Title: Sweet corn production guide.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084287/00001
 Material Information
Title: Sweet corn production guide.
Series Title: Sweet corn production guide.
Physical Description: Book
Publisher: Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084287
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 226965833

Full Text

December 1950


SWEET CORN

PRODUCTION GUIDE

(Prepared in cooperation with workers of the
Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations)

Production practices are subject to rapid change by
new problems arising and the application of research
results to meet these needs. No attempt is made here
to foresee all the complications possible, but instead to
present the current pertinent facts on sweet corn pro-
duction. Experienced growers may have several modi-
fications of these practices for their specific conditions.

For further details on local application of these facts,
contact your County Agricultural Agent.

ACRES OF SWEET CORN HARVESTED IN LEADING


COUNTIES AND
Alachua .......... 450
Bradford ......... 650
Columbia ......... 350
Dade ............. 750
Glades ........... 600
Hardee ........... 650
Hillsborough ...... 2,550
Jefferson ......... 300
Lake ............. 500
Lee .............. 300
Manatee ......... 500


THE STATE, 1949-50
M arion ...........
Martin ...........
Orange ..........
Palm Beach ......
Polk .............
St. Johns .........
St. Lucie .........
Seminole .........
Union ............
10 + Others......


800
500
3,800
11,500
400.
450
700
1,400
400
1,450


TOTAL ........ 29,000

YIELD, COSTS AND RETURNS PER 5 DOZEN BAG OR


CRATE PER


Bags or crates per acre
Production cost
Harvesting cost
Sales F. O. B.
Net return per package


ACRE BY AREAS, 1948-49
Ever- Manatee- San- Sara-
glades Ruskin ford sota
137 118 131 131
$ .85 $1.56 $ .94 $1.15
.85 .87 .67 .65
2.56 2.42 2.15 1.85
+.86 -.01 +.54 +.05


Zell-
wood
213
$ .81
1.01
2.90
+1.08


AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


Circular 99




PLANTING DATES
North Florida: March-April
Central Florida: February-March
South Florida: Jan.-Feb.; Sept.-Oct.


DAYS TO MATURITY
70 to 80


VARIETIES RECOMMENDED
Ioana and Golden Cross Bantam.-Yellow. Remain
in standing as dependable varieties.
Many others.-For example, Calumet, Huron, Flag-
ship, Improved Sencross, Aristogold Bantam Ever-
green, Oto, Gold Rush, Golden Security, Illinois Golden
No. 10, Erie, etc.
Seneca Chief.-Excellent quality. For home garden
use. Needs best of care.

FERTILIZATION
Best results are obtained by applying fertilizer be-
fore or at planting time in two bands, each located
2 to 3 inches below and 3 to 4 inches to the side of the
planting row.


Marl soil
Muck
Peat
Light sand
Dark Sand3


Pounds
per Acre
1,000
800
800
r 1,200
r 1,200


Pounds per 100'
Type With 34" Rows
4-7-5 6%
0-10-10 + 1.0 CuO + 2.0 MnO 51/4
0-10-10 + 1.0 CuO + 2.0 MnO 51/4
4-7-5, 5-7-5 71/4.
4-7-5, 5-7-5 71/


On sandy soils apply one or two top-dressings with
nitrogen or nitrogen and potash. Make the last applica-
tion just previous to tasseling of the plant. Use mate-
rials at rates equivalent to 200 pounds nitrate of soda
per acre and potash at rates equivalent to 50 pounds
muriate of potash.
In areas where "white bud" is prevalent apply 10
pounds of zinc sulfate per acre.


PLANTING
DISTANCES
Between rows:
28" to 42"
Between plants:
. 12" to 18"


PLANTING
DEPTH
1" to 2"


SEED
REQUIRED
Plant acre:
10 to 15 pounds.
Per 100' row:
1% ounces.


INSECTS AND CONTROLS
Worm-free corn is essential. Effectiveness of control
measures. depends on the use of proper equipment,
timing and thoroughness of application, and the degree
of insect infestation.-




Make first treatment for budworms when feeding is
observed, and at one- to two-week intervals, depending
on the infestation. Direct 75 to 125 gallons of spray
or 35 pounds per acre applications of dust so as to
penetrate down into the buds for efficient control. Time
treatments to control worms exposed by the pushing
tassel and cover the very first silks. Repeat silk ap-
plications at 3-day intervals until silks turn brown.
Sprays: Amount
Dusts Per 100 Gallons Baits
Budworms DDT 5% DDT 50% 2 lb.; DDD Toxaphene 2?
50% 2 lb.; DDT 25% 1
qt.; Parathion 15% 2 lb.
Earworms DDT 5% DDT 25% 2 qt.
Silk Fly Chlordane 3-5%;
Parathion 1%
Cutworms Toxaphene 40% 21 lb. Toxaphene 2
Chlordane 1%-26
Lantern Fly Toxaphene 5% Toxaphene 40% 21, lb.
Wireworms (Chlordane 2 to 5 Ib. actual ingredient per acre in soil
Available in fertilizer mixtures.)

SEED TREATMENTS FOR PREVENTING SEED DECAY
AND IMPROVING STAND
Teaspoonfuls
Ounces per 100 per
Pounds Seed Pound of See
Thiram (50% active ingredient) 2 1/
Spergon (48% active ingredient) 6 %

DISEASES
Helminthosporium Leaf Blight.-No fungicidal con
trol and no resistant varieties are now recommended
but zineb applied as a spray has appeared promising
in experimental trials.

PRE-COOLING
Facilities for pre-cooling are essential for handling
sweet corn. In general, equipment should be available
to remove 30 to 40 degrees of field heat within th
first four hours after harvest. This should reduce th
temperature of the corn to 40 to 500 F., and it should
be held at or preferably below 40 F. during shipmen

SUCKERING
Numerous research trials have shown no yield a<
vantage in suckering sweet corn.

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE
AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914)
Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida
Florida State University
And United States Department of Agriculture, Cooperating
H. G. Clayton, Director




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