Title: Second year sewing program for girls' home demonstration clubs
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Title: Second year sewing program for girls' home demonstration clubs
Series Title: Second year sewing program for girls' home demonstration clubs
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Settle, Lucy Belle,
Publisher: Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida
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Bibliographic ID: UF00084539
Volume ID: VID00001
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 214322928

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Circular 28


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914)



AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN,
AND UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
COOPERATING
WILMON NEWELL, Director






SECOND YEAR SEWING PROGRAM

for

GIRLS' HOME DEMONSTRATION CLUBS


Written and Compiled by

LUCY BELLE SETTLE,
District Home Demonstration Agent









Bulletins will be send free upon application to the
State Home Demonstration Department,
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA


June, 1931






BOARD OF CONTROL


P. K. YONGE, Chairman, Pensacola
W. B. DAVIS, Perry
A. H. BLENDING, Tampa
FRANK J. WIDEMAN, West Palm Beach
RAYMER F. MAGUIRE, Orlando
J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary, Tallahassee

STAFF, AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
JOHN J. TIGERT, M.A., LL.D., President of the University
WILMON NEWELL, D.Sc., Director
A. P. SPENCER, M.S., Vice-Director and County Agent Leader
J. FRANCIS COOPER, M.S.A., Editor
R. M. FULGHUM, B.S.A., Assistant Editor
E. F. STANTON, Supervisor, Egg-Laying Contest
RUBY NEWHALL, Secretary
COOPERATIVE AGRICULTURAL DEMONSTRATION WORK
W. T. NETTLES, B.S., District Agent
H. G. CLAYTON, M.S.A., District Agent, Organization and Out-
look Specialist
J. LEE SMITH, District Agent
R. W. BLACKLOCK, A.B., Boys' Club Agent
HAMLIN L. BROWN, B.S., Dairyman
E. F. DEBUSK, B.S., Citrus Pathologist and Entomologist
N. R. MEHRHOF, M. AGR., Poultryman
WALTER J. SHEELY, B.S., Agent in Animal Husbandry'
J. E. TURLINGTON, Ph.D., Agricultural Economist2
FRANK W. BRUMLEY, M.S.A., Agricultural Economist, Farm
Management
W. R. BRIGGS, B.S.A., Assistant Agricultural Economist, Farm
Management
D. E. TIMMONS, M.S.A., Agricultural Economist, Marketing
COOPERATIVE HOME DEMONSTRATION WORK
FLAVIA GLEASON, State Agent
VIRGINIA P. MOORE, Home Improvement Specialist
LUCY BELLE SETTLE, B.S., District Agent
RUBY MCDAVID, District Agent
MARY E. KEOWN, M.S., District Agent
ISABELLE S. THURSBY, B.S., Food and Marketing Agent
EVA R. CULLEY, B.S., Acting Nutritionist
'In cooperation with U. S. D. A.
'Part-time.








SECOND YEAR SEWING PROGRAM


By LucY BELLE SETTLE
THE UNIFORM
DARNING








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Jill, I1

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Material:-A pair of stockings with holes caused by actual
wear.
Darner and needle just heavy enough to carry thread.
Darning cotton. Use two single threads at one time. This
should match the thread of the stocking in size and color.
Making:-Turn stocking right side out.
Place darner inside and smooth stocking over it, holding it
in place with left hand.
Trim off ragged edges with scissors.
Put in basting stitch with colored thread in the form of a
diamond shape as a guide line for your work. The point of
the diamond should be one-half inch from the hole.
Put in lengthwise or warp threads first. Put needle in at
lower guide line, taking running stitches until the upper guide
line is reached, leaving a little loop of darning cotton at each








- -





- -

1

a


4


5
Steps in making Hemmed Patch.
1.-Patch pinned to wrong side.
2.-Patch basted and corners clip-
ped.
3.-Hem turned under and basted.
Right side.
4.-Edge of patch turned under
and basted.
5.-Stitch or hem with hemming
stitch.


III


I I
I I
I I
I I
I I


II
I, ii
11L1111
II II
I, ii


II- _____
I


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I'--- ----41
- - - a








turn to allow for shrinkage. Take care not to draw threads
too tight. Repeat until hole is reached. Take up on the needle
a tiny edge on the other side. Continue this until the hole is
covered and the threads extend within 4 inch of the opposite
corner.
The Crosswise or Woof Threads: Begin 4 inch from top
and work in crosswise threads in the same manner until the
hole is crossed, then take running stitches to the guide line.
Repeat until space enclosed by guide lines is filled. Remove
guide line. After two or three stockings have been darned the
guide lines will not be needed.

HEMMED PATCH
Materials:-Garment that has hole in it. A piece of cloth
that matches garment.
Cutting:-Cut a square or rectangular piece that will cover
the hole and extend beyond the worn part. The patch should
be cut from one to two inches larger than the hole.
Making:-Press material for patch and garment to be
patched. Match design in material or if material has no
design match warp and woof threads. Pin patch in place
on wrong side of garment and baste. Trim hole to form
square. Clip corners diagonally 1/8 inch. Turn hem under
and baste. Turn garment to wrong side. Turn edges of patch
under and baste. Stitch on machine or hem with hemming
stitch.
HOW TO MAKE A BUTTONHOLE
Placing the Buttonhole:-Buttonholes should always be
made on double material.
Wherever there is strain on a garment the buttonhole should
be made at right angles to the edge of the garment.
Buttonholes should never be closer than 1/4 inch to edge.
Mark place for buttonhole with pinholes.
Cutting the Buttonhole:-Fold material half-way between
the pinholes so that the pin will pass through both ends of the
located buttonhole. One should cut truly and exactly on a
thread. Cut from folded edge to pin by placing the fold within
the open scissors and cutting evenly.














7


Overcasting the Buttonhole:-The overcasting stitch is used
to prevent traveling. Hold the buttonhole over first finger.
Begin without a knot and at the end farthest away from
finished edge of garment. Work over the end of the thread.
Point needle to left shoulder to make a slanting stitch. Make
three or four stitches on each side of buttonhole about %1/
inch deep. The corner stitches should be taken so that the
needle is pointed at right angles to the cut. Overcast both
sides.














Making the Buttonhole Stitch:-When the buttonhole is
overcast the needle should be in position to begin the button-
hole where the overcasting was, started. Point the needle
at right angles to the edge and take a stitch 1/8 inch deep.
Hold the buttonhole so that it lies flat on the top of the first
finger. Do not spread it open. Throw the double thread from
the eye of the needle around the point in the same direction







as the buttonhole is being worked from right to left. Draw
the needle through, pulling the thread at right angles to and
toward the cut edge of the buttonhole. A little finishing loop,
called the purl, will be formed at the edge, which prevents
the buttonhole from wearing. Continue along one edge until
the corner is reached. All stitches should be the same depth,
the same space between stitches and the purl exactly on edge.






Sewing on Button:--Start with double thread and make
two stitches, one over the other, to fasten the thread. String
button on the needle. Place pin over top of button, sew it with
stitches crossed back and forth through the holes of the
button. The stitches should be taken so that the pull of the
button will come on the warp or lengthwise threads of the
garment. Finish on wrong side with several finishing stitches.
Remove pin.














PLAIN WHITE DRESS
It is suggested that the club girl make a one-piece dress
suitable for use in presenting demonstrations in canning,
cooking, etc.
Materials:-Cotton materials, such as percale, madras,
Nurse's linen, galatea and linen.







Cutting:-Lay the pieces of pattern on material and pin
before cutting any one piece.
Mark all the notches and perforations with lead pencil,
which will help later in putting the dress together. Cut out
the pieces, following the line of the pattern if seams have been
allowed. If not, measure % inch on all edges where seams
will be taken and cut on this line.
To Make:-Baste underarm seams, then shoulder seams of
the dress together, so that first seam will be on right side.
Try on the dress and take up or let out the seams as needed.
Be careful not to fit too closely.
Stitch 1/4 inch from fitted seam. Trim edges. Turn, baste,
stitch seam on wrong side 1/4 inch from edge. This makes a
French seam.
Sleeves:-If any trimming is used on the sleeve, sew it on
first.
If a cuff is used, put it on first.
Baste the two sides of sleeves together so that the first
seam will be on right side and try on.
Sew on machine 1/ inch from fitted seam. Remove basting
and trim. Turn, and baste 1/4 inch from edge and stitch, mak-
ing a French seam.
When sleeve is finished, place in the dress so that notches
of sleeve and notches of dress correspond.
Baste the wrong side of sleeve and the wrong side of dress
together.
Try on to see if the sleeve is placed just right. Stitch
around the armhole. Turn and baste French seam. Stitch
and remove bastings.
Hem:-Club girls can assist each other in putting the hem
in the dress. Stand straight with your feet flat on the floor.
Let someone measure with a ruler the distance you wish
dress from the floor. By placing pins horizontally at this
distance the hem can be turned on this line.
Cut a marker out of a cardboard the desired width of hem.
Make first fold 1/4 inch. Turn the second fold according to the
depth of marker. Baste and then stitch. Any fullness should
be gathered in rather than held in plaits.







BLOOMERS OR SHORTS
Bloomers are a more desirable garment than teddies or step-
ins. They are gaining in favor, for they are very comfortable
and are easily laundered.
Materials:-Muslin, nainsook, or other undergarment ma-
terial, or same material as wash dress. For wear in the sum-
mer thin material as nainsook, or cross-barred dimity, makes
cooler bloomers.
Pattern:-Commercial patterns may be used.
Making:-If seat is to be reinforced lay pieces on wrong
side of goods and cut size and shape desired. Baste, turn
all edges except along seams of bloomers, baste and stitch.
Be careful to have cut edges of reinforcing pieces come exactly
to cut edges of bloomers.
If bloomers are to be made with a band around the waist,
bound or faced plackets should be made 10 to 12 inches deep
on one or both sides.
If bloomers are to be made with a fitted yoke in the front
and an elastic in the back, no plackets are necessary. Bloom-
ers with a front yoke fitted loosely enough to hang on the hips
give a flat effect.
Place the two back seams together and make a flat fell
seam 1/4 inch wide. The flat fell seam may be made on either
the right or the wrong side. Sew the fronts together in a
flat fell seam. Match these seams and sew the legs up with
flat fell seams.
Make a hem around each leg wide enough for the elastic,
or for the elastic and width heading desired, or gather bloomer
into a cuff at the knee. The cuff may be made about 11
inches wide finished and loose enough to slip comfortably on
the figure when seated. Such bloomers need to be shorter
than when elastic is used at the knee.
Before stitching the bands or hems at the bottom try on
bloomers to see that the length is correct and that they fit
comfortably.
For finishing the top a hem or facing may be used for the
elastic or the directions on the pattern followed for applying
the yoke.
Shorts for girls have been adapted from boys' track pants
and are tighter and shorter than bloomers with elastic. They







usually are made with a fitted yoke in the front and an elastic
at the back.
UNIFORM CAP
For making of cap refer to First Year Sewing Bulletin.
UNIFORM APRON WITH EMBLEM

Use instructions for making apron from First Year Bulletin,
except that apron should be constructed to fasten under arm
with buttons and buttonholes. In cutting apron extend the
two ends of back in a curve to lap over front when fastened.
Cut by these curved ends two small pieces with selvage at
top. Baste these in place on under side of back. This will
give double thickness for buttonholes. In the same manner
make a double thickness on the two ends of the front for the
buttons.
APRON EMBLEM















Instructions for Working:-Outline the four H's, and the
lines connecting the H's. Outline clover leaf in green. Fill in
with seed stitch, also using green. Press the embroidered
emblem on the wrong side. Crease hem evenly around the
four sides, turning the corners in such a way that the emblem
remains square.
The apron emblem belongs on the left side of the apron so
that in pledging the heart to greater loyalty the emblem is
directly under the hand. Lay the apron flat on the table and
place on the left shoulder strap the emblem. Measure from







the lowest part of the neck line straight across to the bottom
of the emblem and adjust the emblem until the lower edge is
in line with the lowest line of the neck and parallel to the floor.
Be sure that it is in the center of the strap and measure equal
distance from the outer edge of emblem to the outer edge of
the strap. The stem of the clover should point downward.
Pin, baste and whip into place.

SUGGESTED ARTICLES
BRASSIERE
Brassieres are needed by practically all girls in order to
have a trim appearance and a feeling of being well dressed.
Materials:-
A. Any firm medium weight material as: poplin, twill,
broadcloth, or muslin. Heavy coarse lace or net.
B. Materials needed will be 1/4 yard of 36-inch material, 1
yard cotton tape for straps, hook and eye, length of
brassiere in the back.
Pattern:-A commercial pattern or a brassiere that fits well
may be used for a pattern.
Making:-Follow directions given on commercial pattern or
instructions of Home Demonstration Agent.








SCORE CARD FOR BUTTONHOLES, DARN AND PATCH*

BUTTONHOLES
Points
I. Suitability to garment and purpose ........................................... 30
Position of buttonhole .............................................................. 10
Type .............................................................................................. 10
Size ................................................................................................ 10
II. W orkm anship .................................................................................... 50
(a) For w worked buttonholes ................................................... 50
K ind of thread used .................................................... 10
Depth and evenness of stitches .................................. 20
Perfection of purl ...................................................... 10
Perfection of fan or bar end .................................... 10
(b) For bound buttonholes .................................................... 50
Evenness of finish ........................................................ 15
End finish ........................................................................ 15
Appearance on wrong side ..................................... 10
K ind of m material used ................................................ 10
III. General appearance ............................... ............. ............................ 20
Total score ....--....--.............................10..................................................... 100

DARN
I. Inconspicuousness of darn ................................................................ 60
Choice of thread or yarfi used ................................................ 20
Size and position of stitches .................................................... 20
General neatness of w ork ........................................................ 20
II. Durability of result ............................................................................ 30
III. General appearance of exhibit .......................................................... 10
Cleanliness .................................................................................... 5
Pressing ..................... .................................................................. 5
Total score .......................................................................................... 100

PATCH
I. Inconspicuousness of patch ................................................................ 40
Choice of material and thread for patch ...... ..................... 10
Placing of patch ........................................................................ 10
Size and position of stitches .................................................... 10
General neatness of w ork ........................................................ 10
II. Suitability of type of patch to article and fabric ........................ 20
III. D urability of result ............................................................................ 30
IV General appearance of exhibit .................................-........................ 10
Cleanliness ................................................................................... 5
Pressing ........................................................................................ 5
Total score .......................................................................................... 100


*From U.S.D.A. Misc. Cir. No. 90.











SCORE CARD FOR CLOTHING*

UNDERGARMENTS
Points

I. Materials used, including trimmings ..........--------------- ------ 30
Hygienic aspects ................................----...........................--------......... 10
Durability of materials ........................--------........ ............ ... 10
Laundering qualities ................................................................ 10
II. W orkmanship ........................................................................................ 30
Choice and neatness of seams, hems, finishes, etc. ............ 15
Perfection of stitching (hand or machine) ............................ 15
III. Design ...................................................................................................... 20
Suitability ............................................. .....-- --.. .................-- -... 10
Protection and modesty
Comfort
Beauty in line and color ............................................................ 5
Originality .................................................................................... 5
IV. General appearance .............................................................................. 10
Cleanliness ...................................................................................---------. 5
Pressing ........................................................................................ 5
V. Relation of garment value to cost in time and money ................ 10
Total score .......................................................................................... 100

SCHOOL, HOUSE, OR STREET DRESSES
I. Materials used, including trimmings .............................................. 30
Suitability to design and purpose of dress .......................... 15
Durability of materials ............................................................ 10
Laundering and cleaning qualities ........................................ 5
II. Design and color ................................................................................ 20
Suitability to occasion ................................................................ 10
Individuality ................................................................................ 5
Beauty of line and color ............................................................ 5
III. W workmanship ........................................................................................ 30
Choice and neatness of seams, hems, finishes, etc., ............ 15
Perfection of stitching (hand or machine) ........................ 15
IV. General appearance .............................................................................. 10
Cleanliness .................................................................................... 5
Pressing ........................................................................................ 5
V. Relation of garment value to cost in time and money ................ 10
Total score .......................................................................................... 100


*From U.S.D.A. Misc. Cir. No. 90.

















Required.
Cup towel
Hand towel
Holder
Cap
Apron


OUTLINE OF REQUIREMENTS

FIRST YEAR SEWING
Articles Needed in Club Work
Suggested Articles:
Sewing bag
Nightgown


SECOND Y
The


Required:
Stocking darn
Patching
Plain white, dress of linen or
cotton material
Bloomers
Uniform cap
Uniform apron with emblem


EAR SEWING
Uniform
Suggested Article:
Brassiere


THIRD YEAR SEWING
Room Improvement
Required: For dining room:
For bedroom Removal of stains
(Any four articles may Curtains-full length
be made) Luncheon Set-Cloth and
Curtains 4 napkins
Scarfs
Pillowcases Suggested Article:
Bed spread Dress suitable for school wear


FOURTH YEAR SEWING
The Well-Dressed Club Girl
Making of a clothing inventory and budget.
Dyeing and remodeling dress.
Making of Princess slip.
Making of an informal party dress.
Suggested Articles:
Pajama Suit.




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