Title: Snap bean production guide
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Title: Snap bean production guide
Series Title: Snap bean production guide
Physical Description: Book
Publisher: University of Florida, Agricultural Extension Service
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Bibliographic ID: UF00084255
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
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COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE
AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 80. 1914)
Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida
Florida State University
And United States Department of Agriculture, Cooperating
H. G. Clayton, Director











SNAP BEAN

PRODUCTION GUIDE
(Prepared in cooperation with workers
of the
Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations)
















AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


Circular 100


March 1951




Production practices are subject to rapid change by

new problems arising and the application of research

results to meet these needs. No .attempt is made here to

foresee all the complications possible, but instead to

present current pertinent facts on snap bean product-

ion. Experienced growers may have several modifi-

cations of these practices for their specific conditions.


For further details on local application of these

facts, contact your County Agricultural Agent.




FLORIDA AND LEADING COUNTIES'
HARVESTED ACREAGE, 1949-50:
73,300 ACRES TOTAL


Fall: 18,000
Broward 2,600
Gadsden 400
Marion 350
Orange 700
Palm Beach 12,500
Seminole 600
Union 200
7 + Others 650


Winter: 31,000
Broward 9,000
Dade 5,400
Palm Beach 16,600


Spring: 24,300
Alachua 1,600
Dade 800
Hillsborough 650
Marion 1,300
Palm Beach 15,500
Seminole 750
Sumter 700
13 + Others 3,000


YIELD, COSTS AND RETURNS PER BUSHEL
BY AREA, 1948-49


Bushels
per acre
Production
costs
Harvesting
costs


150


'&0



99


72


72


0
U


122


0

u


96


0
o -o
0
0 ,

107 121


$ .77 $ .94 $1.17 $ .77 $ .78 $1.31 $1.25


1.25 1.50 1.15 1.02 1.22 1.07 1.05


F.O.B. 2.50 2.27 2.15 2.69 2.79 2.59 2.55

Net return +.48 -.17 -.17 +.90 +.79 +.21 +.25




DAYS TO
PLANTING DATES MATURITY
North Florida: March--April: August--Sept. 50 to 60
Central Florida: February--March; September
South Florida: September--April



VARIETIES RECOMMENDED
New varieties are recommended on a trial basis only.


BLACK VALENTINE.-Rounded. A standard
variety. Has shown extensive blossom drop under hot
weather conditions late in season. Seed black.


SCONTENDER.-Rounded. Black Valentine type
but with increased yields. Developed to hold pods in
late plantings. Resistant to common bean mosiac and
powdery mildew. Seed buff.


LOGAN.-Rounded. Resistant to common bean
mosaic, several strains of rust and powdery mildew. A
degree of tolerance to bacterial blight. Seed brown,
mottled with tan.


FLORIDA BELLE.-Flattened. Resistant to sev-
eral strains of rust and powdery mildew. Has degree
of tolerance to common bean mosaic. Use on muck
only. Seed buff, mottled with purple.


TENDERGREEN.-Rounded. A former standard
variety. Has shown extensive blossom drop under hot
weather conditions late in season. Seed dull black-
brown mottled with tan.


TOPCROP.-Rounded. Resistant to common
bean mosaic. For home garden use. Seed brown mot-
tled buff-purple.




PLANTING
DISTANCES
Between rows:
18" to 30"
Between plants:
2" to 3"


PLANTING
DEPTH

1 2 to 2"


SEED
REQUIRE]
Per acre
45 to 60 po
Per 100' ro
1 pound


FERTILIZATION


Best results are obtained by applying fertilizer
fore or at planting time in two bands, each locate
to 3 inches below and 3 to 4 inches to the side of

planting row.


Type


4-9-3, 4-7-5
0-14-5 + 1.0 CuO + 2.0 MnO
0-14-5

5-7-5, 4-7-5
5-7-5, 4-7-5


0 C

1,200
200 1
300 1

1,000 5
800 4


Marl soils and sands with a pH above 6.0 may

quire spray applications on the plants of 1/2 tc
pounds of manganese sulfate per 100 gallons of wa

where this deficiency develops.




Top-dressing is usually not considered necessary J
this crop: however, on sandy soils a top-dressing

readily available nitrogen such as 100 pounds nitr

of soda will quite often materially increase yields.


Marl soil
Muck
Peat

Light Sandy
Dark Sandy




INSECTS AND CONTROLS
Sprays:
Amount per
Dusts 100 Gallons Baits

r- 5% DDT; TDE Toxaphene 40%
:rms (DDD) 5%; 22 Ibs.;
Chlordane
5% Chlordane; 50% 2 lbs.:
Parathion 15%
3 lbs.
10%0 Toxaphene

timber 5% Chlordane Chlordane
etles 50% 2 lbs.

vorms 5% DDT; 10% Toxaphene Comm. 1 -2%
Toxaphene; 5% 40% 21/ lbs. Chlordane;
Chlordane Comm. 2%
Toxaphene:
Chlordane
50% 4 lbs.
100 lbs. bran.


,pers
I rollers 3% DDT


DDT 50% 2 Ibs.


ners 10% Toxaphene; Toxaphene 40%
2 / lbs.; Chlordane
5% Chlordane; 50% 2 lbs.:
Chlordane 40%
2 Y pts.;
1% Parathion Parathion 15%
1 lb.

ican 1 % Parathion;
n % -1 % Rotenone:
tie 5 % Methoxychlor

ips 5% Toxaphene; DDT 25% 1 qt.
5% DDT


DRY CHEMICAL TREATMENTS FOR
PREVENTING SEED DECAY AND
IMPROVING STAND


gon (48%)
ram (50%)


Ounces per 100
Pounds Seed
4


Teaspoonfuls per
Pound Seed







DISEASES AND CONTROLS


RUST AND POWDERY MILDEW.-Wettable
sulfur, 10 to 16 pounds per 100 gallons or dusting
sulfur 325 mesh.

Frequency of application is variable with weather
conditions. When young plants are near diseased
fields, and the weather is mild and humid, make the
first application a few days after the plants emerge.
Repeat at 7-day intervals until a few days before pick-
ing. Increase intervals when weather is unfavorable
for rust.

Blossom drop caused by sulfur is considered to be
of minor importance. For effective rust control apply
sulfur before the leaves become heavily infected.

Certain varieties are resistant to some forms of rust
and should be used where advisable. Sixteen pounds
wettable sulfur in 100 gallons has given best results
on West Coast.

These materials are compatible with recommended
insecticides.

ROOT ROT.-There are many forms of root rot
but one of the most common is that caused by
Rhizoctonia. Early preparation of the soil so that
weeds or cover crop is well decomposed at planting
time affords best protection.




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