Title: Third year sewing program for girls' home demonstration clubs
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Title: Third year sewing program for girls' home demonstration clubs
Series Title: Third year sewing program for girls' home demonstration clubs
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Settle, Lucy Belle,
Publisher: Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida
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Bibliographic ID: UF00084538
Volume ID: VID00001
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Circular 29


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914)



AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN,
AND UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
COOPERATING
WILMON NEWELL, Director







THIRD YEAR SEWING PROGRAM

for

GIRLS' HOME DEMONSTRATION CLUBS


Written and Compiled by
LUCY BELLE SETTLE,
District Home Demonstration Agent







Bulletins will be sent free upon application to the
State Home Demonstration Department,
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA


June, 1931






BOARD OF CONTROL


P. K. YONGE, Chairman, Pensacola
W. B. DAVIS, Perry
A. H. BLENDING, Tampa
FRANK J. WIDEMAN, West Palm Beach
RAYMER F. MAGUIRE, Orlando
J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary, Tallahassee

STAFF, AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
JOHN J. TIGERT, M.A., LL.D., President of the University
WILMON NEWELL, D.Sc., Director
A. P. SPENCER, M.S., Vice-Director and County Agent Leader
J. FRANCIS COOPER, M.S.A., Editor
R. M. FULGHUM, B.S.A., Assistant Editor
E. F. STANTON, Supervisor, Egg-Laying Contest
RUBY NEWHALL, Secretary
COOPERATIVE AGRICULTURAL DEMONSTRATION WORK
W. T. NETTLES, B.S., District Agent
H. G. CLAYTON, M.S.A., District Agent, Organization and Out-
look Specialist
J. LEE SMITH, District Agent
R. W. BLACKLOCK, A.B., Boys' Club Agent
HAMLIN L. BROWN, B.S., Dairyman
E. F. DEBUSK, B.S., Citrus Pathologist and Entomologist
N. R. MEHRHOF, M. AGR., Poultryman
WALTER J. SHEELY, B.S., Agent in Animal Husbandry'
J. E. TURLINGTON, Ph.D., Agricultural Economist'
FRANK W. BRUMLEY, M.S.A., Agricultural Economist, Farm
Management
W. R. BRIGGS, B.S.A., Assistant Agricultural Economist, Farm
Management
D. E. TIMMONS, M.S.A., Agricultural Economist, Marketing
COOPERATIVE HOME DEMONSTRATION WORK
FLAVIA GLEASON, State Agent
VIRGINIA P. MOORE, Home Improvement Specialist
LUCY BELLE SETTLE, B.S., District Agent
RUBY MCDAVID, District Agent
MARY E. KEOWN, M.S., District Agent
ISABELLE S. THURSBY, B.S., Food and Marketing Agent
EVA R. CULLEY, B.S., Acting Nutritionist
'In cooperation with U. S. D. A.
'Part-time.








THIRD YEAR SEWING PROGRAM
By Lucy BELLE SETTLE

ROOM IMPROVEMENT
The aim of this outline is to teach the girl the funda-
mental principles of sewing, as applied to the artistic furnish-
ing of a room. To accomplish this aim, projects may be se-
lected so that they center around home improvement. It is
suggested that either the bedroom or dining room be chosen.
FOR BEDROOM FURNISHINGS
Materials:-Unbleached muslin, linen crash, Indian head,
or other suitable materials.

CURTAINS
Measure length needed, allowing 21/4 inches for top hem
and 11/4 inches for bottom. Pull threads and cut.
Fold hem at bottom, first fold 14 inch, second fold 1 inch.
Top hem, main fold 21/4 inches, first fold 1/4 inch, second
fold 2 inches. Baste hem.
Put in running stitch 1 inch from edge of hem to form a
casing for curtain rod or string. Hem may be secured with
hemming stitch or with decorative stitch.
Decoration:-Make simple decoration in different colored
thread. Apply strips of plain gingham, chambray or cretonne.
Finish edge with blanket stitch, cross stitch, or other suitable
stitch. Rickrack braid may be used.
DRESSER SCARF, WASHSTAND COVER OR TABLE RUNNER
Making:-Measure width and length of dresser, allowing
about 6 inches to hang down on each end of dresser. Add
11/4 inches all the way around for the hems.
Pull threads and cut.
Hem, making first fold 14 inch wide and second fold 1 inch
wide. Fold corners neatly so that fold is diagonal. Mitre. Baste
hem in place. Hem with hemming stitch, or use outline or
other decorative stitch.
Decoration:-Same as for curtains, so that furnishings
will harmonize.






4
BEAD SPREAD
Materials:-One unbleached muslin sheet 81x90" for double
bed; 63x90" for single bed. If material other than unbleached
muslin is used for furnishings, the bed spread should be se-
lected accordingly.
Making:-Hem and decorate with design to match bedroom
set.
FOR DINING ROOM FURNISHINGS
CURTAINS
Materials:-Unbleached muslin, Indian head, or plain color-
ed material to harmonize with coloring of room. A valance
of the same material, or of cretonne, may be used if desired.
It is suggested that full length curtains be made for the dining
room.
Making:-For directions, refer to curtains in outline for
bedroom.
LUNCHEON SET
The luncheon set consists of the cloth and four napkins.
Attractiveness is added by use of colored thread and cross
stitch, or some other simple embroidery.
Materials:-Indian head, unbleached domestic, or linen;
embroidery cotton.
Cutting:-Cut off selvage and straighten one end by draw-
ing a thread and cutting. Make the luncheon cloth 36 inches
square, or size best suited to needs. Measure from both
straightened edges, draw threads and cut. Make the napkin
15 inches square by measuring, drawing threads and cutting
as described for the luncheon cloth. If colored threads are
to be drawn into the set, this should be done at this point.
Making:-Turn under edges and hem with hemming stitch.
The finished hem may be 1/% or 1/4 inch in width.
Decoration:-Stamp, work design in one corner of napkin
and in each corner of the luncheon cloth.
THE SCHOOL DRESS
It is suggested that the club girl make a one-piece dress.
Materials:-Cotton materials, such as gingham, percale,
chambray, madras, broadcloth, Peter Pan, poplin.







Suggestions for Trimming:-Use a plain material which
matches predominating color of dress. For dark materials,
white makes an attractive trimming, as it tends to brighten
up.
Bias strips piped with material to match the predominating
color in material could be used. There are many braids which
make attractive trimmings.
REMOVAL OF STAINS
Reference: United States Department of Agriculture Thrift
Leaflet No. 6.
CARE OF CLOTHING
It is not enough to know how to make garments and select
clothes that are becoming and suitable. We need also to know
how to repair and care for clothing. We need to form the habit
of taking the proper care of our clothes. Test your habits in
regard to the care of your clothes by answering the following
questions. If you can answer "Yes" to these questions you
may consider that you have formed very good habits.
Do you hang your coats, dresses, and blouses on hangers
as soon as they are taken off?
Do you remove spots and stains as soon as they appear?
Do you mend a rip or tear as soon as it appears?
Do you mend the holes in your stockings by darning?
Do you hang the clothes worn during the day so that they
can air at night?
Do you hang the clothes worn at night so that they can air
during the day?
Do you change your underclothing at least three times a
week?
Do you wear fresh stockings every day ?
Do you keep your shoes repaired as often as necessary ?
Do you keep the clothes in shelves and drawers arranged
in orderly fashion?
Do you keep your clothes brushed and pressed?
Do you keep fasteners sewed on securely?
Do you keep your garments adjusted so that straps and
underwear do not show at the neck? Slips and bloomers do
not show below the dress ?
Do you keep your stockings straight?







Do you keep your hair clean, brushed and nicely arranged?
Do you keep your body clean?
Do you keep your nails nicely manicured ?
Do you protect the dresses and coats that are worn only
occasionally ?
Do you put soiled clothes in their proper container as soon
as they have had a chance to air ?
Do you have a place for every article of clothing?
Do you put shoe trees in your shoes as soon as you take
them off?
Do you clean your hats frequently?
Do you do these things without being reminded?
Pressing:-Sponging and pressing are done to freshen gar-
ments which are not soiled enough to need dry cleaning or
washing. Cotton and linen dresses can be worn for some
time without laundering if they are pressed and occasionally
sponged with clear water.
Silk and rayons must not be pressed with too hot an iron.
Press on the wrong side of the garment.
Wool should be covered with a damp cloth and pressed with
a hot iron until the wool is thoroughly steamed but not dry.
If pressed too dry on the right side, a shine on the goods may
result.
Often wrinkles will shake out of silks and wool garments
if they are hung over a bathtub of steaming hot water. Steam-
ing is all that is necessary for velvet and chiffon.
The Dress Bag:-Dresses and coats that are not in constant
use should be protected from dust, smoke and contact with
other garments. The dress bag should be made of a closely
woven material that will not permit dust and dirt to sift
through. Such materials as percale, cambric, unbleached
muslin, cretonne and Indian head are satisfactory.
Directions for Making.-Make the bag about six inches
longer than the longest garment to be placed inside and from
27 to 30 inches wide. Since most of the materials suitable for
this purpose are made in 36 inch widths, it is an economy to
make two bags, using one and one-half widths for each. There
,are various styles of garment bags, but the ones that are
open through the center lengthwise or along one side are
most convenient. The opening should be finished with snaps.







Care of Stockings:-Select stockings that are durable, and
then take good care of them. Perspiration from the feet
causes the threads to wear quickly. Stockings that are washed
as soon as they are taken off will last longer than if allowed
to dry with the perspiration in them. Use warm soapy water
and rinse well. Do not rub soap on the stockings, as it will
cause them to fade in spots. Do not put silk or wool stockings
in hot water. Select stockings that are long enough in the
feet. They are more comfortable to wear and require mend-
ing less frequently,
Stockings should be mended as soon as a break occurs.
Whether it is a "run" or a hole, a stitch in time will save many
more than nine. If the break is in the form of a "run", turn
the stocking to the wrong side and catch the edges together
with small stitches. Be sure to catch the loop at the end of
the run to prevent further running.
Care of Underclothing:-Underclothing should be changed
frequently, although it may appear to be clean. The body not
only gives out three pints of water daily in perspiration, but
it also gives off oily secretions through the pores of the skin.
Even when a bath is taken daily, there is a certain amount
of perspiration and oily secretion taken up by the undergar-
ments. This explains why it is necessary to change under-
garments at least twice a week and more often, if possible.
The garments worn during the day should be placed where
they can air thoroughly at night. The garments worn at
night should be aired during the day.

HOW TO BE WELL GROOMED
The first and greatest essential of being well dressed is to
be well groomed. By "well groomed" is meant having a clean
body, clean, well-brushed and carefully arranged hair, clean
hands and well-cared-for finger nails, teeth which receive daily
care, well-polished shoes, clean, carefully brushed and pressed
clothing, and all garments carefully and accurately adjusted.
The well-dressed girl wears the right kind of clothing for the
time and place. The girl who gets the most joy and happiness
out of life gives attention to the many little things that make
her attractive and charming.







Care of the Teeth:-Well-cared-for teeth are essential to
good appearance. Brushing after each meal will help to keep
the teeth in good condition. A good tooth powder or paste will
aid in keeping the teeth clean. Salt is also excellent, especial-
ly if the gums are soft or bleeding. A moderately stiff brush
with uneven bristles is good for cleaning the teeth. Particles
of food should be removed from the teeth by means of dental
floss.
A regular visit to a dentist for examination once in every
six months should be a part of the health routine, even if no
trouble is experienced.
Care of the Hair:-The hair should be brushed once a day
with a clean brush to clean and stimulate the scalp. It should
be shampooed whenever it becomes dirty. This may mean
once a week or twice a month, depending on the character of
the hair and conditions of living.
Any good soap can be used in shampooing with warm soft
water, although castile and tincture of green soap are es-
pecially good. After the scalp and hair are clean, rinse all
soap from them, using two or three waters. Drying the hair
in direct sunlight is an excellent stimulant. A vigorous mas-
sage of the scalp with the fingers will stimulate the blood ves-
sels and promote the health of the hair. Brushing with a
clean brush will often prevent dandruff. Rubbing the scalp
with white vaseline is sometimes an aid in combatting exces-
sive dandruff.
Care of the Hands:-One of the first things anyone notices
about a girl is her hands. They can be made attractive by a
little care each day.
Wash the hands carefully with warm water and a mild soap.
A small brush will aid in removing the dirt. An orange wood
stick with cotton wrapped around the end may be necessary
in cleaning under the nails.
Gently push back the cuticle with a wash cloth or towel.
Be careful to remove all soap and rinse well in cold water.
Dry the hands thoroughly after washing to prevent rough-
ness or chapping.
If the hands are rough, use a good hand lotion, olive oil,
cold cream or vaseline.
Once or twice a week take time for a good manicure.







With a flexible nail file, shape. the nails to conform to the
curve of the end of the fingers. Long nails and pointed nails are
not in harmony with the lines of the fingers and, therefore,
are not considered beautiful.
Soak the hands in warm, soapy water until the cuticle is
softened. With an orange wood stick, push back the cuticle
around the nail. That part of the skin which is dead and dry
will rub off. Clean under the points of the nail. Rinse to
remove soapy water.
Polish the nails by rubbing against the palm of the hand
or with a nail buffer. A dry polish may be used. Avoid a
high polish.
Hangnails are the result of dry and hardened cuticle. To
prevent this, rub a bit of olive oil, vaseline, cream or any good
skin softener around the nails at night.
Do not bite the nails. This is a bad habit, due to nervous-
ness, and should be overcome. Keep the hands away from the
nose, mouth and face.
Care of the Shoes:-Well-cared-for shoes add to the at-
tractive appearance of any girl. Keep shoes well polished
with a good shoe polish and a soft brush or cloth. If a sur-
plus of polish accumulates on shoes it may be removed by
cleaning with gasoline or soap and water. Milk spots and
greases often leave white stains on leather. These can be re-
moved with soap and water.
If shoe trees are put inside shoes as soon as they are taken
off the shoes will hold their shape longer.
Heels should be repaired as soon as they begin to wear.
There is no economy in wearing down-at-the-heel shoes, and
they detract from the entire costume.

COST OF CLOTHING
Do you know how much money is spent for your clothing
each year? Did you ever think about how many dollars' worth
of clothing you wear to school every day ? Many girls do not
think of this and sometimes they are not able to understand
why they cannot have some things they ask for. Try to es-
timate the cost of the clothing you have on today, and, when
you go home, estimate the cost of all the clothing you have.
In doing this make an inventory showing how many






garments you have on hand and their condition. With your
mother's help, make a list of the garmets that will be needed
by you this year. Plan your clothing so that you can spend
wisely, dress attractively, and have suitable clothes for every
occasion.
Since you are old enough to begin taking the responsibility
of planning and making your own clothes, you should keep
a record of the amount of money you spend for clothing.
Every girl should form the habit of keeping a personal account
of the money she spends.
CLOTHING TEAM DEMONSTRATIONS
Demonstration teams do as much as an exhibit to interest
people in a club project.
Two girls form a team to demonstrate a practice learned in
club work. Both girls should be dressed as nearly alike as
possible in order that the team may appear more as a unit.
The following are suggestions for subjects for demonstra-
tions:
Selection of materials and design for garments.
Drafting and making the kimono type garment.
Selecting and making suitable accessories for a dress.
Making sleeves.
Materials and finishes suitable for undergarments.
Neck finishes.
Darning.
Patching.
Making buttonholes.
Sewing on buttons.

SUGGESTIVE OUTLINE OF A DEMONSTRATION
MAKING SLEEVES
Team.-Two members from one club designated in this out-
line as "A" and "B".
Equipment Needed.-Table, 2 pairs of scissors, thread, needles,
pins and cushion, thimbles, yard stick, tape measure, paper
for patterns, patterns, materials, trimmings, findings, and
some finished sleeves.






11

PROCEDURE
A B

A. Speaks and demonstrates. B. Assists
Leads in giving a club song, yell or Joins in giving song, yell, or
pledge; gives brief history of the pledge. Stands at attention while
club; introduces team-mate and being introduced.
self, and states what the team is
going to demonstrate.

A. Assists B. Demonstrates and explains.
Styles of sleeves. Long, short,
etc. Full, fitted, two-piece, etc.
Suited to individual, material and
style of dress.
Testing pattern-width, length.
Changing pattern.
Making-
Straight or grain of material.
Marking.
Cutting.

A. Speaks and demonstrates. B. Assists.
Gathering.
Basting.
Fitting.
Finishing.
Trimming.
Summarizes points made in the
demonstration. Asks for questions.
Thanks audience. Stands at attention.






12


HANDWORK ON HOUSEHOLD ARTICLES AND CLOTH-
ING, ACCESSORIES INVOLVING DESIGN*

Points
I. Value of articles in relation to work done and material used .... 25
II. Suitability of materials ....................................................... 20
Textures ........................................................ .......................... 10
K ind of fibers ................................................... ................ ...... 5
Thread used ..................................... ................... .......... 5
Size
Type
III. Design and color .................................... ................................ 25
Appropriateness of design to material ........................... 5
Subordination of design to the purpose of article ......... 5
Adaptation of design to the area ........ ............. 5
Quality of rhythm, harmony and balance ............ .............. 5
Choice of color combination ......................... .................... 5
IV. Workmanship ....................................................................................... 25
Choice and neatness of stitches, seams, hems, etc. ........ 15
Perfection of stitching ......................................................... 10
V. General appearance ................ ............ .... ..... ...........-- 5
Total score ..---- .............................................. 100


HANDWORK ON HOUSEHOLD ARTICLES, INVOLVING
NO DESIGN*

I. Suitability of materials ............................................................ 40
K ind of fiber .......................................................................... 15
Texture of fabric ..... ............................................................... 10
Thread used ............. ............................. ............................... 10
Size
Type
II. W orkm anship ................................................................ .................. 50
H em s .......................................... .............................................. 20
Type
Width
Finish of corners ............................. .................................. 15
Stitches ....................................................... ................................ 15
Kind used.
Appearance on right side.
Appearance on wrong side.
III. General Appearance ......................................................................... 10
Cleaniness ................................................................................. 5
Pressing ..................................................................................... 5
Total score ......... ...... ..................................... ........................... 100


*From U.S.D.A. Mise. Circ. No. 90.







13









SCORE CARD FOR JUDGING CLOTHING SELECTION*

REVUE OF SCHOOL, HOUSE OR STREET COSTUMES
Points

I. General appearance ........... .............................. 30
General design and color combination ............................. 5
Individuality and style ...................................................... 5
Posture and carriage (if worn by contestant) ................. 5
Personal neatness ................................................................. .. 5
Fit of garm ents .................................... .... ............................. 5
Effect of underwear .......................................... ....................... 5
II. Suitability of costume to individual .......................................... 20
A artistic aspects .................................... .................... ........ ...... 10
Becomingness of color
Suitability of design
Health aspects ........................ ...................--.. 10
Comfort
Protection
III. Suitability to purpose .............................. ............... .......... ...... 20
Occasion ............................................................ ... 10
Tim e of year .......................................................... ................... 10
IV. Economic factors ......................... ..................... ............. 20
Durability of materials and design .................................. 5
Value in relation to cost ..........................--- ............--- ................ 5
Judgment shown in distribution of cost among various
articles .................................................................................... 5
Cost of upkeep ................ ...... .................. .................. 5
V. Ethics of the costum e ................................................ .................. 10
M odesty ..................................................................................... 5
Social influence ..... ......................... .......................................... 5
Total score ............ ......... ... ............... 100










*From U.S.D.A. Misc. Cire. No. 90.






14













SCORE CARD FOR JUDGING CLOTHING
CONSTRUCTION*

SCHOOL, HOUSE, OR STREET DRESSES
I. Materials used, including trimmings ............................... 30
Suitability to design and purpose of dress .-...............- 15
Durability of materials ............................. ----10
Laundering and cleaning qualities ................................... 5

II. -Design and color ........--.......... ..............------- ... ...........------..... 20
Suitability to occasion ................................. .................... 10
Individuality ......... ......... .......................... 5
Beauty of line and color .................. ... ..... 5
III. W orkm anship ................................................................................... 30
Choice and neatness of seams, hems, finishes, etc .......--.--.... 15
Perfection of stitching (hand or machine) ................. 15
IV. General appearance ..................................... ................. ................ 10
C cleanliness ............................................... .......... ... ............. 5
Pressing ................... .................. .. ......... ......................... 5

V. Relation of garment value to cost in time and money ............. 10
Total score ....................... ....... ... ............ 100


*From U.S.D.A. Misc. Circ. No. 90.












OUTLINE OF REQUIREMENTS


Required:
Cup towel
Hand towel
Holder
Cap
Apron



Required:
Stocking darn


FIRST YEAR SEWING
Articles Needed in Club Work
Suggested Articles:
Sewing bag
Nightgown



SECOND YEAR SEWING
The Uniform
Suggested Article:
Brassiere


Patching
Plain white dress of linen or
cotton material
Bloomers
Uniform cap
Uniform apron with emblem


THIRD YEAR SEWING
Room Improvement
Required: For dining room:
For bedroom Removal of stains
(Any four articles may Curtains-full length
be made) Luncheon Set-Cloth and
Curtains 4 napkins
Scarfs
Pillowcases Suggested Article:
Bed spread Dress suitable for school wear


FOURTH YEAR SEWING
The Well-Dressed Club Girl
Making of a clothing inventory and budget.
Dyeing and remodeling dress.
Making of Princess slip.
Making of an informal party dress.
Suggested Articles:
Pajama Suit.




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