Title: Squash production guide
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084252/00001
 Material Information
Title: Squash production guide
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Florida Agricultural Extension Service
Publisher: Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida,
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: March, 1951
Copyright Date: 1951
 Notes
General Note: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station circular 103
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00084252
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 226965000

Full Text

Circular 103


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE
AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 80, 1914)
Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida
Florida State University
And United States Department of Agriculture, Cooperating
H. G. Clayton, Director











SQUASH

PRODUCTION GUIDE
(Prepared in cooperation with workers
of the
Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations)
















AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


March 1951






Production practices are subject to rapid change by
new problems arising and the application of research
results to meet these needs. No attempt is made here to
foresee all the complications possible, but instead to
present the current pertinent facts on squash pro-
duction. Experienced growers may have several modi-
fications of these practices for their specific conditions.


For further details on local application of these
facts, contact your County Agricultural Agent.




FLORIDA AND LEADING COUNTIES'
HARVESTED ACREAGE, 1949-50:
10,100 ACRES TOTAL


Fall: 2,400
Alachua 200
Broward 350
Hillsborough 275
Marion 550
Palm Beach 300
11 + Others 725


Winter: 3,700
Broward I 000
Collier 100
Dade 1.200
Lee 100
Martin 200
Palm Beach 1,000
2 + Others 100


Spring: 4.000
Alachua 200
Brevard 350
Hillsborough 1,100
Marion 750
Palm Beach 300
Polk 200
12 + Others 1,li0


YIELD, COSTS AND RETURNS PER BUSHEL
BY AREA, 1948-49


Bushels per acre

Production costs

Harvesting costs

Sales f.o.b.


Fort
Myers

138

$1.39

1.98

3.44

+ .07


Mc-
Intosh


$ .56


Pom-
pano

115

$1.36


* .47 .10


Net return





DAYS TO
PLANTING DATES MATURITY
North Florida:
March--April; August Bush: 42 to 52
Central Florida:
February--March; August Running: 60 to 100
South Florida:
Janu ary- .March- Sept.--Oct.



VARIETIES RECOMMENDED

New varieties are recommended on a trial basis only.


EARLY YELLOW SUMMER CROOKNECK.
Bush. Fruit used immature. Enlarged blossom end.
curved neck.


COCOZELLE.-Bush. Fruit large, long, smooth.
Green with light stripes lengthwise. Cylindrical,
around 16" by 4" at maturity, but usually harvested
when one-half this size.


ZUCCHINI.-Bush. Fruit large but generally
smaller than Cocozelle. Long, smooth. Black-green
overall Cylindrical. around 13" by 4" at maturity
but harvested at one-half this size.


EARLY PROLIFIC STRAIGHTNECK.-Bush.
Fruit large but around Zucchini length, long, smooth
to sparsely warned. Yellow overall. Club-shaped.


TABLE QUEEN.-Vine. Fruit around 5" by
4/2" (several strains', pointed acorn-shaped, dark
green. grooved. Used for baking. Flesh slightly fi-
brous.


ALAGOLD.-Vine. Fruit bell-shaped, 5 pounds.
Orange overall. For winter use.






WHITE BUSH or PATTY PAN.-Bush. Fruit
disc-shaped, white at maturity, 2% pounds. For
home garden use.


SEED
PLANTING DISTANCES DEPTH REQUIRED
Bush: Running:
Between 42" to 8' to Bush: 2V2 pounds
rows: 48" 10' 1" per acre

Between 42" to 4' to Running: 1 pound
plants: 48" 6' 2" per acre


FERTILIZATION


Best results are obtained by applying fertilizer be-
fore or at planting time in two bands, each located 2
to 3 inches below and 3 to 4 inches to the side of the
planting row.












Light sandy 5-7-5, 4-8-8 1.500 133 34Y
Dark sandy 4-7-5, 4-8-8 1,000 91, 23


A pH of 5.5 to 6.0 is optimum for Squash pro-
duction on the acid sands. Marl soils and sands with a
pH above 6.0 may require spray applications on the
plants of 1 Y/ to 2 pounds of manganese sulfate per
100 gallons of water where this deficiency develops.


Top-dressing applications of nitrogen or a com-
bination of nitrogen and potash vary in amount and
frequency according to seasonal conditions. One or






two applications at rates equivalent to 100 pounds
of nitrate of soda and 25 pounds muriate of potash
per acre generally meet the needs during a given grow-
ing period.



INSECTS AND CONTROLS

Do not apply insecticide dusts to cucurbits when
plants are wet. Afternoon applications prevent injury
to bees.


Dusts
Aphids Lindane 1 %;
Parathion 1 %;
nicotine sulfate-
lime 3%


Cucumber
beetles
Melon- and
pickle-
worms


Lindane 1%


Cryolite 30%


Sprays: Amounts
per 100 Gallons
Lindane 25% 1 lb.;
TEPP 40% f2 pt.;
Parathion 15 % 1
lb.; nicotine sulfate
40% 1 pt. plus
spreader.

Lindane 25% 1 lb.


Lindane 25% 1 lb.


DRY CHEMICAL TREATMENTS FOR
PREVENTING SEED DECAY AND
IMPROVING STANDS


L

W,%




Thiram (50% active ingredient) 3 Y2

Semesan (30% active ingredient) 5 Y2

,Spergon (48% active ingredient) 6





DISEASES AND CONTROLS


DOWNY MILDEW.-Use Nabam (27%) 2
qts. plus 1 lb. zinc sulfate plus sticker per 100 gallons,
or Zineb (65%) 6.5% dust in suitable diluent.

First applications should be made when runners be-
gin to form. Repeat at weekly intervals until harvest.
In some years the disease starts before runners begin
to appear, in which case the first application should
be made earlier and the frequency of application de-
termined by weather conditions.

These materials are compatible with recommended
fungicides.

POWDERY MILDEW.-Use Zineb (65%)
6.5% dust in talc or pyrax; or Ferbam (76%)
7% dust in suitable diluent.

Apply when runners begin to form and repeat at
weekly intervals until harvest.

BLOSSOM BLIGHT.-Use Nabam (27%) 2
qts. plus 1 lb. zinc sulfate plus sticker per 100 gallons,
or Zineb (65%) 4% dust in suitable diluent.

Apply same as under downy mildew above.

Squash is a quick-maturing crop and spraying or
dusting to control disease is not always a profitable
investment. The large leaves are difficult to cover
with a fungicide In areas where mildews are favored
by weather, considerable benefit may be derived from
spraying or dusting.




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