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Group Title: Circular
Title: Commercial vegetable fertilization guide
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084393/00001
 Material Information
Title: Commercial vegetable fertilization guide
Series Title: Circular
Physical Description: 13 p. : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Montelaro, James, 1921-
Jamison, F. S ( Frank Stover ), 1903-
University of Florida -- Agricultural Extension Service
Publisher: Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1962
 Subjects
Subject: Vegetables -- Fertilizers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: James Montelaro and F.S. Jamison.
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: "May 1962."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084393
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 81808706

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
Full Text
'.


Commercial V


Fertilization I


James Montelaro
F. S. Jamison


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AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida


Circular 225


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May 1962










Commercial Vegetable Fertilization

Guide
JAMES MONTELARO AND F. S. JAMISON *

Development of good fertilization programs for vegetable
crops in Florida is a very complex undertaking. Many factors
are involved-including the determination of proper amounts,
grades, and sources of fertilizers and the number, placement, and
timing of applications. Each of these factors is in some way af-
fected by such considerations as kind and variety of vegetable
crop to be grown, season, soil type, irrigation and drainage, rain-
fall, and previous treatment of the land.
The purpose of this circular is to present, as briefly as pos-
sible, a general guide for fertilization of vegetable crops. Condi-
tions will vary from area to area, from farm to farm, and even
from block to block on any farm. For that reason, each planting
of vegetables must be considered a new problem and a complete
fertilization program planned each time.

DEFINITIONS
In order for a grower to weigh each factor which might
affect his total fertilization program, it is necessary for him to
understand the terms used in this publication. Examples are
given wherever possible to help clarify definitions.
Amount: The quantity of fertilizers used. This may be ex-
pressed in pounds of mixed fertilizer (Example-2,000 pounds
of 6-8-8 per acre) or in pounds of actual plant food elements
(Example-120 pounds of nitrogen (N), 160 pounds of phos-
phoric acid (P205) and 160 pounds of potash (K20) per acre).
Briefly, this can be written 120-160-160 pounds of plant nutrients
per acre.
Grade: Percentages of total nitrogen (N), phosphoric acid
(P20O), and potash (K20). (Example-a common grade is
6-8-8).

Associate Vegetable Crops Specialist and Vegetable Crops Specialist,
Florida Agricultural Extension Service.







Source: Refers to kind of materials or ingredients that are
used to make the fertilizer. (Example-sources of nitrogen
are ammonium nitrate, urea, castor pomace, ammonium sulfate,
etc.)
Placement: Location and depth of the fertilizer in the soil
in relation to the seed or plant. Fertilizers may be applied in
two ways:
1. Broadcast-distributed evenly over the soil surface and,
where possible, mixed with the soil.
2. Banded-placed in a narrow strip or strips alongside the
plants or seed, on or below the soil surface.
Timing: Application of fertilizer at various intervals as de-
termined by the need of the crop under various conditions. (Ex-
ample-the initial or basic amount of fertilizer may be applied
before planting, during planting, shortly after planting, or in
split applications combining any two or all three of these.) In
addition, more fertilizer may be supplied later at intervals of
time by sidedress application.
Basic Fertilizer Application: The primary or initial amount
of fertilizer (other than supplemental) which is usually applied
before, during, or shortly after planting, and which under normal
conditions supplies the major fertilizer requirements of the crop.
Supplemental Fertilizer Application: Additional fertilizer
(over and above the basic amount) applied anytime during the
growing season of the crop.
Sidedressing: The addition of fertilizer, either basic or sup-
plemental, to a crop after it is planted.

KINDS OF SOILS
All soils on which vegetables may be grown in Florida are
placed into three general groupings for purposes of simplifying
fertilizer recommendations.
MINERAL SOILS
These include all mineral soils except the calcareous soils
(marl and rockland).1 Soils such as the sands, loamy sands,
sandy loams, etc., would fall into the "mineral soils" grouping.
The mineral soils are divided into two sub-groups-irrigated and
unirrigated.
SThe calcareous soils are technically classified as mineral soils. In this
guide, the calcareous soils were placed in a separate group because their
fertilizer requirements differ greatly from those of the other mineral soils.








Irrigated Mineral Soils.-Any mineral soil (except marl and
rockland) having a dependable moisture supply, whether natural
or from supplemental irrigation, throughout the growing season.
Ample moisture permits economical use of rather large amounts
of fertilizer without excessive danger of fertilizer burn. Recom-
mendations for fertilization of vegetables on irrigated mineral
soils are given in Table I.
Unirrigated Mineral Soils.-Any mineral soil (except marl and
rockland) lacking a dependable moisture supply and subject to
periods of moisture shortage. Lack of moisture in a soil limits
the amount of fertilizer that can be used efficiently by plants.
Recommendations for fertilization of vegetables on unirrigated
mineral soils are given in Table II.

ORGANIC SOILS
These include soils which are composed, in large part, of or-
ganic matter. The organic soils may be divided, on the basis of
their fertilizer requirements, into two sub-groups.
Peat and Muck Soils.-These soils include all organic soils,
except the sandy mucks. Recommendations for fertilization of
vegetables on peat and muck soils are given in Table III.
Sandy Mucks.-These include soils which are a mixture, in
varying amounts, of sand and muck. These soils are extremely
variable but, in general, have fertilization requirements similar
to irrigated mineral soils. For that reason, suggestions for the
fertilization of sandy mucks should be taken from Table I.
NOTE: Sandy mucks may require somewhat less nitrogen
than irrigated mineral soils due to the fact that
sandy mucks contain more organic matter than the
mineral soils.

CALCAREOUS SOILS
These include soils which are largely composed of calcareous
materials. These soils are high in calcium content and have a
pH in the range of 7.8 to 8.3. Calcareous soils are divided into
two sub-groups.
Marl Soils.-Calcareous soils consisting of fine particles of a
narrow size range. Recommendations for marl soils are given
in Table IV.
Rockland Soils.-Calcareous soils composed of particles of a
very wide size range. These soils are generally shallow and con-
5








tain a significant quantity of rock. Recommendations for rock-
land soils are given in Table V.

HOW TO USE THE TABLES
Use suggestions given in the tables only as a general guide
for fertilization of vegetables. They should be modified when
necessary to fit local problems.
To explain use of the tables, take as an example a grower
planning a fertilization program for tomatoes on a sandy soil
with seepage irrigation in south Florida. He would follow these
steps:
1. Determine the proper table to use. This soil type accord-
ing to fertilizer usage would come under Table I-Irri-
gated Mineral Soils.
2. The recommendation for the basic application for tomato
is 120-160-160 pounds per acre of N-P2O.-KO, respective-
ly. This is equivalent to 2,000 pounds of 6-8-8 fertilizer.
Other grades supplying approximately the same amounts
of plant food may be substituted.
The 2,000-pound basic application can be applied in split
applications or all at once, if properly placed in the soil.
3. The recommendation for additional fertilizer (expressed
in pounds N, P,20, and KO2 per acre) which can be applied
as sidedressing is also given in Table I under "Supple-
mental Applications". For tomato, the suggestion is 30-
0-30 for each application. Substitute applications which
may be used are 15-0-30, 0-0-30, 30-0-0, 30-30-30, etc. The
second column under "Supplemental Applications" is a
guide to number of such applications that may be needed.
4. Study footnotes for specific information on soil types and
crops. For tomato, study footnotes 1, 2, and 5.

OTHER POINTS TO CONSIDER
pH.-Most vegetable crops grow satisfactorily in a pH range
of 5.5 to 6.5. Have the soil analyzed and add lime as needed two
to three months before planting.
Minor Elements (micronutrients).-These include zinc, man-
ganese, copper, boron, iron, and molybdenum, all of which may
be supplied to the soil in the fertilizer or to the foliage by fungi-
cides or nutritional sprays or dusts.
6








Amounts of Minor Elements to Use per Acre, When Needed

Minor Soil Foliage Spray Foliage
Element Application Amt./100 Gals. Water Dust

Copper 5 to 10 Ibs. CuO 1 lb. CuSOi 1 to 2%
Zinc 4 to 8 lbs. ZnO 1 lb. ZnSO, 1 to 2%
Manganese 10 to 20 lbs. MnO 1 to 2 lbs. MnSO, 2 to 3%
Boron 4 to 8 lbs. B,0 1 lb. borax
or equiv. "frits"
Iron 10 to 20 lbs. FeO 1 to 2 lbs. FeSO0
or equiv. chelates or equiv. from
chelates


Other Elements.-Calcium, magnesium, and sulfur may be
deficient in certain soils. These elements may be supplied to
soils by liming or in the fertilizer.
Placement.-On mineral soils, initial application of fertilizer
should be made in two bands, each located 2 to 3 inches to the
sides and at or slightly below the level of the seed or the root
crown of transplants. Fertilizer may be applied broadcast on
peat and muck soil at time of planting.
Foliar Applications.-In general, there are no special ben-
efits derived from the use of foliage sprays to supply the major
elements (NPK).
Fertilizer Movement in the Soil.-Nitrates, chlorides, and sul-
fates move quite readily with the upward and downward move-
ment of water in the soil. These ions accumulate at the surface
as soil water evaporates and move down or leach out completely
with rain or overhead irrigation. Phosphates, on the other hand,
remain in the zone where they are applied.
Ammonification and Nitrification.-Organic nitrogen must be
converted to ammonia (NH3) and further to nitrates (NO3)
before it can be utilized by plants. Soil microorganisms respon-
sible for these conversions require conditions of soil moisture,
temperature, pH, and aeration similar to those required by most
vegetable crops for good growth.
Soluble Salts.-An accumulation of soluble salts in the root
zone can be harmful to plants by causing a fertilizer burn. High
concentration of soluble salts develops from heavy fertilization,
evaporation, salt intrusion in coastal areas, or use of irrigation
water containing large amounts of soluble salts.







Sources of Fertilizer Nutrients.-Vegetable crops vary in
their response to the various sources of nitrogen and potash.
With few exceptions, there are no special benefits to be derived
from use of organic nitrogen over the inorganic form. The nat-
ural organic do offer some benefits in that they are resistant to
leaching, help maintain fertilizer in good physical condition, and
supply certain minor elements for plant growth. Cost of the
nutrients supplied by the natural organic is considerably greater
than equivalent amounts derived from inorganic sources. Under
certain conditions, some vegetables respond differently to the
sources of potash in common use. Sometimes the sulfate form
is the most beneficial for plant growth and quality. However,
muriate of potash is a good source and can be used to supply part,
if not all, of the potash needed for many vegetable crops.
Soil Testing.-When correlated with past crop performance,
soil testing is a good guide to fertilization. Soil testing should
be used regularly as an indication of phosphorus, potassium, mag-
nesium, calcium, and other nutrient needs. When soil tests show
medium to high levels of these elements, reduce amount of ele-
ments to be applied, proportionately.








TABLE I.-IRRIGATED MINERAL SOILS.

Basic Application Supplemental Applications
Crop Actual Lbs./Acre
Actual Lbs./Acre Each Application No. of
N P2O., K,0 N P2O0 K2iO Applications


Beans, bush ..........
Beans, pole ..........
Beans, lima ..........
Beets .............. .....-
Broccoli ..................
Cabbage ................
Cantaloupe ............
Carrots .................
Cauliflower ............
Celery ............. .....
Chinese cabbage ..
Collards .........-.....
Corn, sweet ..........
Cucumbers ...........
Eggplant ...........
Endive (escarole
& chicory) ........
Lettuce (head,
leaf, & romaine)
Mustard ................
Okra ......................
Onions ................
Peas, English ......
Peas, Southern ....
Pepper ....................
Potatoes, Irish2 ....
Potatoes, sweet ....
Radish' ..................
Spinach ..................
Squash .................
Strawberry' ..........
Tomato2, ..............
Turnip ....................
Watermelon ..........


66- 88- 88
90 -120 120
90 120 120
90-120 120
108 144 144
108 -144 -144
120 160 160
108 -144 -144
120 160 160
300 300 400
108 -144 144
108 144 144
90 120 120
90-120-120
108 144 -144

108 144 -144

108 144 144
108 -144 -144
108 -144 -144
120 160 -160
90 120 120
60- 80- 80
108 -144 -144
150 200 -200
60-120-120
90-120 120
120 160 160
90 -120 -120
96 128 128
120 160 160
108 -144 144
90-120-120


15-
15-
15-
30-
30-
30-
30-
30-
30-
30-
30-
30-
30-
30-
30-

30-

30-
30-
30-
30-
15-
15-
30-
30-
10-

30-
30-
15-
30-
30-
30-


0 30
0 30
0 30
0 30
0-30
0 -30
0-30
0 30
0 30
0 30
0 -30
0 30
0 15
0 30
0 30

0-15

0-15
0-15
0-30
0-30
0 30
0-30
0-30
0 -30
0-30

0 15
0 -30
0 30
0 30
0-15
0 30


1 to 3
1 to 3
1 to 3
1 to 3
1 to 3
1 to 3
1 to 3
1 to 4
1 to 4
3 to 5
1 to 3
1 to 3
1 to 4
1 to 4
1 to 6

1 to 3

1 to 3
1 to 3
1 to 5
1 to 4
1 to 3
1 to 3
1 to 6
1 to 3
1 to 3

1 to 2
1 to 3

1 to 6
1 to 3
1 to 4


1 This large amount of fertilizer may be applied in split-applications


for most crops


where leaching and danger of fertilizer burn are problems.
SWhere leaf-roll has been observed, increase proportion of nitrate-nitrogen to 30-35
percent of the total nitrogen in the fertilizer. As an alternative make supplemental applica-
tion of nitrate-nitrogen as a sidedress.
Supply 50 percent of the total potash in the sulfate form.
3 Usually adequate for two to three crops in succession. No supplemental fertilizer gen-
erally needed.
4 Apply one-half of the basic amount broadcast and disk in at bedding time. The other
half should be applied in bands shortly before mulching with plastic film.
It is practically impossible to place supplemental fertilizer where it will greatly benefit
strawberry plants on plastic mulched beds. Supplemental fertilizer may be applied in the
middles on plastic mulched beds.
5 Adequate calcium is necessary to prevent blossom-end rot and to improve fruit quality.
Sulfate of potash should be used to supply at least part of the potash requirements.
Trellised or staked tomatoes for vine-ripe harvest grown over a five- to eight-month
season will require more fertilizer than the amount suggested above, which is for the aver-
age short-season crop.
For long-season, trellised or staked tomatoes, make supplemental applications at two-
to three-week intervals with about 45-60-45 pounds of N-P2,O-K,O per acre alternated
with the 30-0-30.









TABLE II.-UNIRRIGATED MINERAL SOILS.


Basic Application

Actual Lbs./Acre
N P2.O K.O


Supplemental Applications


Actual Lbs./Acre
Each Application'
N P.O, KO


Beans, bush ..........
Beans, pole ............
Beans, lima ........
Beets ......................
Broccoli .................
Cabbage ................
Cantaloupe ...........
Carrots .................
Cauliflower ............
Celery2 ........
Chinese cabbage ..
Collards ..............
Corn, sweet ........
Cucumbers ...........
Eggplant ..............
Endive (escarole
& chicory) ........
Lettuce (head,
leaf, & romaine)|
Mustard ............... I
Okra ........................
Onions .................
Peas, English ......
Peas, Southern ....
Pepper ...................
Potatoes, Irish' ....
Potatoes, sweet ....
Radish4 .................
Spinach ..............-
Squash .................
Strawberry" ..........
Tomato3, ...........
Turnip ...............
Watermelon ........


42- 56- 56
60- 80- 80
60- 80- 80
60- 80- 80
90- 120 -120
90-120-120
90-120-120
72- 96- 96
90-120-120

72- 96- 96
72- 96- 96
72- 96- 96
60- 80- 80
90-120-120

72- 96- 96

72- 96- 96
72- 96- 96
72- 96- 96
90 120-120
60- 80- 80
42- 56- 56
72- 96- 96
120 160 160
40- 80- 80
60- 80- 80
90 -120-120
60- 80- 80
72- 96- 96
90-120-120
72- 96- 96
60- 80- 80


1 This large amount of fertilizer may best be applied in split-applications for most crops
where leaching and danger of fertilizer burn are problems.
2 Crop not recommended to be grown on unirrigated mineral soils.
3 Where leaf-roll has been observed, increase proportion of nitrate-nitrogen to 30-35
percent of the total nitrogen in the fertilizer. As an alternative make supplemental applica-
tion of nitrate-nitrogen as a sidedress.
Supply 50 percent of the total potash in the sulfate form.
4 Usually adequate for 2 to 3 crops in succession. No supplemental fertilizer generally
needed.
5 Apply one-half of the basic amount broadcast and disk in at bedding time. The other
half should be applied in bands shortly before mulching with plastic film.
It is practically impossible to place supplemental fertilizer where it will greatly benefit
strawberry plants on plastic mulched beds. Supplemental fertilizer may be applied in the
middles on plastic mulched beds.
6 Adequate calcium is necessary to prevent blossom-end rot and to improve fruit quality.
Sulfate of potash should be used to supply at least part of the potash requirements.


Crop


No. of
Applications


0 30
0 30
0-30
0 -30
0 30
0 -30
0-30
0 -30
0 -30

0 30
0 30
0- 15
0 30
0 -30

0-15

0-15
0-15
0-30
0 30
0 30
0 30
0 30
0 30
0 30

0-15
0 -30
0 30
0-30
0-15
0 -30


I











TABLE III.-PEAT AND MUCK SOILS.

Basic Application Supplemental Applications
Crop Actual Lbs./Acre
Actual Lbs./Acre Each Application No. of
N P2,O K O N PO-, K2O Applications


Beans, bush ..........
Beans, pole ...........
Beans, lima ..........
Beets ....................
Broccoli ..................
Cabbage ..............
Cantaloupe1 ..........
Carrots ..................
Cauliflower ...........
Celery ..................
Chinese cabbage ..
Collards ..................
Corn, sweet ..........
Cucumbers1 .........
Eggplant ................
Endive (escarole
& chicory) ........
Lettuce (head,
leaf, & romaine)
Mustard ................
O kra ......................
Onions ....................
Peas, English ......
Peas, Southern ....
Pepper ...................
Potatoes, Irish ....
Potatoes, sweet' ..
Radish (2-3 crops
in succession).
Spinach ..................
Squash ...................
Strawberry' ..........
Tom ato' ................
Turnip ...................
Watermelon ........


0- 60-120
0 120 180
0 120 -180
0 -100 -150
0 100 -150
0 100 150

0 -120 180
0 120 -180
0 320 320
0 -100 150
0 100 -150
0 -160 -240

0 120 240

0 100 -150

0 120 180
0 -100 -150
0- 60-120
0 120 -180
0 120 200
0 100 150
0 160 240
0 -160 240


0 -120 -180
0 100 150
0 -120 -180
0 -120 -180
0 160 240
0 -100 150


See following
discussion







0 40-120
See following
discussion
"p
"t








"t


The amounts of fertilizer suggested here are the amounts needed for
organic soils low in P205 and KzO. When soil tests show a medium level of
PsOs in an organic soil, reduce the suggested amount of P2Os by one-third;
when soil P205 levels are high, reduce by two-thirds. Follow the same sug-
gestions for medium and high levels of K2O.
The amounts of fertilizer suggested are sufficient to grow crops under
normal conditions. Most crops will respond to supplemental applications
of nitrate-nitrogen during periods of cool weather or following heavy rain-
fall.
On new peat soils, make a broadcast application of 15 pounds of CuO,
10 pounds of MnO, and 4 pounds of B03a per acre before any crop is planted.

SThese crops are not recommended for commercial production on organic soils at the
present time.















TABLE IV.-MARL SOILS.

Basic Application Supplemental Applications
Crop Actual Lbs./Acre 1
Actual Lbs./Acre Each Application 1 No. of
I N P.O K,O N P.O, KsO I Applications


Beans, bush ..........
Beans, pole ..........
Beans, lima ..........
B eets ......................
Broccoli ..................
Cabbage ..............
Cantaloupe' .........
Carrots .............
Cauliflower .........- .
Celery1 ..............-..
Chinese cabbage ..
Collards ...............
Corn, sweet ..........
Cucumbers ............
Eggplant ..........
Endive (escarole
& chicory) ........
Lettuce (head,
leaf, & romaine)
Mustard ................
O kra ......................
Onions ....................
Peas, English .....
Peas, Southern .
Pepper1 ..................
Potatoes, Irish ....
Potatoes, sweet ..
Radish1 ..................
Spinach ..................
Squash ..................
Strawberry" ..........
Tom ato ..................
Turnip ...................
Watermelon ........


45- 60- 60
72- 96- 96
60- 80- 80
60- 80- 80
60- 80- 80
60- 80- 80
60- 80- 80
60- 80- 80
60- 80- 80
60- 80- 80
60- 80- 80
60- 80- 80
54- 72- 72
45- 60- 60
54- 72- 72

54- 72- 72

54- 72- 72
54- 72- 72
54- 72- 72
54- 72- 72
54- 72- 72
54- 72- 72
54- 72- 72
60-120 120
40- 80- 80
45- 60- 60
54- 72- 72
45- 60- 60
90 -120- 120
120 160 -160
54- 72- 72
60- 80- 80


1 These crops not recommended for commercial


production on marl soils at the present


2 Apply one-half of the basic amount broadcast and disk in at bedding time. The other
half should be applied in bands shortly before mulching with plastic film.
It is practically impossible to place supplemental fertilizer where it will greatly benefit
strawberry plants on plastic mulched beds. Supplemental fertilizer may be applied in the
middles on plastic mulched beds.


0 -30
0 -30
0 -30
0 -30
0 -30
0 -30
0 30
0 -30
0 -30
0 30
0 -30
0 30
0-15
0 -30
0 30

0-15

0 -15
0 15
0 30
0-30
0 -30
0 30
0 -30
0 30
0 30

0-15
0 -30
0-30
0-30
0-15
0-30














TABLE V.-ROCKLAND SOILS.


Basic Application Supplemental Applications
Crop Actual Lbs./Acre I
Actual Lbs./Acre Each Application No. of
N P.O.- KO N P-0O KO Applications


Beans, bush ..........
Beans, pole ..........
Beans, lima .........
Beets1 ...............
Broccoli ..................
Cabbage ..............
Cantaloupe ..........
Carrots' ..............
Cauliflower ............
Celery1 ..................
Chinese Cabbage ..
Collards .............
Corn, sweet ..........
Cucumbers ...........
Eggplant ................
Endive (escarole
& chicory) ........
Lettuce (head,
leaf & romaine)]
Mustard ................---------
Okra ......- .............
Onions1 ..................----------
Peas, English ......
Peas, Southern ....
Pepper ....................
Potatoes, Irish1 ---
Potatoes, sweet1 ..
Radish1 .................
Spinach .........---...
Squash .................
Strawberry- ..........
Tomato ..............
Turnip
(for greens) ....
Watermelon .........


45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60

45- 60- 60

45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60
30- 60- 60
20- 40- 40
45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60
90 120 120
45- 60- 60

45- 60- 60
45- 60- 60


30 30 30
30 30 30
30 30 30
30 30 30
30 30 30
30 30 30
30 30 30
30 30 30
30 30 30
45 60 60
30 30 30
30 30 30
30- 0-30
30 30 30
30 30 30

30 30 30

30 30 30
30 30 30
30 30 30
30 30 30
15 30 -30
15 30 30
30 30 30
15 30 -30
10 20 30

30 30 15
30 30 30
15- 0-30
40 40 40

30 30 30
30 30 30


0 to 1
1 to 2
1 to 2
1 to 2
1 to 2
1 to 2
1 to 3
1 to 2
1 to 2
1 to 4
1 to 2
1 to 2
1 to 2
1 to 2
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1 These crops not recommended for commercial production on rockland soils at the pres-
ent time.
2 Apply one-half of the basic amount broadcast and disk in at bedding time. The other
half should be applied in bands shortly before mulching with plastic film.
It is practically impossible to place supplemental fertilizer where it will greatly benefit
strawberry plants on plastic mulched beds. Supplemental fertilizer may be applied in the
middles on plastic mulched beds.




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