Cornet and Piano
Light Cavalry Overture-von Suppe
Flute and Piano
Elfin Dance-Grieg
Cello and Flute
Voice of Love-Schumann
Clarinet and Flute
Tarantelle-Saint-Saens

RECOGNIZING INSTRUMENTS IN COMBINATIONS OF THREE
Flute, Oboe and Piano
Morning-Grieg
Violin, Cello and Harp
At the Brook-Boisdeffre.
IMAGINATION
Continuation of making-mental pictures for developing imagina-
tion while music is being played:
Solvejg's Cradle Song-Grieg
Song of the Volga Boatmen (Russian)-violin
Ride of the Valkyries-Wagner
Witches Dance-MacDowell
In a Monastery Garden-Ketelbey
Dance of the Gnomes-Liszt
LULLABYS
Children tell difference in mental pictures of the following: For
instance-" Rock-a-bye Baby" is a song our mothers sing to us. The
"Lullaby" (Brahms) is so beautiful we think it may be played to
lull a little prince to sleep. Teacher aids with suggestions.
Rock-a-bye Baby-Traditional
Sweet and Low-Barnby
Lullaby-Brahms
Solvejg's Cradle Song-Grieg
WATER PICTURES
Tell difference in:
The Swan-Saint-Saens
In a Gondola-Elman
The Fountain-Zabel
At the Brook-Boisdeffre
DREAMS
Tell the difference in:
Traumerei-Schumann
Dream Pictures Fantasia-Lumbye
Midsummer Night's Dream-Mendelssohn
A Dream-Bartlett
CHARACTER OF MUSIC
Have children tell or express mood of selection:
Berceuse-Godard sleepiness
Liebstraum-Liszt love
Badinage-Herbert playfulness
Menuett-Paderewski stately dance







MUSIC APPRECIATION 11

Humoresque-Dvorak fun, humor
Happy Days-Streleski marching
The Gingerbread Man (first part-gladness-major key)
(last part-sadness-minor key)
NATURE STUDY
Birds
Songs and Calls of our Native Birds-Gorst
Serenade-Moszkowski
Coucou, Le-Daquin
The Bobolink-Gaynor
Robin Redbreast-Gaynor
Pets, Flowers, Trees, and Animals
Buttercups-Johnstone
Four-Leaf Clover-Brownell
Pretty Tulip-Johnstone
Sweet Pea Ladies-Gaynor
The Linden Tree-Schubert
Trees-Rasbach
Flight of the Bumble-Bee-Rimsky-Korsakow
The Bunny-Neidlinger
FOLK MUSIC
The music typical of a people:

American Folk Music
Negro
Swing Low, Sweet Chariot
Steal Away
Indian
Hopi Indian Chanters
Four Penobscot Tribal Songs
Omaha Indian Game Song
White Dog Song
Cowboy
Whoopee Ti Yi Yo
Cowboy Spiritual
STORIES
Teacher tells story of: "Music Stories for Boys and Girls"-Cross.
The first four selections may be taken up in connection with Indian
music above:
From the Land of the Sky Blue Water-Cadman (Omaha Indian Song)
Her Blanket-Navajo tribal song arranged by Lieurance
The Sacrifice-Canadian Indian song arranged by Lieurance
By the Weeping Waters-Chippewa tribal song arranged by Lieurance
Tarantelle-Saint-Saens
The Two Grenadiers-Schumann
The Erlking-Schubert
MEMORIZATION
Review fourth grade list and add:
Traumerel-Schumann
Southern Roses-Strauss
Tarantelle-Saint-Saens
In a Gondola-Elman
Berceuse-"Jocelyn"-Godard
Minuet-Paderewski
Miserere "I1 Trovatore"-Verdi
Invitation to the Waltz-Weber
To Spring-Grieg







12 FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION

SIXTH GRADE
SONGS TO BE LEARNED FROM RECORDS
Four Leaf Clover-Brownell
By the Waters of Minnetonka-Lieurance
Hark, Hark the Lark-Schubert
The Linden Tree-Schubert
The Palms-Faure (Easter)
Christmas Songs (review from records Grade 5)
Trees-Rasbach
Fiddle and I-Goodeve
TEACHING CHILDREN TO DISTINGUISH SOPRANO, ALTO,
TENOR, BASS
This is done through an understanding of vocal quality and range.
An approximate scale of range is here given: Bass-from first line
below bass staff (e) to second space above bass staff (d) ; Tenor-third
line bass staff to second space treble (a flat) ; Alto-fourth space, bass
clef to fourth space treble (e) ; Soprano-second line below treble (a)
to first line above treble clef (a flat). Soloists exceed these limits.
Something of the tone quality should be made clear, developing the
thought that soprano and tenor voices are lighter in quality than alto
and bass respectively.
Hark, Hark the Lark-Schubert (tenor)
Der Erlkonig-Schubert (alto)
Gypsy Love Song-Herbert (bass)
Swiss Echo Song-Eckert (soprano)
Calm as the Night-Bohm (tenor)
Trees-Rasbach (alto)
Rocked in the Cradle of the Deep-Knight (bass)
The Rosary-Nevin (soprano)
SOLOS, DUETS, TRIOS, QUARTETTES
An explanation should be made to the children that a solo is for
one voice, a duet for two people, a trio is arranged for three people, a
quartette for four, a quintet for five, and a sextette for six. The chil-
dren should decide whether the selection is a duet or quartette, etc.
This may be done either through vocal or instrumental records.
Solo, Come to the Fair-Taylor-Martin (vocal)
Duet, In the Moonlight-Lully (vocal)
Trio, Trio in G Major-Haydn (instrumental)
Quartette, Quartette in F Major-Dvorak (instrumental)
Quintet, Quintette in E flat Major-Schumann (instrumental)
Sextette, Sextette "Lucia di Lammermoor"-Donizetti (vocal)
LISTENING TO PART SONGS
John Peel (Old Hunting Song)
The Lost Chord-Sullivan
Pilgrims Chorus, "Tannhauser"-Wagner
Anvil Chorus, "I1 Trovatore"-Verdi
Whispering Hope-Winner
INSTRUMENTS TO BE TAUGHT
Piccolo
Badinage-Herbert
Bassoon
Soldier's Chorus, "Faust"-Gounod








MUSIC APPRECIATION


English Horn
Pastoral Symphony, "Messiah"-Handel
Celesta
Waltzing Doll-Poldini
French Horn
Instruments of the Orchestra
Chimes
The First Nowell (Folk) Christmas
Double Bass
Instruments of the Orchestra
Tuba
Instruments of the Orchestra
Kettle Drums
Instruments of the Orchestra
Castanets
Spanish Serenade-Bizet
Xylophone
Dance of the Toy Regiment-Green-Shilkret
COMBINATIONS OF THREE AND FOUR INSTRUMENTS
Pupils should decide what instruments are being played.
Oboe, French Horn and Piano
Cavatine-Beethoven
Violin, Flute, Cello and Harp
Dream Visions--Stix
FOLK MUSIC OF MANY COUNTRIES
Drink to Me Only With Thine Eyes (English)
Comin' Thro' the Rye (Scotch)
Song of the Volga Boatmen (Russian)
Santa Lucia (Italian)
Minnelied (German)
Wearing of the Green (Irish)
The Woodpecker (French)
The Dove (Old Welsh)
La Paloma (Mexican)
RECOGNITION OF DANCE TYPES
March: Four-part measure; quick or stately; marked steady
rhythm. Contrast types: military, processional, funeral, wed-
ding, etc.
Triumphal March-Grieg
War March of the Priests, "Athalia"-Mendelssohn

Gavotte: Of French origin, four-part measure; lively dancing
step; vigorous yet stately; begins on unaccented beat, usually the
third.
Gavotte-Mozart
Gavotte No. 2-Popper

Waltz: Of German origin, three-part measure; smooth, swing-
ing; at times lively; (old "hop" waltz); often a slow, graceful
glide.
Waltz in C sharp minor-Chopin
Waltz in E flat-Durand
Blue Danube Waltzes-Strauss








FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION


Minuet: Of French origin, three-part measure; a stately, grace-
ful dance with dainty steps of varied character.
Minuet in G-Bach
Minuet-Bolzoni
Mazurka: Of Polish origin; three-part measure; great variety
of figures; usually accented on second or third beat instead of on
the first as in a waltz.
Czarine Mazurka-Ganne
Mazurka in F sharp minor-Chopin
Polonaise: Of Polish origin, three-part measure; a stately court
dance, usually a little more slowly than andante; begins on the first
beat.
Polonaise Militaire-Chopin
Polonaise in E major-Liszt
Bolero: Of Spanish origin, three-part measure; brisk; well-
marked accent; rhythm characteristic of castanets.
Legglero Invisible-Arditi
In Old Madrid-Trotere
OTHER TYPES

Obligato: An accompaniment which is important in itself, and
is played by a single instrument.
Angels Serenade-Braga (soprano with violin obligato)
Serenade: A calm, placid type of music supposed to be played
by a lover under the window of a lady.
Serenade-Schubert
Suite: A series of pieces each expressing a different scene, but
which when following each other complete an entire musical picture.
Correlating example: a suite of rooms.
Petite Suite-Bizet
Peer Gynt Suite-Grieg
Nutcracker Suite-Tschaikowsky
Opera: A drama set to music for voices and instruments. It is
given with action, scenery, and costumes.
Robin Hood-De Koven
Gems from Robin Hood
The Bohemian Girl-Balfe
Gems from the Bohemian Girl
The Mikado-Gilbert and Sullivan
Gems from the Mikado
Martha-Flotow
Heaven May Forgive
The Last Rose of Summer
II Trovatore-Verdi
Anvil Chorus
Miserere
Home to Our Mountains
Operetta: A little opera, generally in light and playful vein.
Hiawatha's Childhood
By the Shores of Gitchie Gumee
Wah-waah-taysee








MUSIC APPRECIATION


Oratorio: The text of an oratorio is of religious nature. It is a
composition on a large scale for a chorus and soloists, and may be
given with or without orchestra. The three greatest oratorios are
the "Messiah," by Handel; the "Elijah," Mendelssohn, and "The
Creation," by Haydn.
Messiah
Pastoral Symphony
Glory to God
Hallelujah Chorus
I Know that My Redeemer Liveth
Overture: The part of an opera played by the orchestra before
the curtain rises.
William Tell Overture
The Dawn
The Storm
The Calm
The Finale
MEMORIZATION
Lists from former grades should be reviewed and the following
added:
Pastoral Symphony "Messiah"-Handel
War March of the Priests "Athalia"-Mendelssohn
Blue Danube Waltzes-Strauss
Soldier's Chorus "Faust"-Gounod
At the Brook-Boisdeffre
Spanish Serenade-Bizet
Waltz in C sharp minor-Chopin
Military Polonaise-Chopin

SEVENTH GRADE
COLLEGE SONGS
From the seventh grade through high school we should interest
the boys and girls in thoughts of college, of furthering their educa-
tion, and teach them school spirit in their songs, physical demonstra-
tions, football, baseball, etc.-and in every school activity, through
hearing the songs of other schools and colleges. The following
records are helpful:
College Days
On Wisconsin
Yale Medley No. 2
Standard Songs
FAMOUS SINGERS
The students should know something of the lives of the famous
singers. A catalog is published by the Victor Co. which gives much
interesting information in reference to the above. After discussing
each singer a record should be played which has been made by that
particular artist.
Alma Gluck-Ave Maria
Enrico Caruso-'Mid the Fair Throng "Rigoletto"
Geraldine Farrar-Jewel Song "Faust"
Tito Schipa-Dream of Love
Ernestine Schumann-Heink-Der Erlkonig
Marion Talley-Swiss Echo Song








FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION


Rosa Ponselle-A Perfect Day
Evan Williams-A Dream
Reinald Warrenrath-Gypsy Love Song
John McCormack-Calm as the Night
FAMOUS ARTISTS
These should be taken up in the same manner as the above.
Children should be encouraged to collect newspaper and magazine
articles concerning these people, and bring them to class.
Pianists
Bauer-A la bien Aimee-Schutt
De Pachmann-Mazurka in A Minor-Chopin
Gabrilowitsch-Passepied-Delibes
Paderewski-Moonlight Sonata-Beethoven
Violinists
Kreisler-Aloha Oe-Lilluokalni-Kreisler
Heifetz-Valse Eluette-Drigo-Auer
Elman-Orientale-Cui.
Cello
Casals-Apres un reve-Faure-Casals
Harp
Salvi-Mother Machree-Ball

AMERICAN COMPOSERS
The American composers should be studied in the same way as
"Famous Artists."
Bond, Carrie Jacobs
A Perfect Day
I Love You Truly
Just a-Wearyin' for You
Cadman, Charles Wakefield
At Dawning
From the Land of the Sky Blue Water
Damrosch, Walter
Danny Deever
Foster, Stephen Collins
My Old Kentucky Home
Old Black Joe
Gaynor, Jessie L.
The Slumber Boat
Herbert, Victor
Gypsy Love Song
Selections from "Naughty Marietta"
Lieurance, Thurlow
By the Waters of Minnetonka
MacDowell, Edward
From an Indian Lodge
From Uncle Remus
Nevin, Ethelbert
The Rosary
Mason, Lowell
My Faith Looks Up to Thee
DISTINGUISHING INSTRUMENTS
The children should now be able to tell the name of any instru-
ment when it is used as a solo instrument, and to distinguish the
different instruments which make up combinations.








MUSIC APPRECIATION


FAMILIES OF THE ORCHESTRA

The four sections of the orchestra are the Strings, Brass, Wood-
wind, Percussion. Below are listed the different instruments which
make up these families:
Strings Woodwind Brass Percussion
Violin Flute French Horn Drums
Viola Piccolo Trumpet (Tympani)
Cello Oboe Trombone (Bass Drum)
Doublebass English Horn Tuba (Snare Drum)
Harp Bassoon Euphonium (tenor tuba) Tambourine
Contrabassoon Castanets
Clarinet Triangle
Basset Horn Cymbals
Bass Clarinet Bells
Glockenspiel
Xylophone
Celeste
Records illustrating sections of the orchestra:

INSTRUMENT ENSEMBLE
Brass Ensemble:
Fackeltanz-Meyerbeer
String Ensemble:
Evening Song-Schumann
Oh, Vermeland, Thou Lovely-Swedish
Woodwind Ensemble:
The Music Box-Liadow
Shepherd's Hey-Grainger
Percussion Ensemble:
Instruments of the Orchestra
THE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Our symphony orchestras in the United States consist of from
50 to 100 of the best players obtainable in the United States and
Europe. Every symphony orchestra has the four sections listed
above: Strings, Woodwind, Brass, and Percussion. It takes a great
deal of money to finance a symphony orchestra. Only our largest
cities such as New York, Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia, Cleveland,
Cincinnati, Minneapolis, and St. Louis can afford to support sym-
phony orchestras.
PHILADELPHIA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Dance of the Tumblers-"Snow Maiden"-Rimsky-Korsakow
Scherzo-"Midsummer Night's Dream"-Mendelssohn
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Finale-Fourth (F Minor) Symphony-Tschaikowsky
RECOGNITION OF CLASSIC TYPES
A Symphony: A grand composition of several movements for a
full orchestra. The greatest composers of symphonies were Beetho-
ven and Brahms, although the pioneer work by Haydn and Mozart
must not be forgotten.
Fifth Symphony in C Minor-Beethoven
Toy Symphony-Haydn
Fifth Symphony "From the New World"-Dvorak








FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION


Symphonic Poem: The story of a poem told by a symphony
orchestra is called a symphonic poem. The music describes the sec-
tion of the poem and gives to the listener the same mental picture that
the reader receives.
Viviane-Chausson
Danse Macabre-Saint-Saens Stories of-
The Spinning Wheel of Omphale-Saint-Saens "Music Stories for Girls
The Sorcerer's Apprentice-Dukas and Boys."
The Wild Huntsman-Franck

String Quartette: A composition for four instruments of the
violin species, as, two violins (first and second), a viola, and cello.
Quartet in F Major-"American"-Dvorak
Emnperor Quartet-Haydn
String Quartet Op. 11-Tschaikowsky
Concerto: A concerto is a sonata (a composition of three or
four movements) for a solo instrument with orchestral accompa-
niment.
PIANO: Concerto in A Minor, Op. 54-Schumann
VIOLIN: Concerto in E Minor Op. 64-Mendelssohn

Program Music: This is instrumental music in which the com-
poser attempts to convey to the listener an image, or a succession of
images, that will arouse in him certain emotions which have been
previously aroused in the composer's mind by some scene, event, or
idea.
The Bee-Schubert
Le Cygne-Saint-Saens
In a Monastery Garden-Ketelbey
Narcissus-Nevin
Spring Song-Mendelssohn
Peer Gynt Suite-Grieg
William Tell Overture-Rossini
Opera: Continued from sixth grade:
Lohengrin-Wagner
Elsa's Dream
Bridal Chorus
Aida-Verdi
Heavenly Aida
Grand March and Finale
Carmen-Bizet
Love is Like a Woodbird
Toreador

Oratorio: Continued from sixth grade:
Elijah, The-Mendelssohn
Lift Thine Eyes
O Rest in the Lord
Creation, The-Haydn
With Verdure Clad








MUSIC APPRECIATION 19

Art Songs: These are songs of sheer beauty and art. They are
composed by skilled musicians, and are made to interpret poetry.
Autumn-Franz
Du bist wie eine Blume-Schumann
Hark! Hark! The Lark-Schubert
Morning Song-Grieg
The Swan Bent Low-MacDowell
MEMORIZATION
Review former lists and add:
Orientale-Cui
Passepied-Delibes
Mazurka in A Minor-Chopin
From an Indian Lodge-MacDowell
Le Cygne-Saint-Saens
Concerto in E Minor-Mendelssohn
Moonlight Sonata-Beethoven
Evening Song-Schumann

Note: For address of firms which handle the supplies named in
this bulletin, write Zadie L. Phipps, Director Public School Music,
Florida 'State College for Women, Tallahassee.




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