Title: Insect control in the home garden
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Title: Insect control in the home garden
Series Title: Insect control in the home garden
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Watson, J. R.
Publisher: Agricultural Extension Service
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Bibliographic ID: UF00084503
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 223434433

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COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914)
AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN
AND UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
COOPERATING
WILMON NEWELL, Director



Insect Control in the Home Garden
By J. R. WATSON
Entomologist, Florida Agricultural Experiment Station

The following schedule is designed particularly for home gar-
deners and those growing "war gardens." It is in condensed
form so that it can be quickly referred to from time to time.
As the home gardener will not have any extensive acreage of
any crop, we have reduced the amounts of material to be used
to small quantities. We realize that the home gardener cannot
afford expensive equipment and therefore recommend those
things which are commonly found about the house or are cheap.
Spraying.-The best equipment for a medium size garden is
a knapsack sprayer holding about 3 gallons and costing about
$10, but the small home gardener can usually get satisfactory
control by the use of a small sprayer of the "Flit gun" type
holding about a quart of spray.
Dusting.-The home gardener will usually find dusting quicker
than spraying and will prefer to dust his plants in many cases.
There are hand dusters on the market but the home gardener
can get satisfactory results with cheap homemade equipment.
A tin can with the bottom punched full of small nail holes will
often prove satisfactory, as will a sack made of cheesecloth or
other porous material.
No attempt has been made to describe the insects nor to give
their life histories, etc. This information is contained in Experi-
ment Station Bulletin 370 on truck and garden insects, which is
free to anyone asking for it. The illustrations in this bulletin
will enable one to recognize most of the common pests of the
garden.

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


Circular 66


February, 1943





CONTROL MEASURES FOR INSECTS COMMONLY ATTACKING VEGETABLE CROPS IN FLORIDA


SYMPTOMS


CONTROL
(See v. 4 for footnotes'


WHEN TO APPLY


- - I. .. -. .. ... ..........


general Garden
Crops


Presence of their nests


Carbon bisulfide s'


On warm da s


Cutworms Severed plants or parts Poisoned bait-bran and paris Warm evenings
_______________ _____________green2
Mlole-crickets Small tunnels near the Bran and sodium fluosilicate' When the soil is damp
surface


beans i Leaf-hoppers


Sellow and stunted plants


curlea leaves


Starvation method


Crotalaria in the summer


Mulch Shortly after the plants
are up


Grow resistant varieties


F .. .. I-vetrm nrnpni


See bulletin 311


First si n f injur


Leaf-rollers Leaves rolled or eaten Lead arsenate, a pound to 50 First sign of injury. Not
gallons' on string beans after pods
form
Rotenone7 After pods form
Red spiders Leaves turn yellow and die Dust with sulfur At first appearance
Webworms Plants eaten and webbed Lead arsenate' First sign of injury; not to
be used on tops that will
be eaten


Cabbage, Cauliflow- Caterpillars
liC Ida ohl
Aphids


wnen nrst seen


Lead arsenate in bordeaux'


itoten
'
one pyrethruma


, - --I I


Plants wilt and k


On young plants ony


O yu pn onl


After heads begin m


co ne su a e w sprea er Mien first seen
Carrots Aphids Plants wilt and turn black Nicotine sulfate with a spreader' When first seen
Celery Leaf-tier Heart leaves eaten Pyrethrum dust, rotenone', or When injury is noticed on
nicotine' old plants
Army worms and Leaves eaten Lead arsenate in bordeaux' On young plants only
loopers
Corn Earworm Silk and tips of ears eaten Extract caterpillar or apply After silk has wilted but
pyrethrum oil" before it becomes dry
Corn stalk borers Young plants wilt and die Puil up and destroy dead and When damage is first ob-
dying plants served
'Jun peaC


Cowpea pod weevil


Small black weevils; spots
on pods; wormy peas


Rotenone' or hand collecting


When first observed


Tn 1h o -O rl-r ir


CROP


PEST


SAnts


noot-Knot


Beets


f


_L T --- -- -A 1 U.-A n Ir


Fyrethrum" or ni e'


iN ti lf t ith d "


I7Ll^-- .C-,, ....


uowpeas


*napnia11




..puou.. ~ ron, turn- yeoo l..iioblI~e SLOI.ae onk~ uurueau


Mic Seddgoto il


Alkaloid strychnine in rolled
oats"


Ks.ggY, ul plllu t b8 Flants turn yellow 1NIcIOUine sul.ae in Dorueaux-
Lettuce, Escarole Aphids Plants turn yellow or black Nicotine sulfate in bordeaux'
and Endive Cabbage looper Leaves eaten Lead arsenate in bordeaux8
o Rotenone' or hand collecting"1
Onions Thrips Tips of leaves blanch Nicotine in bordeaux' or soap*
(whiten)
Okra Okra caterpillar Holes in the pods Pick and destroy infested pods
Aphids Plants wilt and turn black Nicotine sulfate with spreader4
Plant bugs Large spots and shrunken Hand collecting in kerosene"
pods
Peas Aphids Plants wilt Nicotine sulfate with spreader4
Red spiders Leaves become faded & dry Spray" or dust with sulfur
Peppers Aphids Plants turn yellow Nicotine sulfate in bordeaux'
Pepper weevil Young peppers drop Thorough cleanup
Potatoes Aphids Plants turn yellow Nicotine sulfate in bordeaux'
Colorado potato Leaves eaten Lead arsenate in bordeaux' or
beetle dust1'
Sweet Potatoes Armyworms Leaves eaten Poisoned bran bait2
Whiteflies Yellow leaves & sooty mold Pyrethrum'; Red Aschersonia, or
S soap
Root weevil Tunnels in potatoes; bitter Thorough cleanup
Tomatoes Aphids Plants turn yellow Nicotine sulfate in bordeaux9
Thrips Bloom drops Nicotine sulfate with spreader'4
Fruit worms Wormy fruit, large holes Lead arsenate in bordeaux9
Remove all wormy fruit
Thorough cleanup
Horn worms Leaves eaten Lead arsenate in bordeaux; hand
picking
Turnips, Chinese Worms Leaves eaten Lead arsenate spray' or dust'
Cabbage and Hand collecting
Mustard IAphids Plants wilt and turn black Nicotine sulfate with spreader'
Watermelons Aphids Leaves curl and turn black Nicotine sulfate spray' or dust


When noticed
Young plants only
After plants begin to head
When first whitening ob-
served
Whenever injury is seen
When first seen
In the early morning

When first observed
Dry warm weather
When noticed
Promptly after harvest
When noticed
When first observed

When first seen
When seen

After harvest
When noticed
In bloom
When first fruits appear
As fruit is picked
At close of picking season
When seen

On young plants only
When damage is observed
When first seen
When first seen
Two days before planting


i


Mice


Seed dug out of hills






DETAILED DIRECTIONS FOR APPLYING CONTROL MEASURES


1 From 1/ teaspoonful to 2 tablespoonfuls, according to the size of nest, poured into a hole made by pushing
a sharp stick into the middle of the nest.
2 One part of paris green or 2 of calcium arsenate in 25 of the bran by weight. Moisten to make crumbly
but not sloppy.
3 Two parts (by weight) of sodium fluosilicate to 25 of bran.
4 Either 3% nicotine-sulfate-lime dust or a spray of 8 tablespoonfuls nicotine sulfate in 3 gallons of water
in which an ounce or two of soap has been dissolved.
6 Applied as a dust or dissolved in water, 2 tablespoonfuls to 3 gallons.
6 Slake 2 ounces of quick or hydrated lime in a little hot water, then dilute to 3 gallons and add an ounce
of lead arsenate.
7 Many commercial brands on market. Follow directions on container.
8 To 3 gallons of bordeaux add an ounce of lead arsenate.
9 A teaspoonful of nicotine sulfate to 3 gallons of bordeaux.
10 Consult Bulletin 370, p. 57.
11 In a wide-mouthed dish place a little water with a film of kerosene on top. Knock insects into this.
12 An ounce of sodium fluosilicate in 3 gallons of water.
13 Five ounces of wettable sulfur in 3 gallons of water.
14 One part of lead arsenate to 9 of hydrated lime.
5 See Press Bulletin 470.




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