Group Title: Circular
Title: Feeding replacement pullets
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084442/00001
 Material Information
Title: Feeding replacement pullets
Alternate Title: Circular 203 ; Florida Agricultural Extension Service
Physical Description: 3, 1 p. : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Harms, R. H. ( Robert Henry ), 1923-
University of Florida -- Agricultural Extension Service
Publisher: University of Florida, Agricultural Extension Service
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: February 1960
 Subjects
Subject: Poultry -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Chickens -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Robert H. Harms.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "February 1960."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084442
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 83695130

Full Text


February 1960


AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA




FEEDING REPLACEMENT PULLETS

By ROBERT H. HARMS
Associate Poultry Husbandman, Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Good Pullet Nutrition Includes

1. Well Balanced Feed
2. Efficient Feed Utilization
3. Proper Feeding
4. Low Feed Cost


The feeding of replacement pullets is a field in which there
is a definite lack of information based on experimental data.
Each poultry breeder has developed and initiated a system of
feeding for his own breed, strain or cross and each particular
environment. So have many individual poultrymen. This has
led to considerable confusion among poultrymen and feed man-
ufacturers as to proper method of feeding replacement pullets.
The purpose of this circular is to summarize some of the
available information concerning this problem and to present
the method of feeding replacement pullets employed at the Uni-
versity of Florida.

AMOUNT OF FEED CONSUMED
The amount of feed consumed by the replacement pullet will
depend upon the breed or strain used. The expected feed con-
sumption by weeks is given in Table 1 for light breed pullets
grown for commercial egg production and for broiler-type pullets
reared to produce eggs for hatching of broiler chicks. It should
be pointed out that the energy content of the feed will materially


Circular 203







affect the total amount of feed required to produce a pullet.
Lowering the energy content of the feed will result in more feed
being consumed, since the chickens attempt to consume enough
feed to satisfy their requirement for energy. Conversely, an
increase in energy content of the feed will result in less feed
consumed.

TABLE 1.-POUNDs OF FEED CONSUMED PER PULLET PER WEEK.*

Feed Consumed (lbs.)
Age in Weeks
SBroiler-Type Pullets** Commercial Egg-Strain Pulletst

2 .................... 0.30 0.26
4 .................... 0.45 0.43
6 .................... 0.75 0.62

8 .................... 1.00 0.70
10 .................... 1.25 0.87
11 ................... 1.35 0.89
12 ................... 1.35 0.83
13 .................. 1.40 0.92

14 .................... 1.45 0.90
15 .................... 1.50 0.89

16 .................... 1.60 0.89
17 .................... 1.65 0.93

18 .................. 1.70 0.96
19 .................. 1.75 1.09

20 ............... 1.80 1.13
Total .............. 22.00 14.85

A change in content of feed by 10 calories of productive energy per pound of feed
will result in an inverse change of approximately 1% in amount of feed consumed
** Estimated for a pullet weighing 4.5 pounds at 20 weeks of age receiving a feed con-
taining 900 Calories of productive energy per pound of feed.
t B. B. Bailey and J. H. Quisenberry-DIata presented at So. Agr. Workers Conf., 1958.
(Based on birds with adult body weight ranging from 2.97 to 3.32 at 21 weeks of age, and
receiving a diet containing approximately 940 Calories of productive energy per pound of
feed.)

FULL FEEDING VS. RESTRICTED FEEDING

Considerable research has been conducted on this problem.
However, a great deal of controversy still remains as to which
method is best. It is the opinion of most poultrymen and re-






search workers that a restriction of feed intake will delay age
at first egg by approximately 3 weeks and increase the size of
eggs produced. This increase in egg size is very desirable in
breeder pullets of the broiler type, since small eggs are not
acceptable for hatching of chicks. However, size of eggs at a
given age will not be affected by the feeding system followed
during the growing period.
Restriction of feed intake may be attained by either of 2
methods. One method is to select the level of restriction desired
and allow the pullets to have only this amount of feed each day.
The proper amount of feed for any desired level of intake may be
calculated from values in Table 1.
The second method of feed restriction is to increase the bulki-
ness (fiber content) of the feed until it is impossible for the pul-
lets to consume all of the feed they desire.
When either of these methods is employed, be sure the pul-
lets are obtaining the vitamins and minerals that are necessary
for them to develop a strong body. The minimum nutrient re-
quirements as outlined by the National Research Council for
replacement pullets is shown in Table 2.

TABLE 2.-SOME MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS FOR STARTING AND
GROWING PULLETS.*

S Age in Weeks
__0-8 8-18
Total protein (percent) .................................. 20 16
Vitamin A (I. U./lb.) ..................................... 1200 1200
Vitamin D3 (I.C.U./lb.) .............................. 90 90
Riboflavin (mg./lb.) ..................... ............. 1.3 0.8
Pantothenic acid (mg./lb.) --............................ 4.2 4.2
Niacin (mg./lb.) ......................................... 12.0 12.0
Choline (mg./lb.) .... .... ......... ................. 600 600
Vitamin BI2 (mcg./lb.) ................... ..... ...... .. 3 3
Calcium (percent) ...... ........................ 1.0 1.0
Phosphorus (percent) ............. ............. ........- ... 0.6 0.6
Salt (percent) ....................................... 0.5 0.5
Manganese (mg./lb.) ........... ......................... 25 25
National Academy of Science Pub. 301. (Other vitamins and minerals are required.
However, sufficient amounts are contained in common feedstuffs to meet the need.)
3






METHOD FOLLOWED AT U. OF F.

Full feeding is practiced for pullets being raised for com-
mercial egg production at the Florida Agricultural Experiment
Station Poultry Farm. The starter feed (Table 3) is used for
the first 8 weeks and then the protein content is reduced from 22
to 17 percent. These are complete feeds and do not require the
feeding of additional grain.

TABLE 3.-COMPOSITION OF STARTING AND GROWING FEEDS USED FOR PRO-
DUCTION OF PULLETS FOR COMMERCIAL EGG PRODUCTION AT THE FLORIDA
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION POULTRY FARM.

Lbs/cwt.
Ingredients Starter Grower
__0-8 Weeks 8-20 Weeks

Ground Yellow Corn ....................................... 53.6 70.1
Soybean Oil Meal (44%) ................................ 35.0 21.0
Alfalfa M eal ....................................... .......... 2.5 2.5
Fish M eal ........................ ... ........- ............... 2.5 2.5
Dried W hey ............. ............ .................. .... 2.5 -
Calcite ............................ ...... .. .......... 1.0 1.0
Steamed Bone Meal .....................................--- --.... 2.0 2.0
Manganese Sulphate ...........................---......... 8 gm. 8 gm.
Salt ................. ............ ..... ...-....--- ..... 0.4 0.4
Vitamin M ix* ............................................... 0.5 0.5

Contains 199,585 I. U. vitamin A, 64,580 I.C.U. vitamin Da, 200 mg. riboflavin, 400
mg. calcium pantothenate, 31.6 gins. choline chloride, 600 meg. vitamin Bis, 900 mg. niacin,
500 mg. Terramycin and a selected Coceidiostat.

This program is not considered to be the only method, but is
believed to be a sound program for feeding pullets which are
being raised for the production of commercial eggs.
Regardless of the feeding program followed, sufficient feed
troughs should be used (see Circular 202). In order to prevent
wastage of feed, these troughs should never be filled more than
half full. Birds should be allowed adequate watering space (see
Circular 202) and waterers should be cleaned and disinfected
as often as needed.


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914)
Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida,
Florida State University and United States Department of Agriculture, Cooperating
M. O. Watkins. Director




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs