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 Front Cover
 Introduction
 Data considerations
 Florida overview
 Back Cover














Group Title: Circular
Title: Federal executive branch expenditures in Florida
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084357/00001
 Material Information
Title: Federal executive branch expenditures in Florida
Series Title: Circular
Alternate Title: Federal executive branch expenditures in Florida, 1976
Physical Description: 24 p. : maps ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Gordon, John R
Florida Cooperative Extension Service
University of Florida -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Science, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1976
 Subjects
Subject: Grants-in-aid -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Intergovernmental fiscal relations -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Appropriations and expenditures, State -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by John R. Gordon.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084357
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 31444947

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Data considerations
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Florida overview
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Back Cover
        Page 25
Full Text






I


I/V'~ c/


Circular 453
FEDERAL
EXECUTIVE BRANCH
EXPENDITURES
IN FLORIDA
by John R. Gordon


Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida, Gainesville
John T. Woeste, Dean for Extension


--


---------- --- --------------- ------


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I


^BC>CjL..< _-^A'' - - - . F --e







FEDERAL EXECUTIVE BRANCH EXPENDITURES IN FLORIDA, 1976


by

John R. Gordon


Federal government outlays in Florida have a major influence upon the

state and local economies and upon the welfare of individual residents.

Funds for fiscal 1976 from seven major federal government agencies and

an eighth category comprised of all remaining agencies are identified

by county in this overview of federal executive branch outlays in

Florida. Some comparisons of Florida to the other states are also shown.

Some of the highlights are as follows:

In fiscal year 1976, the executive branch of the federal
government spent $358.9 billion of which $13.0 billion,
or 3.6% of the total, went to individuals, organizations,
businesses and units of government in Florida.

Florida ranked seventh among the states in total federal
outlays received.

An examination of the data shows that Florida has not
received federal outlays in excess of its "national share"
based on criteria including population, number of residents
65 years of age and over, school enrollment, unemployment
and number of persons with poverty level incomes.

The per capital total outlay in Florida of $1,518 was less
than the corresponding national average of $1,672.

The percentage of total personal income in Florida coming
from federal support of various retirement programs is
impressive with an amount well in excess of 10% of total
personal income in the state coming directly as retirement
program payments to individuals in Florida.



JOHN R. GORDON is an Extension Economist and Associate Professor in
the Food and Resource Economics Department, Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.






As might be expected, the largest total dollar federal
government expenditures were made in the more populated
counties with Dade, Pinellas, Broward and Duval counties
ranking highest. Rural counties including Lafayette,
Glades, Liberty and Dixie received the lowest levels of
total federal expenditures.

Counties receiving the highest per capital amounts of federal
program expenditures tend to be urbanized and have relatively
high per capital income. On the other hand, counties ranking
low in per capital federal program expenditures tend to be
rural with relatively low per capital income. These counties
tend to be located in the north Florida area and in the inland
area of south Florida. Per capital federal outlays ranged
from highs of $3,488 in Brevard County and $3,486 in Leon
County to a low of $568 in Union County. The average outlay
in Florida was $1,518 per person. Only nine counties exceeded
the national average of $1,672 per person.

There are several limitations in interpreting federal outlay
data. Necessary proration and allocation techniques cannot
reflect actual practice in all cases. Allocation of outlays
by geographic area can be a misleading indicator of distribu-
tional benefits and costs also differ among geographic areas.
Per capital outlays vary greatly within the state, and each
community should study its own unique situation before reaching
final conclusions on potentials and limitations of federal outlays.


INTRODUCTION


Federal government spending has a major influence upon the U.S. economy.

Federal outlays equaled $358.9 billion, or 21 percent of the gross national

product, in 1976. The geographic distribution of these funds has great

implication for state and local economic development. Consequently, many

decision makers and citizens are concerned with how their counties, states,

or regions fare relative to other areas. In addition to examination of

total outlays, comparisons of federal outlays for individual programs may

also be useful. Disparities among geographic units with apparently equal

economic and social needs may suggest that changes are needed in local,

state or federal policies.

The objective of this report is to present an overview of the geographical

distribution of federal executive branch expenditures by county within






Florida for fiscal year 1976. Expenditures in Florida as compared to

other states are briefly examined. This information can be used to

provide a basis for considering and understanding the effects of

federally funded programs on economic development in Florida.


DATA CONSIDERATIONS


It should be emphasized that these data report, to the extent possible,

the total federal expenditure impact on the state of Florida and its

counties. This total includes outlays to individuals, institutions,

businesses and units of state and local government. Frequently, aid

given to units of state and that to local governments are reported

separately. In these rankings, Florida consistently ranks very low.

For example, in 1977, only Indiana received less federal aid per person

to state and local government than did Florida.

The task of reporting federal spending in small areas was initiated

in the Office of Economic Opportunity and is presently carried on by

the Community Services Administration. Since 1969, federal outlays in

each county and in each city with a population of 25,000 or more have

been identified. This identification process requires that several

assumptions be made and, consequently, the following limitations should

be carefully considered in the interpretation and use of these data.


Limitations

The outlays do not include expenditures by the legislative and judicial

branches of the federal government, but are limited to executive branch

expenditures. Also, security considerations dictate incomplete reporting

in some instances. In addition, necessary proration and allocation

techniques cannot reflect actual practice in all cases. Outlays which






pass through the state government or a prime contractor are especially

difficult to trace to final recipients. Because it contains the state-

house, Leon County figures must be used with special caution.

Allocations of outlays by geographic area can be a misleading indicator

of distributional benefits. The service provided by the outlays may not

aid residents of the area as much as nonresidents. For example, highway

construction in a rural area may yield more benefits to metropolitan

people than to the local population; similarly, freeways in a central

city may be used by more suburbanites than city dwellers.

Another problem in using expenditure data for analysis of the federal

government's impact on people's welfare is the variation across geogra-

phic areas in the cost of providing a given service. In other words,

equal dollar allocations do not necessarily purchase equal quantities

of services in different localities.

The outlay side of the issue contains only a part of the answer to

federal government's role in determining patterns of economic growth.

Equally important is the tax side; i.e., how much does the federal

government take from each area? The net impact of outlays-less-taxes

is a more appropriate measure of federal influence than either outlays

or taxes taken alone. An area receiving a relatively low per capital

share of federal outlays may actually be benefiting from federal policy

as a whole if per capital share of the federal tax burden is even lower.

However, the data for determining the incidence of federal taxes during

this fiscal year were not available and, consequently, the tax side was

not examined in this study. It should be noted, however, that in a

recent study conducted by the Tax Foundation, Inc., Florida received

only $1.00 in aid for every $1.22 in taxes sent to the federal government






to be spent for aid to state and local governments in fiscal 1977.

Finally, many regulative and legislative activities are "nonbudgetary"

but are important determinants of people's welfare and the prosperity

of areas. Examples are federal transportation policy and pollution regu-

lation. The influence of such factors is not captured by analysis of

outlays and receipts. Other financial support, such as the face value

of guaranteed/insured loans, is considered "indirect" support and is

not included in the outlay totals given here.

FLORIDA OVERVIEW

In fiscal year 1976, the executive branch of the federal government

spent $358.9 billion of which $13.0 billion, or 3.6% of the total, went

to Florida citizens, firms or governmental units. This federal money

received in Florida was dispersed through 40 principal agencies. In

this report, the.funds are reported for seven major agencies plus another

category including all other agencies. The category selection reflects

a compromise between a manageable report with few categories or a bulky

report with much detail. The eight categories are identified and

described below and in Table 1.

1. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE outlays in Florida during 1976
totaled $457 million, or 3.0% of the national total. Of
the 50 states, Florida ranked eighth in funds received
from the Department of Agriculture, but per capital outlays
of $53 in the state were 24% less than the national average
of $70. Over 60% of the U.S. Department of Agriculture
expenditures in Florida were attributable to one program --
food stamps.

2. In 1976, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE expenditures in Florida
totaled over $2.9 billion. This total represented 3.6%
of the U.S. Department of Defense outlays and ranked Florida
seventh among the states. These funds comprised 22.6% of
the federal monies coming into the state in 1976. Active
duty pay, retirement pay, supply contracts and civilian pay
accounted for most of these outlays in Florida.






3. The DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION AND WELFARE expended the
largest national and state total of any federal agency. Florida
received 4.6% of the Department's outlays or a total of more
than $5.7 billion. This expenditure ranked Florida fifth
among the states. This category of spending is large in Florida,
accounting for 44.3% of total federal money received, because it
includes social security payments which comprise about two-
thirds of the HEW total outlays. Per capital expenditures of
$673 in Florida exceeded the national average by about $90
per person.

4. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR outlays are largely a barometer of employ-
ment conditions. When high unemployment levels prevail, out-
lays from this department tend to increase. In 1976, Department
of Labor outlays in Florida totaled $275 million, or 2.1% of
all federal funds received by the state. Florida ranked 11th
among the 50 states in total funds received from this agency.

5. The DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION made outlays in Florida for
several programs but most of the $322 million were expended
for highway planning and construction, Federal Aviation
Administration operations and Coast Guard activities. This
total represented 2.5% of Florida's federal outlays and the
state ranked eighth in the nation as a recipient of these funds.

6. TREASURY DEPARTMENT outlays totaled $520 million in Florida
and represented 4.0% of federal funds received in the state.
Florida ranked 14th among all 50 states in the receipt of
these funds and the state average of $61 per capital was just
36% of the national average expenditure of $171 per person.
Federal fiscal assistance to state and local governments is
included as a major portion of this total.

7. VETERANS ADMINISTRATION outlays in Florida are large. They
totaled $889 million in 1976, giving Florida a ranking of
fourth among all of the states. Veterans Compensation,
Veterans Readjustment Training and Veterans Hospitalization
programs accounted for most of the outlays.

8. The OTHER FEDERAL PROGRAMS category includes expenditures by
all other executive branches of government not accounted for
in the previous discussion. These other branches accounted
for $1.8 billion, or 14% of federal funds received in Florida
in 1976. Some major outlays in this category included expendi-
tures from the Civil Service Commission (includes civil service
retirement payments), Postal Service, National Aeronautics and
Space Administration, the Railroad Retirement Board and Envir-
onmental Protection Agency.

The percentage of total personal income in Florida coming from federal

support of various retirement programs is impressive. Included among

these programs are the following:






Selected Retirement
Related Program


FY 1976 Outlays
(in thousands)


Military Retirement Pay

Social Security-Disability Insurance

Social Security-Retirement Insurance

Social Security-Survivors' Insurance

Social Security-Supplemental Income

Civil Service Retirement and Disability

Railroad Retirement Act


TOTAL


$ 654,673

412,867

2,670,412

733,180

194,577

565,732

149,321


$5,380,762


This total of $5.4 billion amounted to 11.5% of the $47.1 billion of

personal income in Florida in 1975. This figure is even more impressive

in view of the fact that this is not the complete total of all federal

program payments to retired Florida residents. For example, postal

worker retirement, food stamp assistance and medicare payments are not

included in the retirement related figures presented above.

Recently, much of the interest in the geographical distribution of

federal government funds has centered on the role of these monies in

stimulating economic growth in the southern and western portions of the

country rather than in northeastern and upper-midwestern states. Business

Week labeled this struggle "The Second War Between the States."

Table 1 shows that six of the agencies examined -- Department of

Agriculture, Department of Defense, Department of Labor, Department of

Transportation, Treasury Department and all Other Federal Agencies --

expended less on a per capital basis in Florida than the national average.

Two agencies -- Department of Health, Education and Welfare and the






Veterans Administration -- spent more on a per capital basis in Florida

than the national average, but the per capital total outlay in Florida

of $1,518 was $154 less than the corresponding national average of $1,672.

In fiscal year 1976, Florida received 3.6% of the federal outlays but,

as shown in Table 2, the state had 3.9% of the county's population, 4.8%

of the nation's unemployment, 4.0% of the persons with poverty level or

lower income, 5.8% of the U.S. population 65 years of age and over, and

4.0% of the nation's veterans. Florida's need for funds appears less when

the criteria of contribution to federal income tax and percentage of

school age children are used to compare states. However, Florida's

ranking on these criteria is easily explained. Because of the relatively

low per capital income of Florida's residents, which is 90.8% of the

national per capital average income, residents of the state contributed

only 2.7% of the federal income tax paid in 1975. In addition, because

of the relatively older age structure of Florida's population as compared

to the national average, the state's share of school age children was

slightly lower, 3.3%, than the state's share of total population, 3.6%.

Thus, an examination of the data in Tables 1 and 2 shows that at least

one southern state -- Florida -- has not received federal outlays in

excess of its "national share" based on criteria including population,

number of residents 65 years of age and over, school enrollment, unemploy-

ment and number of persons with poverty level incomes.

DISTRIBUTION OF FEDERAL OUTLAYS

BY AGENCY AND COUNTY


Florida counties do not receive federal funds on equal total or per

capital bases. Rather, a county's share depends upon its population and

population density; the education, age, income and race of its population;










Table l.--Federal outlays in Florida by major agency and state ranking, 1976


Propor- Florida's Per Per
Propor- Total tion of rank in capital capital
Total tion federal total total outlays outlays
Federal department federal spent in outlays outlays expendi- in the in
or agency outlays Florida in Fla. in Fla. tures U. S. Florida


(thousands) (percent) (thousands) (percent) (out of 50)

Department of Agriculture $15,082,164 3.0 $ 456,593 3.5 8 $ 70 $ 53
Department of Defense 82,453,705 3.6 2,937,269 22.6 7 385 344
Department of Health,
Education and Welfare 124,948,947 4.6 5,753,304 44.3 5 582 673
Department of Labor 9,315,765 3.0 275,548 2.1 11 43 32
Department of Transportation 10,094,852 3.2 321,741 2.5 8 47 38
Treasury Department 36,728,824 1.4 520,148 4.0 14 171 61
Veterans Administration 19,201,163 4.6 889,414 6.9 4 90 104
Other Federal Agencies 61,044,494 3.0 1,824,294 14.1 -- 284 213

Total $358,869,914 3.6 $12,978,311 100.0 7 $1,672 $1,518



Source: "Federal Outlays in Florida" PC-261-610, Community Services Administration,
National Technical Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington, D. C.,
December 1976.







the size and type of its agricultural base; employment opportunities;

and certain institutions that exist in the county such as military

installations, veterans hospitals or universities. The 1976 total and

per capital federal agency outlays by county are shown in Table 3. Popula-

tion and per capital personal income data are also shown in Table 3. As

might be expected, total dollar expenditures were higher in the more

populated counties with the largest dollar amounts in Florida going to

Dade, Pinellas, Broward and Duval counties. Rural counties including

Lafayette, Glades, Liberty and Dixie received the lowest levels of

federal expenditure.

Because counties vary in population, per capital expenditures are more

useful than total dollar expenditures in comparing outlays among counties.

Per capital county rankings by total federal outlays received and by agency

are shown and discussed in Figures 1 9.


Table 2.--Florida's ranking with other states based on selected social and
economic characteristics


Florida as Florida as
percent of percent of Florida's
Characteristic U.S. total U.S. average rank

(percent) (percent) (out of 50)

Total federal outlay 3.6 7
Per capital federal outlay 90.8 27
Population, 1975 3.9 8
Per capital income, 1975 94.6 29
Resident population, 1975 3.9 8
Federal income tax paid, FY 1975 2.7 11
Number of unemployed, July 1976 4.8 6
Low income individuals, 1969 4.0 6
Persons 65 & over, 1974 5.8 4
Elem. & sec. school enrollment' 3.3 9
Living veterans, 1974 4.0 8


Source: "Federal Outlays in Florida" PC-261-610, Community Services
Administration, National Technical Administration, U.S.
Department of Commerce, Washington, D. C., December 1976.







Figure 1. Total Per Capita Federal Outlays by County, 1976


Counties receiving the highest per
capital amount of federal program expendi-
tures tend to be urbanized and have rela-
tively high per capital income. Many
contain within their boundaries well known
federal government sponsored institutions--
Cape Canaveral, military bases, univer-
sities and state headquarters of federal
government agencies--which to a large ex-
tent account for the relatively high rank-
ing.
On the other hand, counties ranking
low in per capital federal program expendi-
tures tend to be rural with relatively low
per capital income. These counties tend
to be located in north Florida and in the
central area of south Florida.
Per capital federal outlays as shown
in Table 3 ranged from a high of $3,488
in Brevard County and $3,386 in Leon County
to a low.of $568 in Union County. The aver-
age in Florida was $1,518 per person. Only
nine counties exceeded the national average
of $1,672 per person.








County Rank

VZZ 1-17

S18-50

I I51-67








Figure 2. Rank of Counties by Department of Agriculture Per Capita Outlays, 1976


The counties receiving the largest per
capital outlays from the Department of Agri-
culture tend to be relatively low income
rural counties in the northern part of the
state. Most of this money is channeled
through food stamps, school lunch, and other
food assistance programs. Traditional agri-
cultural commodity and cropland program ex-
penditures also tend to be higher in these
counties. Alachua County is relatively high
because Gainesville is the headquarters of
several USDA agencies and the Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences at the Univer-
sity of Florida.
The more densely populated, high-income
counties along both the east and west sides
of the state rank low in per capital Depart-
ment of Agriculture outlays. Per capital
outlays averaged $53, ranging from $241 in
Lafayette County to $23 in Charlotte County
(Table 3).








County Rank

77ZZ1 1-17

I II 18-50

1 51 67







Figure 3. Rank of Counties by Department of Defense Per Capita Outlays, 1976


Not surprisingly, many of the counties
ranking high in per capital outlays from the
Department of Defense contain a military base.
Most of those counties are located along the
coast. The largest payments from the Depart-
ment of Defense are typically made for mili-
tary payroll, civilian payroll, military re-
tirement, and military contracts. Low rank-
ine counties tend to be concentrated in rural
north Florida. Per capital outlays from the
Department of Defense exceeded $2,500 in
Okaloosa County and were less than $10 in
Liberty, Hardee, Hamilton, and Jefferson
Counties (Table 3). The average expenditure
in Florida was $344 per person.











County Rank

Z72 1-17

= 118-50

E-- 51-67







Figure 4. Rank of Counties by Department of Health, Education and Welfare Per
Capita Outlays, 1976


More than 200 programs of the Health, Edu-
cation and Welfare Department brought $5.7 bil-
lion to Florida counties. Counties ranking high
had a relatively large number of residents re-
ceiving social security and medicare benefits
or they had medical facilities within their
boundaries. Low ranking counties tend to be
non retirement counties, but there is no appar-
ent rural versus urban or low versus high income
pattern in this ranking. Per capital values, as
shown in Table 3, exceeded $1,000 in Leon, Sara-
sota, Broward, Pinellas, Charlotte, and Citrus
Counties and were less than $300 in Okaloosa and
Union Counties. The state average was $673.


County Rank

E 1--17

I 18-50

E 51 -67







Rank of Counties by Department of Labor Per Capita Outlays, 1976


Department of Labor expenditures are made
primarily for various manpower programs, unem-
ployment insurance, and unemployment benefits.
Many of the counties which include a major
Florida city within their boundaries rank
high in per capital Department of Labor out-
lays. Low ranking counties tend to be sparse-
ly settled.
Many of these funds are passed through to
counties from the state government. This re-
quires that an allocation of the funds to the
counties be made. This allocative process re-
quires that the Leon County figures be inter-
preted very carefully as they may reflect
some amount of residual effect. Excluding Leon
County, per capital outlays ranged from $53 in
Polk County to $4 in Gilchrist County (Table 3).
The per capital outlay in the state was $32.






County Rank

z 1-17

I I 18-50

S-- 51-67


Figure 5.








Rank of Counties by Department of Transportation Per Capita Outlays, 1976


In 1976, highway planning and construction
grants on a per capital basis tended to go to
counties in north Florida. Other counties which
rank high on a per capital basis have coast guard
or FAA operations within their boundaries. Coun-
ties with a low per capital ranking from this de-
partment are scattered throughout Florida, but
several are located in the center of the southern
half of the state. Per capital outlays averaged
$38 but ranged from less than $1.00 in Bradford
and Union Counties to $809 in Nassau County (Table
3). Over one-half of the counties received less
than $18 per capital.








County Rank
IZ 1 -17

W I 18-50

--- 51-67


Figure 6.






Figure 7. Rank of Counties by Department of Treasury Per Capita Outlays, 1976


Department of Treasury outlays were made
primarily as grants of fiscal assistance to
units of state and local government and also
for payment of interest on instruments of Fed-
eral debt, such as bonds and notes. Excluding
Leon County (Tallahassee), per capital outlays
from the Department of the Treasury ranged from
a high of $97 in Duval County to a low of $29
in Collier County (Table 3). The average of all
counties was $61.









County Rank
E 1 17

I I 18 50

--1 51-67









Rank of Counties by Veterans Administration Per Capita Outlays, 1976


Payments for veterans programs amounted
to $889.4 million in 1976. Counties such as
Columbia and Alachua ranked high in per cap-
ita outlays because of veterans hospitals.
The range of per capital outlays was from
$547 in Columbia County to $49 in Glades
County with a state average of $104 (Table


County Rank
IZZ1 -17

I -18-50

I 51-67


Figure 8.







Figure 9. Rank of Counties By All Other Federal Agency Per Capita Outlays, 1976


This category of expenditures from all
other federal agencies combines a large number
of diverse programs. Although no single pro-
gram is very large the combined total repre-
sents 14.1% of Florida's federal funds. The
largest outlays were made by the Civil Service
Commission (payments to retired government
workers), Postal Service, and National Aero-
nautics and Space Administration. Per capital
outlays as shown in Table 3 ranged from a high
of $987 in Brevard County to a low of $50 in
Liberty County. The Florida average was $213
per person.












County Rank
IZZ 1-17

18-50

EE 51-67











Table 3.--Total and per capital federal


County DA DO


Alachua


Baker


Bay


Bradford


Brevard


Broward


g Calhoun


Charlotte


Citrus


Clay


Collier


Columbia


Dade


Total
Per Capita

Total
Pe- Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita


18,


1,


3,


1,


7,


24,









1,


1,


3


3


Total 113
Per Capita


381 20,668
140 157

907 211
157 17

523 117,367
38 1,264

037 604
64 37

428 451,321
30 1,813

735 43,128
28 49

702 89
82 10

989 1,056
23 25

818 3,363
51 94

,548 12,031
31 244

,961 8,407
61 130

,069 5,473
107 191

,986 167,513
79 116


executive branch outlays by county and agency for fiscal year 1976.

Aeencv*


Thousand


HEW

107,271
815

4,579
377

38,933
419

8,302
509

109,175
439

652,112
737

9,215
1,072

43,702
1,034

36,028
1,011

17,233
350

39,771
614

14,568
508

915,193
631


1976
Total Population


2,690
20

75
6

1,288
14

131
8

9,737
39

26,976
30

81
9

255
6

177
5

367
7

290
4

355
12

46,176
32


Total 877
Per Capita 49


:46 9,964 89
14 556 5


70 835
4 47


1,235 2,040 15,356
69 114 856


17,935
4,114


1975
Personal
Income


DT Treas
Dollars
3,970 6,199
30 47

1,224 427
101 35

2,617 4,673
28 50

12 815
1 50

6,409 12,788
26 51

15,814 35,194
18 40

44 404
5 47

2,748 1,585
65 37

816 1,146
23 32

835 1,548
17 31

350 1,899
5 29

2,336 1,283
81 45

83,552 103,065
58 71


De Soto


VA


35,972
273

683
56

7,637
82

1,560
96

27,814
112

71,563
81

648
75

3,266
77

2,179
61

3,246
66

4,163
64

15,672
547

161,774
112


Other

26,695
226

971
80

21,482
231

2,108
129

243,608
979

139,028
157

909
106

6,381
151

4,032
113

4,740
96

14,286
221

3,613
126

329.555
227


224,846
1,709

10,077
830

197,420
2,125

14,569
892

868,280
3,488

1,008,550
1,140

12,092
1,407

59,982
1,419

49,559
1,391

41,548
844

71,417
1,103

46,369
1,618

1,920,814
1,325


131,552


12,143


92,884


16,324


248,922


884,872


8,593


42,278


35,627


49,253


64,761


28,664


1,449,300


4,813


3,267


4,357


3,722


5,187


6,464


3,673


4,970


4,350


4,709


6,647


4,484


6,433










1975
Agency* 1976 Personal
County DA DD HEW DL DT Treas VA Other Total Population Income
Thousand Dollars
Dixie Total 601 99 3,299 35 24 342 526 823 5,759 6,750
Per Capita 89 15 -489 5 4 51 78 123 853 2,998

Duval Total 29,998 358,777 287,780 19,738 15,457 56,036 57,433 127,243 952,462 579,661
Per Capita 52 619 496 34 27 97 99 220 1,643 5,646

Escambia Total 11,082 336,473 88,088 6,444 25,447 11,701 20,881 53,151 553,267 225,575
Per Capita 49 1,492 391 29 113 52 93 236 2,453 4,850

Flagler Total 414 152 4,588 38 65 229 440 884 6,810 7,358
Per Capita 56 21 624 5 9 31 60 120 926 4,631

Franklin Total 543 761 5,307 66 329 435 751 2,615 10,807 7,943
Per Capita 68 96 668 8 41 55 95 329 1,361 2,750

Gadsden Total 3,306 2,075 23,202 318 785 2,103 2,615 5,020 39,425 38,095
Per Capita 87 54 609 8 21 55 69 132 1,035 4,665

Gilchrist Total 549 114 2,652 21 9 231 341 1,953 5,870 5,091
Per Capita 108 22 521 4 2 45 67 384 1,153 3,664

Glades Total 332 319 1,952 29 22 239 261 904 4,058 5,372
Per Capita 62 59 363 5 4. 44 49 168 755 5,839

Gulf Total 777 205 5,209 91 275 611 976 1,216 9,360 10,909
Per Capita 71 19 478 8 25 56 89 111 858 4,415

Hamilton Total 1,317 53 4,352 52 545 487 553 1,383 8,742 8,600
Per Capita 153 6 506 6 63 57 64 161 1,017 3,885

Hardee Total 1,177 153 8,465 97 53 948 1,410 1,946 14,249 18,319
Per Capita 64 8 462 5 3 52 77 106 778 4,074

Hendry Total 852 916 6,160 121 75 683 931 1,934 11,675 16,600
Per Capita 51 55 371 7 5 41 56 117 703 10,422

Hernando Total 2,930 542 24,164 142 64 1,137 1,903 3,910 34,792 28,851
Per Capita 102 19 838 5 2 39 66 136 1,206 4,021

Highlands Total 2,137 3,883 35,022 240 89 1,744 2,772 5,160 51,047 41,007
Per Capita 52 95 854 6 2 43 68 126 1,245 4,538

Hillsborough Total 23,760 252,467 298,437 18,128 10,465 35,384 88,617 130,008 857,266 600,715
Per Capita 40 420 497 30 17 59 148 216 1,427 5,239











Agency*


HEW DL UT


Treas


VA Other Total


1976


1975
Personal


Population Income


Inousana uoiiars


Holmes


Indian River


Jackson


Jefferson


Lafayette


Lake


Lee
b3

Leon


Levy


Liberty


Madison


Manatee


Marion


Martin


Monroe


County


Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita


1,329
98

2,094
45

6,464
165

1,063
109

791
241

3,977
46

5,712
35

21,542
161

1,897
120

874
212

1,816
125

4,768
38

8,100
82

1,861
38

2,421
45


434
32

1,664
36

1,751
45

59
6

49
15

2,261
26

21,033
128

17,256
129

381
24

41
10

210
14

2,061
16

2,390
23

24,871
513

44,902
833


8,585
635

37,123
804

22,647
578

5,698
584

1,987
606

76,610
878

121,719
742

205,565
1,538

9,778
619

2,254
547

9,670
666

115,145
913

66,198
673

38,434
793

26,504
492


112
8

318
7

394
10

77
8

23
7

751
9

3,412
21

56,313
421

95
6

35
8

109
8

3,008
24

695
7

242
5

693
13


1,468
109

1,565
34

845
22

332
34

18
5

2,144
25

3,609
22

17,573
131

172
11

471
114

96
7

1,264
10

691
7

583
12

3,441
64


539
40

2,137
46

1,902
49

478
49

146
45

3,500
40

6,453
39

72,035
539

832
53

141
34

695
48

5,125
41

3,534
36

1,708
35

2,948
55


1,024
76

3,799
82

2,807
72

656
67

231
70

6,883
79

11,683
71

9,958
75

1,134
72

252
61

955
66

10,329
82

6,912
70

2,987
62

5,119
95


2,104
156

6,680
145

5,892
150

1,192
122

212
65

11,984
137

21,291
130

45,744
342

1,997
126

207
50

1,964
135

17,035
135

11,919
121

5,168
107

9,487
176


15,585
1,152

55,380
1,199

42,702
1,090

9,555
979

3,457
1,065

108,110
1,239

194,912
1,189

465,986
3,486

16,277
1,031

4,275
1,037

15,515
1,069

158,690
1,258

100,619
1,023

75,854
1,564

95,515
1,773


rnousana Dollars


13,527


46,184


39,178


9,758


3,277


87,261


163,978


133,663


15,787


4,124


14,515


126,160


98,362


48,496


53,886


3,290


5,936


3,830


3,762


4,233


5,424


5,096


5,007


3,573


3,174


3,344


5,212


4,376


5,705


5,478












Agency*


DT Treas VA


Other Total


Population Income


1975
Personal


Nassau


Okaloosa


Okeechobee


Orange


Osceola


Palm Beach


Pasco
Co

Pinellas


Polk


Putnam


St. Johns


St. Lucie


Santa Rosa


Sarasota


Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita


1,277
42

3,536
34

916
51

21,558
51

1,540
41

18,010
37

5,937
44

18,392
27

15,077
55

3,506
80

2,042
51

5,381
76

3,962
80

4,003
24

4,379
32


420
14

265,401
2,543

577
32

372,773
886

3,887
103

116,303
238

2,615
19

110,929
165

22,885
83

2,291
52

6,043
150

2,363
33

36,272
735

12,176
74

20,168


10,195
334

27,826
267

8,513
476

198,972
473

25,407
674

367,557
735

108,736
804

701,448
1,041

157,645
573

27,573
632

22,147
550

46,027
647

15,535
315

184,551
1,118


Agency*


45,554 3,180 302 4,542
328 23 2 33


Thousand
263
9

1,679
16

80
4

14,295
34

239
6

10,679
22

1,997
15

15,686
23

14,534
53

349
8

276
7

654
9

515
10

4,460
27


Dollars
24,720
809

1,152
11

96
5

8,025
19

90
2

10,132
21

195
1

36,382
54

3,904
14

351
8

319
8

15,649
220

929
19

5,579
34


1,224
40

4,235
41

715
40

21,762
52

1,695
45

21,761
45

4,208
31

28,904
43

13,636
50

2,152
49

1,911
47

3,433
48

1,792
36

7,174
43


9,403 13,316 100,844
68 96 727


2,038
67

7,466
72

988
55

40,075
95

2,723
72

37,607
77

7,503
56

120,024
178

23,039
84

3,623
83

2,988
74

5,110
72

3,603
73

15,883
84


3,114
102

35,862
344

1,842
103

72,283
172

4,985
132

88,245
181

14,443
107

163,077
242

37,905
138

6,836
157

7,929
197

8,333
117

7,007
142

25,459
154


138,775
4,303


County


43,251
1,415

326,210
3,126

13,727
768

749,743
1,783

40,566
1,077

670,394
1,374

145,670
1,078

1,194,842
1,774

288,625
1,049

46,681
1,069

43,655
1,083

86,950
1,222

69,615
1,410

257,285
1,559


Seminole


30,563


104,356


17,883


420,552


37,676


488,044


135,186


673;,603


275,078


43,660


40,297


71,128


49,368


165,054


3,928


4,488


3,758


5,885


4,254


6,940


4,313


5,817


5,302


4,018


4,888


4,814


4,531


6,783


1976











DT Treas


VA Other Total


1975
1976 Personal
Population Income


Sumter


Suwannee


Taylor


Union


Volusia


Wakulla


Walton


Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita


1,922
90

2,786
147


Total 1,092
Per Capita 74


Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita

Total
Per Capita


Washington Total
Per Capita


481
46

8,594
40

1,139
131

1,590
87

1,029
78


3,754
176

787
42


3,051
208

252
24

39,743
187

6,217
714

350
19

318
24


11,948
561

11,238
594

8,392
572

2,706
257

194,370
913

4,127
474

10,738
590

9,460
714


Thousand
91
4

136
7


169
12

45
4

5,321
25

43
5

249
14

86
6


Dollars
22
1

742
39


518
35

3
.3

2,045
10

90
10

1,619
89

102
8


741
51

404
38

10,007
47

333
38

854
47

612
46


1,421
67

1,197
63

1,344
92

1,102
105

18,819
88

595
68

1,579
87

916
69


3,373
158

2,479
131

1,803
123

987
94

38,343
180

1,481
170


23,375
1,097

20,239
1,070

17,110
1,167

5,980
568

317,242
1,490

13,725
1,576


2,500 19,479
137 1,070


2,781
210


14,275
1,077


2,937,269 5,753,304 275,548
343 673 32


321,741
38


520,148 889,414 1,824,294 12,978,311 8,551,814
61 104 213 1,518


*Agency designations are as follows:
DL=Department of Labor, DT=Department
and Total=Total Federal Outlays.


DA=Department of Agriculture, DD=Department of Defense, HEW=Department of Health, Education and Welfare,
of Transportation, Treas=Treasury Department, VA=Veterans Administration, Other=All Other Agencies,


Sources: U.S. Community Services Administration, Federal Outlays in Florida, Fiscal Year 1976, distributed by the National Technical Information
Service, U.S. Department of Commerce; Florida Estimates of Population, July 1, 1976, Division of Population Studies, Bureau of Economic and
Business Research, University of Florida; and Florida Statistical Abstract 1977, Bureau of Economic and Business Research, College of Business
Administration, University of Florida.


County


Agency*


State


21,315


18,918


14,659


10,532


212,895


8,707


18,198


13,257


Total
Per Capita


456,593
53


3,474


4,397


4,567


2,848


5,110


3,266


3,735


3,434



5,640




























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