Title: Watermelon production guide
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084519/00001
 Material Information
Title: Watermelon production guide
Physical Description: Book
Publisher: Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida,
Copyright Date: 1952
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084519
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 221303307

Full Text




Circular 96
Revision A


September 1952


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June S0, 1914)
Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida
Florida State University and
United States Department of Agriculture, Cooperating
H. G. Clayton, Director








WATERMELON

PRODUCTION GUIDE

(Prepared in cooperation with workers
of the
Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations)


* :r-


AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
,. UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA,
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


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las4 to eseant 4e e e t, pwUtint, facts on


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r0 -o m p'c -_,r


FeOftu trdstilem haden S applicatie of thhe
Sfeae, oontat yeur Couwty Agricultunl Aptt.


F'PLOIA AND LEADING COUNTIES'
LHAVEWSTD ACREAGE 1909-51:
iaMmO 5,(i00 bfattyette 1,000 Pasco 4,900
1 il hea t 4f6r- e 1,400 .
fHlltborough vi 4o u8iter 8,800

tq a1 44,800
ads0won 1,650 Marion 6,900 26 + Others 8,500

TOTAL 57,000


SV SrAL SEASONS' AVERAGE YIELD,
S COTS .AND RETURNS PIR MELON
p BY ABEA:
(Based on Representative. Gaers' Records
and Estimates)
Se Leesbug. Newbery-Treton
S4BavpeKr d 194r. 194 918
S per acre 296 218 .


Production costs
SIbrestng wts
8WO F.O.B.
Net return


$0.45
0.18
0.59


$0.29
0.11
0.44


Nboth Plorldac i.'Memth4AibAl
ceoarl PlaodaJamisaif-Maise
South Flordd..aDeMber'pB6k


-tavelf9-llaestna1Y0
90 to 100
.


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: VAMAIETRS RNOMMENDED
New varieties arereeemnmeaded on a trial basis
only.

CANNON BALL.-(Black Diamond, Florida
Giant).-Rounded. Solid green. Seed brownish-
black, mottled. The standard shipping variety.

GARRISON.-Elongated. Dark green stripes
on ivory-cream background. Seed white. Mainly
local market.

CONGO.--Elongated. Light green stripes on
dark green background. High percentage of large
melons. Anthracnose-resistant. Extra tough
rinds. Considerable hollow-heart reported in 1950
season; Seed white or light tan.

BLACKLEE.-M-ongated. Solid green. Fusar-
ium wilt-resistant. Seed black. Mainly local mar-
ket.
BLACK KLECKLEY.-Elongated. Dark green,
almost '"black." Seed white or light tan. For home
garden use only. Fusarium wilt-resistant; an-
thracnoe-resietaant


PLANTING
DISTANCES
Between rows
8 to 12 feet
Between hills
6 to 8 feet


PLANTING
DEPTH
2 inches


SEED
REQUIRED
Per aceroi pound
(8 plantings)


DRY. CHEMICAL TREATMENTS FOR CONTROL OF
SEED-BORNE FUNGUS DISEASES,
PARTICULARLY ANT'RACNOSE
Ounces per Teasp.ooefls per
100 Pounms Seed Poand of SWd.
Spergon (48%) 6 '
Thiram (50%) 4 %


Marl soil
Light sandy
Dark sandy


FERTILIZATION
Type

4-7-5, 4-4
4-7-5, 4-8-8


Pounds per. Acre
700
1,200
1,200


A pH of 5.5 to 6.0 is optimum for watermelon
production on the acid sands. Marl soils and sands
with a pH above 6.0 may require spray applica
tions on the plants of 11 to 2 pounds of mane
ganese sulfate per 100 gallons of water where this
deficiency develops.

Top-dressing applications of nitrogen or a comn
bination of nitrogen and potash vary in amount
and frequency according to seasonal conditions.
Two to three applications at rates equivalent to
100 pounds of nitrate of soda and 25 pounds mu.
rate of potash per acre generally meet the needs
during a given growing period.

INSECTS AND CONTROLS
Sprays:
Amount per
Dusts 100 Gallons Baits
Aphids. Lindane Lindane 25%
1% %; 1 lb;
Parathion I% TEPP 40%
% pt;
Parathion
15% lb.


Cutwot s


Leiafimners Itidane Lindane 25%
1%%; 1 lb;
Parathion 1% Parathion
15% 1 lb.


Chlordane 1%-
2%;
Toxaphene 2%


Do not apply any of the organic insecticides to
wet or damp foliage. Applications in the after.
noon reduce chances of injury to bees.
Sprays and dusts made from crude, low gamma
benzene hexachloride should not be used. Insecti-
cides made from Lindane can be used. Do not
use tomaphesie, DDT, or chlordane sprays or dusts
on watermelons.
When using TEPP and parathion take special
precautions not to spill the insecticides on any
part of the body or to breathe the spray mist,
vapor or dusts.


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The importance of anthracnose, downy mildew
iad gummy-stem blight 'aries widely from year
tb year with weather conditions. When a disease
appears late little benefit may be derived from
spraying or dusting. When disease appears early,
subsequent applications of a fungicide are effec-
tive in checking further spread. The time of ap-
pearance of a disease and weather conditions
should serve as a guide as to how often end how
many applications should be made. The same
fungicide schedule is usually effective for all three
diseases. .
Anthracnoe.-Zineb (65% active ingredient)
.6.5% active ingredient dust in suitable diluent or
2 pounds per 100 gallons, plus sticker.
Nabam (27% active ingredient) 2 quarts plus
1 pound zinc sulfate per 100 gallons plus sticker.
Mix the nabam in the spray tank, then add the
zinc and then the sticker. Some cuticle damage
has been reported following use of nabam.
Begin applications when runners start to form
or when first signs of disease appear. Follow
with two or three applications at 7- to 10-day in-
tervals. The varieties Congo and Black Klecldey
are resistant to antliracnose.
Downy Mildew.-Tribasic copper sulfate diluted
to metallic copper content of 11/ pounds per 100
gallons, plus sticker, or 6% dust in suitable di-
wient.
Zineb (65% 9 active ingredient) as given for
anthracnosee.
Nabam (27%. active ngre4ient) as given for
anthracnose, ,
Apply as given for anthracnose control.
Gummy-Stem Blight.-Zineb (65% active is-
gredient) as given for anthscnese.
Nabam (27% acive ingredient) as given for
anthracnose. ,
Apply as suggested for anthracnose eomotea


Wlt-~In agaoe^ to 10W.btwBtee melons
crops will reduce the wilt fungus in the soil to
a point where land can be used again for planting
susceptible varieties. It pays to wait at least two
years between crops of watermelons on the same
S land, even when wilt-resistant varieties are grown.
There is always danger of wilt occurring 6o
new land where drainage water from a diseased
field has flowed over the new field, or where
cattle have had access to both fields.
White Heart and Hollow Heart.-The causes of
white heart and hollow heart are not known.
White heart is believed by many to be caused by
sisond growth indeed by favorable growing con-
ditions. Hollow heart is often associated with high
edible quality in a variety and certain varieties
are particularly susceptible to either white heart
or hollow heart.
FIELD MICE CONTROL
S Materials


Zinc phosphide, 8 ounces
Scratch grain, 40 pounds
Soybean lecithin, % pint
(Mineral oil, corn oil, or some other vegetable
oil can be substituted)
Mix well.
Applications
first, three to four weeks before planting.
Second, four days before planting.
Rate.-One teaspoonful every 15 to 20 feet; 40
potuds for 10 acres fbt d~hh application. '
S- PRUNING.
When .melons are, three to four inches long
prune down -to one to two melors per vine, depend-
ing on local cultural practices. In sandy soils
.leave only one fruit per vine until the melon ,
about six inches in diameter,; then allow a second
melon to form. In the heavier soils of the state
melon vines can carry two melons simultaneously.
However, one good melon per vine per season
would give growers higher than average .yelds,


1




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