Title: Cantaloupe production guide.
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 Material Information
Title: Cantaloupe production guide.
Series Title: Cantaloupe production guide.
Physical Description: Book
Publisher: Agricultural Extension Service
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Bibliographic ID: UF00084474
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 221975089

Full Text

Circular 122 March 1954

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 30. 1914)
Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida.
Florida State University and
United States Department of Agriculture, Cooperating
H. G. Clayton, Director



CANTALOUPE

PRODUCTION GUIDE

(Prepared in cooperation with workers
of the
Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations)

Additional information is available in the fol-
lowing publications: University of Florida Agri-
cultural Experiment Stations Bul. 465 and
USDA FB 1468. For currently available pub-
lications and for further details on local prob-
lems, contact your County Agricultural Agent
of the University of Florida Agricultural Exten-
sion Service.

FLORIDA AND LEADING COUNTIES' HARVESTED
ACREAGE (1952-53 Season)
A lachua ...... ........................................ ... .............. 600
Levy .... ........................................................................... 100
M arion ................. ....................... ...................... 450
Sum ter ......... ............................ .... ..... ...................... 100
A ll O others ........ ................................... .. .................... 550
TOTA L ................. ....... .............. .........- .... 1,800

PLANTING DATES
North Florida: March-April
Central Florida: January-February
South Florida: January-February

VARIETIES RECOMMENDED
Smith's Perfect.-Fruits of excellent quality,
large, sparsely netted, late maturing. Resistant
to downy mildew.
Georgia 47.-Fruits medium-sized, well-netted
and of excellent quality when grown with plenty
of moisture and fertilizer. On soils with insuf-
ficient moisture and fertilizer, melons are small


AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA





with a large percentage possessing an objection-
able enlargement of the blossom-ends. Resistant
to downy and powdery mildew.
Hale's Best No. 36.-A standard variety for
shipping. Well netted, medium-sized fruits.
Hale's Jumbo.-Similar to, but producing
larger fruit than, Hale's Best No. 36.
Powdery Mildew-Resistant No. 45 and No. 5.-
Well netted, medium-sized fruit.
Honey Dew.-Late maturing melon not gen-
erally grown in Florida.
Planting
Planting Distances Depth Seed Required
Between rows: 5' to 7' % inch Per 100' row: 1 oz.
Between hills: 2' to 3' Per acre: 1%-2 lbs.

FERTILIZATION
Best results are obtained by applying fertilizer
before or at planting time in two bands, each lo-
cated 2 to 3 inches below and 3 to 4 inches to the
side of the planting row.
Soil Type Fertilizer* Pounds per Acre
Marl ........................ 6-8-6 600
Light sand ................ 6-8-6 1,500
Dark sand ............... 6-8-6, 6-6-8 1,500**
A 4-8-8 may be used in place of 6-8-6, provided equivalent
amounts of nitrogen are applied.
** Reduce to 900 pounds for soils similar to loamy sands of Gaines-
ville-Ocala area.

Optimum pH for cantaloupe production on acid
sand is 5.5 to 6.0. Rockland and sandy soil with
a pH of 6.0 or above may not supply sufficient
manganese for good vine development. Manga-
nese can be supplied to the foliage of plants by
a spray application containing 1.5 to 2 pounds of
manganese sulfate (65%) per 100 gallons of
water per acre.
Sidedress one or more times, depending on
amount and frequency of rainfall, with 100 pounds
of nitrate of soda or nitrate of potash per acre.

INSECTS AND CONTROLS
PRECAUTIONS:
1. Insecticides and their residues are poisonous
to man and animals. Carefully read and follow
precautions on the labels of packages.
2. DDT, chlordane and toxaphene applied to
the leaves will stunt plants and reduce yields.






3. Do not apply insecticidal dusts to cucurbits
when plants are wet. Make afternoon applications
to avoid injury to bees.


Sprays (Amt.
Insects Dust per 100 Gals. Baits
Water)
Aphids* Lindane 1% Lindane wettable,
1 lb. 25% or
equiv.;
Parathion 1% Parathion wet-
table, 1 lb.
15% or equiv.;
TEPP emulsion,
% pt. 40% or
equiv.
Cucumber Lindane 1% Lindane wettable,
beetles 1 lb. 25% or
equiv.
Serpentine Parathion 1% Parathion wet-
leaf table, 1 lb.
miners 15% or equiv.;
Lindane 1% Lindane wettable,
1 lb. 25% or
equiv.
Melonworms Lindane 1% Lindane wettable,
and pickle- 1 lb. 25% or
worms** equiv.;
Parathion wet-
table, 1 lb.
15% or equiv.


Cutwormst


Chlordane 5% 2-2%
chlor-
dane-
wheat
bran


Wireworms$ Chlordane 5%
(100 lbs. per
acre)
*Treatment for aphid control should begin at first indication of
infestation and be repeated at 7-day intervals until aphids are elimi-
nated.
** Begin treatment for melonworm and pickleworm control when
first blossoms appear and continue until first harvest at weekly
intervals.
t Chlordane applied over the soil surface before planting will give
good control of cutworms and lesser corn borers. If cutworms are
found after plants emerge, apply 30-35 pounds of chlordane bait per
acre. Moisten and apply in late afternoons.
$ Apply chlordane 10 to 14 days before planting. Distribute mate-
rial evenly over soil surface and disk 6 inches deep.
DRY CHEMICAL TREATMENTS FOR PREVENTING
SEED DECAY AND IMPROVING PLANT STAND
Ounces per Teaspoonfuls
Materials 100 Lbs. Seed per Lb. Seed
Thiram (50%) .......................... 3
Semesan (30%) ...................... 5
Spergon (48%) ...................... 6
DISEASES AND CONTROLS
Downy Mildew.-
Material Amount per 100 Gallons Water
Nabam (27%) .... 2 qts. plus % lb. zinc sulfate (36%)
Zineb (65%) ........ 2 lbs.
Manzate (75%) .. 1% lbs.





After the disease appears, make applications at
weekly intervals or as often as is necessary to
keep new growth covered. A 6 percent zineb dust
applied at 30 pounds per acre gives fair control.
All recommended insecticides are compatible with
the above fungicides.
Powdery Mildew.-Lacking complete experi-
mental evidence, no general recommendations for
the control of this disease can be made.
Sulfur will control powdery mildew, but it will
burn the foliage of most cucurbits, especially in
hot weather. In the West Coast area fertilizer
grade sulfur (35 to 40 pounds per acre) applied to
the plants when dry so that the material rolls
off the leaves to the soil, has been used for control.
Angular Leaf Spot.-This disease does not oc-
cur often in the state. The use of disease-free
seed is the recommended control. Infected seed
can be treated for 5 to 10 minutes in a corrosive
sublimate solution (1 ounce bichloride of mercury
crystals in 71/2 gallons of water), then rinsed in
clean water several times and spread out to dry
before planting.
It has been noted that spray applications of
copper will prevent the spread of the disease.
Copper sprays are injurious to the plants under
certain conditions.

NEMATODES
Cantaloupes are very susceptible to nematode
injury. Heavily infested soils should be avoided.
Fumigation will help plants get off to a good
start on soils infested with nematodes. Use DD
or EDB according to manufacturer's recommenda-
tions.
HARVESTING
There are no exact measures for maturity for
all varieties. Color, net and ease of separation
from the vine are all indications of degree of
maturity.
Care should be exercised to prevent bruising
in harvesting, grading and packing.




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