Title: First year sewing program for girls' home demonstration clubs
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Title: First year sewing program for girls' home demonstration clubs
Series Title: First year sewing program for girls' home demonstration clubs
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Settle, Lucy Belle,
Publisher: Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida
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Bibliographic ID: UF00084541
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 214322589

Full Text

September, 1931


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914)



AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN,
AND UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
COOPERATING
WILMON NEWELL, Director







FIRST YEAR SEWING PROGRAM

for

GIRLS' HOME DEMONSTRATION CLUBS


Written and Compiled by
LUCY BELLE SETTLE








Bulletins will be sent free upon application to the
State Home Demonstration Department,
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA


Circular 27




BOARD OF CONTROL


P. K. YONGE, Chairman, Pensacola
W. B. DAVIS, Perry
A. H. BLENDING, Bartow
FRANK J. WIDEMAN, West Palm Beach
RAYMER F. MAGUIRE, Orlando
J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary, Tallahassee

STAFF, AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
JOHN J. TIGERT, M.A., LL.D., President of the University
WILMON NEWELL, D.Sc., Director
A. P. SPENCER, M.S., Vice-Director and County Agent Leader
J. FRANCIS COOPER, M.S.A., Editor
R. M. FULGHUM, B.S.A., Assistant Editor
E. F. STANTON, Supervisor, Egg-Laying Contest
RUBY NEWHALL, Secretary
COOPERATIVE AGRICULTURAL DEMONSTRATION WORK
W. T. NETTLES, B.S., District Agent
H. G. CLAYTON, M.S.A., District Agent, Organization and Out-
look Specialist
J. LEE SMITH, District Agent
R. W. BLACKLOCK, A.B., Boys' Club Agent
HAMLIN L. BROWN, B.S., Dairyman
E. F. DEBUSK, B.S., Citrus Pathologist and Entomologist
N. R. MEHRHOF, M. AGR., Poultryman
WALTER J. SHEELY, B.S., Agent in Animal Husbandry'
J. E. TURLINGTON, Ph.D., Agricultural Economist'
FRANK W. BRUMLEY, M.S.A., Agricultural Economist, Farm
Management
W. R. BRIGGS, B.S.A., Assistant Agricultural Economist, Farm
Management
D. E. TIMMONS, MS.A., Agricultural Economist, Marketing
COOPERATIVE HOME DEMONSTRATION WORK
FLAVIA GLEASON, State Agent
VIRGINIA P. MOORE, Home Improvement Specialist
LUcY BELLE SETTLE, B.S., District Agent
RUBY McDAVID, District Agent
MARY E. KEOWN, M.S., District Agent
ISABELLE S. THURSBY, B.S., Food and Marketing Agent
EVA R. CULLEY, B.S., Acting Nutritionist

'In cooperation with U. S. D. A.
'Part-time.







FIRST YEAR SEWING PROGRAM
BY LucY BELLE SETTLE

GENERAL DIRECTIONS
SEWING EQUIPMENT
1. Needles-A package of needles, 5-9.
2. Thimble-The thimble should fit the middle finger of the
right hand.
3. Emery bag-This is a small bag filled with emery dust
and is used to clean and sharpen needles.
4. Tape measure.
5. Scissors.
6. Pins.
7. Thread-Nos. 50 and 70.
8. Gauge-Made from cardboard or stiff paper.
9. A box in which to keep your sewing materials.
SUGGESTIONS FOR SEWING
1. Have the hands and nails clean and dry.
2. Sit erect, lower part of the body against the back of the
chair, feet squarely on the floor.
3. Hold your work high enough so that you will not strain
your eyes.
4. Sit with light coming over your left shoulder.
5. Study your tape measure, so that you will know the
marks that stand for 1/4 inch, 1/2 inch and 1 inch. The
quality of your work depends upon accuracy.
6. In cutting, hold the scissors in the right hand with the
narrow blade down. Cut with steady, long stroke.
7. In threading a needle always break or cut the thread
from the spool. Do not cut it with the teeth, as that
breaks the enamel of the teeth and causes them to decay.
8. Use a short thread about the length from the shoulder to
the right hand.
9. The needle should be threaded with the end of the thread
that comes from the spool first.
10. In choosing sewing materials, select simple patterns
and decorations. They are always prettier than more
elaborate ones.
11. Measure material accurately and cut it carefully. In
order to cut straight edges, pull a thread and cut along
this line.







PLAIN STITCHES
EVEN BASTING STITCH
The even basting stitch is started with a knot and finished
with a stitch over the last stitch called a back stitch. The
purpose of this stitch is to hold material together until it is
sewed securely.
RUNNING STITCH
The running stitch is started with two back stitches and
ended with two back stitches. This is made like the even
basting stitch, except the stitches are very small and close to-
gether. The purpose of this stitch is to sew seams which have
not a great deal of strain.











OVERHAND STITCH
The overhand stitch is a small, slanting stitch over the edges
or folds of material. It is started by leaving a small end of
the thread to be sewed over; the stitches are close to the edge
and very close together. This stitch is used to sew on lace or
to make a French hem. The needle is held so that it points
to the chest.






HEMMING STITCH
The hemming stitch is started by leaving a short end of the
thread under the fold. Pointing the needle to the left, take
up a few threads of material and a few threads of the fold.
Finish with a back stitch. The hemming stitch is used to
fasten a hem.


DECORATIVE STITCHES
THE OUTLINE STITCH
This stitch outlines or follows a design. The stitch is
taken on a line and worked from left to right. Care must be
taken to make the stitches all one length. Begin with a knot.
Draw needle to the right side on line. Throw thread away
from worker. Take a small back stitch on the line, needle
pointing towards the worker. This will make a long thread
on the surface and short stitches underneath. The effect is
much prettier when the stitches are taken close together.


THE BLANKET STITCH
This stitch may be used as a decoration around designs or
on the edge of blankets, table runners, etc. Work from left






to right. Fasten the thread on the underneath side with a
few running stitches and bring needle out on the right side,
1/3 to 1/4 inch from edge. The needle should come up under
the edge and through loop made by the thread. The thread
will be carried along the edge as the stitches are made. In
finishing, take several tiny stitches on the wrong side. In
starting a new thread, bring it up through the last loop at the
edge.
THE USE OF THE SEWING MACHINE
Here are a few things to notice in learning about the sewing
machine:
PARTS BELOW THE TABLE
1. Treadle.
2. Large wheel.
3. Connecting rod.
The belt connects large wheel below the table to little wheel
above the table.
PARTS ABOVE THE TABLE
1. Spool holder.
2. Shaft.
3. Needle bar.
4. Needle plate.
5. Feed.
6. The shuttle fits in the shuttle-carrier under the needle
plate.
7. The bobbin is in the shuttle.
8. Two big screws, one to make the stitches shorter or
longer; one t6 regulate the tightness of the thread, called
the tension.
A FEW THINGS TO PRACTICE
1. Learn to tread evenly. This can be practiced before
threading.
2. Follow the book of directions for threading.
3. Learn to wind the bobbin.
4. Practice filling the shuttle.
5. Practice stitching without a thread, on brown paper.
A FEW THINGS TO BE CAREFUL ABOUT
1. Both threads should be on top before beginning to stitch.
2. Hold the material on the table at the left hand and pass
it on lightly. Do not pull or push it.







3. Turn corners evenly. Have the needle down in the cloth.
Raise the presser foot and turn the work. Put presser
foot down and continue.
4. When stitching bias and straight edges together, the bias
should be placed down towards the feed, as it is more
easily stretched and is thus held in as the feed moves
forward. The presser foot holds the straight edge tight.
5. The table at the left hand is for the bulk of the work. It
should not be crowded to the right of the presser foot,
for then it is impossible to guide the work as easily or
stitch well.

THINGS TO MAKE

CUP TOWEL
A good cup towel is one that will absorb moisture readily
and which can be easily laundered. Linen has these charac-
teristics but is expensive. Expensive materials are not neces-
sary.
A cotton material which has all the dressing thoroughly
washed out may be satisfactorily used for the cup towel.
Materials:-A clean flour sack. Square from old tablecloth
thoroughly sterilized. One yard of toweling or linen crash.
Three inches of tape for loop.
Cutting:-If flour sack or square from tablecloth is used,
draw a thread on two sides, cut and then fold material cross-
wise and draw threads on the other two sides equal distances
so the cup towel when finished will be square. If toweling or
linen crash is used, straighten ends as in cutting of hand
towel.
Making:-Turn in the raw edges 1/4 inch and turn hem 1/2
inch deep. Baste and finish with hemming stitch.

HAND TOWEL
Material:-One yard of toweling or linen crash.
Cutting:-Straighten ends by drawing a thread and trim-
ming uneven ends by this thread.
Making:-Turn the edges 1/4 of an inch. Then turn 1 inch.
Baste hem in place using even basting stitch. Hem with hem-
ming stitch.





8
HOLDER



Making:Turn a /2-inch hem around
S,-


/ .












squares and baste. Place one square on table with hemmed
The efficient person has for her use in the kitchen pa holder
to lift hot utensils For the sake of convenience it can be
made with a tape having a loop at c one end that may be slipped
over the belt.
Material:-Two 8-inch squares of gingham, unbleached
muslin, or other practical material.
Two 6hree/ inch squares of outing flannel.years.
One yard of tape.
Making :-MTurn a .-winch hem around edges of 8 inch
squares and baste. Place one square on table with hemmed
edge up. Lay padding exactly in center and baste in position.
Place second square on top with hemmed edge down, keeping
corners and edges even, and baste. Stitch edges on machine or
secure with running or whipping stitch. Put two rows of pattern. /8 inch
stitching diagonally from corner to corner to hold padding in
place. Sew one end of tape to a corner of holder and on other
end, make a loop just large enough to slip over belt.

APRON
McCall Pattern No. 4001. This pattern is no longer to be
obtained in the stores, but copies of the three sizes may be
secured from the State Home Demonstration office. ..
Three sizes: Small, 8-10 years.
Medium, 12-14 years.
Large, 16-18 years.
Material:-Medium weight white percale, longcloth or cam-
bric, or other similar material will do.
Cutting :-Lay all the pieces of pattern on material and
pin before cutting one piece. Mark notches and perforations
with lead pencil. Cut out, following lines of pattern. % inch
has been allowed on all seams.







Making:-Close centerback seam as notched with French
seam. Close underarm seams in same way. Neck and outer
edges of apron may be finished with hem by hand or machine
or may be faced or bound with bias tape, finished by hand or
machine.


Turn hem at top of pocl et .44
hem.
Turn % inch hem around outer
position on apron.


inch and stitch with 1 inch

edge of pocket and stitch to


SUGGESiED ARTICLES


After the required article
ing bag in which such equi
thimbles, etc., may be carri


aS of sewing are completed a sew-
pment as needles, thread, scissors,.
id can be made.


SE VING BAG
Material:---Unbleached domestic, rep, cretonne, or linen
make attractive bags. A piece 12 inches by 28 inches will be
required. 48 inches of tape.
Cutting:-Draw thread and straighten.
Making:-Fold piece in half by placing two narrow ends
together. Make seam on each side 1 inch wide to within 4
inches of the top, using short running stitch. Open seam and
overcast edges to the opening. Turn under top edges 1/4 inch,
then turn 13 inches for the hem. Run a double row of


. .9


OACK -







stitches, one on edge of hem and the other 1/2 of an inch above
this row.















Briar stitch or other decorative stitch may be used here.
This forms a casing for drawstring.
Whip edges in the hem together above casing.
Run two tapes 24 inches long through the casing.
Draw from both sides.
GOWN
Material:-Night Gown-Berkeley cambric, nainsook, long-
cloth, muslin, or crepe.
Directions for Making Pattern:-Take measure from high-
est point of neck to the floor.
One-half width of chest plus length of sleeve.
Bust measure. Take measure around fullest part of bust
and add two inches to insure measure being large enough.
Desired length of sleeve,
Inside length of sleeve.
Loose armhole measure.
AB-Length from highest point of shoulder to floor.
AD-Four to five inches.
AE-Five to six inches.
DE-Line for neck (neck may be round, square or pointed).
AF-One-half width of chest plus desired length of sleeve.
CG-One-quarter bust measure plus one inch.
GH-Desired length of inside sleeve.
BI-One-quarter width of bottom.
GI-Underarm seam of gown.
BJ-Bottom curve.

































Cutting:-Fold the material, in the middle lengthwise; then
fold crosswise, bringing the ends together.
Place drafted pattern so that shoulder, AF, and center of
front, AB, both come on folded edges of material. Pin pattern
securely, so that there is no danger of slipping. Cut, making
seam allowance one-half inch and hem allowance of two and
one-half inches.
Making:-Utiderarm seams: French seams may be used
for making these. Place the two pieces of cloth with wrong
sides together and edges even; baste and stitch. Remove
basting, trim edges, turn or fold, baste, and stitch on machine.
Hem: Try on the gown to see that it is even around the
bottom. Fold a two-inch hem, using the measuring gauge.
The fullness, due to the curve of the bottom, can be laid in
small plaits. Baste, and then stitch along the edge of the hem.
Finish of neck and sleeves: The neck and sleeves may be
finished with bias seam tape or bias facing, on the edge of
which lace or other trimming may be used for nightgown.






12



SCORE CARDS FOR CLOTHING*

Handwork on Household Articles and Clothing Accessories,
Involving Design
Points
I. Value of articles in relation to work done and material
used .............................................. .. ............................................ 25
II. Suitability of materials .......................................................... 20
T textures ................................................................................ 10
K ind of fibers .................................. .....--.............................. 5
Thread used ........................ .... ........ .................. ............ 5
Size
Type
III. D esign and color ................................-..................................... 25
Appropriateness of design to material-.........................-------.. 5
Subordination of design to the purpose of article........ 5
Adaptation of design to the area..........---........-...................-------- 5
Quality of rhythm, harmony, and balance-....................-----.. 5
Choice of color combination ..............................................-- 5
IV. Workmanship ....................................---------------------- 25
Choice and neatness of stitches, seams, hems, etc....... 15
Perfection of stitching .................................................. 10
V. General appearance .............-- .........................------................. 5
Total score ................................--................................ 100

Handwork on Household Articles, Involving No Design
I. Suitability of materials .......................................................... 40
K ind of fiber .......................................................................... 15
Texture of fabric ................................................................. 15
Thread used .........................................................---------------......... 10
Size
Type
II. Workmanship ........... --------------------------------------- 50
H em s .............................................................................. .... 20
Type
Width
Finish of corners ..............................----------------------............................----........ 15
Stitches ....................................---............................................... --------15
Kind used
Appearance on right side
Appearance on wrong side
III. General appearance .................................................................. 10
Cleanliness .............................................................................------------- 5
Pressing ................................................................------------.................. 5
Total score ..............----------.......---- ..........--------..-. 100

*From U.S.D.A. Misc. Cir. No. 90.












SCORE CARDS FOR CLOTHING*

Undergarments
Points
I. Materials used, including trimmings .................................. 30
Hygienic aspects .................................................................. 10
Durability of materials ...................................................... 10
Laundering qualities ............................................................ 10
II. W orkmanship ....................................................8....................... 30
Choice and neatness of seams, hems, finishes, etc......... 15
Perfection of stitching (hand or machine) .................... 15
III. Design .......................................................................................... 20
Suitability .............................................................................. 10
Protection and modesty
Comfort
Beauty in line and color...................................................... 5
Originality ............................................................................... 5
IV. General appearance ................................................................ 10
Cleanliness ............................................................................ 5
Pressing .................................................................................. 5
V. Relation of garment value to cost in time and money.... 10

Total score ...........................................-.............. ..... 100

School, House, or Street Dresses
I. Materials used, including trimmings.................................... 30
Suitability to design and purpose of dress ................... 15
Durability of materials ..........-........................................... 10
Laundering and cleaning qualities......-...--........................ 5
II. Design and color ............................................................--....------.... 20
Suitability to occasion ........................................................ 10
Individuality ......................................................................... 5
Beauty of line and color ....................................................... 5
III. W orkmanship ........................................................................... 30
Choice and neatness of seams, hems, finishes, etc......... 15
Perfection of stitching (hand or machine).................... 15
IV. General appearance --........-........................................................ 10
Cleanliness .............................................................................. 5
Pressing .................................................................................. 5
V. Relation of garment value to cost in time and money.... 10
Total score ......................................... .....--............ 100

*From U.S.D.A. Misc. Cir. No. 90.












OUTLINE OF REQUIREMENTS

FIRST YEAR SEWING
Articles Needed in Club Work
Required: Suggested Articles:
Hand towel Sewing bag
Cup towel Nightgown
Holder
Cap
Apron

SECOND YEAR SEWING
The Uniform
Required: Suggested Article:
Patching Brassiere
Stocking darn
Plain white dress of linen or
cotton material
Uniform cap
Uniform apron with emblem
Bloomers


Required:
For bedroom:
(Any four
made)
Curtains
Scarfs
Pillowcases
Bedspread


THIRD YEAR SEWING
Room Improvement
For dining room:
Removal of stains
articles may be Curtains-full length
Luncheon Set-Cloth and 4 nap-
kins of suitable size
Suggested Article:
Dress suitable for school wear


FOURTH YEAR SEWING
The Well-Dressed Club Girl
Required: Suggested Article:
Slip Pajama Suit
Bloomers or step-ins
Brassiere
Informal party dress




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