Title: Preparation and cooking of whole deboned roasters
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084341/00001
 Material Information
Title: Preparation and cooking of whole deboned roasters
Series Title: Preparation and cooking of whole deboned roasters
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Fry, Jack L.
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084341
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 228022992

Full Text
CIRCULAR 341
CIRCULAR 341


PREPARATION AND COOKING
)/ OF
WHOLE DEBONED ROASTERS
Jack L. Fry





















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PREPARATION AND
DEBONED


Many new poultry "conven-
ience" items are available to the
housewife today. Various types
of chicken and turkey rolls or
roasts are commercially pro-
duced in great numbers. One
problem common to these prod-
ucts is that they no longer have
the appearance of the tradition-
al roasted turkey or chicken. It
is the purpose of this publica-
tion to describe a procedure
whereby the bird is essentially
boneless and can be easily
carved but retains the normal
appearance of the whole chicken
or turkey.
This is not a new method of
poultry preparation; it has not,
however, been extensively uti-
lized. It is questionable that it
will become a common commer-
cial process because of the time
and labor involved. It does,
however, offer definite advan-
tages to families and for cater-
ing or special events in which
the whole bird is to be carved at
the same location that it is con-
sumed.
The ready-to-cook poultry to
be deboned may be large broil-
ers, roasters (baking hens), ca-
pons or turkeys. The giblets are
removed from the body or neck
cavities; they are cooked sep-
arately and may be used in the
stuffing or gravy. The deboning
procedure is as follows with care
being taken not to cut the skin.
Step 1: With the bird breast
down, insert the tip of a sharp
boning knife in the neck open-


COOKING OF WHOLE
ROASTERS


Jack L. Fry*
ing under the skin and separate
the wings from the body (Fig-
ure 1). The wings are not de-
boned. Loosen flesh from the

I / i


i-A
clavicle (wishbone) and from
the long flat bone (scapula) on
either side of the back bone.
Step 2. Reverse the bird and
cut the flesh from the rear por-
tion of the back (Figure 2). De-
tach the femurs (thighs) at the
hip joint. The skin and flesh








2

over the back of the bird must
be completely loosened from the
skeleton.
Step 3: Slide the skin for-
ward over the skeleton, and cut
the breast meat from each side
of the bird, leaving the meat as
intact as possible (Figure 3).
Step 4. Remove the bone from
each of the thighs (Figure 4).
Although the tibiae (drum
sticks) may be removed, a more


*Associate Poultry Products Technologist, Department of Poultry Sci-
ence, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida 32601.








Either the rear or neck open-
ing of the bird is closed, using
string or small metal skewers.
The stuffing is placed in the bird
(Figure 6), and the opening
closed as described above. The


4 -

attractive cooked product is ob-
tained if these bones are left
in.
The result of this deboning
procedure is shown in Figure 5.
The skin is still intact and the
bird is boneless except for the
wings and drumsticks.


bird is arranged as much as pos-
sible in its original shape and
cooked in a V-shaped rack in
order that it will hold this form
(Figure 7).












Cook in an oven preheated to
325-350 F.; the bird and rack
may be covered loosely with a
"tent" of aluminum foil. At an
oven temperature of 3250 F. the
cooking time will be slightly
longer than that required using
a 3500 F. oven. The bird is done
when a meat thermometer in the
breast or thigh registers 180-
1850 F.







After removal of one or both
of the wings and the drumsticks
as required, the bird can be
sliced. Each slice will be a com-
bination of boneless meat and of
the stuffing or dressing (front
cover).
Cooking studies with capons
weighing about 71/. pounds
ready-to-cook have resulted in
the following observations.
(1) The bones (including
those removed before and after
cooking) totaled slightly over
26 % of the ready-to-cook weight
(without neck and giblets) com-
pared to 18% for comparable
birds cooked whole. The bones
removed from the raw bird
could be cooked as soup stock or
additional cooked meat removed
for other meat dishes.
(2) Approximately 21/
pounds of stuffing could be put
in deboned birds of this size.
Only 11/2 pounds could be put in
non-deboned birds. The amount
(weight) of the dressing after
cook i n g was approximately


105% of that put into the bird.
(3) The boneless meat and
skin of the cooked birds was
44% and 49% of the ready-to-
cook weight for the deboned
and whole birds, respectively.
(4) The cooking losses (vol-
atile and drip combined) were
221/. % of the weight of the de-
boned, stuffed bird and only
slightly higher for stuffed whole
birds.
(5) When cooked in a 350 F.
oven, the amount of time re-
quired to reach an end point
temperature of 1850 F. was 36.6
minutes per pound of raw de-
boned bird with stuffing and
39.4 minutes for raw whole bird
with stuffing. This differential
in total cooking time is approx-
imately equal to the amount of
time required to debone the raw
bird.
This method of preparation
and cooking results in a cooked
bird that can be easily sliced but
still retains the desired appear-
ance of the whole bird.


ACKNOWLEDGEMENT:
Appreciation is expressed to Mrs. Beth Walsh, Extension Food Special-
ist, for assistance in the preparation of this manuscript and to Dr. Bobby
Damron, Assistant Poultry Nutritionist, for photographic assistance.





5M-10-69

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914)
Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida
and
United States Department of Agriculture. Cooperating
M. O. Watkins, Dean




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