Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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Nassau & Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper CLASSIFIEDS TRADER: CARS, CARS, CARS AND TECH! HIGH 89FLOW 81F it! 24/7 BREAKING NEWS ON TRIBUNE242.COM Biggest And Best!The Tribune $1 Established 1903 OBITSINSIDE OFFICIAL SOURCE THURSDAY JEFF LLOYD, Minister of Education, at the opening ceremony for the orientation exercise for newlyappointed teachers yesterday. Photo: Terrel W. Carey/Tribune Staff Teachers pay hike promise THE Securities Commis sion has warned the public that local asue business Pineapple Express Asue Holders should be viewed as unsafe and very high risk and advised members of the public to exercise extreme caution when con sidering to engage with this entity or persons soliciting membership. The commission said the methods used by Pineapple Express is structured like a pyramid or Ponzi scheme where promoters claim they can turn a small investment into large prots within a short period of time. The statement urged anyone with concerns about the company to contact police. Hundreds of Bahami ans have now been left in limbo after the business temporarily closed its doors HUNDREDS CAUGHT OUT IN By SANCHESKA DORSETT Tribune Staff Reporter Sdorsett@tribunemedia.net TOURISM Director General Joy Jibrilu re vealed yesterday that share holders in the downtown Nassau development part nership are all coming back to the table, with a view to nally address the unacceptable state of the area. As I said (before), and I am not afraid to say it again, we should be ashamed, the longtime tourism ofcial stated in response to ques tions on the governments plans for the tourism hub. Mrs Jibrilu was speak ing to reporters following a presentation on the state of the countrys tourism econ omy at a Rotary Club of Southeast Nassau meeting. DOWNTOWN STALEMATE NEEDS TO BE BROKEN By RICARDO WELLS Tribune Staff Reporter rwells@tribunemedia.net FORMER Free National Movement Deputy Prime Minister Frank Watson ad mitted yesterday the Minn is administration is maybe not moving as quickly as one would like them to, however he added another six months may be needed to give a proper assessment of the new government. His statement came as today marks 100 days since the administrations rst Cabinet meeting. Last Fri day marked 100 days since the FNM was overwhelm ingly voted into ofce. An ofcial in the Minnis administration said Prime Minister Dr Hubert Minnis would not release a state ment marking the rst 100 days. (Its) not a marker that the prime minister recognises, the ofcial said: (Hes) continuing to do the work for which he was elected, beginning with the cleanup. WATSON JUDGE FNM IN SIX MONTHS AS the Progressive Liber al Partys convention nears, Ofcial Opposition Leader Philip Brave Davis said he will appoint a constitu tional reform committee to fully review the partys con stitution to ensure it meets modern expectations. I think its time for us to review the partys constitu tion in totality to todays reality, he said, mak ing sure the constitution is more relevant to the politi cal party in todays context. Ill be appointing a commit tee to do that, well do that at the convention. DAVIS TARGETS NEW PARTY CONSTITUTION By RASHAD ROLLE Tribune Staff Reporter rrolle@tribunemedia.net BAHAMAS Electri cal Workers Union repre sentatives yesterday scoffed at the suspension of two managers from Bahamas Power & Light amid an in vestigation into a more than $2m fraud scheme uncov ered earlier this year, claim ing those put on the shelf this week played no major role in the alleged matter. Meanwhile, three em ployees who were red from BPL last week in UNION: BPL SUSPENSIONS A SIDESHOW By RICARDO WELLS Tribune Staff Reporter rwells@tribunemedia.net EDUCATION Minister Jeff Lloyd pledged yester day to increase the salaries of teachers to match the role educators play in so ciety as well as provide scholarships to instructors seeking to obtain masters degrees and PhDs. Addressing newly ap pointed teachers at an ori entation exercise at Uriah McPhee Primary School, Mr Lloyd urged teachers to help me help you as he assured them that whatever he promises them, he will deliver. Mr Lloyd also said the government hopes to ex tend its pilot programme of equipping pre-schools with electronic tablets through out the country within a year or two. He also said his ministry is in the process of revamping the current cur riculum to lessen the num ber of classes students are required to take. We are going to capaci tate the Professional De velopment Institute, so that you will and continue to be equipped with the required skills and supplies to do an effective job. I invite you to go on to get your mas ters degree and PhDs and I promise you that the Min istry of Education is going to make the resources avail able so you may do so, Mr Lloyd said. Today the scholarship mindset is Let us give By SANCHESKA DORSETT Tribune Staff Reporter sdorsett@tribunemedia.net By RASHAD ROLLE Tribune Staff Reporter rrolle@tribunemedia.net SEE PAGE SIX SEE PAGE SIX SEE PAGE EIGHT SEE PAGE SEVEN SEE PAGE FIVE SEE PAGE THREE A1MAIN

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PAGE 2, Thursday, August 24, 2017 THE TRIBUNE CHEF Jared Forbes, Government Houses food service manager for the last six years, gained the unique opportunity to participate in the Royal Household Hospitality Scholarship training in Britain recently to enhance mastery of his culinary craft. The programme of six weeks provided study with seven other scholars within the master of the house holds department in the Queens Residences at Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle. The circle of eight stu dents were from Caribbean Commonwealth nations of Antigua and Barbuda, Ba hamas, Barbados, Belize, Jamaica, St Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia, and St Vincent and the Grenadines. During a recent Royal Tour of the Caribbean, Prince Harry made a public statement regarding the op portunities the scholarship has offered to talented Car ibbean hospitality profes sionals. The programme tests the scholars ability to quickly use their individual prob lem solving techniques with real time scenarios that take place in the royal household daily to improve upon their efciency while building positive relation ships. By assisting the royal household during the com plex pageantry of royal events, such as the delivery of the 2017 Royal Ascot week at Windsor Castle this past June, the scholars showed signicant improve ment in high level hospital ity service on a multi-inter national level. The royal household stu dents learned and imple mented the royal household techniques, and they also were afforded the opportu nity to meet industry lead ers and trade contacts with specialist suppliers, expe riences that helped them understand the networking necessary to support the hospitality industry. After the programme was completed, the eight stu dents attended a reception as they looked back at what they accomplished together in six weeks. They each re ceived a certicate present ed to them by the Master of The Household Vice-Ad miral Tony Johnstone-Burt, in the presence of the Car ibbean High commissioners representing each nation that participated. Cooking for royalty thanks to scholarship By GENA GIBBS Bahamas Information Services JARED FORBES CHEF Jared Forbes and fellow members of the Royal Household Hospitality Scholarship meeting Prince Harry. CARIBBEAN participants in the Royal Household Hospitality Scholarship training programme in Britain. The participants were on a six-week programme. A2MAIN rrfnntbbr Reservations Required Call: 323-7770 | www.lucianosnassau.com

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THE TRIBUNE Thursday, August 24, 2017, PAGE 3 following a meeting with government ofcials earlier this week. Pineapple Express, ac cording to their Facebook page, is an asue holders company dedicated to helping persons thrive nancially. The Tribune understands that on Monday, the com pany, after being unable to pay out several hands or disbursements to customers was called into a meeting with the Securities Com mission. In order to join the asue, persons are re quired to pay a one-time fee of $200 and receive $1,050 or pay $100 and re ceive $540. Participants are also required to pay a $25 membership fee. Per sons are also required to pay a $25 processing fee each time they rejoin for a payout. After signing up, persons receive a payout in around 14 business days. In reality, participants make money solely by re cruiting new participants into the programme. The scheme gathers momentum until it crashes, the Securi ties Commission said. Fraudsters behind these schemes typically go to great lengths to make their programmes appear to be legitimate multilevel marketing schemes, but the schemes eventually fall apart when it becomes impossible to recruit new participants, which can happen quicklyPonzi and pyramid schemes are very harmful to the un suspecting public as in variably, any payouts for all people joining these schemes depend solely on what comes from the peo ple who join afterward. So, without new inves tors, money for payouts very soon becomes insuf cient. Therefore, under no circumstance are these schemes to be viewed as bona de investment pro grammes as they tend by nature to involve fraud. The commission hereby advises that the activity of Pineapple Express, its agents or consultants should be viewed as very high risk and unsafe. Therefore members of the public are advised to exercise extreme caution when considering to engage with this entity or persons soliciting on be half of this entity. Persons who decide to do so, do it at their own risk. Anyone who is concerned about having transacted with the above named company, their agents or their consultants, should contact the police, the commission added. According to Pineapple Express Facebook page, several hundred persons were able to receive payouts before the company experi enced difculties. On Monday evening, Pineapple Express execu tives met with members at the Breezes Resort to dis cuss the way forward. Hours before the meet ing, the company posted that they would be closed on Monday, August 21, and reopen for business on Tuesday, August 22. However on Tuesday, they remained closed and asked anyone with ques tions or concerns to send them a message on Face book. Shortly before midnight, the company issued a state ment saying government of cials and authorities have asked them not to open. We will not resume op erations until a new system is in place, the companys statement noted. We un derstand fully that this pro cess can take longer than we anticipated and so we are willing to refund members but there will be a process. Members will be con tacted in groups based on the dates they joined to schedule times to receive their refunds. We are truly sorry and apologise for the inconvenience, Pineapple Express added. Many persons have de scribed the business as a pyramid scheme, similar loom phenomenon, which became popular in The Ba hamas several months ago. In January, the Securities Commission announced that looms are fraudulent pyramid schemes. In the loom scheme, persons were asked to join groups and contribute small sums of money to get a larger payout, for instance $100 with the promise of getting $800. Despite the issues and concerns with Pineapple Express, an overwhelming number of persons have de cided not to request their money back and instead trust that the company will reopen. Under the companys statement on Facebook one person wrote: Why go to the bank for money for back to school when we could go to Pineapple? Their hands are being forced by the gov ernment. This is truly for the poor people. Think out of the box. Another member said: Until I see a post saying sorry guys, this failed then I will get my money back, until then I will chill. The dream is still alive, they are just looking for a better way to assist us. Other persons, however, were not as forgiving. One person wrote: Please try hard give me my money back. I been messaging for weeks now and can not get a response. Please do not go missing with my money. I knew this was too good to be true, I should have known better (sic). The Tribune attempted to contact Pineapple Express but calls were not returned up to press time. Hundreds caught out in Pineapple pyramid scam POLICE took two men into custody shortly after an armed robbery and the seizure of a large number of dangerous drugs on Tues day. Shortly before 7pm, po lice received a report that a man was held up and robbed of a large amount of cash near a business near the Lynden Pindling Inter national Airport by two men armed with a handgun, who ed in a Nissan Cube vehicle. Police immediately put out an all-points-bulletin (APB) for the vehicle and a short while later ofc ers from the Selective En forcement Team on rou tine patrol intercepted the vehicle on Emerald Coast Road near Gladstone Road. The two men in the ve hicle were stopped without incident and taken into cus tody. During a search of the ve hicle, police recovered the stolen cash and uncovered 40 pounds of marijuana. Investigations are con tinuing. TWO HELD BY POLICE FOLLOWING ARMED ROBBERY AND DRUG FIND PYRAMID AND PONZI SCHEMESPYRAMID schemes are scams where promoters claim they can turn a small investment into large prof its within a small period of time. In reality, participants make money solely by recruiting new participants in the scheme. The scheme gathers momentum until it crash es when it becomes impossible to recruit new partici pants. A Ponze scheme is similar to a pyramid scheme, the primary difference being that a Ponzi scheme involves invest a sum of money, purportedly involving an invest ment vehicle or product such as a mutual fund, in re turn for a greater sum of money or payout from the pur ported investment with little to no risk to the initial sum. In reailty, there is no mutual fund or investment vehicle and therein lies the primary fraudulent activity. THE PINEAPPLE Express premises yesterday. Photo: Shawn Hanna/Tribune Staff from page one A3MAIN The M a ll-at-M a r athon B O X OFFICE OPENS A T 10:00 A M DAIL YGalleria CinemasEFFECTIVE A UGUST 24TH, 2007 The M a ll-at-M a r athon B O X OFFICE OPENS A T 10:00 A M DAIL YGalleria Cinemas EFFECTIVE AUGUST 25TH, 2017380-FLIXUse y our e-card to reser v e tickets at 380-3549 or visit us at www .bahamaslocal.com BIRTH OF THE DRAGON THE HITMAN'S BODYGUARD ANNABELLE CREATION KIDNAP THE DARK TOWER EMOJI MOVIE GIRLS TRIPNEW C T C T A C 1:15 1:00 1:05 1:10 1:15 1:15 1:00 3:45 3:20 3:35 3:30 3:45 3:35 3:25 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 6:15 6:00 6:05 6;10 6:15 6:15 6:00 8:45 8:20 8:25 8:20 8:45 8:30 8:20 10:50 10:40 10:45 10:50 10:50 10:35 10:45

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The Tribune LimitedNULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972-Published daily Monday to FridayShirley & Deveaux Streets, Nassau, Bahamas N3207 TELEPHONES News & General Information (242) 322-1986 Advertising Manager (242) 502-2394 Circulation Department (242) 502-2386 Nassau fax (242) 328-2398 Freeport, Grand Bahama (242)-352-6608 Freeport fax (242) 352-9348 WEBSITE, TWITTER & FACEBOOK www.tribune242.com @tribune242 tribune news network PAGE 4, Thursday, August 24, 2017 THE TRIBUNE EDITOR, The Tribune. IT must be quite clear to the public at this time that the witch-hunt being al leged by prominent politi cians and lawyers is not de serving of their acceptance. It is their way of trying to stop the intensive inves tigations being conducted by the Police (not the poli ticians) into the blatant corruption and criminality practised in high places and the misappropriation of our public nances, which have resulted in the dangerous economic state that exists today. There are those persons, who would wish the inves tigations to cease. It is my position, that the staff pro vided to Assistant Commis sioner Paul Rolle could be increased, if we ask for as sistance from the Royal Ca nadian Mounted Police, the FBI. and the Metropolitan Police from London. Other Caribbean nations have received such assistance, which enabled them to ex pedite investigations and expose the villains involved in the criminal acts. The Police are under at tack by attorneys and oth ers for what appears to be efcient and effective prob ing being done and the ar rests of persons allegedly involved. I concur with the critics with regards to the handcuffs and shackles. but do not agree that detention of the persons arrested was unnecessary. As a Policeman, I was trained by experts, such as Mr Salathiel Thompson, Sir Albert Miller and Mr Stan ley Moir. I had the opportu nity to attend many institu tions overseas for training. I have read The Bahamas Constitution, the Criminal Procedure Code and other laws of The Bahamas. A provision of the Con stitution, that is relevant is where the Police Ofcer has reasonable grounds for believing that the persons arrested have committed crime or about to commit crime. The detention of such persons would occur, if the policeman has reasonable grounds for believing that the persons arrested will interfere with or harm the evidence connected with the ofce or interfere with or cause injury to other per sons, has reasonable ground to believe, that the persons arrested will alert other persons suspected of being involved in the same crimes; who are yet to be arrested or has reasonable grounds that the persons arrested will hinder the recovery of any property obtained as a result of the crime. As I recall from my train ing and experience, the Constitution provides for the denial by the Police to permit an attorney to inter view an accused person, if the investigating ofcer is satised, that such a meet ing would interfere with the investigation. For example; an accused person is about to take the policeman to recover; a murder weapon; to rescue a kidnapped victim or to nd stolen property. The attorney must be denied access to the accused. The 48 hours detention of the accused persons gives the investigating time to pursue and arrest other suspects, check alibis and proceed with other functions to complete the investigation. The 48 hours detention would be increased as I re call to 72 hours on applica tion to a Magistrate. Our Police Force has been involved in investi gations of political gures in the past. A government minister (UBP) was arrest ed and charged with elec tion bribery; an MP and prominent labour leader was arrested and charged with sedition, two MPs were arrested for stealing and fraud at government institutions and an MP was arrested and charged for attempting to bribe a magistrate. I recall in the lat ter case cabinet ministers, party leaders and bishops attending the Magistrates Court. Their presence did not inuence to custodial sentence imposed by the Magistrate. I implore our Police Of cers to be honest, fair and work to preserve the lega cy of the Royal Bahamas Force. PAUL THOMPSON Sr Nassau, August 21, 2017. NEW YORK (AP) Faced with an angry backlash for defending white su premacists right to march in Charlottes ville, the American Civil Liberties Un ion is confronting a feeling among some of its members that was once considered heresy: Maybe some speech isnt worth defending. Cracks in the ACLUs strict defense of the First Amendment no matter how offensive the speech opened from the moment a counter-protester was killed during the rally in Virginia. Some critics said the ACLU has blood on its hands for persuading a judge to let the August 12 march go forward. An ACLU leader in Virginia resigned, tweeting, Whats legal and whats right are sometimes dif ferent. This was a real tragedy and were all reeling, said Lee Rowland, a senior staff attorney at the ACLUs headquar ters in New York City. Charlottesville should be a wake-up call to all of us. The backlash, reminiscent of one that followed the ACLUs 1978 de fense of a neo-Nazi group that wanted to march through Skokie, Illinois, a Chicago suburb with a large number of Holocaust survivors, set off a tumultu ous week of soul-searching and led to a three-hour national staff meeting in which the conict within the group was aired. What resulted from the backlash was an announcement that the ACLU will no longer stand with hate groups seek ing to march with weapons, as some of those in Charlottesville did. If people are gathering armed to the hilt and hoping for violence, I think the ACLU would be doing damage to our free-speech rights in the long term, Rowland said. The newfound limit on how far the nearly century-old ACLU is willing to go to defend free speech sets up intrigu ing choices in the months ahead. Will it intervene, for example, in the case of a white nationalist rally at Texas A&M that the university cancelled after Char lottesville? The ACLU said it wont discuss when and where it might take a stand. The seeds of upheaval in Charlottes ville were planted when a judge agreed with the ACLU that white nationalists should be able to protest the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen Robert E Lee where the monument stands, in stead of at a neutral site sought by city ofcials. It was a position consistent with the ACLUs history of defending freespeech rights for protesters on all parts of the spectrum. But then James Alex Fields Jr was accused of using his car to kill 32-year-old Heather Heyer and in jure several others who were staging a counter-demonstration. Within hours, a board member of the ACLUs Virginia branch, Waldo Jaquith, resigned and red off a stinging tweet that ended with, I wont be a g leaf for the Nazis. In an opinion piece in The New York Times, K-Sue Park, a race studies fel low at the UCLA School of Law, argued that the ACLUs defend-in-all-cases ap proach to the First Amendment per petuates a misguided theory that all radical views are equal, adding that group is standing on the wrong side of history. Virginia Gov Terry McAuliffe went further, accusing the ACLU of creating a powder keg in Charlottesville. The ACLU of Virginia responded by saying it was horried by the violence but didnt cause it. We do not support Nazis, it said. We support the Constitution and the laws of the United States. After the 1978 furor over the neoNazi rally in Skokie, which never actu ally got off the ground, the ACLU stood rm even as it received hate mail and hundreds of members quit. The latest criticism of the ACLU has come from some of the same people who had heaped praise and donations on the organisation for its resistance to President Donald Trumps travel ban. Membership surged from 425,000 to 1.6 million, with $90m in online contribu tions, in the months since Trumps elec tion. The ACLU has faced much worse before and emerged stronger and more dynamic, said Ron Kuby, a New York civil rights attorney. Refusing to repre sent people who intend to march while visibly armed is a reasonable line to draw given what weve seen from the white supremacists. ACLU member and Charlottesville resident Ira Bashkow said he never con sidered quitting the group but feels the disturbing episode in his city showed it has to rethink its old-line approach to the First Amendment. I believe in the right to free speech, but it doesnt mean (demonstrators) can say whatever they want and hold a weap on at the same time, he said. Stacy Sullivan, an associate director with the ACLU, said that after Char lottesville, a small increase in people quitting as members or dropping off so cial media last week was made up for by new sign-ups. She said the ACLU will not shy away from taking unpopular positions. If you cant stomach respecting the First Amendment rights of people you despise, Sullivan said, you dont work here. By Tom Hays and Larry Neumeister, Associated Press Police probe is not a witch hunt LETTERSletters@tribunemedia.net Decisions for ACLU on free speechjrolle@tribunemedia.net EDITOR, The Tribune. WHEN I heard the news about the punishment that was handed down to the two police ofcers who were caught on video drinking on the job, I was absolutely outraged. This was literally a smack on the wrist. Anybody whose head is not buried in the sand knows that this had been a problem for a long time now. The Commissioner had the opportunity to send a clear message that this kind of behaviour would not be tolerated. The precedent has now been set. How could he re any ofcer in the future for this same infraction? They would have a good case to argue that they are not be ing treated fairly. Police should be held to the highest standard and letting these ofcers off so easily has lowered the bar. Has the moral fabric of our society decayed so bad ly that these sorts of behav iours are dismissed as no big deal? All right thinking citizens should be outraged at this. With all due respect, I think the Commissioner dropped the ball on this one. OUTRAGED CITIZEN Nassau, August 22, 2017. Punishment a joke EDITOR, The Tribune. CONGRATULA TIONS to Steven Gardiner, with his silver medal at the IAAF in London. He has the potential to be one of the worlds greatest runners in his time. However, raw talent must go along with a sensible strategy. Did he believe that the semi-nal was the nal? When I saw him at on his back and doing his personal best in the seminal, I thought what was he thinking? It is one thing to lie at on your back to get into a nal, but he had plenty cushion and it was not necessary to do a personal best and Ba hamian record. He was obviously one of the favourites to win the gold, so going into the seminal all he needed to do was ensure he was one of the top three nishers. He expended too much energy in the semi-nal, his body obviously did not recover, and the photo of him on his back should have been after the nal. His desire to only want to run in the nal in the 4x400, shows his lack of understanding; that to run in the nals you have to get into the nals as the coach pointed out. Only very deep teams such as the USA can af ford to rest their fastest runner in a heat. That he might have to lie at on his back again, to get this team into the nals, was not ap pealing to him.The 400 is a punishing race, and the 4x400was for team and country. Again, raw talent must combine with common sense race strategy in pre liminaries, to produce a world beater. He is still very young and I trust he can learn for 2020. EDROY DEVEAUX Nassau, August 16, 2017. Gardiner will learn A4MAIN

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THE TRIBUNE Thursday, August 24, 2017, PAGE 5 connection with the fraud scheme have led a trade dispute with the Depart ment of Labour against BPL, saying they were red without knowledge of what they allegedly did and in the absence of evidence they breached BPLs poli cies. Speaking on the suspen sion of the two managers, BEWU Secretary General Astrid Bodie, in an inter view with The Tribune said the union remains on a mission to put right where right should be. Ms Bodie, while insist ing that the union doesnt plan to stage any protest or strike action in the coming weeks, maintained that de cisive action must be taken once and for all. She claimed Minister of Works Desmond Bannister told the union change is coming at BPL and that a conclusion to the polices investigation into the fraud scheme is imminent. On Monday, BPLs board of directors elected to have CEO Pamela Hill termi nated, however a specic reason for Ms Hills ring was not given. This was followed by the suspension of two man agers on Tuesday. A clearly frustrated Ms Bodie said on Wednesday: They wanted to give the impression that they have been busy, I guess. These managers on suspension are not at the core of the issue. But the heart is (a cer tain) department where between the manager, as sistant manager and (an other high ranking em ployee) have (allegedly) allowed millions to walk out of BPL. She added: Ive said it once and I will continue to say it, we in the BEWU do not and have not ever con done theft. Our issues are with the fact that these three persons have been kept on despite all their failures in this scheme and other things close to this. According to staff at the company, employees in the department in ques tion are required to, with any transaction, process claims under the guidance of senior personnel. This means that all transactions would have to go through an authorisation process, checked and approved by a manager, further processed by the employees and then nally signed off by that su pervising manager. Furthermore, all cheques used would have had to have been made out to a vendor recognised and sanctioned by BPL, and if any issues are raised, the audit department would step in, it was claimed. To this end, union rep resentatives have suggested the scheme was fostered through blatant mismanagement and errors on the part of general work ers and management alike. Ms Bodie continued Wednesday: These three senior staff should be held accountable for the mon ey going missing on their watch. BPL shouldnt have brought them back; those three (managers in ques tion) should have been terminated with our mem bers. She added: We are standing rm. We are not going to rest because too much foolishness has hap pened on their watch and we are on a mission. Ms Bodie yesterday also revealed the union spent most the day in meetings with Works Minister Des mond Bannister, discuss ing issues pertaining to the fraud. She said the meeting was strictly based on nding out why the three managers in question have been kept on and not punished. Ms Bodie claimed the minister assured them that a major shake-up was on the way for the company, but didnt offer any rm details on the future of the three managers in question. He presented his case and we will work with him, she added. We are not go ing out there protesting and breaking up the place. Weve spoken with Minister Bannister and he has given us his word that change is coming. He said the police are almost completed with their investigation and we are condent that resolution is coming, she concluded. Both the government and the BPL board have received copies of an audit conducted by Ernst and Young into the discovery of a ve-month long scheme, which involved approxi mately 44 cheques paid out to 16 vendors from Decem ber 16, 2016 to May 9, 2017. It was revealed on Mon day that BPLs board has instructed its legal counsel to demand reimbursement from PowerSecure of all funds gone missing due to the vendor fraud scheme. Additionally, the board called on PowerSecure to cure all deciencies and/ or breaches set out under its management services agreement within 30 days. BPL said its board has addressed further critical performance issues with PowerSecure and awaits its response within the con tractually required time frame. Union: BPL suspensions a sideshow from page one ONE of the workers red from Bahamas Power and Light, who said she did not want her face shown. A5MAIN

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PAGE 6, Thursday, August 24, 2017 THE TRIBUNE scholarships to those enter ing for the rst time, maybe here or there we will give the masters degree but hardly ever a PhD and that cannot be intelligent, that cannot be a smart applica tion of our resources. No, sir. We want people to continue on with their masters and want them to continue on with their PhDs and teachers are at the forefront of that con sideration. I will help you to do so...I am an educator and we have lived with the expectation that because you are doing Gods service you should be satised with menial, small salaries. Lies. The devil is a lair. We like to talk about the importance of educa tion and please understand its important. Well I in vite this country to put its money where its mouth is, if we consider education to be important then let us pay the professionals what you deserve and that will change. I will help you with that. Mr Lloyd also said within two years, he hopes to have hand held devices in all preschools in The Bahamas. We have to rethink edu cation, Mr Lloyd said. So we are going to in troduce this year, iPads and tablets or handheld devices in a selected num ber of pre-schools. Right now, we have 340 in the test programme and our in tention is to have all other preschools equipped with these iPads within a rea sonable period of time and I hope that that can happen within the next year, cer tainly within the next two years. The point is that technology is crucial. We are going to make that a priority in the Ministry of Education because that is where the world is today. I am happy that our team is already working on reformation of curricu lum, look more closely pri mary schools where they are overwhelmed with the number of subjects they must address. Children are not playing enough, I am not telling you to let chil dren run wild in the yard, even though there is a place for that but in a properly controlled supervised en vironment, children learn through play that is their method of understanding the world. On Sunday, Mr Lloyd said the Minnis administra tion plans to build at least one new school in southwest New Providence this term. He also said his ministry is looking into several public private partnership strate gies to plan and construct new schools. Once nalised, the gov ernment will enter into 25year, lease to own agree ments with private entities for several proprieties. TEACHERS PAY HIKE PROMISE from page one The Minnis administra tion took a ten-week break from the House of Assem bly in July that will end on September 13 when Parlia ment resumes. It is expected that the new governments legislative agenda will ramp up once this happens. What I hear people say ing is they want to hear the plan which means (the ad ministration) needs to do a better job of explaining what they have in mind, Mr Watson said when contacted yesterday. I think they are maybe not moving as quick ly as one would like them to but I think they are making some decisions that appear to be in the interest of go ing forward. There are a number of things one might do immediately after get ting into ofce but it takes a while to plan a programme of action that begins to be seen by the general public. We should judge them after six months or so. While an administration that spent ve years in op position should have a plan for what it wants to do before entering ofce, Mr Watson said the circum stances the administration nds itself in are relevant. You dont really know all the things going on when youre in opposition, he said. You hear many sto ries but dont really know until you look at the records and books. The new administration is encountering a similar situation to what the rst Ingraham administration did in 1992, Mr Watson said, adding that this sce nario may be even worse. I thought it was a very bad situation in 1992, but the nancial situation of the country now is much worse, he said. Still, blaming the former Christie administration for the countrys woes will wear on Bahamians, he said. Sooner or later they have to speak in clear and unambiguous terms about what their plans are. In a statement yesterday, the Democratic National Alliance (DNA) labelled the administrations rst 100 days unfullled. Armed with a myriad of pre-election promises on how to improve the lives of Bahamians, the Minnis led opposition rode a wave of anti-PLP sentiment into ofce and declared that af ter ve years of lackluster governance it would nally be the peoples time. Un fortunately, more than 100 days into this term, it has become painfully clear that the FNM, though clearly capable of winning the election, was not prepared to govern, DNA Leader Branville McCartney not ed. He chided the admin istration for not offering detailed plans on the way forward. While the government has been consumed with the arrests of former poli ticiansa move which in isolation is an important part of efforts to root out corruptionthey have ignored the needs of the persons who voted them in, Mr McCartney added. Families being crushed by the weight of the oppressive value added tax and who were promised a repeal of that tax on poplar bread basket items, continue to suffer. Business owners and budding entrepreneurs who have, over the years found themselves buried by miles of red tape, and who were promised a greater sense of ease in conducting their affairs, continue to face challenges. Similarly, Ba hamians in Over-the-Hill communities who bought into the prime ministers promised initiatives for the revitalisation of those areas have been left with absolutely nothing to show for all the PMs grandiose promises. Aggressive Yesterday, Attorney General Carl Bethel said the government will unveil an aggressive legislative agenda of reform and im provements starting next month. While he did not give specics, he mentioned the FNMs support for the ap pointment of an ombuds men and said there may be some movement towards that. He suggested that when Parliament returns, the administrations focus on good governance policies, a major talking point for the FNM, will only intensify. Mr Bethel said: A host of radical changes are going to be enacted that we hope will become institutional features of governance in this country and bring a higher level of performance for this government while subsequently enhancing integrity and enshrining the highest conduct for of cials. The Minnis adminis tration has not placed a timeline on most of its promises, nor has it been specic about much of what it intends to do. A call from the National Congress of Trade Unions of the Baha mas (NCTUB) last week to start to give timelines for its priorities was seemingly ig nored by the administra tion, despite requests for comment from the press. In the lead-up to the May general election, one area for which the FNM came closest to giving a time line for implementation involved value added tax (VAT) repeal on some items. During a rally in Grand Bahama on May 5, Dr Min nis said: Your FNM will immediately remove VAT from bread-basket items to bring relief to the less fortu nate. However, after coming to ofce, ofcials suggested this promise would have to wait as the Minnis admin istration cleans up the s cal mess left behind by the Christie administration. Among its promises, the government has pledged to create and enforce anticorruption legislation for parliamentarians and pub lic ofcers; bring legislation to amend the Public Disclo sures Act to include a cam paign nance component and allow for a matter to be referred to an independent prosecutor. The Minnis administra tion also pledged to enact legislation to establish the Ofce of an Independent Director of Public Prosecu tions. The party has also pledged to hold a referen dum to constitute an inde pendent Electoral Com mission and Boundaries Commission, introduce term limits for prime minis ters and introduce a system of recall for non-perform ing members of Parliament. Watson judge FNM in six months from page one MINISTER of Education Jeff Lloyd addresses the Department of Education Orientation Exercise for newly-appointed teachers at Uriah McPhee school yesterday. Photo: Terrel W. Carey/Tribune Staff A6MAIN

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THE TRIBUNE Thursday, August 24, 2017, PAGE 7 A LEADING member of the Grand Bahama En vironmental Association is no longer condent that the Minnis administration will be any different from the previous Christie ad ministration in bringing some resolve to the plight of residents living in Grand Bahama communities near the industrial plants. Shuffel Hepburn, an ex ecutive member of GBEA, claimed Minister of State for Grand Bahama Kwasi Thompson has not respond ed to letters his organisa tion has hand delivered to the senator about its mem bers concerns. We had hoped we would receive genuine helpbut those hopes are dim at the moment, he said. I deliv ered them (the GBEAs let ters) myself and signed for them at his ofce. He claimed it has been asserted that Mr Thomp son has had regular meet ings with the GBEA, some thing Mr Hepburn said is not the case. He had never had meet ings with us other than when we were invited to the Ofce of the Prime Minis ter, along with the indus trial plants and the Grand Bahama Port Authority, to get copies of the two studies the safety assessment and e-nose studies that were undertaken by the previous government, he said. We already had ve years of inaction from the previous PLP administra tion, and we do not intend to spend another ve years of inaction, Mr Hepburn said. The group also believes it is being censored by ZNS radio and television in Grand Bahama, saying the government owned broad caster has not aired its re cent press conference. The GBEA held a press conference regarding plans for its rst Industrial Plant Residents Day that was held on August 19, the same day of the FNMs 1992 victory anniversary celebration. The Tribune contacted Mr Thompsons ofce on Wednesday for a response and was told that the sena tor had scheduled a meet ing with the GBEA for next Monday at his ofce. Mr Hepburn indicated that the GBEA had ex pected things would change after a new government was elected on May 10. The GBEA, which is born out of the Pinders Point Lewis Yard Environ mental Committee, was formed earlier this year. The group has been agitat ing for the relocation of res idents living in Seaco Town, Pinders Point, Lewis Yard, Hawksbill, Hunters and Mack Town. For the past 30 years, the residents have complained of continuous exposure to chemical emissions ema nating from the nearby plants. They also claim to suffer from various health issues, from respiratory illnesses to nose, eye, and throat irritations, vomiting, and nausea. GBEA and PPLYEC have held protests, calling for the relocation of resi dents. The Christie adminis tration had undertaken an environmental health risk assessment study conducted by international independ ent health organisations PAHO and WHO in No vember 2014 and December 2015. The study concluded that there was no health risk to residents living near the plants, but made recom mendations for the installa tion of e-nose air monitors and for a safety risk assess ment to be undertaken in the affected communities near the industrial facilities. The GBEA and PPLYEC rejected the PAHO/WHO ndings, and claims that the studies were faulty. Activist losing faith in FNM over pollution By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net SHUFFEL HEPBURN The manner in which stalwart councillors are (se lected) will be among the matters addressed, he said. In addition, he said the review will focus on ways to ensure that branches have more say in national affairs and that the provisions of the constitution have more relevance to not just ofcers, members and leaders, but to the wider general public. The constitutions of the major political parties have long been criticised as less than democratic because of the power they bestow upon leaders. Before Januarys PLP na tional convention, former Attorney General Alfred Sears derided the election process, saying 355 stalwart councillors were appointed on the eve of the partys in ternal election. The former Fort Char lotte MP wrote in June: At the convention, immediate ly before nominations for ofcers on January 25, 2017, the partys constitution was amended giving the leader the authority to increase the number of stalwart councillors as he deems necessary. The appoint ment of these new stalwart councillors on the eve of the convention automatically conferred voting status on these persons to determine the leadership race. Mr Sears vied unsuccess fully against former Prime Minister Perry Christie for the leadership of the PLP in January. After holding the post for 20 years, Mr Chris tie resigned as PLP leader several days after the party suffered an embarrassing defeat in the general elec tion. The PLPs next conven tion will take place between October 22-25. Mr Davis has revealed his inten tion to vie for the partys leadership. No one has yet announced an intention to challenge him. Former Tourism Minister Obie Wilchcombe has said he will run for chairmanship of the party. Former Minister of State for Legal Affairs Damian Gomez has also said he is mulling over run ning in the chairman race. DAVIS TARGETS NEW PARTY CONSTITUTION from page one OPPOSITION leader Philip Brave Davis. A7MAIN

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PAGE 8, Thursday, August 24, 2017 THE TRIBUNE THE Ministry of Tourisms re-engagement of the global public relations rm We ber Shandwick was in the best interest of improving the coun trys stagnant tourism product, according to Tourism director general Joy Jibrilu, who insist ed yesterday the company of fers something we dont have at this time. Reecting on the lack of growth in tourism statistics in recent years, Mrs Jibrilu in an interview with the press following an appearance at a Rotary Club of Southeast Nas sau meeting, said the attempt to establish an in house public relations unit by the former administration proved to be a learning curve that didnt yield the results expected. She said the countrys tour ism product was in the midst of ghting a global battle, one that needed a reach the team built at the ministry could not get. Tourism is the most com petitive sector, economic sec tor in the world and when we start looking at our numbers, we must start asking ques tions, stated Mrs Jibrilu. She continued: Why is it that we are sort of between six million, 6.05, 6.1, 5.98 (mil lion)? Why is it that we are not able to move the needle? And so engaging a juggernaut like a Weber Shand wick who, you know it was in teresting meeting them. Theyre the PR agency on record for Google, for Pepsi; you talk about much of the top 500 companies in the world, but they are most excited about the Bahamas, they say that there is something so very special. An announcement on the reported $600,000 deal was made by the rm on August 9, and distributed via PRNews wire, which reported that the ministry did not issue a re quest for proposals (RFP) for the job and that budget infor mation was not disclosed. Weber Shandwick was dropped in 2013 by the former Progressive Liberal Party ad ministration after an 18-year long run with the ministry. Alice Diaz, executive vicepresident of Webers travel and lifestyle practice, told PR Week that ties were severed in 2013 due to budget restruc turing issues. The partnership came as the Ministry of Tourism executed several rounds of rings over the course of July and into August. According to earlier reports, Weber Shandwick is expect ed to assist with project work in the UK and Latin America. When asked what past expe riences and the ultimate ter mination of that previous deal with the rm has taught tour ism ofcials here in the Baha mas, Mrs Jibrilu said they are smarter, wiser and more astute. I dont discount the years that we were doing it on our own. The learning curve was steep. We are smarter, we are wiser and I think now that we come to the table as equals, she said. So engaging them, we know what we want from them, we are demanding it, rather than hav ing it dictated to us. We have people who are working with them who are saying, excuse me, what about this, but it is just that they have a reach that re ally, we dont have at this time. Mrs Jibrilu conceded: But I do look forward to the time when Bahamians can sit, and we have our own in-house agency that can compete with the Weber Shandwicks of this world. Reacting to the reports on Weber Shandwick, former Tourism Minister Obie Wilch combe recently said it was un fortunate the Minnis adminis tration would prefer to spend millions creating employment overseas. He noted that the govern ment saved $3.5m in agency fees and commissions in 2016. As he defended the capacity of the ministrys in house pub lic relations team, at the time, Mr Wilchcombe underscored that the cadre of young profes sionals at the Ministry of Tour ism must not be overlooked or shunned. Jibrilu defends hiring of foreign PR rm by ministry By RICARDO WELLS Tribune Staff Reporter rwells@tribunemedia.net Mrs Jibrilu said it is im perative for the government and stakeholders of proper ties in the downtown area to make it a priority to x the many issues. She said the area must become an important part of the governments new tourism strategy because it acts as front entrance for cruise passengers. Specifying the section of downtown Nassau east of East Street, she said it is nothing short of disheart ening to see the state of an area that could, if re vamped, play a vital role in the countrys tourism prod uct. So, sitting down with all the stakeholders, there are some challenges if we look east of East Street and we see a lot of derelict build ings, buildings that are fall ing to pieces, those are ac tually privately owned. So, you are needing to work with families, people who owned those proper ties to say that, youve got to do something. I cant trespass and go on their property and start to do something. So it is getting all the stakeholders around the table, ensur ing that conversations take place, having a plan that we are working towards, and moving it. Mrs Jibrilu said ide as have been put on the ta ble for some time and now is the time for them to move from ideas to action. I think it has to be a time when we say, collectively, enough is enough, lets do something, she said. Asked to clarify what held up potential develop ment in the past, Mrs Ji brilu added: The fact that you are dealing with stake holders. She explained: Why should one person carry the brunt to do some major upgrade, to do some major renovation when you have, perhaps, six others who are not prepared or not will ing to. And so, everybody has to be on the same page. There has to be goodwill. This is not something the government can do alone because it is not just gov ernment owned property. And this is when we talk about derelict buildings, it has to be a public private partnership. So having someone who will champion the cause, having a minister who will be out there, who will speak with his counterparts; and let us hope that the fact that he is from the business sector, that these are peo ple who understand each other, know each other, they speak the same lan guage, that there is now a core belief that this is the right time. But it is really discour aging that you have visi tors who are coming to our mega resorts for example, and feeling Nassau itself is not worthy to visit or they come and they visit and cant wait to leave. So all of us have a role, litter, some things we can do immediately we are looking at campaigns. But we have to clean it up. All of us have to take pride in our surroundings, dropping rubbish just on the ground like that, it is unacceptable. Each and every one of us now has to accept re sponsibility for the small changes we can make while the big ones are being planned out. Back in 2014, follow ing China Construction Americas acquisition of the British Colonial Hilton, then Prime Minister Perry Christie said the developer had indicated his willingness to join in a public private sector partnership with the government and other stakeholders along Bay Street to implement an overall plan for redevel opment, extending from Arawak Cay in the west to Potters Cay in the east. This comes as Financial Service and Immigration Minister Brent Symon ette, owner of a property in the downtown area, has indicated that he and his family, along with other property owners, have pro vided the government with various options for a pro posed boardwalk, which is supposed to run east from the British Colonial Hilton all the way to Potters Cay Dock. However, he warned that downtown Nassaus major property owners, his fam ily among them, would not invest in the redevelopment of their landholdings until the government gave them the rules of the game. There have been rum blings that a major down town redevelopment could amend current height re strictions for buildings, which currently exist at four stories. DOWNTOWN STALEMATE NEEDS TO BE BROKEN from page one TOURISM director general Joy Jibrilu. A8MAIN

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THE TRIBUNE Thursday, August 24, 2017, PAGE 9 AN 18-year-old man was arraigned in a Magistrates Court in connection with the shooting death of a teen age boy on bail for house breaking in the Claridge Road area late last month. Mark Augustine, of Fred die Munnings Drive, stood before Magistrate Subusola Swain facing one count of murder for allegedly kill ing Tavares Deveaux in the morning hours of Saturday, July 29. On the day in question, the victim was walking near Peardale Manor, just off Clar idge Road, around 9.20am when two male occupants of a silver coloured Honda Ac cord armed with handguns, approached and shot him multiple times about the body before speeding off. At the time of his death, Deveaux was being electronically monitored by police while on bail for a serious offence. Augustine was not re quired to enter a plea and was remanded to the Ba hamas Department of Cor rectional Services (BDCS). The matter was adjourned to October 24 at 10am for service of a voluntary bill of indictment (VBI). 18-YEAR-OLD ACCUSED OF KILLING TEENAGER ON BAIL By NICO SCAVELLA Tribune Staff Reporter nscavella@tribunemedia.net A 30-YEAR-OLD man has been sentenced to ten months and seven days at the Bahamas Department of Correctional Services for causing harm to a police ofcer during a widely pub licised scufe near Christ Church Cathedral in which he sought to evade arrest. Scott Major, of St Albans Drive, was sentenced by Magistrate Carolyn VogtEvans on August 16 after pleading guilty to one count each of damage, disorderly behaviour, resisting arrest, and causing harm in con nection with his August 14 scufe with Police Corporal 3928 Goddard on George Street. Regarding the one count of damage, Major pleaded guilty to damaging Cpl Goddards trousers valued at $70, one bush jacket val ued at $95, and one Motoro la radio set valued at $3,678, property of the Royal Ba hamas Police Force. Major was ultimately sentenced to six months for the count of damage, two months for causing harm, two months for resisting ar rest and seven days for the count of disorder, set to run consecutively. The incident in ques tion was captured on cell phone video and was widely shared on social media. The short clip showed the ofcer entangled in a tense struggle with another man in the middle of George Street. During much of the inci dent, the man and the ofc er are seen on video rolling on the ground, with the lat ter ghting to maintain his grasp on the civilian. At one point in the video the civilian had the ofcer pinned to the ground on his back. The ofcer continued to maintain his grasp before a man nearby, who appeared to be a security guard, stepped in to assist. The se curity guard subsequently encouraged the ofcer to maintain his grasp on the man, while also ordering the civilian to stay down. The civilian was ultimately subdued after the police of cer managed to body slam him on the sidewalk, and the security ofcer pinned him to the ground so the of cer could retrieve his mis placed handcuffs. The male civilian, throughout the entire or deal, loudly protested his circumstances, shouting: I aint do nothing boss. Ten months in jail for scufe with police ofcer By NICO SCAVELLA Tribune Staff Reporter nscavella@tribunemedia.net MARK AUGUSTINE, 18, outside court yesterday. Photo: Terrel W. Carey/Tribune Staff A9MAIN

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PAGE 10, Thursday, August 24, 2017 THE TRIBUNE IT felt like 110F out side but for the 56 kids who donned race suits and helmets and tackled a chal lenging slalom course in speedy karts they had taken apart and rebuilt, it was the coolest thing ever. Edukarting Bahamas recently wrapped up its two-week summer camp at Doris Johnson High School where teens and pre-teens created business plans, pitched sponsors, managed nances, pulled apart karts all while learning how to drive them in a holistic pro gramme designed to teach values of self-discipline, re sponsibility and teamwork. According to organisers, it was the best karting camp ever and wouldnt have been possible without the support of volunteers and sponsors. This undoubtedly has been our best camp to date, said EduKarting Ba hamas founder and coordi nator David McLaughlin. The kids were fantastic, really absorbing all of the skills the camp is designed to teach, from marketing to mechanics, while hav ing a great time with their teammates and the karts. But its a camp that we cant conduct without our dedicated team of local and international volun teers and sponsors. We owe our tremendous success to them. We were able to of fer the camp for just $25 per camper per week, including lunch, thanks to sponsors like Pizza Hut. Its a beauti ful example of private/pub lic partnership positively impacting the lives of our Bahamian youngsters. For campers like Elzoria Knowles, 10, and Miracle Carey, 10, a seconds trepi dation turned to condence and broad smiles as they took control of the little racing machine that is the training ground of all the worlds top Formula One racers. You can watch these kids mature in one circuit, said Craig Cam Camill eri, who rides on the side of the kart, holding on as a student takes his or her rst drive. Theyve been in class, theyve learned the importance of safety, theyve driven the simula tor, theyre raised virtual money to pay for their gear, but now suddenly they are in the kart. It is just them and the engine and the road in front of them and they have to press the pedal and go. That rst touch of the foot to the oor is a moment every kid who has ever driven a kart will always remember. Once they do, there is no stopping them, they want another turn and another. You see the fear dissipate instantly and it is like they are gaining condence in front of your eyes. This is the third year he and Henry Beaudette have used their vacation time from jobs in the UK to volunteer in the Bahamas with the EduKarting pro gramme. Sponsors included the Ministry of Education, Science & Technology, Ro tary Club of East Nassau, Rotaract, JS Johnson, Ba hamas Waste, Diane Phil lips & Associates, Custom Computers, Oasis Furni ture, Pizza Hut, Valvoline, Caribbean Bottling Com pany Ltd, Aquapure, Bat tery & Tyre, Jumbex and the FIA. ASH HENDERSON, director of marketing, Restaurants Bahamas, with week two camper Andria Gardiner and the FIA road safety pledge. EDWARD MONROE, Queens College student, masters the slalom course at Doris Johnson High during the second week of the EduKarting camp. This is the fth year for the camp and this time 56 students from schools throughout New Providence participated in the programme. FULL SPEED AHEAD AT SUMMER CAMP A10MAIN

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THE TRIBUNE Thursday, August 24, 2017, PAGE 11 A CRANE that caught re and sustained hurri cane damage last year at the Freeport Container Port was dismantled on Tuesday and will be disposed of, a spokesperson for the com pany said Wednesday. The transshipment termi nal is expecting the arrival of three new cranes early next year. The crane, which was dismantled around 1pm on Tuesday, caught re in April 2016. It incurred fur ther damage in October 2016 as a result of Hurri cane Matthew. Crane three was de stroyed and written off as its from the original eet over 21 years, said the spokesperson, who re ported that the appropriate decision was one of replace ment and not repair. The deconstruction was handled in house and head ed by the engineering de partment. All safety precautions were taken, the ofcial said. Indus try partners were notied by the FCP of the activity. FCP, which is owned and operated by Hutch ison Ports, is undergoing a $300m expansion, with con struction to begin in Sep tember/October this year. It is the largest container port in the region and one of the largest employers on Grand Bahama. The spokesperson said that Hutchison Ports re mains committed to the growth and development of Grand Bahama island. Safety for all and the pro tection of the environment are a priority, he said. HURRICANE-DAMAGED CRANE DISMANTLED IN FREEPORT By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net THE CRANE being brought down at Freeport Container Port and, below, the dismantling in stages. A11MAIN

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PAGE 12, Thursday, August 24, 2017 THE TRIBUNE A BLUE Marlin landed and released near Habour Island. Photo: Oldno7shing A HOGFISH caught by Luke Maillis. Photo: Reel Addictive Charters VICTORIA Higgs with a squad of lobster. Photo: Victoria Higgs LOCAL boy Luke with a hogsh caught from kayak. A12MAIN

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THE TRIBUNE Thursday, August 24, 2017, PAGE 13 BTCs Limitless Summer promotion will now assist students all over the coun try to get ready to enter the classroom to start the new school year. The company has sup ported several back to school initiatives and will now be starting a new pro motion, Back to School Spin and Win. Alphanique Duncombe, the companys vice presi dent for mobile, said that over 1,200 customers will win an assortment of prizes including cash, gift vouch ers and free top-up. In just a few days our students will return to school and scores of tod dlers will start school for the rst time. These are indeed exciting times. We realise that back to school is sometimes stressful for par ents. So, instead of having a traditional back to school jamboree, we decided to do something that would im pact much more persons. In addition to the partnerships that weve had across the country, we are also start ing a new Back to School Spin and Win competition. Over a thousand parents and students will be able to benet from gift vouchers, cash prizes and free top-up. Our grand prize will be a $10,000 scholarship. The promotion is simple. To participate, custom ers should text the word CASH to the short code 5014, the text message is free of charge. The custom er will then be sent a trivia question, which will cost 50 cents to answer from short code 5015. Customers that answer the question cor rectly will be sent an inter net link, to scratch a BTC card for a chance to win a prize. We believe that this pro motion will provide a head start for a number of stu dents returning to school and it will also relieve some of the pressure from parents. BTC has always been very community ori ented, and we continue to talk with our customers to see what we can do to con tinue to meet the needs of the community. Last year, we ventured into a partner ship with Doris Johnson Senior High School, where we worked along with the administration to reward three students monthly for their hard work and dili gence. These were not all typical A students, but they were identied as stu dents working hard to pur sue their dreams and make a positive difference on the campus. These are the types of opportunities that we live for at BTC, Ms Duncombe said. This summer, BTC intro duced a number of promo tions under its Limitless Summer campaign. Some of these included Roam Like Youre Home, Double Data and Free After 3. Two weeks ago, we also partnered with the Uni versity of The Bahamas as it hosted its annual fresh man week of activities. We were able to talk with the students about their career choices, and our BTC en dorsed celebrity talents also participated in the student councils entertainment and activities, Ms Duncombe said. The Back to School Spin and Win promotion begins on August 28 and runs for a 90 day period. No limit on back to school support ALPHANIQUE DUNCOMBE A13MAIN

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PAGE 14, Thursday, August 24, 2017 THE TRIBUNE TEMPERATURES this summer are soaring across the globe. A heat wave, aptly named Lucifer, has brought scorching tem peratures of over 100F to southern Europe. Wildres have been sparked in Portugal, France and Greece, resulting in several deaths. Industries such as tourism, agri culture, as well as public transport services, have all been negatively affected. Emergency alert warnings of the high temperatures have been issued in several European countries. In the Pacic Northwest of the United States, unusually high temperatures peaked at over 100F, with temper atures being recorded in cit ies such as Seattle and Port land of 104F and 107F respectfully. Earlier this year in April, a severe heat wave hit Pakistan, causing temperatures to soar over 120F. Here at home, it has been an unseasonably hot summer, with temperatures regularly reaching over 90F. Higher than average air and sea surface tem peratures do not bode well for the upcoming hurricane season. Are these high tempera tures due to a changing cli mate? Climate and weather are two different, but relat ed, concepts. Climate looks at average or long-term weather patterns. Weather looks at short-term changes in temperatures, rainfall, etc. The difference can be remembered with the short phrase, Climate is what you expect. Weather is what you get. Climate science there fore looks at changing pat terns in the Earths climate over the long termover decades and even hundreds of years. Climate science and modelling future sce narios of a changing climate is very complex, including many variables. As a result, climate scientists are reluc tant to attribute one single weather event to climate change. Instead, they may say that these soaring tem peratures are in line with the impacts we can expect to see due to a changing cli mate. What scientists are cer tain of is that average global temperatures have been in creasing and that it is clear that humans have contrib uted to this warming. The last 30 years have been the warmest three decades in over a millennium. Since the 1880s, the globally aver aged land and ocean tem perature has increased by 0.85C which has had signicant impacts on many natural and human systems including melting of snow and ice, changes to ecosys tems, increased intensity of tropical storms, decreased crop yields and sea level rise. As the global tem perature average continues to rise, these impacts, and many others, are expected to increase. Increased temperatures and impacts are particu larly disturbing for small island states such as the Bahamas. If temperatures continue to increase, sea level rise can threaten the very existence of many lowelevation islands. Because of this, small island states have been advocating in international climate nego tiations to keep the global average warming to a maxi mum of 1.5C. Although there will still be impacts from climate change with this level of warming, there will be more adaptation op tions and increased ability of small islands to survive. However, with 0.85C of warming already being ex perienced, there must be urgent and signicant ac tion to limit warming to 1.5C. While small islands are one of the groups most at risk to climate change impacts, they are among the lowest emitters of green house gases, the drivers of warming. Thus, it is im perative that industrialized countries and high emitters such as the USA, China and Russia curb their emissions to limit warming and result ant impacts. More information about climate change can be found on the Climate Change Ini tiatives website: www.cli matechangebahamas.org. Lisa Benjamin and Adelle Thomas are assis tant professors at The Uni versity of The Bahamas, and co-founders of the Climate Change Initiative Its hot really hot! Is it climate change? By LISA BENJAMIN and ADELLE THOMAS AN ICEBERG oats in the Nuup Kangerlua Fjord near Nuuk in southwestern Greenland, earlier this month. Greenlands glaciers have been melting and retreating at an accelerated pace in recent years due to warmer temperatures. Photo: David Goldman/AP A14MAIN