Title: Beautifying the home grounds
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Title: Beautifying the home grounds
Series Title: Beautifying the home grounds
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Carter, Louise.
Publisher: Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida
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Bibliographic ID: UF00084542
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April, 1931


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914)


AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN,
AND UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
COOPERATING
WILMON NEWELL, Director




BEAUTIFYING THE HOME GROUNDS

By LOUISE CARTER
Formerly of the Florida Extension Service


Fig. 1.-Shrubs and flowers, properly arranged, add much to the
attractiveness of a home.

Bulletins will be sent free upon application to the State Home Demonstra-
tion Department, Tallahassee, Fla.


Circular 26






BOARD OF CONTROL

P. K. YONGE, Chairman, Pensacola
W. B. DAVIS, Perry
A. H. BLENDING, Tampa
FRANK J. WIDEMAN, West Palm Beach
RAYMER F. MAGUIRE, Orlando
J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary, Tallahassee

STAFF, AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
JOHN J. TIGERT, M.A., LL.D., President of the University
WILMON NEWELL, D.Sc., Director
A. P. SPENCER, M.S., Vice-Director and County Agent Leader
J. FRANCIS COOPER, M.S.A., Editor
R. M. FULGHUM, B.S.A., Assistant Editor
E. F. STANTON, Supervisor, Egg-Laying Contest
RUBY NEWHALL, Secretary
COOPERATIVE AGRICULTURAL DEMONSTRATION WORK
W. T. NETTLES, B.S., District Agent
H. G. CLAYTON, M.S.A., District Agent, Organization and Out-
look Specialist
J. LEE SMITH, District Agent
R. W. BLACKLOCK, A.B., Boys' Club Agent
HAMLIN L. BROWN, B.S., Dairyman
E. F. DEBUSK, B.S., Citrus Pathologist and Entomologist
N. R. MEHRHOF, M. AGR., Poultryman
WALTER J. SHEELY, B.S., Agent in Animal Husbandry'
J. E. TURLINGTON, Ph.D., Agricultural Economist2
FRANK W. BRUMLEY, M.S.A., Agricultural Economist, Farm
Management
W. R. BRIGGS, B.S.A., Assistant Agricultural Economist, Farm
Management
D. E. TIMMONS, M.S.A., Agricultural Economist, Marketing
COOPERATIVE HOME DEMONSTRATION WORK
FLAVIA GLEASON, State Agent
VIRGINIA P. MOORE, Home Improvement Specialist
LUCY BELLE SETTLE, B.S., District Agent
RUBY MCDAVID, District Agent
MARY E. KEOWN, M.S., District Agent
ISABELLE S. THURSBY, B.S., Food and Marketing Agent
EVA R. CULLEY, B.S., Acting Nutritionist

1In cooperation with U. S. D. A.
'Part-time.









BEAUTIFYING THE HOME GROUNDS

By LOUISE CARTER

PLANNING ESSENTIAL TO SUCCESS
The planning of the home ground is quite as essential as the
beautification work itself. Very often one sees home surround-
ings that have had a great deal of work expended on them but
where no definite plan has been followed the result is usually
disappointing. The haphazard planting of trees, shrubs and
flowers, beautiful though they may be of themselves, does not
always make a beautiful complete whole. So, whether building
a new home or undertaking to beautify the old one, one should
first have clearly in mind, and preferably on paper also, the plan
of what she wants the surroundings of her home eventually
to be. Then, little by little, year by year, one can work toward
this definite goal.
There are a few simple rules with which everyone interested
in home beautification should be familiar.
1. Simplicity is the keynote to success. No elaborate plant-
ings should be attempted.
2. Native trees and shrubs or common nursery varieties that
are known to do well are always the most satisfactory. One
does not have to send far away for plant material, for in most
cases lovely things may be found in the woods near home or in
a neighbor's garden.
3. The lawn should be kept open and any flower or shrub
plantings should be grouped in borders along walks and boun-
daries and in the corners of the grounds. It is not wise
to crowd a lawn with small flower beds of various shapes or to
have shrubbery dotted over it. An open lawn makes a beautiful
setting for the house, as it gives a sense of spaciousness and
peace.
4. Shrubbery should be planted about the base of the house
in order to hide the bare foundations and make the building
fit into its surroundings.
5. Provide good soil. It is very unwise to plant shrubs and
flowers in such poor soil that they can make only a stunted
growth. It is worth while to enrich the beds and borders with
good soil, well rotted manure, or leaf mold from the woods.











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Fig. 2.-Suggestions for shrubbery planting about the house. Check list of shrubs referred to:
1. Wax privet 6. Plumbago
2. Viburnum 7. Star jessamine
3. Pittosporum 8. Ilex
4. Abelia 9. Duranta
5. Primrose jasmine






Beautifying the Home Grounds


LAWNS
There is hardly anything that lends more charm to the home
surroundings than a green, well kept lawn. It is often compared
to the canvas of a picture, and it surely makes a pleasing and
beautiful background on which to paint the picture of a home.
There are several varieties of lawn grasses that do well in
Florida.
Bermuda grass is one of the most universally used grasses
throughout the south. It does well on almost any type of soil,
growing fairly well on very sandy soil or on washed clay hill-
sides. It does, however, respond to good fertile soil, making
a green luxuriant growth. It may be started either from seed or
with roots. It spreads rapidly and its chief disadvantage lies
in the fact that it may become a pest in gardens and cultivated
fields.
Carpet grass is one of low creeping habit and when once es-
tablished it spreads rapidly and makes an attractive and satis-
factory lawn. The seed may be sown in spring or during the
rainy season of the summer. Sometimes it does not germinate
until the following year. Carpet grass seed may be sown with
Bermuda grass and makes an excellent combination. It never
becomes a pest in field or garden.
St. Augustine grass is a popular lawn grass in towns and
cities, and has the advantage of doing well in shady locations.
It is of coarse texture. It is started by cuttings and the cuttings
require some care until established. In a dry season they must
be watered until they are well rooted. St. Augustine grass is
sometimes badly troubled by chinch bugs. The use of tobacco dust
is recommended, or a spray of nicotine sulphate, 1/2 pt. to 50
gallons of water and 5 pounds of laundry soap.
Centipede grass makes an attractive lawn with less attention
than most other grasses. It requires less water and mowing and
grows well on high, dry sandy land as well as the heavier soils.
Centipede grass has short leaves, seldom grows more than three
or four inches high, and spreads by means of runners. The
method of planting is similar to that of St. Augustine. When
once established this grass holds the stand almost indefinitely
if reasonable attention is given it.
Italian rye grass is very generally used for a winter grass.
The seed germinate quickly and the grass grows readily under
average conditions. One can sow the seed almost any time be-






Florida Cooperative Extension


tween October and December and with a little watering can have
a green lawn until May or June. It can be seeded in the per-
manent lawns where it will fill in the bare places and become
very attractive during the winter season. This grass dies down
with the coming of warmer weather.
Bulletin 209, Florida Agricultural Experiment Station,
"Lawns in Florida", also Bulletin 57, Agricultural Extension
Service, "Herbaceous Perennials", and 59, Agricultural Exten-
sion Service, "Rose Growing", will be supplied upon request.

VINES
When one thinks of the variety and beauty of the vines that
grow in such profusion throughout Florida, one wonders what
excuse there can be for bare, unsightly buildings or yards.
In the northern section of the State are found the far-famed
Cherokee roses and the lovely yellow jessamine which festoons
the branches of the forest trees in early spring. Among the
cultivated vines wisteria probably reigns supreme with its glo-
rious wealth of purple bloom. The honeysuckle is a favorite,
too, beloved by butterflies and bees, and blooms freely through-
out most of the year.
In the tropical sections of the State the bougainvillea, the bril-
liant Bignonia venusta or flame vine, the antigonon, the thun-
bergia, and many others flaunt their vivid colors throughout the
round of seasons. In planting some of these semi-tropical vines
of such intense, brilliant hues one must exercise great care in
seeing that the colors do not clash with other plantings.

SHRUBS
Shrubs are of very great value in planting the home grounds.
When massed about the base of the house they conceal the bare
foundations and make it fit into the landscape.
In a subtropical climate, preference should be given to the
broad-leaved evergreens, because they grow here in such variety
and vigor, making the grounds green and bright, while those
of the states to the north are bare and brown.
Study the shrubbery placing on the plan in Fig. 1. At the
corner of the house the taller growing varieties may be used,
such as oleander, hibiscus, yaupon, duranta and others, while
the space underneath the windows should be planted with the
low growing varieties-abelia, the spireas, ligustrum, azaleas,







Beautifying the Home Grounds


pittosporum. Caution should be exercised in the use of shrubs
with colored or variegated foliage.
In the beds in the corner of the yard either shrubs or small
trees could be used. As an example, in North Florida a very at-
tractive planting could be made by using cedars as a background
and the Judas tree or redbud, or dogwood, and the dainty flower-
ing wild plums. The lovely redbud and plums bloom at the same
time and are very beautiful against the dark, solid background
of cedars. The dogwoods, coming into flower a little later,
would continue the period of bloom. All these trees grow wild
in profusion through the woods of northern Florida, and are
therefore easily obtainable.
Study the shrubbery chart for suggestions regarding the
planting of shrubs about the base of the house.

TABLE L.-SHRUBBERY CHART.
Kind of Shrub I Color I Time of bloom j Height I Uses I Type
White | I I Hedges
Abelia tinged pink .......... All year ................ 3- ft Borders | Evergreen
Buddleia ...............| Lavender ..............I Spring .................... 8-10 ft] Borders I Evergreen
S- Where highI
Duranta Lilac bloom, Spring I plants are I
uranta .....| yellow berries .... Fall ........................ 10-12 ft needed I
S Pink, white, | .. Tall hedges
Hibiscus .............. red .......................... All year ........ 10-12 ft Borders Evergreen
For shady
I (acid soil)
Ilex or inkberry Black fruit .......... Spring ...............8..... 4 ft locations Evergreen
Borders,
Lantana ........... orange, lavender Fall ........................ 2- 4 ft cover I
Oleand ...... I White, j Summer I o
Oleander ........ red, pink .............. Fall ........................ 110-12 ft| Borders Evergreen
[ Light blue, I Summer I
Plumbago ...... white ...................... Fall 3- 4 ft Borders I Evergreen
I I Spring I Borders, | Not
Spirea ................. White, pink .......... Summer I 4- 5 ftl hedges | Evergreen
I Trained as
Shrub or
Star jessamine .... White ............. All year ............... 3- 6 ft vine Evergreen
Yaupon .................I Red berries ..........I | 8-12 ft| Borders I Evergreen







TABLE II. PLANTING GUIDE FOR SOME FLORIDA FLOWERS.

Kind of Flower I When to Plant How To Plant ] Time of Bloom


Asters ...........--........... --...... .

Bachelor buttons ---..............------
Daffodils-bulbs (narcissus)


Calendulas .....-...-.......------............--..

California poppies .---------.... I

Chrysanthemums .------.......-.....--...

Cosmos ............-....---.---.......---]
Shasta daisies .....--..-----.. --..---

Larkspur (annual) .....----..........

Marigolds ................................
P hlox -.................. ........... .....

Petunias ......-....---...............-..-----.......

Snapdragons ...................-........

Sweet alyssum ....... ............... I

Sweet peas ............................ I

Zinnias ................ ..................


Spring .....--....
Sprin, Autmn -i


I Heights I Colors


Spring, Autumn .. I
Autumn .............

Autumn ... ......- ... -

Spring, Autumn ..

Spring .......---.........---

Spring .-------...
Autumn ..... ...... !

Spring, Autumn ..1

Spring .-------- ... --J_
Spring, Autumn ..]

Spring ....................

Spring, Autumn ..

Spring, Autumn ..

Autumn ..................

Spring .. ...---------


See lists in Gardening in the Lower South-Hume, pp. 314 and 320-21.


Se lst i Grdnig n heLoerSoth-H me p. 14an 30-1


In garden or I I I white-blue,
transplant .............. Summer, Autumn .... 1-2 ft. rose, lavender
In garden-............... Spring, Autumn ........[ 2-3 ft. I blue
In garden
3-4 in. deep ............ I Winter, Spring .......... 1 ft. I yellow, white
In garden or
transplant ..............I Winter, Spring .......... 1 ft. I yellow, orange
In garden I
never transplant .... Winter, Spring .......... 6-12 in. | yellow, orange
By cuttings I
(divisions) ...I Autumn .... ..... 2-3 ft. great variety
In garden .......-............ Summer ...................... 3-6 ft. I lavender, white
In boxes and I I
transplant ............. Spring ---..................--I 3-6 ft. | pink, white
In garden .................. I Spring, Summer ....... 18-24 in. white, rose,
[ I blue______
In garden ..-.............. I Summer .........-- ..-.... 12-30 in. yellow, orange
In garden or I I pink, yellow,
transplant ........... Spring, winter .......... 6-12 in. white, crimson
In garden .................I Spring, Summer ........I 6-21 in. white, purple,
| magenta
Sow in boxes I Winter, Summer .-..... 12-18 in. pink, white,
transplant .............I I yellow, red
In garden, cover I All seasons ................ 6 in. | white
lightly ..............
In drill 3 in. deep I I 5-6 ft. I pink, white,
(rich soil necessary)! Winter .......................| j lavender
In garden .................. I Spring, Summer ........[ variety








Beautifying the Home Grounds


. G


Fig. 3.-A desirable planting plan.






















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Fig. 4.-A suggested planting plan for a border.




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