Title: Pepper production guide
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Title: Pepper production guide
Series Title: Pepper production guide
Physical Description: Book
Publisher: University of Florida, Agricultural Extension Service
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Bibliographic ID: UF00084253
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 226964940

Full Text
Circular 102


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE
AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914)
Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida
Florida State University
And United States Department of Agriculture, Cooperating
H. G. Clayton, Director












PEPPER

PRODUCTION GUIDE
(Prepared in cooperation with workers
of the
Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations)

















AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESV1LLE, FLORIDA


March 1951




Production practices are subject to rapid change by

new problems arising and the application of research

results to meet these needs. No attempt is made here to

foresee all the complications possible, but instead to

present the current pertinent facts on pepper pro-

duction. Experienced growers may have several modi-

fications of these practices for their specific conditions.


For further details on local application of these

facts, contact your County Agricultural Agent.




FLORIDA AND LEADING COUNTIES'
HARVESTED ACREAGE, 1949-50:
13,750 ACRES TOTAL


Fall:

Broward
Hardee
Lee
Orange
Palm Beach
6 + Others


950 Winter

150 Broward
200 Calhoun
100 Lee
125 Manatee
150 Martin
225 Palm Beach
2 + Others


4.200

1,900
75
200
75
125
1.750
75


Spring:

Alachua
Broward
Hillsborough
Palm Beach
Polk
Sumter
10 + Others


8,600

800
500
3,300
1,100
600
950
1,250


YIELD, COSTS AND RETURNS PER BUSHEL
BY AREA, 1948-49


Busiels
pe acre
Prcluction
cats
Havesting
cs:s


FO.B.


$ .52 $1.41 $ .84 $1.57 $ .81 $2.13 $1.11

.99 .83 .36 .55 .74 .42 .41

3.78 3.00 3.24 4.17 2.63 3.03 3.16


rarn +2.27 + .76 +2.04 +2.05 +1.08 + .48 +1.64




PLANTING DATES:
TRANSPLANTS

North Florida:
February--April
Central Florida:
January--March; Aug.--Se
South Florida:
January--February; Aug.-


SEED TO DAYS' TO
TRANSPLANTS MATURITY


42 to
56 days


60 to 80
from plants


VARIETIES RECOMMENDED

New varieties are recommended on a trial basis only.


CALIFORNIA WONDER.-Sweet.
lobed fruit. A standard variety.


Mostly 4-


WORLD BEATER.-Sweet. Mostly 4-lobed
fruit. A standard variety. Certain strains are said to
be resistant to one form of leaf spotting.


HUNGARIAN WAX.-Hot. Yellow, red at mat-
urity. Fruit slender, tapering. For home garden use.


PLANTING
DISTANCES

Between rows:
20" to 36"
Between plants:
18" to 24"


PLANTING
DEPTH


1 inch


SEED
REQUIRED


Seed direct in field -
1 lb. per acre
Seedbed, plant acre
34 pound
Produce 1,000 plants
1 ounce


FERTILIZATION


Best results are obtained by applying half or more
of the complete fertilizer at planting time and the re-
mainder when the crop is one-third to one-half
grown. The initial application should be made in
two bands, each located 2 or 3 inches below and 3
inches to the side of the plant row. Subsequent appli-
cations should be drilled close to the plant row.




Poun
Pounds 100'
Type per Acre 36"

Marl soil 4-7-5 1,000 6

Muck 0-10-10 + 0.5 CuO 1,000 6
+ 1.0 MnO
Peat 0-8-24 + 0.5 CuO 1,000 6
+ 1.0 MnO
Light sandy 4-8-8, 4-7-5 2,500 1

Dark sandy 3-8-8, 4-7-5 1,500 1


Marl soils and sands with a pH above 6.0 may
quire spray applications on the plants of 1 2 t(
pounds of manganese sulfate per 100 gallons of w;
where this deficiency develops.


Top-dressing applications of nitrogen or a cor
nation of nitrogen and potash vary in amount
frequency according to seasonal conditions. Two
three applications at rates equivalent to 100 pour
nitrate of soda and 25 pounds muriate of potash
acre generally meet the needs during a given grow
period.

INSECTS AND CONTROLS

Sprays: Amount
Dusts per 100 Gallons
Aphids Parathion 1% DDT 25% 1 qt.;
Parathion 15% 11
Nicotine sulfate 40
1 pt. plus spreader.
Army-
worms DDT 25% 1 qt.
Pepper
weevil DDT 5%
Thrips DDT 5%; DDT 25% 1 qt.
Toxaphene 5 %
Use nicotine only in warm, calm weather. Can
used for late applications.




DRY CHEMICAL TREATMENTS FOR
PREVENTING SEED DECAY AND
IMPROVING STAND


Ounces per 100 Teaspoonfuls per
Pounds Seed: Pound Seed
coxide (80%) 8 Y
gon (48%) 6 Y

DISEASES AND CONTROLS

ROGEYE SPOT.-Use Ziram (76%) 2 lbs.
100 gallons; Nabam (27%) 2 quarts plus 1
nd zinc sulfate per 100 gallons; or forms of
per that have proved satisfactory diluted to give
allic copper content of 1 2 pounds per 100
ons.

n plant beds, begin when plants are 2 to 3 inches
h and repeat at 7-day intervals; in fields after
nts have become established repeat at 7 to 10-day
rivals as needed.

rogeye spot does not occur in serious form every
r. When weather conditions are not favorable the
ay schedule may be modified.

These materials are compatible with isotox, DDT
table and emulsion.

BACTERIAL SPOT.-Use forms of copper that
ve proved satisfactory diluted to give metallic
per content of 1 Y pounds per 100 gallons.

Application and compatibility same as under frog-
e spot.

Bacterial spot is usually most severe during or
allowing rainy, windy weather. Where it occurs with
bgeye and alternaria spot the same schedule should
ke care of all diseases.




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