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Title: Soil testing
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 Material Information
Title: Soil testing
Series Title: Soil testing
Physical Description: Book
Creator: NeSmith, James,
Publisher: Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida
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Bibliographic ID: UF00084269
Volume ID: VID00001
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SOIL TESTING
JAMES NeSMITH
EXTENSION SOILS SPECIALIST


Don't Guess...
LET A SOIL TEST HELP
IN YOUR CROP PRODUCTION


Circular 239 June 1962
AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida







WHY A SOIL TEST?


Lime and fertilizer are essential
for good crop production.


CAN YOU ANSWER THESE QUESTIONS?

1. Is your soil acid or alkaline?

2. How much residual fertilizer and lime are
in your soil?

3. How much and what kind of lime does
your soil need?

4. Which fertilizer ratio is best for your
crop and soil?

5. How much fertilizer does a good crop re-
quire?


If you cannot answer these questions

A SOIL TEST MAY HELP


-A SOIL TEST CAN'T-

1. Tell you which crop to grow.

2. Prevent poor crops caused by drought,
disease, insects, too much water, etc.

3. Substitute for proper planting time and
certified seed.

4. Take the place of good management.





HOW TO TAKE A

SOIL SAMPLE

1. See your county agent for complete infor-
mation.

2. Proper sampling tool is important. Use
sampling tube or auger. If necessary to
use shovel or trowel, dig a v-shaped hole
in the soil 6 inches deep-slice 1-inch
slab off one side and save center 1-inch
strip.

3. Don't sample unusual areas. Avoid wet
spots, feeding areas, burn piles, old fence
rows, sand boils, etc. The sample you
collect should be the average of the field
or area sampled.

4. Divide farm into fields or areas for samp-
ling. Sample separately areas differing
in crop growth, soil color, or different
lime or fertilizer histories. Don't sample
areas too small to be fertilized or limed
separately.

5. Take a core (with sampling tube) of soil
6 inches deep from at least 15 spots in
each field or area to be sampled.

6. Fill out an information card for each
sample collected. Number matching cards
and samples. Sample No. 1 would have
information card No. 1; sample No. 2, card
No. 2; etc.





7. Make a sketch or record of some kind so
you will know which sample came from
which field.

8. Take cards and samples to your county
agent. He will send them to the labora-
tory for analysis.

9. The county agent will receive soil test
results from the laboratory and will help
you develop fertilization and liming pro-
grams for your farm.


FOLLOW THE

RECOMMENDATIONS




























COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1014)
Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida,
Florida State University and
United States Department of Agriculture. Cooperating
M. O. Watkins, Director




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