Title: Cucumber production guide
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084254/00001
 Material Information
Title: Cucumber production guide
Series Title: Cucumber production guide
Physical Description: Book
Publisher: University of Florida, Agricultural Extension Service
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084254
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 226964904

Full Text
Circular 101


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE
AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 80, 1914)
Agricultural Extension Service. University of Florida
Florida State University
And United States Department of Agriculture, Cooperating
H. G. Clayton, Director











CUCUMBER

PRODUCTION GUIDE
(Prepared in cooperation with workers
of the
Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations)
















AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


March 1951




Production practices are subject to rapid change by

new problems arising and the application of research

results to meet these needs. No attempt is made here to

foresee all the complications possible, but instead to

present the current pertinent facts on cucumber pro-

duction. Experienced growers may have several modi-

fications of these practices for their specific conditions.


For further details on local application of these

facts, contact your County Agricultural Agent.



FLORIDA AND LEADING COUNTIES'
HARVESTED ACREAGE, 1949-50:
14,200 ACRES TOTAL


Fall: 4,100

Hardee 1,000
Hillsborough 350
Lee 300
Martin 200
Palm Beach 200
St. Lucie 300
Sumter 300
13 Others 1,350


Winter

Broward
Charlotte
Collier
Dade
Lee
Manatee
Martin
Palm Beach
Sarasota


2,100

200
75
600
250
150
175
200
400
50


Spring: 8,000

Alachua 1,450
Collier 350
Hardee 800
Hillsborough 700
Manatee 900
Martin 300
Sumter 500
24 + Others 3,000


YIELD, COSTS AND RETURNS PER BUSHEL
BY AREA, 1948-49


0

.- c)
s ^


327 114 303


. 0
o o




87 156 260 285


$ .83 $ .96 $ .97 $1.00 $1.48 $2.14 $1.27

1.05 .42 1.08 .97 .89 .50 .58

1.54 3.48 3.21 3.80 2.63 3.16 3.38

-.34 +2.10 +1.16 +1.83 +.26 +.52 +1.53


Bushels
Per Acre
Production
costs
Harvesting
costs
Sales
F.O.B.
Net
return





PLANTING DATES
North Florida :February--April
Central Florida : January--March; September
South Florida : January--February: Sept.--Oct.


DAYS TO
MATURITY
40 to 50


VARIETIES RECOMMENDED
New varieties are recommended on a trial basis only.



MARKETER AND COLORADO.-Standard
varieties.


PALMETTO AND SANTEE.-South Carolina
introductions resistant to downy mildew, with qual-
ity comparable to standards. Good yielders.


STRAIGHT 8.-For home garden use.


PLANTING
DISTANCES
Between rows: 48" to 60"
Between plants: 15" to 24"


PLANTING SEED
DEPTH REQUIRED

2 to /4 Per acre: 2 pounds
inch 100' Row: 1 ounce


FERTILIZATION

Best results are obtained by applying fertilizer be-
fore or at planting time in two bands, each located
2 to 3 inches below and 3 to 4 inches to the side of the
planting row.


Type
4-6-8, 4-7-5
4-6-8, 4-7-5
4-5-7, 4-7-5


Pounds
per Acre
800

1,500*
1,200


Pounds per 100'
With 48" Rows
7V4
13-3%
11


*Under troughs and on irrigated light sandy soils, increase to
2,500 pounds.


Marl soil
Light sandy
Dark sandy




A pH of 5.5 to 6.0 is optimum for cucumber
duction on the acid sands. Marl soils and sands
a pH above 6.0 may require spray applications or
plants of 1'l to 2 pounds of manganese sulfate
100 gallons of water where this deficiency deve


Top-dressing applications of nitrogen or a c
nation of nitrogen and potash vary in amount
frequency according to seasonal conditions. Tw
three applications at rates equivalent to 100 pounc
nitrate of soda and 25 pounds muriate of potash
acre generally meet the needs during given grov
period.




INSECTS AND CONTROLS

Do not apply insecticide dusts to cucurbits w
plants are wet. Afternoon applications prevent in
to bees.


Dusts

Lindane 1%;
Parathion 1%I
Nicotine
sulfate-lime
3%


Cucumber
beetles


Melon- and
pickleworms


Sprays: Amoun
per 100 Gallon

Lindane 25% 1 1
TEPP 40% V I
Parathion 15% 1
Nicotine
sulfate 40% 1 pt.
plus spreader.


Lindane 1% Lindane 25% 1 11



Cryolite 30% Lindane 25% 1 It


Aphids




DRY CHEMICAL TREATMENTS FOR
PREVENTING SEED DECAY AND
IMPROVING STANDS

Ounces per 100 Teaspoonfuls per
Pounds Seed Pound Seed

m (50% active ingredient) 3 /2
an (30% active ingredient) 5 V2
;on (48% active ingredient) 6 V



DISEASES AND CONTROLS

POWNY MILDEW.--Use Nabam (27%) 2
lus 1 lb. zinc sulfate plus sticker per 100 gallons;
ineb (65%) 6.5% dust in suitable diluent.

irst application should be made when runners be-
:o form. Repeat at weekly intervals until harvest.
me years the disease starts before runners begin
ppear, in which case the first application should
iade earlier and the frequency of application de-
ined by the weather conditions.


'he varieties Palmetto and Santee are resistant to
lew. However, if susceptible varieties of cucumber
growing nearby, then even the resistant varieties
lid be sprayed for mildew control.


'hese materials are compatible with recommended
;icides.


.NGULAR LEAF SPOT.-Make solution of
asive sublimate bichloridee of mercury) 1 ounce
tals per 72 gallons of water. Treat seed in the
000 solution above for 5 minutes, then rinse in
ral changes of clean water and spread out to dry.
disease-free seed.




Angular leaf spot does not often occur in the state
because seeds are produced in areas where the disease
usually does not occur.


POWDERY MILDEW.-Use Zineb (65%)
6.5% dust in talc or pyrax; or Ferbam (76%)
7% dust in suitable diluent.


Apply when runners begin to form and repeat at
weekly intervals until harvest.




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