Title: Planting charts for home gardens
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084501/00001
 Material Information
Title: Planting charts for home gardens
Series Title: Planting charts for home gardens
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Jamison, F. S.
Publisher: Agricultural Extension Service
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084501
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 223455721

Full Text



COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914)
AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN
AND UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
COOPERATING
WILMON NEWELL, Director
/




Planting Charts for Home Gardens
By F. S. JAMISON
Truck Horticulturist, Florida Agricultural Experiment Station

The growing of a good home garden is commendable on the
part of farm families at all times, urban families in critical
times. World War II has brought home to all the simple fact
that our food supply is not inexhaustible. All patriotic citizens
who have facilities available have been asked to grow gardens
during the emergency period.
The best home gardens are those that have a large variety of
fresh vegetables ready for use over long periods of time. This
necessitates succession plantings of many vegetables. It entails
proper care, watering, fertilization, cultivation, and pest control.
Where the garden is subject to depredations by either farm
animals or rabbits it should by all means be enclosed in a good
fence. The garden is often the most valuable plot of ground on
the place, and it should receive the care and attention which it
merits.
All gardeners should realize that supplies of gardening tools,
fertilizers, seed, insecticides and fungicides are limited. They
should do everything possible to use materials and supplies so
that they are not wasted but rather converted into abundant
amounts of food.
The following planting charts for spring and fall victory gar-
dens will give a fair idea of the vegetables that can be planted
from time to time. Circulars 66 and 67 contain concise infor-
mation on insect and disease control. Bulletin 119 carries more
complete information about the home garden.

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


Circular 65


February, 1943








PLANTING CHART FOR SPRING VICTORY GARDENS

Amount to Plantinl
Date to Plant* Plant tance BE
in Florida Vegetable Variety** (Family Rows
North Central South of 4) (ft.)


Feb. 15 Feb. 1 Jan. 1
to to to
Mar. 1 Feb. 15 Feb. 1


Feb. 1
to
Feb. 15


Jan. 15
to
Feb. 1


Dec. 1
to
Jan. 1


Broccoli
Cabbage
Chinese cabbage
Lettuce, head
Lettuce, leaf
Onions
Peas, garden
Potatoes, Irish
Spinach

Beans, lima
Beets
Carrots
Cauliflower
Collards
Mustard
Peas, garden
Radish
Turnip

Beans, green
Cabbage
Cucumbers
Cantaloupes
Corn, sweet
Radish
Squash, summer
Tomatoes
Watermelons

Beans, garden
Beans, pole
Field peas
Eggplant
Peppers
Summer spinach


Beans, lima
Okra
Squash, winter
Field peas
Mustard
Sweet potatoes

Field peas
Summer squash
Sweet potatoes


Green Sprouting
Copenhagen Market

Imperial 44
Black-Seeded Simpson
Bermuda
Little Marvel
Katahdin
Virginia Savoy

Fordhook
Crosby Egyptian
Chantenay
Snowball
Georgia
Florida Broadleaf
Little Marvel
Early Scarlet Globe
Purple Top Globe

Tendergreen
Copenhagen Market
Black Diamond
mith's Perfect
Golden Cross Bantam
Early Scarlet Globe
Yellow Straight-Neck
Marglobe
Leesburg

Tendergreen
Kentucky Wonder
Crowder
Ft. Myers Market
Worldbeater
New Zealand


Henderson Bush
Perkins Long Green
African
Crowder
Florida Broadleaf
Improved Porto Rican

Crowder
Straight-Neck
Improved Porto Rican


25 plants
25 plants
15 plants
25 plants
25 ft. of row
50 ft.
100 ft.
200 ft.
50 ft.

100 ft.
40 ft.
60 ft.
25 plants
15 plants
30 ft.
50 ft.
40 ft.
40 ft.

50 ft.
15 plants
30 ft.
30 ft.
75 ft.
40 ft.
30 ft.
40 plants
10 hills

100 ft.
50 ft.
50 ft.
10 plants
10 plants
25 ft.


100 ft.
40 ft.
10 hills
50 ft.
25 ft.
200 ft.

100 ft.
40 ft.
400 ft.


3
3
2
2
2
11/2 or 2
2
3
1% or 2

3 or 32
112
1%
3
3
2
2
1
1%

2
3
4 or 5
4 or 5
3
1
4
2 or 3
8

2
4
3
4
3
3


3
3
8
3
2
4

3
4
4


Mar. 1
to
Mar. 15







Mar. 15
to
Apr. 1




Apr. 1
to
Apr. 15


Apr. 15
to
May 1


Feb. 15
to
Mar. 1







Mar. 1
to
Mar. 15


Mar.
to
Apr.


Apr. 1
to
Apr. 15


Feb. 1
to
Feb. 15


Feb. 1
to
Mar.


Mar. 1
to
Mar. 15




Mar. 15
to
Apr. 1


-----~-'-----~









PLANTING CHART FOR FALL VICTORY GARDENS

Amount to Planting Dis-
)ate to Plant* Plant tance Between
in Florida Vegetable Variety** (Family Rows Plants
h Central South of 4) (ft.) (in.)


Oct. 10 Nov. 1
to to
Nov. 1 Nov. 20


Sept. 1
to
Sept. 20





Sept. 20
to
Oct. 10


Sept. 20
to
Oct. 10





Oct. 10
to
Nov. 1


Field peas
Beans, snap
Cucumbers
Okra
Summer squash
Mustard
Tomatoes

Beans, garden
Beets
"ollards
Turnip
Lettuce, leaf
Peas, garden
Endive
Strawberries

Broccoli
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Brussels sprouts
Carrots
Lettuce, head
Kohl-rabi

Onions
Chinese cabbage
Mustard
Radish
Lettuce, leaf

Beets
Spinach
Carrots
Cabbage
Radish
Peas, garden
Endive
Lettuce, head


Sugar Crowder
Tendergreen
Black Diamond
Perkins Long Green
Straight-Neck
Tendergreen
Marglobe

Black Valentine
Crosby Egyptian
Louisiana Sweet
Purple Top
Black-Seeded Simpson
Little Marvel
Green Curled
Missionary

Green Sprouting
Copenhagen Market
Snowball
Catskill
Coreless
Imperial 44
Early White Vienna

Bermuda
Pekin
Florida Broadleaf
Early Scarlet Globe
Black-Seeded Simpson

Crosby Egyptian
Bloomsdale
Red Cored Chantenay
Glory of Enkhuizen
Early Scarlet Globe
Little Marvel
Green Curled
Imperial 44


50 ft.
50 ft. I
30 ft.
50 ft.
30 ft.
50 ft.
25 plants

50 ft.
40 ft.
20 plants
40 ft.
25 ft.
150 ft.
25 ft.
250 plants

20 plants
25 plants
25 plants
15 plants
40 ft.
50 plants
40 ft.

100 ft.
25 ft.
40 ft.
25 ft.
25 ft.

40 ft.
100 ft.
40 ft.
25 plants
25 ft.
100 ft.
25 ft.
50 plants


Nov. 1
to
Nov. 20



Nov. 20
to
Dec. 10


Nov. 20
to
Dec. 10


Dec.:
to
Jan.


*Most crops appearing in any onQ group may be planted at the same
time as the following group.
** The names of other desirable varieties may be found in Bulletin 119,
The Florida Home Garden.

















FAVORITES FOR BEGINNERS AND VICTORY GARDENERS

Experienced gardeners may be successful in growing many
different kinds of vegetable crops, and generally like to try new
crops from time to time. It will be well for the beginner and
the Victory Gardener, however, to attempt only the "old stand-
by" vegetables which are easily grown, are nutritious, and pro-
duce heavily on small areas. Here are bur favorites. Try them
first, following planting recommendations on the inside pages of
this circular.


FALL AND WINTER
Broccoli
Cabbage
Carrots
Collards
Lettuce
Onions
Peas, garden
Turnips


SPRING AND SUMMER
1. Beans, green
2. Beans, lima
3. Collards
4. Okra
5. Peas, field
6. Spinach, New Zealand
7. Squash, bush
8. Sweet potatoes
9. Tomatoes
10. Turnips




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs