Title: Meat
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 Material Information
Title: Meat
Series Title: Meat
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Sheely, W. J.
Publisher: Agricultural Extension Service
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Bibliographic ID: UF00084528
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 216622074

Full Text


Circular 57
March, 1941


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MEAT -


WHOLESOME,

NUTRITIOUS


W. J. SHEELY
Animal Husbandman, Florida
Agricultural Extension Service


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If farm families are to be well fed and properly nourished
they must have lean meat, such as beef and pork, in their meals
practically every day. Meat in any well balanced meal is a
very wholesome and nourishing food. For flavor, variety, and
appetite appeal, meat is unsurpassed. Its taste, nutritive value,
energy-yielding fat, and essential minerals (iron and phos-
phorus) and vitamins make meat an essential part of the daily
diet. Meat contains a combination of highly desirable and neces-
sary food elements needed daily by the laborer, the clerical
worker, and the growing child to maintain health and resist
disease.
Production of meat, both beef and pork, fits well into the live-
at-home farm program. The farmer can raise a home supply
of beef and pork more economically than he can raise crops to
sell to buy meat. The average farm family of five should supply
itself with from 200 to 300 pounds of beef and from 400 to 600
pounds of pork and lard each year.
Beef.-Under Florida climatic conditions, with grass lands
available, with the improvement of canning methods, with in-
creased refrigeration and cold storage plants, and with
the development of the Rural Electrification Adminis-
tration, it is much more practical to grow, cure and
preserve the home beef supply now than formerly.
Fresh beef can be canned, cured, or kept in cold stor-
age, according to the family situation.
Two fat calves or one yearling weighing around 600
pounds will furnish the necessary beef for the average
family's yearly needs. The home beef supply fits in
with the family cow plans of having two cows to each
family. These cows would produce calves that could be killed
as calves and canned or put in cold storage and cured.
Where cold storage or canning is not available or desired,
farmers' beef clubs of eight to 16 families should be organized
with each member to kill a beef and distribute it during the
season among the members. This will give fresh lean meat at
a minimum cost to farm families for a longer period. In the
thinly settled areas not convenient to cold storage plants, farm-
ers' beef clubs and canning offer the best solution to preserving
beef for home supply.
































Meat has been the delight of hearty eaters throughout the ages. Farm
people are entitled to a bountiful supply, raised at home.

Pork.-One good sow will raise sufficient pigs to supply the
necessary pork for farm families, with probably one or two pigs
for sale. Four to six pigs finished out to weigh
150 to 225 pounds will produce all the pork and
lard needed by the average farm family.
Peanuts are a fine feed crop for hogs and are
also excellent for soil conservation and soil improvement. Pork
production with peanuts is profitable, guarantees the family
meat supply, and builds up the soil.
Pigs are the most efficient producers of meat of any animals,
giving greater returns for the amount of feed consumed. It is
far more economical for farm families to produce their meat
supply on grazing and fattening crops (in the peanut producing






counties) than it is to grow crops to sell to get money to buy
meat. A succession of grazing and fattening crops for hogs
makes the hog crop the surest and safest in the pea-
nut producing counties.

There is definite independence and satisfaction in
growing the required hogs and processing the pork
needed by the farm family. One of the benefits at-
tending an adequate home meat supply is the enjoy-
ment of fresh sausage and delicious, wholesome cured
meats. Another is the feeling of financial security, the result
of having saved sufficient meat in the smoke house, which rep-
resents a considerable money value and saving.


Health is so necessary to all the duties,
of life, that the crime of squandering it is


as well as pleasures
equal to the folly.

-Johnson.


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914)
AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SaRVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN
AND UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
COOPERATING
WILMON NEWELL, Director


Other circulars in this series:
51. Fit as a Fiddle
52. Feed the Family First
53. Gather Health from Your Own Garden
54. Can and Save-Can and Have
55. Your Poultry and Egg Supply
56. The Good Family Cow Helps Fill the Health Cup




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