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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03736
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03736

Full Text















Lrrtirunt


Registae.d with Postma.sr or 8hTmss for postage concessions within the Bahamas) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper
VOL. LXX1, No. 82 Thursday, February 28, 1974 Price: 20 Cents


It's a disappointment, say dealers


THE PETROLEUM Dealers
Association made it clear today that
Government's new gasoline prices are a
"disappointment," but there was "no
comment" on whether there would be
any dealer action to force improvement
of their position.
Association secretary Algie Darville
issued a statement after getting the views
of a number of PDA members in
telephone conversations.
"We don't want the public, the Prices
Commission or the oil companies to get
the impression that we're happy," Mr.
Darville declared.
"The dealers requested the Prices
Commission to restore to us the
percentage mark-up that we had prior to
the December 28 price revision. That was
our specific request. Our request has not
been granted."


for


Mr. Darville said Association members
"appreciate the small relief" which came
in the form of a 16-cent mark-tiup, and
added that it would "no doubt relieve
some of the financial burden of the
dealers."
But, he pointed out, the new mark-up
merely restores to us the loss we took in
the Dec. 28 revision, with an additional
half-cent.
"In terms of percentage return on our
investment," he continued, "under the
new prices the dealers have only gained
one-half of one percent mark-up on
high-test gasoline compared to the Dec.
28 prices, and we are still 8.77 percent
below our mark-up of prior to Dec. 28.
"It would appear that no interest was
placed on percentages, and only the
cents-per-gallon mark-up was considered.
notwithstanding the cost of the product to






rhe I


top


SPIRALLING international oil prices filtered through
to the Bahama. today for the third time in six months.
producing a 1I cents per gallon increase in the retail
price of high-test gasoline. the nation's best seller.
The various increases in the four types of fuel in the three
separate pricing areas New Providence. Freeport and the out
Islands averaged 13.5 cents per gallon.


Contributing most to the
overall average were the
Freeport aie4 generally, where
reclassification pushed up
prices more' than anywhere
else, and diesel fuel
specifically, which was
*hardest-hit of the "four
fuel-types with a price increase
in the three pricing areas
averaging 15.3 cents per gallon.
The price increase at both
the retail and the wholesale
levels was approved today by
price-controlling Deputy Prime
Minister and Minister of
Finance Arthur D. Hanna.
The increases are believed
unlikely to satisfy the
Petroleum Dealers Association.
The retail service station
operators complained that the
last gas price revision, on
December 28, cut their
mark-up on the high volume
high-test gasoline from just
under 32 percent to just over
22 percent. Today's price
changes give the dealers a
mark-up of just over 23
percent.
A PDA press statement was
expected sometime today.
In New Providence, the
country's population and
commercial centre, retail prices
have gone up an average of
12.2 cents per gallon.
The price at the pumps of
regular gasoline, the smallest
seller, went up 12 cents from
67 to 79 cents per gallon. The
wholesale cost went up ten
cents from 53 to 63 cents per
gallon.
The most-popular high-test
fuel's retail price also went up
12 cents, from 73 to 85 cents
per gallon, while the wholesale
price rose 9.5 cents from 59.5
to 69 cents.
High (100) octane fuel,
whose popularity plummetted
since the Dec. 28 increase put
it up to 80 cents, has now risen
a further ten cents to 90 cents
per gallon. The fuel's wholesale
price has increased nine cents
from 65.5 to 74.5 cents per
gallon.
The retail price of diesel fuel
in New Providence has climbed
to 79 cents a gallon, 15 cents
over the previous 64. The
wholesale price has risen 15
cents also, from 52 to 67 cents.
Freeport's maximum prices
went up the highest. Freeport,
as a result of tariff advantages
under the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement, has been able to
Sell fuels for less than in
Nassau, and was accordingly
given a separate pricing
classification under earlier

AT

SEE
SALE PRICES
EVERY DAY

ad YOU SAVE! ,


By MIKE LOTHIAN

Gasoline and Deisel Price
Control Regulations. Now,
however, ti.e area's prices have
'e~ ., br.' "I '-,: .' 'ith
those in New Providence.
As a result, the retail price
of regular gas in Freeport has
risen 14 cents from 65 to 79
cents per gallon. The wholesale
price has gone up 12.5 cents,
from 50.5 to 63 cents per
gallon.
High-test fuel has increased
15 cents at the retail pumps
from 70 to 85 cents per gallon.
Wholesale prices rose 13 cents
from 56 cents a gallon.
The retail price of 100
octane has increase 17 cents
from 73 to 90 cents a gallon,
following a wholesale rise of
16.5 cents from 58 cents per
gallon.
Diesel fuel in Freeport has
jumped 15 cents from 64 to 79
cents at the pumps, matching a
15-cent rise in the wholesale
price from the previous 52
cents per gallon.
In the Out Islands. there are
middle-men distributors
operating between the
wholesale oil companies in
Nassau and the Out Island retail
stations, so that in effect the
wholesale prices in the Out
Islands are considerably higher
than in New Providence and
Freeport, resulting also ini
higher retail prices.
All the prices quoted in
relation to the Out Islands are
automatically subject under
price control regulations to
increases to match shipping
costs.
In the Out Islands the retail
increase average 13.2 percent,
compared with an average
wholesale rise of 12.1.
The new retail prices in the
Out Islands for regular
gasoline, high-test, 100 octane
and diesel fuel are all two cents
(plus freight charges) higher
than those applicable in New
Providence and Freeport.
The last gasoline price
increase to hit Bahamian
motorists came on December
28. Prior to that, there had
been a revision on August 16
last year.


the dealers."
Under the August 16 gasoline price
control regulations, the dealers had a
15.5-cent mark-up, 31.958 percent of the
48.5 cents they had to pay wholesalers.
The December revision pushed the
wholesale price up 11 cents but limited
retailers to a nine-cent increase, with the
result that the retail mark-up, despite the
increased wholesale price, was cut to 13.5
cents a gallon, or 22.689 percent.
The service station operators protest,
with a 60-hour shutdown of their stations
on the weekend of January 4-6.
Mr. Darville added that many
customers, failing to understand the price
structure, are blaming the dealers today
for the entire 12-cent retail increase,
when in fact the wholesale price increase
is responsible for all but 2.5 cents of the
overall rise.






)rice


: SHELL 100 *



i l






no-


Committee to


probe 1

A FIVE-MEMBER House
committee has been
appointed to inquire into all
matters relating to the high
cost of propane gas.
LP gas was increased from
$13 a drum to $21 in
December. St. Agnes
representative Bruce Bra.vnen
(PLP), yesterday moved for
appointment of the
committee "not to convict
the sellers" but to determine
the reason for the price
increase.
"If the increase was
necessary, let this committee
come back to the House and
present the facts," Mr.
Braynen said. "so that
constituents would be
satisfied that it was justified.
The motion was supported
by Cat Island representative
Oscar Johnson (PLP) who
noted however, that the
matter did not stop just with
LP gas.
Housewives, those in
business and all residents of
the Bahamas were acutely
aware of the cost of living
situation in the Bahamas. Mr.


REDUCE TAX LEVI


THE FREE National
Movement today called on
Government to "substantially
reduce the level of taxation
now being imposed on gasoline
to lessen the burden on the
consuming public."
The FNM statement came
on the heels of Government
authorisation of increases in
gasoline prices that put the
most popular fuel, high-test
gasoline, up to 85 cents a
gallon.
Taxes, industry sources have
revealed, amounted to 30.1


percent of the former price of
73 cents, or about 22 cents on
the gallon. As a result of
today's wholesale and retail
price increases, taxation now
accounts for almost 26 percent
of motorists' fuel costs.
An FNM spokesman pointed
out that the public "depends
heavily on their cars" in the
absense of a mass transit
system, and the high prices will
result in motorists' taking
economy measures to reduce
their consumption, and that
would reduce Government's


he cost

Johnson suggested that those
people who patted themselves
for supporting various
charities might better direct
their attention to discovering
why there was need for
charities in this affluent
society.
The root cause, he said.
was the "out and out"
monopoly on LP gas.
Another system employed by
the two companies, Mr.
Johnson charged, was to
boycott a customer who
wanted to transfer his
business, even though he was
prepared to pay cash.
"That attitude displayed
by the gas companies runs to
the very core of those who
control the economy. The
practice they put into effect
with LP touches on the lives
of every Bahamian in this
country..
Named to the committee
were Mr. Braynen. Mr.
Johnson: Edmund Moxey
(PLP-Coconut Grove);
Errington Watlkins (Ind.-
Marsh Harbour) and Cyril
Tynes (FNM-Crooked Island).


EL-FNM

revenue from petroleum taxes
anyway.
If the price of gasoline
could be kept down by a
reduction in tax, however, the
public would probably not cut
consumption significantly, the
FNM said.
'I he FNM called for a tax
cut on gasoline in January.
after dealers staged a 60-hour
station shutdown to protest a
one-third cut in their mark-up
under the December 28
Govern ment-controlled
gasoline price structure.


Sick spots


*. "- '











Butler


gets


Miami


post
I SINAFOR MILO Butler Jr.
(pictured) 37-year-old son of
(Governor General Sir Milo
Butler, is to become the
Bahamas's first consul-general
at the Consulate Generlr's
office soon to be opened in
Mianni.
The announcement was
made todav hy Prime Minister
Lynden Pindling.
A Bahamas Intonnation I
Services release said that the
new diplomatic post "is
expected to give the Bahamas a
more positive image in an
important area of th-' united
States.
In acc'ptilig the post
Senitor Bth'r ihas resigned
from hi.s : mes.nt position as
chairman of the board of the
Broadcasting Corporation
effective tomorrow.
The Prime Minister noted in
his announcement that Miami
was a major gateway to the
Bahamas for North and

business visitors and 'or trade
with the Commonwealth.
Senator Butler will continue
as a member of the Senate
until he is officially appointed
and accredited to the new post.
The Tribune understand,'
that Mr Cadwell Armbrister,
PLP representative for
Killarney, will succeed Mr
Butler as chairman of the
S Broadcasting Corporatio .

CUTLASS

GANG

ROB

VISITORS
THREl: YOUTHS armed
with a cutlass and two knives
got away with $175 in cash
and a number of credit cards
Fucsday after a daylight attack
onil t\\o Aimerican visitors o,.
the Sonest-a Beach (olt Course.
Cable Beach.
tGerald R. Smith, 42, and
William J. Webber, 41. oth of
Illinois, were treated for
'abrasions" at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital and discharged.
a Bahamtias Information
Services press release said
The paii, both guests at ithe
Nassau iBeach Hotel, had just
completed play at the courts'
S lith hole and were getting into
their golt cart when the\ '.were
robbed, at about 4 20 p. r.
rhe robbers were described
as "between the ages oft 1 arid
20 sears."

Watkins
backs PLP
MARSH II ARBOUR
representative Frrington
Watkis announced toda. that
he intends to give his "full
support" to the government
because as an Independent tc
is unable to make a "definite'.
contribution to building Abaco
and the Bahamas.
Fhe surprise announcement
follows Mr. Watkin's expulsion
from the Free National
Movement last year for tailing


to toe the party's line on the
Abaco independence issue.
The Abaco member said
today that he felt every
Bahamian had an obligation to
help in the country's
development. The Opposition
however, seemed to have no
sense of direction and was
ineffective.
He therefore could not
support them and he had no
intention of remaining "a lone
voice in the wilderness."
Mr. Watkins was not
prepared to say whether he had
joined the PLP.


hotel


CASHIIER SHORTAGE S,
guest ledgei discrepancy. ies.
heavs linen losses and bad
debts are among the major
considerations .' ling rn the
profitability of Balhamiain
hotels. M,'. 'i.ir : in the
Dayton-Kccnan lot'! indlstrr
report has disclosed,
The tindings ', ihe I flor I
consultancy firm 'were tabIed
in the llouse s rdli'. 1K
Fourism MMnister 1 Ciri.-;"'
Maynard, whose Mi:niistr
commissioned the survey' o
learn wht BAhamiania hiotl-s a.I-
ailing at a time when s t)' r
r.'. ,,rti are -;howinat h,. th
returns
Cou pled with 'tihose
shortages, the report also
names high commissions
telephone department losses,
transportation costs, heat. light
and power, repairs aind
inaintenance and advertising
and promotion as .Ifactors also
adversely affecting the
profitahbiit of Bahamia i
hotels.
In di raw ing comparisons
between the Bahamas a:id
other a nrd e s o r t
Da% ton-Kei enain recoi'urine..ne Ic-
that Hawaii rather than Puerto,
Rico be ..:sd a1 lthe ard i'.
Fhec is ten(.rl," i
analysis 0o -o niparr i -';.ii -
costs I! it t Baheli.. a'. .O h
l'rurto Ri,,. .and too o-. r
tavourabf i 1'.i o i : ,;cp Q' j .
a satistfactor stl.iandaid or he
Bahamas
"This i .'nti ct,. ; t paii.in
one sick irndus'i\ vwithf
another." the .'onsu l i;t
pointed out
Ilawaii. thev' said ws a
S1 ,, I, tI :u: ,u ,- =<
it was a group oi s:l : i -
clinatica!Iy sim ijar. v. i;h .li :
properties o )ated on t i :
and therefore subi'ct ; I higli
repairs and maintenance
Hawaii, like the B.ahima.
was dependent on inpo' !or
practically all ot its ftoo
materials. machinery i.
equipment and supplies
All of its pow er ..'
generated by ste.i.i p ,'
ex ept for peak i'
Wv,'eC scales (or f e0 '11 ,. \ ;\ % ,
v a S i c a I i on
,. h .5 n .
in the Balha nil iid! ,*.' o,, t )S
living was higher. : th i
air where in I :;' i" c' .
SW'rited States
Unlike the tahar'
lhiowever, tlawa.ii i ( i .'i..
tronm its clock ses s.
su, ppl or visltor ..irk t ,F ..i


THE LOT of hotel iimon
and non union metnmbers will
not be improved mitt1!i the
industry is producing a high
quality service, food ami
entertainment and is in .
healthy financial position
This prerequisite was
spelled out by the recently
completed Dayton Keenai
hotel survey report, which
pointed out that revenues had
to be' produced with which to
support full employment
In dealing with the
question of Bahamian labour
in the industry, the consul
tants found "ample ev;den':"
that both a credibility and a
communication gap exists
between the unions and hote!
management."
While it was true that the
interest of union leadership
for its members and the
interests of management did
not always coincide, there
was, they felt, a vast area of
mutual interest.
Stated the report. "It
cannot be disputed that a
healthy industry, potentially
able to give full employment
to upwards of 12.000
workers in existing properties
is of mutual concern.
"The present atmosphere
of mistrust can only delay the
achieving of this objective."
The report recommends
that employee representatives
of each hotel and manage-
ment meet regularly to
discuss ways and means to
improve service and
productivity and consistently


ti a.N r(id p'tiibic contii ronitita

ft unions
iiti ate a pIlograniml e to
u'n .iitn, i raht .tui nship rather
thi s'i' p i% I .lani heam l v to
aclhiee ti.s goa'. by weight of
n til'ber.
I fird. ith;i. itons make an
tl t nis't o!, I t t i' % stop
pIiteiiii. anid needless,
c;areless d ni: tiie
I iii) I s-mhould also
cooperate l iil wil i training
being donr,)e b the Hotel
Training < mounci At the same
iuit' ini ons and management
should initiate a programme
t ) produce a healtheir
attitude to ward service.
"' wvay must be found to
convince hotel workers that
friendly,. competent service is
as much a tangible
commodity as food or drink
or beds and that it weights
more heavily in the visitor's
assessment of his or her
Bahamian vacation "
On its part management
should actively seek the
assistance, cooperation and
understandingg of union
leaders and be certain that all
expatriates are fully qualified.
At the same time employee
manuals should be revised to
take into account that
employees at lower levels are
inclined to be more sensitive
than those on higher levels.
"Manuals need not be
insulting to be understood or
to be effective," the report
said.


in the


industry


Rv NICK! KELLY
4 ., i' q 5.000 miles from its
I-oI', liII inmarket, whereas the
S, '-,"is, art 'es than 200
rom t-s major supply
30i0 rifles from its
:; :' s r mnrs niara ket and less
M j 20 miles from its

i: th ; nuit r ot rooms. theV
'. i id ia t wh it
.I .t t '* p o its it this
i r ". :-, n* 1:0 m pared
r.,s !iS; w- with other
:,. 'ure we nar somed
'erences in
( ( '. i li I s I IONS
St ay roll.
c 't !iissio- jrc thie largest
s. itin o;: expense in this

1t N1s t!I,,' 'nsw of the
o i ;ant' s t~ ti. ommn missions
;! .iu i hioltebl might
W'.1 O he th highest in the world
id :; os,, to hioliesalers were
s-, 'ht i to ,,p this year
t-lr the !en hotels studied,
the ( Cominissions totalled
S3 ,!4.000 or I1 per cent of
r ,ia ls ,)nimd in average of
''94 per available room per
\ ear
l-hi; siv. the report.
c i' tc <( ie teotna arno nt of
tihier expenses per available
room in awaii and Florida.
''i' ".v'- :' I i- r *R -& arnas
er cent
t .. h:. ' ) 1 -4r per c I' t
S'i : ; I r and
S.: l s were
." s 11 l b i! n rh, report
S ;.: s l h to
o ir 1n'kr-- f wht while
; 3 reduce

NI \ N )OSSfS
S hs. for linen
;'o, :i!t ', bstantially
i 'er a' i; of Hawaii
f rtc s it w as- : rind.
The r-ep;.r saiid "FBahamian
p rnes '!i: s!c show
i W ti jA.. ii ::' expense
'> ,"'A ,.:^.i s ,e:': indicate
:i in some

s af'fct ing
1 beverage
e s were'

,, '- c than the
I 7.'r r. i-' age profit
h,., ,' \ ",..: :b antially

.. ', toJ cost of
S' ;' i 1 ,il hwrier than all
th .. '.i I.t tbstantially


Two departments which
contribute significantly to
losses are the telephone
department and transportation
costs.
In the ten hotels studied,
telephone losses varied from
$10,000 to a high of $77,000.
Transportation costs for
employees and guests in each
of four of the hotels were in
excess of $60,000 per year and
in one case over $100,000.
Administrative and general
expenses were regarded as
extremely high by any
standards.
"Administrative and general
payroll alone in the Bahamas is
88 per cent of the total
administrative and general
expenses for Florida and 82
per cent of those in Hawaii,"
the report says.
HIGH EXPENSES
"Other administrative and
general expenses are more than
double those of Florida;nearly
equal total Hawaii expenses
and exceed those of Puerto
Rico".
Usually high expenses in
these areas were:
Cashier shortages -
$90,000 for six hotels. Four of
these had losses over $12,000
and one, more than $30,000.
Bed debts of $712,000 for
nine hotels Guest ledger
di s c repancies ai.d after-
departure ci.-ugas o, amounts
varying from $5,000 to over
5100,000.
Lost and damaged articles
accounted for a $30,000 loss
for six hotels.
Five of the hotels paid over
$25,00A 'ach nd two off these
spent over $45,000 on
security.
Credit card commissions
totalled $323,000.
"As in other areas," the
report said. "the Bahama
hotels had higher expenditures
for advertising and promotion
than any area except Puerto
Rico, with an average of $927
per room.
While it was not unusual in
the early years for new
properties to budget
generously for advertising and
promotion, the consultants
i['i.nd that this practice was
continued by older properties
as well.
'Advertising and pro-
motion costs of $3.6 mil-
lion for the ten hotels,
when added to the rooms
commissions paid by the
same hotels comes to a grand
total of $6.8 million," the
report said.
Given the trends of the
industry in the Bahamas,
Dayton-Keenan recommended
that "perhaps the energy,
tent and resources devoted to
advertising and promotion
could be directed in part more
.ti,.. urit and profitably to
the local ills of the industry."


Electrician

jailed

AN 18-YEAR-OLD Oxford
Avenue electrician who
pleaded guilty to three counts
of housebreaking and stealing
was sentenced to 1 2 months in
jail today when he appeared in
the lower court before
magistrate Emmanuel
Osadebay.
Eric Poison was accused by
police of breaking into the
homes of Everette Bruno in
Regency Park, David Graham,
Shirley Park Avenue, and the
home of Neville Gibson.
He was accused of stealing
cash amounting to $355 from
the homes.
Poison also pleaded guilty to
a charge of attempted
housebreaking arising from an
incident on June 22 when
police said he tried to break
into the home of Terrence
Jones, Lancaster Street.


1 DUDLEY'S
COR. ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE.
NEW 1974 MODELS
"THE VERY BEST" "PION..."
ARRIVING SOON!


CAiOT'S CIOSOI E SIAS
NOW IN STOCK

BAHAMIAN PAINT iV 2 IIl
BAY STREET PHONE 2-ZM3


Friendly service


'weighs heavily'


C IVIH I= ] Ili,

MARY IQIU4Nill
-j ( ,\ j"


Chl


.lux











2 Wwh ( rt bue


Thursday, February 28, 1974


TheZ

w orld


THIEVES who stole a
priceless oil painting by the
17th century Dutch master
Jan Vermeer were warned:
"Handle with care or it will
crumble and be lost forever."
The 18 by 20 inch painting
"The Guitar Player", stolen
from London's Kenwood
House Museum, is one of the
world's most precious
paintings.
POLICE are blaming
customer apathy for the
death of a 33-year-old man
who fell to the floor in a
topless Wilmington-go-go bar
and was left unattended for
five hours.
Dr. Ali Z. Hameli, state
medical examiner, said John
Bradley of Wilmington died
of acute alcohol ingestion.
THE BARBADOS
government has virtually
banned Irish potato imports
because farmers are presently
producing above normal
quantities of potatoes. yams
and other produce.
The Ministry of Trade's
decision to stop issuing
import licences was taken to
give farmers a better deal on
the domestic market, and
encourage householders to
use local foodproducts.
THE ARCHBISHOP of
Bilbao was under virtual
house arrest and there were
reports the government was
seeking Vatican permission to
Indict him for a sermon
urging more freedom for
Basques.
A government spokesman
said he could not confirm or
deny the reports of a possible
indictment, the first of a
bishop under the regime of
Gen. Francisco Francoe.
EUGENE Jean Knopf,
French president of the
Italian affiliate of Dun and
Bradstreet. was fatally
stabbed in a Milan street near
his home.
Police said a passerby
reported he saw two men,
armed with a pistol and a
knife, attack Knopf.
Reports from AP.


MIN P
Athens 41
Home 41
Paris 32
London 30
Berlin 28
Amsterdam 28
hiUssels 36
Madrid 32
Stockholm 27
New Yrk 27
San -rancisco 46
Los AngetleTs 52
Chicago 36
Miami 43
Tokyo 32
long Kong 48
Buenos Aires 70
Montreal 1 3
Rio 68
Liston 43
Seoul 18
Bangkok 66
Taipei so


MAX
45 cloudy
54 rain
37 cloudy
39 cloudy
36 sunny
41 clear
48 clear
54 clear
34 overcast
39 clear
57 rain
70 cloudy
48 cloudy
64 cloudy
48 clear
61 clear
84 cloudy
34 cloudy
86 cloudy
63 clear
3 cloudy
89 clear
56 cloudy


LONDON Britons voted for a new
government today as snow fell in several
parts of the country.
Some cities reported long lines at the
polling booths and there were indications
of a massive turnout, usually a good sign
for Labour. Polls still gave the
Conservatives a slight edge, however.
In England, the election is being fought
largely over bread-and-butter issues, and
observers say that no matter who wins,
Britons face another round of
belt-tightening.
In Northern Ireland, the election for
members to parliament is being fought
over the determination of the Protestant
majority to stay apart from the
neighboring Irish Republic. while the
minority Catholics seek union
Rioters hijacked trucks and cars in
Londonderry and set up barricades today


STROLL
U.S. mi
evicted a
occupying
dam pro
bulldoze
homes.
"They
we are r
Christoph
for th
Departme
The m
blue jump


in the streets. In Belfast, troops fired
rubber bullets to disperse stone-throwing
crowds.
Earlier, at least six people were
wounded in terrorist bombing and
shooting in the province.
Public and private pollsters forecast a
photofinish between Labour and the
ruling Conservatives in the election.
But most signs suggested a big-time
Liberal revival in the voting.
If Liberal leader Jeremy Thorpe's


homes flattened
UDSBURG, Pa. The squatters, estimated to and 30
marshals Wednesday number about 65 men, women a "peo
colony of squatters and children, 'vere led out in on which
g the site of a federal pairs and driven to roadblocks and ch
eject and began to on the fringe of the lush valley gardens
their abandoned that flanks the Delaware River The
near this Pocono Mountain to as
were there illegally so community, summer
removing them," said The government has viewed say.
ter Rice, a spokesman the self-proclaimed residents of c o m m
he U.S. Justice the area, known as through
elnt. Shawnee-on-the-Delaware, as a declare
marshals, dressed in problem for more than three from
psuits and armed with years Generally in their 2-', society


revolvers, knocked on doors of
the 21 rundown structures the
squatters have called home
since arriving in the late 1960s-
The marshals presented letters
telling the inhabitants they
were being asked to leave as
the result of an eviction order
issued by a federal judge.
"The area has been cleared.
We are proceeding to break
down the property," a
marshal's voice crackled over a
walkie-talkie less than two
hours after the officers moved
in at daybreak.


HOUSTON Former
astronaut James Lovell,
commander of the near-tragic
Apollo 13 space flight, says a
TV movie based on the 1970
mission is "fictitious and in
poor taste." Lovell aired his
complaints about the AB('C-TV
movie, "Houston, We've Got A
Problem," in a letter to l)r.
James C. Fletcher, chief of the
National Aeronautics and
Space Administration.
"NASA did a disservice to
the flight crew and ground
personnel connected with
Apollo 13 by cooperating fully
with this film," Lovell said.
"I resent the mixing of fact
and fiction. If NASA wanted
exposure of this nature, the


WASIINGTON Despite
the higher cost of imported oil
the United States had another
big trade surplus in January,
totaling $644 million, the
government reported
Wednesday
While trade activity
continued to favour the United
States at the start of 1974.
government experts predict the
high cost of world pretroleumr


story should have been based
on a fictitious space flight."
rhe movie, to bd shown
Saturday. is billed as a tribute
to the men of Mission Control
who helped get Lovell and
fellow astronauts Fred W.
'llaise Jr. and John L. Swigert
Jr. back to earth.
The mission was launched
April 1 1, 1Q70. After an
u'. pl,.,ii in the service
module, a planned moon
landing was cancelled and the
crippled space craft limped
back to earth.
"It is not necessary to resort
to soap opera plots to enliven
the Apollo 13 story," Lovell
said. "It is a sad commentary
of the times when we have to


s. the squatters declared
pie's right" to the land.
ch they kept pigs, horses
hikens and tilled small
population would swell
many as 170 in the
r months. authorities
but a loose-knit
Su ni t remained
hout the year. Most
d themselves dropouts
a more conventional


will drive the country into a
substantial trade deficit before
the year is over.
The country had a trade
surplus of $1.7 billion in 1973,
the first surplus in three years.
The cost of imported
petroleum products was tip
sharply in January, but the
value of the nation's exports
also increased substantially.


fictionalize the truth to make
it palatable to the public.
"If one is to believe this
story, it was obviously more
. traumatic to be in Mission
Control then to be on board
the crippled space ship.
"The safe return of Apollo
13 was one of NASA's finest
hours. The people who made
that feat possible deserve a
more accurate recounting of
the story."
Herman Saunders, executive
producer of the film for
Universal Studios. Hollywood,
said he made it clear from the
beginning that the story would
be fictitious.


centre party wins a substantial number of
seats in the 635-member House of
Commons, it would change the face of
British politics, dominated for nearly a
half century by Conservatives and
Labour.
The crisis-ridden campaign has seen
Prime Minister Edward Heath and Labour
chieftain Harold Wilson each claiming to
be the man to halt the nation's slide
toward bankruptcy and class conflict.
The voting culminates months of grave
industrial and economic unrest. The
country's 280,000 coal miners are on
strike for more pay, aggravating fuel
shortages already serious because of
soaring oil prices.
For two months many Britons have
been working a fuel-saving three-day
week with two million temporary or
permanently jobless.


I he nation is spending
abroad at an annual rate of
nearly $8.8 billion more than it
earns. rhis represents the worst
trade deficit in British history.
Runaway inflation has sent
food prices up by 53 per cent
since Heath took office in June
1970.
The country's 40 million or
so eligible voters have been
told that, whoever wins,
belt-tightening years lie ahead
with higher taxes and lower
living standards, reminiscent of
World War II.
Heath, Wilson and Thorpe
have presented their own
answers to one central
question: Can the British
people, their empire gone and
their economy crippled, restore
their pride and place in the
world?
Only through "firm and fair
government," Heath has
insisted. He argues this cannot
be achieved by Labour plans to
nationalize a huge slice of
industry and buckle before the
demands of labour unions,
opening the way for an
ultimate Communist takeover.
Wilson's answer: By "getting
Britain back to work again
with Labour."
The Tories must not get
another chance to widen the
gulf between the wealthy and
the needy, he says. Ile has
hammered Labour's theme of
"conciliation not confronta-
tion." with pledges of a
soak-the rich tax policy,
food subsidies, price controls
and a gentleman's agreement
with the unions to curb wage
rises.
Thorpe has lashed both
Heath and Wilson as symbols
of the extreme right and left
His cure-all for Britain's woes
emphasizes moderation.
Hie has picked elements from
both programmes and spiced
them with ideas of his own.
The result: A policy of
consensus on il er thing
controversial from Britain's
membership in the European
Common Market to the
regulation of industrial
relations. (AP)


gold
nation's oldest and biggest,
termed the situation
"madness."
"Every now and then you
get a traditional collector,"
he said, adding that new
consumers of gold coins were
mainly professional persons,
"who are aware of what is
taking place."
Wednesday, U.S. 20 dollar
pieces were going for 360
dollars. Two days earlier, the
price was 330 dollars. And
just two weeks earlier, it was
260 dollars.
Vigdor said customers are
waiting one to two hours at
the rate of a couple of
hundred a day just to buy
gold.
"It's not only here," he
said. "I speak to dealers all
over, and it's nationwide."
He said his biggest problem
was the ignorance of buyers.
Coen described his
advice: "I won't let people
talk to me about investment.
I say, 'talk to me about
speculation', and I talk to
them. An investment to me is
something that has growth
aspects internally."
But to the waitress who
spent 3,000 dollars of her
savings on Mexican pesos,
investment was not
paramount.
"Every day in the
supermarket makes me
nervous." she said, pleading
anonymity. "I'm so
frightened of the dollar
shrinking, I think of gold as
being the most stable, if not
profitable thing."


-I can be

useful,

says

freed

Called


Will I-\ 1 1 M .Il I Y *
COtL 1t'\11l. Lt. William
L. Calley Jr., the only man
convicted for the massacre of
Vietnamese civilians at Mly
Lai, was released from
custody yesterday by a
civilian judge.
"I feel I could be useful to
society," he told the judge.
Calley, 30. who has nearly
exhausted his appeals for the
murders of at least 22
Vietnamese, smiled and
waved at friends as he walked
out of a federal courthouse
here. free for the first time
since President Nixon ordered
him held in an apartment
three years ago pending
appeals.
Calley signed an order
allowing him to be released
without paying the $1,.000
bail set by U.S. District Court
Judge J. Robert Elliott. The
short, balding Calley declined
to comment on the day's
events.
lie left the courthouse and
went by military escort back
to Ft. Benning, where lie has
lived in a red brick apartment
since March 1971 while
appealing his convictions.
At Calley's side. as she has
been in the five years he has
faced charges for leading the
My Lai massacre, was his
red-haired girlfriend, Anne
Moore.
Miss Moore. a frequent
visitor to Calley's apartment
at Ft. Benning. told the court
there w as no reason to believe
Calley would not honour the
terms of bail. "'He had amnple
opportunity before he was
confined and lie ine er
considered it.' she 'aid when
asked if Calley would flee
"I feel it necessary to be
able to consult more freely
with nmy attorneys ... also.
there's a financial need."
Calley told the court.
Calley's appeal is noNw
before Army Secretary
Howard W. Callaway, who
reportedly met with military
attorneys following the
decision.
After Callawav rules on
Calley's appeal of his 20-year
sentence. Nixon has said he
would give the case final
review. (AP)


Now Messmer


picks up


the pieces
PARIS Premier Pierre Messmer was putting together a ne4
government today that will hopefully be free of the internal
bickering that plagued his last one in recent months.
The new team faces some hard decisions on economic and
social measures and Messmer said it will have "better cohesion
and the greatest effectiveness possible to decide and to act."


MUTINY

CRISIS

FOR

SELASSIE


ADDIS ABBA I emperor
Hlaile Selassie rushed troop
reinforcements to Ethiopia's
borders with Somalia today
amid a widespread troop
mutiny for higher pay and
border skirmishes with the
Somalis.
Prime Minister Aklilu
Ilapetworld submitted his
government's resignation after
four generals tailed to
negotiate an end to the
mutiny. now in its third day.
Instead the rebels in Asmara
in Northern i-thiiopia, took
three of the generals hostage
and sent the fourth one back
to Addis Ababa with new
demands.
The 8 2-year-old Emperor
appealed for national unity and
said Etthiopia, one of Africa's
poorest countries, was a victim
of world inflation and "hostile
outside forces." iHe said the
nation was in great difficulties
but had faced greater problems
in its 2,500-year history.
TIhe government accused
Somalia. Ethiopia's neighbour
to the east and southeast, of
massing troops along the
border to inflame the situation,
Military units from near
Addis Ababa headed south and
east. and official sources
reported skirmishes between
Ethiopian soldiers and Somalis
who crossed into Fthi'i si
' Ib'L., rii ie Ogaden desert.
Somalia has long claimed
more than a quarter of t-astern
Fthiopia. much of it desert
inhabited by nomads of Somali
tribes.
I lie army mutiny broke out
on I ucsda in Asmara, the
nation's second largest city.
among the 10,000-man 2nd
h)ivison who constitute nearly
Sfiorth ot the army. It spread
\Wcdn'.isda to the nayS in
M'ss .ai, north of Asmara, and
ih 11 to other army units in
I ,lem Ethiopia and the Air
lForco
The mutineers' chief initial
demand was for a 50 per cent
pay boost, to $75 a month for
enlisted men. They vowed that
they were loyal to the
Emperor. (AP).




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OL YLOWBIDCLE
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9 a.m. to 12 noon Saturday


vw bh-Uu~


VOTING IN THE SNOW


Mass turnout boosts Labour


hopes as Britons go to the polls


Squatters evicted,


TRADE SURPLUS


Lovell slams Apollo film


Americans rush


Caill P F ll ir lls l lll B IlmNit seS it:



CAPE SANTA MARIA CLUB

LONG ISLAND, BAHAMAS



Resident Builder
Finest Lee Beach in the Bahamas
Choice Lots Available on Harbour, Hills, and Beach
Boat Rentals and Tennis Facilities
Private Airstrip
Club has outstanding Food and Accommodations
Friendly Islanders -- Doors never locked
Marina Site with 200' Dock For Sale

Call or Write Leslie Knowles, Manager, for Brochure, Reservations.
or Information


Bahamasair Scheduled Air Service (to Stella Maris seven miles
South of Club)


Nassau Architects of Houses Built or Building at The Cape Santa Maria Club:
Donald Cartwright for J. H. Lee Chambers
Philip Pool for Pierre du Pont 111 -- Andre van der Meersch
Douglas Minns for William C. Horn
Robertson Ward The Cape Santa Maria Club Cottages


Wait till you see


hat's happening




*^T f~fttt~ffiPkffy, ^EIH^R^ uH1


- \


to buy
NEW YORK With most
of her life savings in her
pocketbook, a 42-year-old
waitress joined the growing
number of Americans who
are lining up at coin dealers
to convert the dollar into
gold as a hedge against
inflation.
"I wish I had done this
three weeks ago.," the woman
said, confessing she was
hardly a numismatist. "But
I'm learning."
With inflation continuing
and gold prices soaring, the
city's biggest coin dealers
report that Americans are
buying gold frantically, widly
and viluminously. By law,
Americans can own gold only
as collectors.
"We can't even handle the
volume any more," said Luis
Vigdor, coin manager at
Manfra. Tordella and Brookes
Inc. at Rockefeller Centre.
"I've never seen a situation
lik this."
At Joel D Coen Inc.. the
proprietor closed down for
the day Wednesday to sort
bags of silver coins amid the
clamour of ringing telephones
and patrons vainly seeking
entrance to his store.
"These people drive me
out of my mind on these gold
quotes," Coen sighed, leaving
a cheese sandwich uneaten.
"I've stayed in the hotel
across the street for the last
week because the phone
never stops when I'm home."
Benjamin Stack, a partner
at Stacks Coin Co., the


I I


I


I


The 57-year-old premier
tendered the resignation of his
government in a bombshell
move during a regular meeting
of the French Cabinet
yesterday under President
Georges Pompidou.
But six hours later
.Pompidou appointed him
premier again, in effect giving
Messmer his full backing to
bring an end to disarray in the
government.
Push-pull statements and
decisions in the past several
weeks have often given the
impression Messmer's 38-man
team was working at cross
purposes.
Under the French
constitution, the president
appoints and fires the premier.
thus retaining ultimate
executive power. Pompidou',
current term runs out in 1976,
France's foreign and
domestic policies are expected
to remain l.rgel the same
under Messmer's new team.
which will be eliminated or
combined, and up to 12
min embers of the old
government may be dropped.
f iin.e Minister Valery
Giscard d'Fstaing is expected
to remain. He faces a tough
fight against inflation.
Currently running at an annual
rate of 12 per cent, and will
also have to grapple with an
estimated $3.6 billion
payments deficit caused by
higher oil prices.
Foreign Minister Michel
Jobert. who has angered
France's European partners
and the Nixon Administration
while implementing Pompidou's
go-it-alone foreign policy, is
also expected to remain.
Otber ministers, who hrye
issued statements contrary to
the government line on
highway safety, industrial
policy, a reported plan to sell
the liner "France" and gasoline
rationing, are expected to be
dropped, official sources said
SAP)



McAIIister Hotel'
DOWNTOWN MIAMI


hIIIlII lltus


8O










Thursday, February 28, 1974


UhP rihunr


he aribunt


NuLLus ADDicrus JU&RAE IN VEBBA MAGIST'
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903- 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPU(H, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972.-

EDITORIAL


The world around us


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
GRAND CAYMAN, January 23 English newspapers are now
showing an increased interest in Central, South American and
Caribbean affairs.
A couple of days ago I reviewed an article with a London date
line that discussed the possibility of relations between the U.S.
and Cuba being normalized.
A later article by Hugh O'Shaughnessy of the London Observer
Service reports that "Cuban officials in London and other cities
of Western Europe are trying to persuade left-wing Chilean
refugees to move to Havana and join a movement to overthrow
the Chilean Military junta."
The report states that this agitation is being promoted by
Carlos Altaminano, the Secretary General of the late Salvador
Allende's Chilean Socialist Party, who escaped to Cuba when
Allende was killed during a military coup.
O'Shaughnessy went on to comment that "this shift comes in
the face of the bloody right-wing coup in Chile and more or less
violent right-wing trends in Uruguay, Argentina, Bolivia,
Venezuela and other countries" in Latin America.
It is this movement to the right in former radical areas of the
Americas that leads the U.S. to hope and believe that the
Communist drive may have come to a halt in this hemisphere and
is now going into reverse.
President Nixon has taken a long step towards improving U.S.
relations with Communist China and the Soviet Union. If the
barriers with Cuba are now broken down it is possible that the
left-wing threat that Uncle Sam had feared might develop in some
of the new island governments may level off.

Another article on this area comes from the London Observer
Service and bears the by-line of John Crocker. It is date-lined
Tortola, British Virgin Islands.
There are two groups of Virgin Islands one British and the
other American. And therein lies a problem because the two
groups are being thought of as one area in the outside world. As a
result the British group fear that they may suffer from the
reputation for murder and violence that has driven tourists away
from the American group.
The British Virgin Islands are much smaller and quieter
than their American neighbours in this northern Caribbean island
group.
Crocker quotes a tourist official in the British area as saying
that "it might even get to the point of us having to change our
name. Unlike almost anywhere else in the Caribbean today," he
went on, "people, including young girls, can walk about here at
night without fear of being molested. You can leave your doors
open and your cars unlocked. Nobody but a lunatic would do the
things that are happening in the U.S. Virgin Islands."
There are about 60 islands in the British group and the
difference to conditions that exist in the American group is
remarkable because they are separated only by a narrow body of
water. They are so close that Crocker describes them as being
"only a stone's throw apart".
This marked difference in the way of life of two peoples who
live in such close proximity to each other emphasizes the fact
that the British are a more disciplined people than the Americans.
The British Virgin Islands have complete internal
self-government. They are at the same stage of political
development as the Bahamas before our islands moved into
independence on July 10th last year.
There is a feeling in the American group that the British islands
should become integrated with their American neighbours under
the Stars and Stripes.
"At the first of the annual 'Friendship Day' celebrations, held
in October 1972, one U.S. Virgin Islands legislator talked about
the need for 'absorption' of the British Virgin Islands into the
United States territory.
"However, this sort of remark angers most of the 10,200
British Virgin Islanders. Why should a broadly happy and
reasonably prosperous (nobody need be out of a job) group of
people, accustomed to a British-style democratic system, be
'absorbed' by a larger group where there is social unrest,
unemployment and an American system of government where, to
put it mildly, corruption and graft are not unheard of?'"

The British islands came under American influence to the
extent that the U.S. dollar has for some time been the official
currency of this group.
"Last June, however, the British Virgin Islands," Crocker
reports, "celebrated 300 years of British rule by issuing their own
coinage, and this has resulted in the curious situation of the
(ueen's head appearing on a United States dollar coinage."

It is planned to give the islands a new constitution.
"A constitutional commission appointed by London arrived
here in November and it is expected that the British Virgin
Islands will get the new constitution next year," Crocker reports.
"At the moment the British Government helps the British
Virgin Islands to balance its budget to the tune of about $1S
million annually and, in addition, the various British aid agencies
have been advancing some $2 million a year in development
rtpney.


: "The Chief Minister is very firm on one point," the report
continues. "He accepts as almost everybody does here that
the only possible way to enrich the economy of these islands is
through tourism. But he insists that development beach hotels,
shopping plazas, yacht marinas and so on must not be allowed
tq, interfere with the islanders right to control their own property
and destiny.
"Three years ago, the government decided that one particular
mtlti-million-dollar development scheme, which had already been
started, would not, after all, benefit the islanders because the
terms given the developers were too liberal and gave them too
rniach power. A halt was ordered and the developers were bought
oat with the help of a $5.8 million interest-free loan from the
Btitish government."

-An interesting fact brought out by Crocker in his article is that
tourismm rose by 18 percent in 1972 at a time when tourism in
the Caribbean generally declined".
'The Cayman Islands also claim a substantial increase in their
tourist business during this period.
It is interesting to note that both the British Virgin Islands and
tle Cayman Islands are still British territory and the Union Jack
still flies from the flagpoles in public places and a highly qualified
British governor still represents Her Majesty the Queen even
tlhugh control is centred almost entirely in the native people.

iThis article today will deal entirely with events outside the
Bihamas.


Donald M. Fleming.
newly-elected director and
chairman of the board of
Solomon Brothers Limited
(third from left, seated)
presided at a meeting of
the Company's it,,.' m r
this week
From left to right,
seated, are Harold
Wilkinson, general
manager: Fane Solomon,
president. Mr. Fleming.
and Roy M. Solomon,
vice-president and
managing director.
Standing are the three
new board members, left
to righ, Robert H
Symonette, Donald F.
Britchford and Ronald E.
Strange.


New men for Solomon board


THE ELECTION of four
new members to the board of
directors of Solomon Brothers
Limited was announced today
by Roy M. Solomon, managing
director of the 66-year-old
wholesale and retail firm.
In addition to Mr. Roy
Solomon, who is also vice
president, the company's
officers and directors include
Fane Solomon, president, and
Harold Wilkinson, general
manager.
Sons of the two founders of
the business, the late Cyril
Solomon and the late Captain
Eric Solomon, Mr. Fane
Solomon and Mr. Roy
Solomon entered the firm after
attending schools in England.
They returned to Solomon
Brothers in 1946 after World
War II service.
Mr. Fane Solomon is an
underwriting Member of
Lloyd's.
Mr. Roy Solomon was a
member of the House of
Assembly for San Salvador and
rum Cay for 19 years until the
1968 general election when he
did not offer as a candidate. He
was appointed Minister of
Posts and Telecommunications
from 1964 to 1967.
Mr. Wilkinson who came to
Nassau in 1944 with the British
Army settled here after
demobilization in England in


1947. He joined Solomon
Brothers in 1959 as manager of
The Pipe of Peace, succeeding
Oswald Sweeting upon the
latter's retirement.
In 1967 Mr. Wilkinson was
appointed general manager of
all the firm's operations and
elected a director in the same
year.
"In projecting our
programme of planned
expansion," Mr. Roy Solomon
said, "my colleagues and I
decided that the board would
be substantially strengthened
by the inclusion of men from
outside the company with
broad experience in finance
and marketing in the Bahamian
business sector.
The new directors include
Mr. Donald M. Fleming, P.C.,
Q.C., managing director of
Bank of Nova Scotia Trust
Company (Bahamas) Limited,
and of the Bank's other trust
operations in the Caribbean
and West Indies. At a meeting
held on February 25 Mr.
Fleming was also elected
Chairman of the Board.
Prior to taking up his
appointment in Nassau in
1966. Mr. Fleming had a
distinguished career in law and
government in his native
Canada. He was called to the
Bar of Ontario in 1928. He
served from 1945 to 1963 as a


I am giving this information space in my column because I
think it is important for our people to know what is happening all
around them.
A Miami Herald news bureau despatch from Azul, Argentina
reports that President Juan Peron has launched a big
anti-terrorism drive in his country.
On more than one occasion recently I have referred to Peron as
an example of what happens when a political leader poisons the
minds of a people and sets in motion a doctrine that tries to
establish the idea that this is indeed "the century of the common
man".
This socialistic doctrine loses sight of the fact that, without the
vision and drive of "the uncommon man ", human society would
descend to its lowest denominator ... and the common man
would starve to death. In the process "the uncommon man" may
be dragged down to a low level but, by the very nature of life. he
would still rise to the top of the pile.
Before Peron and his late wife Evita got control of Argentina-
this was a great country. I was amazed when I first visited Buenos
Aires about 25 years ago. It was like a great American city. It
made me think of Chicago. Its economy was still sound ... but
Peron introduced a revolutionary leftwing programme aimed at
milking the rich.
Soon after I was in Buenos Aires Peron was driven out by a
military coup but by that time the nation's economy had been so
completely undermined that no one has been able to repair the
damage.
In desperation Peron was called back to the country recently
to see what he could do to repair his own destructive handiwork.
But the rate of decay has accelerated since Peron's return to
power.
"His voice quivering," The Herald article reports, "Peron has
called for a general mobilization of the people to assist in putting
down terrorism and kidnapping which have increased since he
took office on October 12".

In 1951 I was in Buenos Aires for the nation's annual
Independence celebrations. Thousands of people came into this
capital city from the country towns. They wore national
costumes and most of them rode into the city on the backs of
donkeys to hear Peron give his annual address from the balcony
of the Ministry of War's red building in the great public square of
the city.
At the time Peron was still a god among the people and his
wife Evita was their saint. In spite of her vicious record ... she was
a woman who came up out of a brothel and, as Peron's wife.
terrorized the merchant community into making unreasonable
contributions to a fund she promoted, supposedly for the poor,
she was regarded as a Saint by the people.
I am told that she was gently reprimanded by the Pope
because, when he received her in private audience, she was not
very discreetly dressed.
She was anything but a Saint in the eyes of the church but it is
no idle talk that she was canonized in the minds and hearts of the
Argentinian working people.
I moved in the crowd in Buenos Aires on their great festive
day. Women were selling supposedly holy pictures of St. Evita.
Two girls got terribly annoyed when I refused to buy this trash. I
told them so in no uncertain terms. I could afford to do this
because an hour later I was leaving the country for a flight to
Brazil. Were I staying there I would most certainly have received a
visit from the secret police.
Now the pattern has changed. Peron has created a monster he
cannot tame.
A group who styles themselves the People's Revolutionary
Army is now highly critical of Peron. They call him a "bourgeois
reformist" who has "betrayed the masses."
Somewhere in Shakespeare's plays he has a line to the effect
that he who steals a man's purse steals nothing but he who steals
a man's reputation robs him of his most valuable possession.
In the same way I can say that he who burns down a man's
house does him only temporary harm but he who destroys a
man's mind turns him into a dangerous animal.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
I love to be alone. I never found the companion that was so
companionable as solitude. THUREAU


Member of the Canadian
Parliament
He served as Minister of
Finance and Receiver General
from 1057 to 1062. and as
Minister of Justice and
Attorney General of Canada
from 1962 to 1963.
Also joining the Solomon
Brothers Board is 4Q-year-old
Robert Hlallam S\ monette.
who returned to Nassau in
1 94o after studying
engineering at lassachusetts
Institute of Technology.
In I948 he built the Nassau
Yacht Haven and later opened
the Pilot House Club to cater
for the vacation needs ashore
of y achtsmen using the
facilities of the vacht haven.
In 1953 Mr Symionette
joined the late Sir Stafford
Sands in the formation of
Burns House Limited and it's
subsidiary, Bahamas Blenders
Limited.
Donald t. Brtchlord. the
third new director is a
chartered accountant who was
engaged in his profession in
England and (Canada before
coming to the Bahamas. le is a
Fellow of the Institute ot
Chartered \Aountants in
Ontario and Vice President of
the Bahamas Institute ot
Chartered kcciiouIntant',. Mr.
Britchford hais miad'." hi,, home
in Nassau since l, 1
Ronald E. Strange, a partner
in an international firm ot
chartered accountants, is the
fourth new director elected.
Mr. Strange was engaged in his
profession in Canada prior to
coming to the Bahamas in
1966 Ile is a Member of the
Institutes of Chartered
Accountants ol Quhebc,.
Ontario and Nosa Scotia and a
Vice President of the Bahamas
Institute of Chartered
Accountants.


C'


NOW SERVING



From 11:00a.m. Till 5:00

DAILY SPECIALS DRINKS UNLY $1.00

DINNER SERVED 5 p.m. to Midnight

Plenty of FREE PARKING

EAST BAY AT THE FOOT OF BRIDGE


NOW AT ONE BIG LOCATION

6th.Terrace Centreville

TEL: 2-2347 2-8150


NEW ARRIVALS


DUTECTO VELVET ROSE ESEMBLE

-SHOWER CURTAINS

ALSO

NEW BEDSPREADS WITH

MATCHING DRAPES

HOURS: Monday through Friday 9:30 a.m. 6 p.m.
Saturday .............9:30 a.m. 9 p.m.


Ii
fi


__ __


IL








Thursday, February 28, 197
.......


THE INCREDIBLE DATSUN 240Z.


American Motors' Matador is available at Nassau Motors on Shirley Street in three models as well as a station wagon


The sleek new Matador


AMF RICAN \MO IORS has a
sleek .- :* ,-, Matador in
its line-up !or 74 and it is
isiah, ble at \Nasau Motors ,on
Sh:ll e Street It ts a io'alh
ne addition to the
it.-rnI.dI'atec Matad, r line Ihe
now 1 1 4 :.h wheeba ,e is :o rit
v'uhes ,thor'er than the
\at.ad, sedaa .a r statIon
St ig teaturs n this
beauits int uiide frarn less door
gass. a hood that los bhajk 0,
the ',windshield hase and
sloping rear deck
I hce nistrnitent panei is one
! the mnost attra, iVTi changes
i the re. stt led intei or. I he
dils iages and warsnitn light

J, p seated hoising1 dircttl \
! n trent of the driver I oir
P.w air onlitioning register'

F 'T t o r in hi :; e e ( 1 : ; ,mo d el w i hr
the an ut1a 'Frjn!ssqoon
. ortr, h'Sle ner l eth- oR! th)I
,i: tcd or in td ill the
n:VII luster 'he ne ;w
M.oado"r ou'p t 'r, a
ipt ioial o in'r-o i n tled
jiiTO iaWt fi a !rn ASKIN's o s ;hp!'
po l ttrol t i: r ;' p the

-here are thre c :.cr-on, o
the Madat'or whith i: h ier n
t'eroi o'namentnatiotii id
"e r t r: [h !e r aand
w''iit, Aw- \ as the
', -' Miatador coupe, there are


two others the sporty "'"
and the premium Brougham.
American Motors' "famous
designer intenor" programme
is avaidla le in the exclusive
(' (assni package which
features a black and copper
co'lou scheme This is offered
oin the Broughami coupe
I he Matador Sour-door
Sedan and tour door Wagon are
smooth riding with a I linch
wheel base the lonenest in the
intermediate class (oil spring
seats are standard on all the
Matadors to further increase
riding comfort
\lso 'tandird on al models
are Ne\ mer: an M otors,
:ar pro\ e rd : ree->st andt id g.
energ} .bsorb'.ng front and rear
recveiabie hbnipers swith
rubber bumper guards and the
new 'hre-pom t occupant
re', r nt system St. litn
re.mements include a new
g. 'e .nd tailights
Iw s ix-cylinder and foir
V el tine- are available .r
the latador series Standard
She base model, the
o' upe and the
our-door sedans is the 232
(ID s.\ under engine with a
t h r e s p ted a n u a i
transmissionh. The 258 (DII) sx
a n d I' o r q u e o m mI a n d
automltiatic transmIission are


See
trom
Nassau
Street


all the new Matadors
American Motors at
Motors on Shirle\


The new instrument panel

SUNSHINE POWER


AN ELECTRIC car using
the sun's rays as a charging
plant is in use on the roads of
Britain. The Joseph Lucas
group, in co-operation with
the Solar Power Corporation
of America, has developed a
charger for the roof of the car
which converts light into
electrical energy.
During daylight hours the
unit charges a storage battery
powering lighting and
ancillary equipment. This
eliminates the tendency for
lights, normally run from the
traction batteries, to dim as
the battery power decreases
and means maximum power
is conserved for traction.
The electric car is owned
by John Hudson (C V.)
Ltd., the British commercial
vehicle suppliers and is used
by the company's managing
director to travel to and from


work, a distance of about 10
miles (16 kms) daily. The car
has a range of up to 28 miles
(45kins) on a single charge
and a top speed exceeding 40
m.p.h. (64 km/h)
Lucas Solar Power units
have attracted )Nidespread
interest both in the UK and
abroad for a wide range of
applications including radii
beacons for air and marine
navigation, marine buoys,
radio telephones and ,] l
telecommunications and
television relay stations
remote from convene tional
sources of power.
Almost any requirements
of voltage or current can be
met as the cells are in
modules of five producing 2 2
volts. 600 millamps and can
be multiplied, connecting in
series to increase voltage
=A


I


THOMPSON
PHONE 56739


BLVD.


WE TRADE/FINANCE, INSURANCE AVAILABLE!


1974


Take advantage of:-


American

Motors


THE AMC 6 -CYLINDER


Gas-saving models that leave nothing to be desired in acceleration
though loaded with all extras...

AIR -CONDITIONING POWER STEERING- AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION

Warranty Offers 12.000 Miles or 12 Months


HORNET 2-DOOR SEDANS
starting at $4972.00 . . .


to $6130.00 in 4-DOORS
COMPLETELY LOADED.


+
I-,
d.k


U


MATADOR "BROUGHAM" (with CASSINI trim) ..
Famous interior design by "Oleg Cassini". Black and copper is the featured colour scheme.
$'1768.00.. COMPLETELY LOADED.

TRADE-INS ACCEPTED, FINANCE & INSURANCE AVAILABLE.

PLEASE COME IN OR CALL AT YOUR CONVENIENCE FOR A DEMONSTRATION RIDE


SPORTABOUTS.....
starting at $5187.00 to..
$6636.00... COMPLETELY LOADED.


NASSAU MOTOR COMPANY LTD.
"WHERE AFTER SALES SERVICE IS A PLEASURE"
SHIRLEY STREET P.O. BOX N-8165 PHONE 2 4626/7/8


4 be w ribmr


'I
Q-~ /


OPPOSITE DAVIS STREET
BOX N3741


1974


HATCHBACKS.....
starting at $6316.00 to ..
$6589.00.. COMPLETELY LOADED.


-:- c.


F l a


COMPANY EXECUTIVE CARS & DEMONSTRATORS

NOW OFFERED AT REDUCED PRICES


N.1


VI I |icen


MOTORENTR


"-~L, -L ,


4R.


% in
"sWl?


otrw m. .









Thursday, February 28, 1974


PUBLIC AUCTION
TO BE CONDUCTED BY BELGRAVE AUCTIONEERS
Saturday, Mar. 2nd. 1974
from 10:30 a.m.
AT
OUR FRIEND DRY GOODS STORE-
Flint Street (off East Street)
West from I'ormer Milk Depot near Fr. Allen's
Men's & Ladies' Wear, Household Goods, Materials.
Appliances, Gift Items, Novelties, Notions, etc., etc.
Entire Stock Must Go!


AMANA SIOR- MOR


COMPACTOR


Amana puts the pressure on trash. Shrinks a
week's household trash into one trash can.

Compacts your trash in low cost plastic bags
you buy at Super Markets.

A lock & key, stop & start switches provide
simple safe operation.

Only 320.00

This is a New ftem/



TAYLOR INDUSTRIES LTD.


P. O. Box N.4806 Tel. 2-8941


THE YOUN HG MIS



Ill -( %trcet \cr Rx m,,st


'S llm I I I II I \N( d Ifi 1) ) _l


rwAA6


m


ARRIVED TODAY:
Tropic Haven, from West
Palm Beach.
SAILED TODAY: Bahama
Star. Emerald Seas. Flavia tor
West Palm Beach,
SUN:
Rises 6:32 a.m.
Sets 6:13 p.m.
MOON:
Rises 1 1:19 a.m.
Sets 12:24 pmi.
First Quarter at 1:03 p.m.
TIDES:
High 12:26 a.m. and 12:44

Low 6:44 a.m. and ( 49
p. m.
WEATHER:
WIND: Easterly 12 to 18
m.p.h.
WEATHER: Partly cloudy
SEA: Moderate
TEMP: Min. tonight 57
Max. tomorrow 75.




DINNER FUNDS
A DINNER sponsored by
the Abaco Independence
Movement at the close of its
one-d;y convention Saturday
raised $2,300
The convention was held at
the theatre in Marsh Harbour.
Abaco.
Funds from the dinner will
go toward party funds.

DRAMA WORKS
CARIBBEAN quarterly, the
Journal of the Department. has
offered the hospitality of its
pages to a limited number of
new dramatic works submitted
by the end of May, 1974 No
payment can be made for any
plays accepted, but any
playwrights wishing to appear
in print are cordially invited to
submit their work by the date
mentioned above.

STATIONS OF
THE CROSS
EVERY Friday evening
during the season of Lent, the
Stations of the Cross will be
made at 6 p.m. at Marv Star of
the Sea church, followed by
benediction.


Ham operator corrects


Abby's wrong signal


Calif. 9 nM9. Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope,
please.
Hate to write letters? Send 81 to Abigail Van Bura,
1n Laaky Dr., Beverly Hills. Cal. 9012 for Abby's booklet,
"How to Write Letters for All Occasias."


By Abigail Van Buren
9 1974 bY Cticiag TriHnmi-N. Y. News SMad., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: A woman wrote that she heard strange
voices coming from her turned-off radio and traced it to
her neighbor-a ham radio operator. Your reply was an
insult to more than 285,000 radio amateurs in the U.S.A.
She should first contact the ham, and if he is indeed a
licensed ham operator, he has had to pass strict examina-
tions which require him to know enough to keep a good,
non-interfering signal on the air. If he's at fault, he would
appreciate being told, so he can promptly remedy the situa-
tion.
There are thousands of nonlicensed law-breakers oper-
ating radios on another service who often cause interfer-
ence, for which we hams are blamed. Our record for sel-
policing and helping in emergencies is too often overshad-
owed by annoying interference from someone who is not a
licensed ham.
Any questions you or your readers have about amateur
radio can be answered by writing to The American Radio
Relay League, 255 Main St., Newington, Conn. 06111.
WA4BDW IN BIRMINGHAM
DEAR "WA": Sorry my advice about hams wasn't
kosher. I appreciate your setting me straight.

DEAR ABBY: My husband and I have a godchild we've
seen only twice in our lives. She's 22 new and sent us an
invitation to her wedding. We would have gone even tho it
would have meant traveling to another state and spending
a night in a motel, but the date of her wedding conflicted
with the opening of hunting season. My husband loves to
hunt, and I've never planned anything that would keep him
from his hunting.
I wrote her a nice letter, explaining why we couldn't
attend her wedding. A few days later we received this one
from her:
"Dear godparents: I received your letter today, and
I am disappointed and insulted. My fiance is also a
hunter, and so are many of his friends, but they all seem
able to make it to our wedding. Hunting season comes
every year, but I get married only once, therefore I feel
that your excuse is very flimsy and downright disgusting.
And please don't send me a gift as it won't be appreciated.
YOUR GODDAUGHTER"
Abby, we were shocked! I wanted to reply, but my
husband said: "Ignore it." He was also glad we declined
now that he found out what kind of a person she is.
How would you have handled this? SHOCKED
DEAR SHOCKED: When declining the invitation, I'd
have omitted the reason. But since you didn't, and she took'
offense, I'd have ignored her rude letter and saved the
price of a wedding gift.

DEAR ABBY: How do you get a little wart off your
hands? JUDI
DEAR JUDI: Dermatologically speaking-see a derma-
tologist. Socially speaking-tell him you're busy.
Problems? You'll feel better if you get it off your chest.
For a personal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. 0706, L.A.,


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that OCTAVIUS MERON
WALTERS of Freeport G. B. Box 306 is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 28th day day
of February 1974 to The Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that CLYDE DOUGLAS
ALLEYNE of Bass Lane Freeplort, Grand Bahama, P. 0.
Box 2583 is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration should not be granted should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 21st day of February 1974 to
The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that STANFORD ELIJAH PRICE
of 20 Shipton Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama Island is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 21st day of February 1974 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P. 0. Box
N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that PATIENCE ELIZEBETH
JONES of Jones Town, Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 21st day of February 1974 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P. 0. Box
N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ROBERT McARTHUR
STUBBS of Box F2430 Freeport Grand Bahama. Bahamas
is applying to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 21st day of February 1974 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P. 0 Box
N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that INA HALL of Lincoln
Boulevard, P. 0. Box 5412, Nassau Bahamas is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21st day of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HUDSON HEWITT
GARDINER of Freeport Grand Bahama is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas. and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21st day of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that PERCIVAL HALL of Lincoln
Boulevard, P. O. Box 5412 Nassau Bahamas is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21st day of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147, Nassau.


IF









01r
,





















You'll see by the paper what's new, what's go-


ing on, what's to do. In your newspaper, your


whole family finds entertainment and informa-


tion. What's more, your newspaper is your


marketplace, where advertising competition


thrives, and you discover how to get best values


from your shopping dollars.




hr hL Uritbun

SHIRLEY STREET NASSAU, BAHAMAS
l^.^l.~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~1 W .... ^ ^ .^ ,^ _______


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that EMMANUEL THOMAS of
Alice Town, Bimini is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for naturalisation as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why naturalisation should not be granted should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 21st day of February 1974 to
The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.
O. Box N7147, Nassau.


- L


(Siht rtitbuttw


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that KENNETH PRICE
RAINFORD of West End, Grand BahamaP,.i,.,, s.is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The Bahtamas.
and that any person who knows any reason wiv
registration should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts .,..h,.n twenty-eight days
from the 28th day of February 1974 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P. 0 Bo,
N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CLAUDF ,..i r SIMARU
of Hawksbill, Grand Bahama. is apptl ig to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship. 'or registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and -lat any per',on who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the 'acts
within twenty-eight days from the 21st day of February
1974 to The Minister responsible for NationalIy and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GORDON SHURTLEFF
DEMPSEY of P. 0. Box F150, Freepot, G.B.I. is appyivng
to the Minister responsible for 'Ji. r. '.'. and CitrZ0e'-ilp.
for naturalization as a citizen of The Baham -. and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written arid signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21st day of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Natiornalty
and Citizenship P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that 'R A LEXI iUX F R
BAPTISTE of Holmes Rock Grand Bahama I, ,appvinq to
the Minister responsible for Li i a 1 f a'rd Ciei ip 't
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamasr ard ;it 1!,
perosn who knows any reason why natur'aisatio' should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21st day o-
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationalit'i
and Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROTHMAN MCAiULEY
TUCKER of Eight Mile Rock Grand Bahama is applying te
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship. for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why r~ i,-.tr-,t .-,, should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21st day of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BERNICE LOUISE OUT TF.N
of Eight Mile Rock. Grand Bahama i applying to th'
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citzenship ft(,
registration as a citizen of The Bahama, and that a
person who knows any reason why er .'in-
be granted should send a written and s ,id ,'
the facts within twenty-eight days 'm 21 .It i .-r j
February 1974 to The Minister iesp ,;-sibh t i- N i :. ,it
and Citizenship. P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANNIE ESTHER SIMONS o-
Eight Mile Rock Grand Bahama is applying t, th.
Minister responsible for Nationality .id Citii, -, ,;
registration as a citizen of The Bahrumas, and .' .
person who knows any reason why tersti ation i .r ;
be granted should send a written iand '.ined I.t, ..
the facts within twenty-eight days ti oin the Is' .',I
February 1974 to The Minister r espor siblr fo ir 'ir
and Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ILENE '. I(.i', ..,
WILLIAMS of Eight Mile Rock Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nrji .... :,r arind
Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The B3a!..,n.a
and that any person wno knows any 'easo h-.,-
registration should not be granted should so' l ,ii ,-. ,
and signed statement of the facts within tweI t e :,cri- :ii
from the 21st day of February 1974 to Trh, e.-,,.
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P o .-
N7147. Nassau.


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CYNTHIA MARY BOWEN of
West End Grand Bahama is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for -,. .jt,:r.
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
Knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 28th day ibrbuary
1974 to The Minister responsible r Nati.alitv ,and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassa ,




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that PAUL SMITH of Hawksbill
City, Freeport, Grand Bahama is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of Wt facts within twenty-eight days from the 28th day of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.


i I









Thursday, February 23, 1974


U


HISTON nd AROUND


Humane Society,



not so dumb!

WITH ONLY ONE MORF DAY to buy a ticket for the
Bahamas Humane Society's annual raffle first prize a Dodge
Arenger car and eight other super prizes the Ball committee
under the driving chairmanship of Miss Lorraine Onderdonk are
now stepping up the pace for the Ball to be held on March 23 at
La Chandelle Room at the Halcon Balmoral Hotel from 7.30


p.m to the wee hours.
Mrs Betty Kenning,
president of the Bahamas
Hi4mane Society. says that
"the society is in need of
equipment for surgery and
also another ambulance In the
Spring we hope to send
another Bahamian abroad for
training in courses on Animal
Welfare" And of course, there
are all the current expenses
that are needed tor the
day-to-da, running i t the
clinic and the innumerable
services the Soctety performs.
In 1 973 the Society wtas
funded by rummage sales. the
Dog Show, Fiest Dance and
V'i 1u>as cards and
calendars
The Februar i 4i) raffle
S wll be drawn at the Cat and
fiddle on Frida> March 8 March 5 as previous
announced There wveill i one
Liast chance tor the pubhl to
nuy tickets which wsill be on
,,ale at the at and Fiddle that
ternon from 3 until '-. The
results of the dra:i will be
Larnte over z N S that

M .. the Ball This
ear t be the emerald Ball
i t:l i'se sears ago the
Bahda 'das HIumane Soclet 's
Ball was Ialways a headdress
Bal Sincc then there ias
.awiaw., ee'en an imaginative
'ohe e gold. silver rainSbew.
-r sti aid ths sear


emerald. Miss Onderdonk
says "being an 'Fmerald Ball'
you can haul out all those
heirloom emeralds you don't
have a chance to wear and the
men can sport a green evening
jacket which will make all the
women green with envys"
Appropriately enough a
peice of emerald jewellery will
be the first pnzc in the
minl-room raffle the night of
the Ball.
M el Dot i ..'. '., :,
interior decorator assisted by
Jim Whitehead. talented
window dresser and shop
interior decorator, will create
the intenor of ia Chandelle
S..... for the night of the
I emerald Bali
The price of the ticket.
besides helping the humane
Society .' include a "'cordon
bleu" dinner, dancing to the
inimitable band of Perce Bethel
(Dr Fsfakis is a member of this
fun band) lots and lots of door
prizes and table pnz.es (in
addition to the piece of
emerald '. and a news
prize this year)
This special pnze will be
awarded to the owner of the
most photogenic Li.'g Ball
patrons are invited to bring
along a photograph of their
dogs with their names (of dog
and master on the reverse side.
A\ panel of judges will award a


C() MM1 I I MI MBI -S 1 OR T1It IM R-\Lt ) BAiLl. this sear's 1
if the' b;hilr,.am La 'haiiidelle, Hfalml H.Iairxral. with the c.pert M"hlI
( ,jr.tn. i P ir fti Ix right SMrs t ,alialix hittield. Sliss ) under
it-rna rd ic ,,r xind rNs Virs t -xr. xt .1 i, J rIh.I i it hxIs. i-s irs ('srrrhx, x
_-II II-Il -IIII


...by Daphne Wallace-Whitfield


'1
SW


.I-,

J-4



1)


~fYh


. . ..
Photo: PHILIP SYMONETTE
THE ADJUDICATORS FOR THE 1974 BAHAMAS MUSIC FESTIVAL were hosted
at a Reception at the Teachers' Training College on Monday evening at 6:30 p.m. Left to
right: Dr. John Fletcher (Adjudicator from Barbados), Mrs. Kayla Lockhart Edwards, Mr.
and Mrs. Clement Bethel, Mr. and Mrs. Sinclair Outten, Professor John Churchill
(Adjudicator from Canada), Mrs. Ivy Dean Dumont, Mr. T. Baswell Donaldson, Mrs.
Velma Thompson and Mr. Livingstone Coakley, Minister of Education and Culture.


KAYLA LOCKHART
EDWARDS patriot.

prize to the xA wter of '\r., Mrs.
or Miss Phot.>'enti of 174'
I 'magativ.l Miss. Onderdoi k
sa.s th.it as .jxst i xr thIere swill
be a surprise [ti > cIr
At last sear's ( r\stal Bli.
Luck,. a sitr.\ tire take in
b- the liiitumanc SSociet. iiadLe
a surprlse appear.lnce at the
Bi dcrviwmix in1 the inria course
of the evening meal a carthld
of Ienderilin O f Beef
Wellingtoln' a guess what
this ear's Ball .:: brng t
The m poi r, ad cvrtislin tlic
Emerald i'. ,' Cdteatures two


iumanle S,. ict) It ll dra ussu t1i' dt oir
I)ot Interior o .x r it.w :it Hi M-t i1s d
rdm'Pi' ilxxrraijn! Mr S l'% !)ri%, I Sirs
l ri.ish'h r i Phit' O,,s i,. rtl

beautiful pot-caike d 's. Sai
andI (veorgc RoIberts adopted
pets of Mr. and Mrs. Gus
Roberts of Nas-sau
Sam and George are t:w I-t
thle mno irt rtiuna i.'it N\assa,
u n dc r ri C d .C 1 n c
popuailonl Mr anid Ms, (uis
R hcbert- .idopted their frin ix
the tiumainie .S.,ct 'v,i l,-' had
rescued tih .-At tiihAic' iilx the>
were 'ki ehl se'eks jand


Sliisii l ilt x t i i+rl '.t l xar ix'
c,'ait C h .i Ld 'rotit Iui 'rN ni -ic

i dt-, I hC'd hei sir ani \t-,
Rofberts to-ok o e'r aiid s hi
t i xiddde thic ii to 1 he l ch "

ti, keis' ir ihe tii5\ ec
',It.i inxid hr'mi Miss Lorraine
Ondt' rdonk, l'arjdiis h.xd
x d Ba lxa it.xs I *ntl ii-x
PItI')I t I o B ,h'II l i te pliph i1't


28382), the Humane Soceity
(3-5138) and House and
Garden, Lyvford Cay. (7-4034).
The Auction at Government
House in aid of the Retarded
was a lot of fun with people
enjoying themselves and
bidding
The committee is very
happy with e proceeds this
Veal i which will amount to
something just over $10,000.
(I accounting is still going on).
Although last year the Auction
made S 23,000 this year's
proceeds were very satisfactory
considering the amount of
things that were donated.
For example there were no
complete contents of a home
this year, but *crlpc donated
generously what they could.
There were many crystal vases,
ithe sort of thing a generous
homeowner could do without.

Kayla Lockhart Edwards,
Nas.sat 's operatic soprano,
could be concentrating on a
personal career and pursuing
international stardom
Instead of concentrating on
a career at the Metropolitan
Opera Kayla is devoting much
of hier en ergy and talents to the
development of latent musical
abilities and appreciation of
her own people in her own
little town of Nassau.
"%M wholile goal at the
tmomient '. Kayla told me, "is
to combine with a dance
troupe and a group of actors to
form a National Theatre Group
and have a regular season".
A monumental ambition for
this gentle, petite, browneyed
young Bahamian with a hard
core of determination. It is
difficult to believe that up
until 1964 she hled in the
twilight world ot a girl with a
faulty heart. An operations
performed by the Sir Victor
Sassoon HIeart Ioundation not
only gave Kayla the gift of a
normal life and the strength to
anII Ibut aalso gae lie Bahatlas
the it oti Kaila.
"I travel an aw a ful lot. sihe
told ne. Kayla did a concert in
l)eceimbra r nid they have
united her back ini .\ -',, for
the Independence Anniversary
celebrations,
One of Ka\Ila s newest
\cntures oni the hoime scene is
tihe formation of Ihe Chamber
Singers
She gcves credit t1,r the idea
,if tihis group to htier husband.
Desmond Edwards, whxo is also
her partner She met him when
lie w as her accompanied ist. His
protc'ssi l is that o) trust
corporation officer hbut his wife
delscnihes hi as .1 "liIusiclan
S hlII hides behind a Itrust
officer's garb" liec has his
I R S.\M. and he plas the
olgan, pl.xino axnd stng base' as
'Al' ,iis ,ic iompanx ing Kay la
lihe idea of the ( hamlber
Singers was Desmond's. Kayla
saidl Shie was teaching and
D)e'snli d tiltouiht it iwuld he


end of the year.
A full life indeed
professional singer,
wife. mother and. in


for this
teacher.
the best


Page 7 Col. 4 ;r -

ROSETTA STREET .
TWO DOORS WEST OF


WE ALSO MAKE FINE RUBBER STAMPS


r
0
0


Come and bring a friend!
YOUR TICKET TO PARADISE!



ESCAPE

from the hum drum

to the TROPICAL SETTING of the


PARADISE BEACH PAVILION
overlooking beautiful Paradise Beach

Pleasant service of reasonably priced meals under the
personal direction of Bernard Perron.
Breakfast Lunch e Dinner. Open from 7:30 a.m. to 11 p.m.

RESERVATIONS: 5-7541
Paradise Beach Pavilion is just west of the Holiday Inn.
WHERE JAMES BOND MADE THUNDERBALL


THINK ABOUT YOUR CHILDREN.


WE THINK ABOUT YOUR CHILDREN.
And, we think San Andr is isthe investment
opportunity with a future.
by the time your children are old enough to buy real
estate for themselves-the choice land may be gone.
And the prices may be so high they could not afford
land anyway.
You can solve that problem for them, Invest for them
in San Andros. NOW. These low terms cannot last
forever:

49o DOWN *45 MONTHLY,.
(Just $3495 for more than 1/4-acre; $3995 for almost
I1/3-acre!)





eT."
+w ri.(6hW- mu


Call the experts, the ones who think about your
children and your grandchildren, and about
quick investment returns, too.
CALL

C. A.Christie Real Estate
Norfolk House, 2nd floor, Suite 8 Phone: 5-9737
"The name that's a tradition in Bahamas real estate


d1


a good idea to form a group
that would have national, and
indeed international, standing.
This was well within Kayla's
scope as her Bachelor of Music
degree course had included
chorale conducting.
So the Chamber Singers
were born a year ago. They are
a small group. Kayla explained,
a cross-section of about 20 of
the better singers They put on
two concerts in 1973 at the
Lutheran Church and also did a
commercial for the Ministry of
Tourism which is now being
shown on network T.V. in the
States. It consists of a medley
of Bahamian songs against a
pictorial background of a
moonshot on Fleuthera.
In December the Chamber
Singers performed in the Fli
Whitney auditorium, Pompano
Beach. Florida for a benefit
con ce rt.
At present they are
preparing simultaneously for
two concerts in Freeport and
thile Music Festival at Easter.
The program for the
Freeport concerts is one
performance for children and
an evening variety for adults
which will consist of Bach,
Brahms, Samuel Barber,
Balfour and Rubbra and negro
spirituals and calypso these
latter arranged by husband.
Desmond.
For the Music Festival the
Chamber Singers will present
Moiart's Reina C(oeli soli
and chorus and instrumental
song
As the reader will no doubt
obhserse the Freeport concert
progranitle is in two halves
classical and lighter.
"Underneath it all our aim is
to expose our audiences to all
ty pes of music", Kayla said.
She continued: "The
Bahamas is a singing country .
]he average Bahamian can
carr\ a tune. My whole aim is
to bring out the talent that is
there already. Our goal is to
bring professionalism ... We'd
like to go to all the faniils
islands to give concerts".
Kayla is well aware of the
practical obstacles facing her
nanil\ ,ack of finance but this
condition is not deterring this
pluckN young woman from her
ultimate goal.
KaylIa also conducts an adult
voice class at the Stephen
Dillet School ecery Tuesday
evening. In this class shlie covers
techniques o(i ,oice production
and also does a "little bit of
stage presentation- and public
speaking
It this wasn't enough Kayla
also is planning to produce
lainsel and (iretel before the





E ltr inato


Exciting things are

happening at the Fabuldous

Trade Winds Bar & Lounge

Paradise Island


NOW APPEARING




















GLEN

COVINGTON

TRIO

SHOWTIMES NIGHTLY: 10:40 & 12:40

#lake the evening complete with a gourmet dinner
in the Imperial Dining Room.
Dinner from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.



i.PUVhseS



Lianidh


NOTICE


IN l 1 I SI ()1 It l1inis (Gregoiry Thaoipso 1
Lit, )t P.,irdtcl 1i the Southcern District of New
xx. "d i cdii d .cccisx',d.

\ 1 I pets,>ii- li,ixi.'nr l.nlin '. iigtillnsl the jils, .' stalt e
i.t rc'(ltiirc'l ix s hidxl i 'lii l' tc Uii t certifiec i il
rslitii to lilh i',dci.i-'l(iI- d ot kr bcfoic the 2'lst
dia\ of MdiLcli ,V I). I0"4 aft'i which late thie
A\din sll trattorirNs ill i p i,,ccd to distribute thel isset,
ltii.tin_ r 'g_~(I on|l to the claiins om f \ ich lhe shaill
thicin lnc had niotiL.

AN) AI 1 persons indcbtcd to the said Estate are
rcqucstcd to Ii K I' ll ,cttlc ient on or before the
date hicrciinbctr o iirclil tonc.

SaLtcd thls I 1 th dai\ (t I ebluar' A. D). 11)74.


GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.
Attorneys for the Administrators
P. O. Box N. 272
Nassau, Bahamas.


in


r --- ii


BUY LOCAL AND SAVE!



Shop at the Retail Outlets of



THE


PRODUCE EXCHANGE
ON: ROBINSON ROAD POTTER'S CAY MARKET RANGE



SPECIALS FOR THIS WEEK ARE:





lIb gaos Per Lb. 20(



Omngyss Per 5 Lb. Bag



Onus Per 3 Lb. Bag I5


Tf <


i


whrt (hriuntr


Ir~R









Thursday, February 28, 1974


7


From Page 6


MISS BUENA V. KELLEY (right), the Grand Daughter Secretary of the Improved Benevoleni
and Protective Order of Elks of the World was in Nassau recently to perform at the "Collaring"
ceremonies of the past Grand Daughter Rulers and the past State Presidents of the Bahamas
Association of Elks held at the Sheraton-British Colonial Hotel. Miss Kelley is from Norflok,
Virginia. Her mother was the founder of the Grand Daughter Rulers. She is pictured with Mr. and
Mrs. U. Bostwick of Young Street, her hosts during the short visit here which was high-lighted by
the collaring ceremony where Daughter Elks were presented with collars symbolizing their service
and their role in the society. There are 10 temples in the Bahamas.


sense of the w,)rd, paitiir
* I * >
The Bahamas Music Festival
began on Mondas
All last week Professor John
Churchill and Mr. Cleient
Bethel have been adjudicatlim'
in the out-islands Some tcin
islands are involved this scar.
On Monda\ cesnierin'
Professor Churchill of Canatid
and Dr. John Fletcher tf1
Barbados. the adjudicators tf
the 1974 Music Festival,. v,,re
hosted at a reception at 30
p.m. at the Ie.churs' Traiini ly
College.
Fl i In i in a t i o n s a n d
adjudications will c'i tiltnu'e 7il
day this week at St riilCis
Xaviers and at the lcadt.,"
CG1lkg. in the evening.
The whole shehan nlilots t
Freeport next week.
1T I hose interested in
ftu'her particukits slinutild
contactt the Culti ral Alttair,
Division of the Ministiy ,t
education (telephone 5 9617
Over the ycars lho, ,in-ceC)t
of the Music Festival h..is bc.
changing. There i niw ,i
Bahamian sect'iC n I ii
includes all age vriiips,


I ;il tti, K :ila "W e are
! I .... !;; i;;lsoI as a w hlole
ir" w ii 1 Music is a

k l- .:i n !f v!d 1t 1 to lw "pain"
- 'I'" t in ie Bahamas are
",s'ill w,;t' rin a lack of music
I,^ .1- itil^ i t !ii h r h,,, l s m\ ~,te n .

I i nct iu imonthl musical
c niiiig .i ili,- Bahalini s Music
S -,,-!\ ICAItuic-s Ednmund
Mo\ ,% s ia/ qutintet oi n iMaich
2nd eil !iie l -i Schci- l ainiingl
i' .1 i i" !1d

Si i t si T i o i n d
I *', li.\ I;.,i .l! c iinlt s, ias-
li l ie i ' t ied
Paulne C laQs vnprann 'id
Terrv Ma"lll lll !t u C inl A

IN PUNK Ale '. I ed 1-

i i ii i t .ii d ir ii*
1 .1 pin I bl to; f the great
1 \ .. ,.! iI iV:. in thel

p hi i s phical
i \ iN and


should be in the Bahamas.
Well. our Oscar-winning.
Bahamian resident and
Bahamian film star Sidney
Poitier was being shown on the
American T.V. screen on
Sunday night's late show in
"Raisin in the Sun". Viewers in
the Bahamas had to fight the
continuous interference
caused by the weather.
It seems that U.S. viewers
can see Sidney Poitier or
Calvin Lnckhart on their
screens but that we in the
Bahamas cannot see them on
our own.
Some funny sort of
philosophy they have on
Broadcasting Hill!

A son, Vincent Kenneth,
was born to Mr. and Mrs.
Donald Britton in Toronto,
(anada, on February 18.
Mrs. Britton is the former
Marella deGregory.

Vince Hamilton of Nassau. a
freshman at Luther College in
Decorah. Iowa. learned some
of the finer points of archery
during the month of January.


What's your






hearts desire?


A Royal Bank




Savings Account




can help you


The most im portal t thing Vi n
about savings is to do it
regularly. When o1u d '
your money builds up.
Another important thing is
to put your savings to '-Ik
for you. Earning interest Ii
The Helpful bank Sa ,s i!'
ofter security ftot i.n, A
days, future tcsiiVest
tflexibility.
Savings also ofteri '- .-un:'ihig c
Your chance to buy S\i hearts id, :eC
Helpful Bankes in N,'-su andi.l tihe I
Islands can tell you bhout si .mes. Just aisk. imnc


The Royal The Helpful Bank
ROYAL BANK
i!,; -l-es i .. i.. 1 1lie B I ,hI m ias


*le was one of 17 Luther
College students who
participated in a three-week
course in outdoor recreation
and camp counselling which
was held in Kerrville. Texas.
Canoeing. campcraft.
h.inliiiig and bait and fly
casting were also part of the
course emphasis
Vince's archery instructor
si ys that he has good form.

Three local students made
the Dean's List for the Fall
1973 Semester at Saint Leo
College, Florida.
Joan P. Damianos, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. John Damianos
of Retirement Road, Nassau, is
majoring in sociology.
?aulette M. Mitchell,
da. fighter of Mr. and Mrs. Leroy
Mitchell of Fergusons Manor, is
a junior with a double major in
sGciology and secretarial
science.
Gloria L. Wong, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Wong of
Nassau, is a senior majoring in
social science.


S.


EVANGELICAL

CONVENTION

MARCH 3-10
THE BAHAMAS Evangelical
Church Association, formerly.
known as the Island Missionaryl
Society have announced their
23rd Annual Convention,
March 3 10.
This year the guest speakeii,
will be the well known, world
travelling evangelist, Rev.
Ernest Wilson of Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania; and Bible
teacher, Rev. Dpuglas Hine
from Seminole, Florida. Rev.
Wilson will be preaching
nightly at 7:30; Rev. Hine wil)
by teaching Bible messages
daily at 10:30 a.m.
Other stimulating meetings i
will centre around the 7 a.m.
prayer times conducted by the
BECA missionaries, and the
9:30 a.m. messages by
seasoned BECA pastors.
Saturday night, March 9 will
also feature a special Youth
Rally.
Special music throughout
the Convention will consist of
choirs, instrumentals, quartets,
and solos.
All of these meetings will be
attended by BECA church
representatives and visiting
church members from the
Family Islands and Nassau and
are open to the public.
The Convention will
convene at the BECA :
Headquarters located at the
Carmichael Bible Church on,
the comer of Gladstone and
Carmichael Roads.
The BECA Superintendent,
the Rev. Edward Godet, said
that during the business
meetings this year major
proposals will be drawn up.

EVANGELIST ON
JAMAICA MISSION
EVANGELIST Rex Major,
associate evangelist with Great
Commission Gospel Crusades
of Nassau, is the guest speaker
at the Kingston United Young
People's group convention
being held from Friday to
Sunday, March 3 in Kingston,
Jamaica.
Included in his schedule are
special speaking sessions at
various high schools, the
university and also the
theological seminary. Mr.
Major will be interviewed by 1
both the radio and T.V.
stations, and will be
making several tapes for use the
radio broadcast, "Food for
thought."


UUI I IUO LJUI I IUI f




And at 9:00 First Nassau Showing
RIICHARD HARRIS
1O ITAWLMOR P
TIlf DFADIM TRACKERS
From warner Bro* 0 Parental Guidance Suggested.

5 H 4I R L E Y 5iT. rheatie.'v -


NOW SHOWING -
*Matinee 3:00 & 5:00, Evening 8:30-'Phone 2-1004, 2-10051





Mati^ee starts not PANA5iSlONWM(TROCOlO MM
VUL BRYNNER RICHARD BENJAMIN
PARENTAL DISCRETION ADVISED.
Reservations not claimed by 8:15, will be sold
on first come, first served basis.


Now Showing Last Day Friday
Matinee starts at 2:00 Continuous Showing%
Evening 8:30 from 3:00
"FISTS OF THE
DOUBLE K" R. "THEY ONLY KILL
Henry Yue Young THEIR MASTERS" PG.
"THE HOUSE THAT James Garner,
DRIPPED BLOOD" PG. Katherine Ross
PLUS Late Feature PLUS
Friday night
Friday night "THE BIG MOUTH" G.





i LAST DAY FRIDAY
*Matinee Continuous from 1:45, Evening 8:30'Phone 3-46641
BLACK GODFATHER IS BACK!
...and he'stakin'r 4 1
S over the town!



FRED WILLAMSON cOLO.IN.M I
Plus! "THE HUNTING PARTY" R.
S NO ONE UNDER 18 WILl READMITTED.


* 5l
aiIl
*
iSl

aI
It
a


ai
ai




SI

ii

al



ap
aI
Ui
a
aI
al
al
a!
a
a4
Si
i
t
ii






i-
tit
al
a

ai
.i


___ ~ _f


I -.


___


_MB_.HTi

HS GAROM
*VC REIAR


~ttf i~Tritttr~tc

















CLASSIFIED


REAL ESTATE


Thursday, February 28, 1974


SECTION


I I,_~__, -- II I,


I I


C13bb
FOR GOOD buys in residential
and commercial lots and a wide
selection of attractive homes.
Call Bill's Real Estate Agency
Ltd. and let us arrange terms to


residential site. West Bay Street
near Orange Hill One of the
finest home sites on New
Providence and located on one
of ts- highest hills. All utilities
now in Views from sea to sea.
Must see to appreciate.
Purchase onrice $45,000.00.
LONG ISLAND
Twelve acre tract of land on
Broad Bay with 700 feet of
pr !me beach frontage.
Excellent elevation. Views sea
to sea- Purchase price
$40.000 00.
GREAT EXUMA
Waterfront lot in deep water
u otected harbour lot
elevations to 45 feet 1 & ::
miles to George-Town 1: acre.
Purchase price $6.000 00
CONTACT. McF',- F .,N &
BROWN REAL ESTATE
LIMITED
Tei ephr-ne 22680
Telephone,. 22680, 22681.
22682

C 13376
DAVSON'S REAL ESTATE
CO LTD.
Certified Real Estate Broker,
Phones 21178 55408
P. 0 Box N-4648
Nassau, Bahamas
Proudly present
SMASHING REAL
ESTATE B.-r" P' -,
THROUGHOUT THE
COMMON WEALTH
2, 3 and 4 Bt L,- '-".'
HOUSES in the "- ., ,
areas-
-ASTERN ROAL
on the water as wel! as


on the ,"
SAN SOULC
BLAIR ESTATES
CI f ir .' GARDENSr
WINTON
THE GROVE (West Bd-,)
SKYLINE HEIGHTS
NASSAU LAST
SEA BREEZE
VILL -i. F ROAD
GOLDEN GATES
HIGHLAND PARK
PROSPECT PIDGE
r. ,', -. VILLAS
C 0 N D O M I N U ,
APARTMENTS in PARADISE
ISLAND
EAST BAY STREET
WEST BAY STREET
HOTELS and HOTEL SITES,
BEACH LOTS, COMMERC-
IAL LOTS, RESIDENTIAL
LOTS
ACR E AG E FOR
DEVELOPMENT IN THE
NASSAU AND FAMILY
ISLANDS SUCH AS GRAND
BAHAMA LONG ISLAND,
ELEUTHERA, ABACO.
45 ACRE CAY IN THE
EXUMAS WITH DEEP
WATER HARBOUR AND
MORE
CALL
DAVSON'S REAL
ESTATE AGENCY
Phone 21178 or 80932 21178
P 0 Box N-4648
Nassau, Bahamas,


REAL ESTATE


I I


i
i


NASSAU HILLCREST
TOWERS
laundry facilities.
1 bedroom apartment $250 per
month.
2 bedroom 2 bath apartment
$410 per month
(available April 1st)
Fully furnished. Lease
required. Contact
7-8421-2. Evening 7-7065.

C13671
2 BEDROOM unfurnished
duplex apartment McKinney
Avenue, Stapledon Gardens.
See proprietor on premises.
$180 monthly.

C13658
HOUSE suitable for store or
o fice Madeira Street facing
Shopping Pla. a. Contact
2-3170

C13714
EFFICIENCY Apartment in
Palmdale for reserved
gentleman ONLY. For
information call 5- 1044


SC13732
THREE Bedroom, 1'- Bath.
Unfurnished House Phone
- 4-2193- After 5 p.m.
-- ---- -
SC13728
TWO bedroom unfurnished
apartment nice location near
S,-, i, ,L Tenwich Street,
Shirley Heights. Phone Carey
5 3471.

|,C13733
ONF bedroom apartment.
T wy n a m Avenue area
s Basically furnished.
Decorative iron guards on all
windows Master TV Antenna.
To view call 2 3261


CARS FOR SAL
: 3631
S!973 VOLKSWAGEN 1300
i Sedan Excellent condition,
radio, white wall tyres, low
rtil-age. licensed for '74 to '75
Call 3 661 1 4
C 13624
1970 FORD 4 door like
new. Nassau Florist
telephone 2-4223.

C13670
1959 ROLLS ROYCE $9500.
Call 74295.
C13379
BLACK CHEVROLET
CAPRICE in excellent
condition. L J. Knowles, Tel
58134.


C13678
1968 M.G.C. GT. Perfect
running condition, Al motor.
Asking only $1,300 or nearest
offer. Call 77301 Dupuch.
C13673
CHEVY MALIBU one year
old, airconditioned, radio etc.
Like new. Phone 2-4777 days.
Evening 3-1425.


CARS FOR SALE


suit your pocketbook or get
the best cash price. Call us
23921.
C13672
2 COMMERCIAL lots
Carmichael Road 212 ft on
road to 160 ft. deep. $8,000
each.
CHESTER THOMPSON REAL
ESTATE 2-4777.

C13627
BUY NOW!
SAN ANDROS
LOTS
14,500
sq. FEET!
Almost 1/3 acre
$45 DOWN, $45 per MONTH
CALL OR VISIT
FRANKCAREY
REAL ESTATE
P. O. Box N4764
BAY & DEVEAUX ST.
Tel. 27667 I>A;-
C13662
SPONGER'S Cottage Business
with property or Sponger's
Cottage Business with lease on
property. Contact: The
Manager. Telephone 41052.
C 13559
4 BEDROOM, 2 bathroom
unfurnished house with carport
and sewmg room. FOR SALE.
Call 31671 31672 (9:00 a.m
1200: 2:00 p m. 5:00
p rm We.-days).
C13670
FOR SALE
WINTON HIGHWAY
Four unit two bedroom hilltop
apartment block with space in
building for additional units
On one acre with magnificent
views. Currently grossing
$ 16.000 00 per annum.
Purchase price $130,000.00.
BAY STREET
uComnieicial site on East Bay
Street 46x125 Located
)e-tween Christie & Armstrong
Streets on the southern side of
Bay Purchase price
$50.000 00,
GAMBIA
One & one quarter acre hilltop


Manager
Friendly Big "Al Collie"
Hostess Ms.Penny Kemp
THE BRIDGE INN
NOW SERVING LUNCH
Open 11:00 a.m. 5.00 p.m.
Dinner Served 5 p.m. to Midnight
FREE PARKING

LOST
C13731
MALE Miniature Black Poodle
with gray paws. Answers to the
name "SAMBO". Lost in
Winton Highway in the Eastern
Road area. Please call 4-2211
or 4-1214.

PETS FOR SALE
C13667
DOBERMAN Pincher guard
dogs male eleven months -
female five months. Phone
after eight nightly 41568.

WAITS TO BUY
C13675
GRAND piano needed for
church. Call Mr. Cole 5-8770
or 4-2161. Mr. Saunders
4-2215.



L 13666
NOW AVAILABLE
19 74 World Book
Encyclopedia, Childcraft
Dictionary and Atlas and also
1972 and 1973 year book. Call
C W. Sands Enterprises Ltd.
23921-


MARINE SUPPLIES
C 11894
1969 31 ft. CHRIS CRAFT
Commander. Sleeps six, private0
shower, two 230 h.p. engine,
with less than 200 hours,
kitchenette, good condition
Call 24267, 54011.

C13381
PACEMAKER 44 ft.
Luxurious Cruising yacht
Phone 3-2371.

C13730
27' CHRIS CRAFT Cavaii,r,
new engine, radio, good
condition. Duty paid G B 17.
Can be seen at Bayshore
Marina. Call 41323 after 5:00
p.m.


SCHOOLS


SI


C 13604
LOT 118' x 155' MONTAGU
HEIGHTS, Completely
enclosed with bearing fruit
trees, $18,000 00 Phone
5-8512.
C13661
FOR SALE
3 bedroom 2 bath house
financing available. Phone
2-1495 or 6.

PUBLIC AUCTION
C13679
PUBLIC AUCTION to be
conducted by BELGRAVE
AUCTIONEERS, Saturday,
March 2nd, 1974, from 10:30
a.m at OUR FRIEND DRY
GOODS STORE. Fliru t Street
(off East Street) Wext from
Former M'Ik Depot iear Fr
Allen's. Men s & Ladies' Wear.
Household Goods. Materials.
Appliances. Gift items,
Novelties, Notions. etc., etc.
ENTIRE STOCK MUST
GO!

ENTIRE STOCK MUST GO!


FOR RENT
C13538
COTTAGES and apartmenr-
monthly airconditioned,
fully furnished, maid service
available. Lovely garden and
swimming pool. Telephone
31297, 31093.

C13497
2 one bedroom fully furnished
apartments Centreville
District Ring 5-8679 Don
Pritchard.

C13600
BASICALLY furnished I
bedroom. 1 bath, kitchen,
living and dining areas .
Montrose Avenue. Telephone
2-1722-5 and 2-3865.

C13599
BASICALLY furnished 2
bedroom (1 bedroom air
conditioned) 1 bath, kitchen,
living & dining area, washing
machine. Montrose Avenue.
Telephone 2-1722 5 and
2-3865.

C13630
LARGE spacious 1 bedroom
apartment. Walking distance
from town and shopping
centre. Phone 23709 34881.

C13633


C13720
ASSISTANT ACCOUNTANT
(Part Time)
Applicant for the above
position should have had at
least seven years commercial
experience as senior
bookkeeper or assistant
accountant and preferably will
have spent some time with an
accounting firm, a professional
qualification is not obligatory.
Experience in offshore
company bookkeeping to final
accountants stage, working in
different currencies, is
essential, together with ability
to work accurately, neatly and
quickly. Salary according to
qualifications and experience.
Excellent references regarding
character and ability will be
required.
Applications in own
handwriting, giving full
personal and career
information to P. 0. Box
N-8338, Nassau.


HELP WANTED


I I


C 13715
CENTRAL GARAGE LTD.
"The Easiest Place in Town to
Trade"

1970 FORD CORTINA -
B$850
1970 SUNBEAM RAPIER -
B$1650.
1971 JAVELIN S.S.T.
(automatic, radio) B$2850.
1970 FORD TORINO
(automatic, radio) B$2695.
1968 G.M.C. PICK UP TRUCK
B$995.
1970 CHEVELLE MALIBU
(automatic, radio) B$1875
1968 PLYMOUTH VALIANT
(radio, automatic) B$1050
1971 DODGE AVENGER
(automatic) B$1395
1965 BUICK SKYLARK
(automatic. radio) B$750.
1969 CHEV II NOVA
(automatic, radio) B$1350.
1972 FIAT BUS (7 passenger)
B$1650
1968 ROVER 2000 SALOON
(automatic) B$1000
1969 DODGE DART SPORT
(automatic, radio) B$1500
1972 VAUXHALL VICTOR
(automatic) B$1475
1970 FORD CORTINA
S/WAGON B$1275
1969 VAUXHALL VIVA -
B$775.
1970 FIAT 850 B$550
CENTRALGARAGE LIMITED
Thompson Boulevard
P. O. Box N1525
Telephone 34711.

FOR SALE
C13650
FISHER Amplifier 500-120
Watts.
Kenwood Radio/Stereo tuner
K.T. 7000. Good bargain.
$400. Phone 5-7317 after 6.
C13632
5 PIECE Dinnette Set $75
Hollywood Bed $85.
WE GIVE CREDIT RIGHT IN
STORE
CENTREVILLE DRUGS &
DEPT. STORE
Phone 5-9342.

C13594
Beautify your garden:-
Dutch Flower Bulbs
Dahlia
Gladioli, etc.
MODERNISTIC GARDEN
& PET SUPPLY
2-2868

DINING GUIDE
C13629


TRADE SERVICES
C 13656
FOR EXPERT
RADIO TV SERVICE
contact
Channel tiectromncs Ltd.
TV Specialist
Wulff Road. Phone 35478.


C 13386
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOl
Learn to drive with confidence
Phone 59805 between 7 anti
8:30 a.m. or after 6 p.m. or
35084 anytime.

POSITION WANTED
C13712
FINANCE executive seeks a
challenging position. Write to
P. 0. Box 4697, Nassau.
C6716E
SHIP CAPTAIN AVAILABLE,
holding a Panamanian
unlimited foreign qoinq masters
licence, a Liberian all tonnages
foreign going masters licence
and Bahamian masters licence.
Also have yachting and tugging
experience
For information contact:
Captain Hanna, P. 0. Box
F-2580, Freeport, Grand
Bahama. Telephone: 348-3020
or 352-9212, anytime.

I ELP NTED
C13677
Experienced, dressmaker -
only Bahamian need apply.
Phone 36175.
C13674
TYPIST/TELEPHONIST
required for Nassau business
consulting company.
Applicants should be capable
of fast, accurate typing, have
experience in suitable business
office and not expect to be
closely supervised. Pleasant
offices on eastern edge of
town. Write to Jones,
Bardelmeier & Co., P. 0. Box
N-7790, Nassau, Bahamas.

C13659
BANK OF MONTREAL'
(BAHAMAS & CARIBBEAN)
LIMITED has the following job
vacancy:
Manager International
Branch
The applicant must be
knowledgeable in all aspects of
banking and have had specific
experience in the foreign
Exchanges, Eurodollar Lending
& Funding, and Corporate
Credit Analysis. He will be
responsible for expanding the
Bank's International business
and should possess a solid
background of international
trade and marketing functions.
Interested persons should
forward detailed resumes in
confidence to the Personnel
Officer, P. 0. Box N-7118,
Nassau.
C13639
JUNIOR CREDIT ASSISTANT
IN
INTERNATIONAL
BANKING
Must have following
qualifications:
1. Graduate of recognized
university preferably with
degree in accounting, business
administration, economics or
finance, or
2. Good high school record and
minimum three years banking
experience with emphasis on
analysis of financial
statements, loans
documentation and related
correspondence.
3. Foreign language helpful but
not required. Applicant will
receive indoctrination in
various banking departments
and activities for an indefinite
period before being assigned
specific duties and
responsibilities. Starting salary
commensurate with
educational background and/or
experience.
Attractive fringe benefits.
Only Bahamian applicants with
above qualifications need
apply. Please send curriculum
vitae to Adv. C13639 c/o The
Tribune, P. O. Box N-3207,
Nassau.
C13713
CAREER OPPORTUNITY
Finance and mortgage
company in search of 2
male Bahamians 21 years old
and over to be trained for
future managerial posts. Apply
Adv. C13718, c/o The Tribune,
P. O. Box N 3207. Nassau.

C13719
QUALIFIED Lifeguard
required for Anchorage Hotel.
Must be able to conform with
standards required by tYe hotel
licensing board. NO PHONE
CALLS PLEASE APPLY IN
PERSON.


C13703
ELEVEN seamen to work on
M/V LADY ASTRA between
Haiti and Nassau. Contact
Captain Elexes Joffre.

C13727
Live-in handyman gardener
and watchman. Telephone
32095.
C13729
LYFORD CAY Resident
requires a middle-aged
Bahamian chauffeur-caretaker,
on a year-round basis, without
dependent children. If married,
wife could be given part-time
duties. Living quarters will be
provided. Please apply in
writing, with references, to
Adv. C 13729, c/o The Tribune,
P. O. Box N3207, Nassau.

TRADE SERVICES

C13391

Pindera Cudom.

Brokerar tid.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU. BAHAMAS
P.O. BOX N3714
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE:2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-3798
Airport 7-7434
FREE ESTIMATES


I *fa


HELP WANTED

C6717
POSITION AVAILABLE -
MANAGER OF
RESTAURANT.
APPLY: LUTHER MARTIN,
COZY RESTAURANT AND
BAR, EIGHT MILE ROCK.

C6715
GENERAL MANAGER FOR
HOTEL
Excellent opportunity available
for experienced Hotel Manager.
Applicant must have'minimum
5 y ears management
background. Three years as
Manager of a hotel, he must be
experienced in all phases of
hotel operation, including sales
and marketing background. A
minimum of three years college
is also required.
INDIES HOUSE, P. 0. Box
F-455, Freeport. Telephone
352-8821.







WEt^^

U


hill IM I it N t


ANTENNAS
Island Tv 2-2618
AUTOMOTIVE
Lucas Batteries
Bay Street Garage 2-2434
BODY BUILDING
Wong's Barbell Club
5-4506
BOOKSTORE
The Christian Book Shop
5-8744
BUILDERS
Richard's Construction 5-708C
BUSINESS FORMS
Executive
Printers 2-4267/5-4011
CAMERAS
John Rull 2-4252/3

CARPETS
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993
DRAPERIES
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993
DRUGS &
PRESCRIPTIONS
McCartney's 5-6068/5-2127
ENTERTAINMENT
Movies
Film & Equip. Service 2-2157
GARDEN & PET
SUPPLIES
Modernistic Garden
& Pet 2-2868
Nassau Garden & Pet
Montrose Avenue 2-4259
HARDWARE
John S. George 2-8421/6
WRECKER SERVICE
Gibson Wrecker
Service
2-8896


-A 11


2 L hrH rtl. '


HOUSE PLANS
Evangelos G. Zervos 2-2633
LAUNDRY
DRY CLEANING
New Oriental Laundry
2-4406
MEN'S & BOY'S WEAR
The Wardobe 5-5599
MEN'S WEAR
Fashionette Ltd. 2-2376/7

MUSIC
Cody's Records 2-8500
OPTICIANS
Optical Service Ltd. 2-3910/1

PRINTING
Wong's Printinq 5-4506
Executive
Printers 2.4267/5-4011

RADIO & T.V. SALES
Carter's Records 2-4711
RUBBER STAMPS
Wong's Rubber Stamp
C9. 5-4506
SPORTS GOODS
Champion Sport Land 2-1862
TRAVEL
Playtours ?-2931/7
R.H. Curry & Co.,
2-8681/7
TRUCKING SERVICE
Gonzaez Trucking
3.1562/2.4726
TV REPAIRS
Channel Electronics Ltd.
3-5478
WINDOW/DOOR
REPAIRS
Window & Door Specialists
5.A4Tn


am -mm mm m -h-ammg amm m- -'t
FOR THU ACTIO W I0 WANT


I(mm^ml a I e mmmmmmm .
Shop Nassau Merchants
For Buines And Services
For Business And Services*


El --- -


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS -AST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


GRAND BAHAMA




CLASSIFIED


II FKES TEL. -52-M


BUSINESS PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY

SSave Time


.,.y I W
BT AOI


S> SlVE TlIM SAVE Mly <"


f -~ I -- --


-- I-- 1


C13390
T.V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for homes.
apartments and hotels
SALES AND SERVICES
Call 5-9404
WORLD OR MUSIC,
Mackey Street
next to Frank's Place.

C13607
LANDSCAPING and for all
your gardening needs,
trimming, hedging, pruning,
tree felling and beach cleaning
call 57810. LAWNS AND
HEDGES. Prompt
reasonable and efficient
service.

C13498
FOR your building needs and
CRANE hire see:
ISLAND BUILDERS
LIMITED P. 0. Bo'
N-4559 Phone 31671 3167"'

C13572
ACT now before the burglar
comes. Call Scriven's
Maintenance Service for your
security requirements. Tel.
51748.
A


-~-_---


-------------------


r


-


- I


I I I


I


-1


I


II .~


M-


HELP WANTED

C 13664
THE BAHAMAS OIL
REFINING COMPANY is
seeking personnel for its
Refinery operations.
Applicants should be skilled
and experienced in one or
more phases of Shop and Field
Machine Work, Industrial
Electricity, Instrumentation.
Welding, Pipefitting, Boiler
Making, Engine Overhaul
(Heavy Diesels and
Automotive)' and Heavy
Equipment Operation (Cranes
and Trucks). Work involves the
daily repair and overhaul of
applicable refinery equipment
and facilities.
Applicants should have a basic
education in mathematics,
reading and writing. Preference
will be given to men who have
had previous refinery or
industrial plant experience.
Starting salary commensurate
with experience and education.
Qualified persons requiring
further information, should
write to Borco Personnel
Office, P. 0. Box F-2435,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, or
apply in person to Ministry of
Labour in Nassau.


I
i





i


(31hr Tribitlp













Thursday, February 28, 1974


s-ZA


I


"It finally happened! Taxes, social security, medical
and pension deductions took my WHOLE paycheck."


RUFF NOT OFF HIS FEED NO MOR !


Ji


j


CROSSWORD
PUZZLE
ACROSS
Communicant 27. Brown ermine
7. Marvelous 29. Except
12. Parsley 30. Buckshot
camphor 31. Annoy
13. Texas shrine 32. High hill
14. Deep South 33. Terminate
15. Edible 34. Append
mushroom 35. Kind of
16. Mark Twain's firework
burial place 37. Romantic
18. Cumberland's 39. Lemur
river 42. Splotch
19. Bankroll 43. Ancient
21. Salamander Roman wine
22. V"tch plant cup
23. Article 44, Fished for
24. Person morays


EA NAVE R E
LUD 8BE 3S
L R E

p NE

K N K E E LO0


AgA
L. YawsK
SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE


DOWN
1. Frenzied
2. Finial
3 Heterogeneous
4. Simmer
5. Ingredient


paint dries quickly, and the Gomnie hands
statue back to Rupert. "Now that t's
in all over," he smiles, '"no one will
ive that man's bluff. We've filled him !"
little beer has no need to return to the
cottage, for the Gomnle shows him
her way out, this time through a hollow
. The big trunk swings open and Rupert


6. About
7. Long account
8. Gums
9. Kitchen
utensils
10 Radiation
11. Boulder
15. Knack
17. Bowstring
hemp
19. Existed
20 Counterpoison
22 'Corrode
24 Tree
25. Second story
man
26. Food
fish
28. Trial
29. Dickens
32. Nervous
disorder
33. Heron
34. Church recess
35. Locate
36. Whit
38 Cravat
40. Anger
41. Downcast
43. Turin's river


Whir Irttune


CARROLL RIGHTER'S


from the Carroll Righter Institute
GENERAL TENDENCIES: Until noon you are
likely to have very poor judgment, so avoid
giving advice and start nothing new, or some real difficulties
could follow However, afternoon and p m are good for
recreation.
ARIES (Mar 21 :o Apr 19) Don't bring an adviser and a
good friend together, or an unfortunate argument ensues Plan
time for getting work done and for social contacts
TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) If you disagree with a
higher-up, keep mum, or you lose support you now enjoy.
Listen and you may find you are wrong.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Instead of fretting over
present position, look into some new outlet that is more right
for you Combine hunches with fine judgment.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Listen to what a
clever friend recommends instead of relying on that adviser
who is not in fine fettle now
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Remain neutral during a possible
altercation between a higher-up and an associate, or you lose
the support of both. Postpone action.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Study new outlets while
keeping steadfast to the old so you can decide which to
choose. A letter brings good news.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct 22) Responsibilities are more vital
than you believe, so get them behind you quickly and forget
fun Show loyalty to mate for greater future happiness
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov- 21) Kin and associates are in a
mood. for dispute, so keep them apart now and do not start
any controversial subjects Don't confide in others.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) Be objective in
judgment which is better than using your personal view right
now Schedule time wisely for duties.
CAPRICRON (Dec. 22 to Jan 20) Forget finances and
anxieties now and relax with good friends Evening is then fine
for working on important matters
AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb. 19) Do not disagree with
those at home, or you get into unfortunate arguments best
avoided Early in favors recreation
.PISCES (Feb 20 to Mar 20) You like to live in a quiet and
sensible way, so do not get into situations that could bring real
trouble to you
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY .. he or she will be
very attractive, bit will want just about everything he or she
sees, so teach early to discriminate, know what can be
afforded, or there could be much trouble instead of a steady
course of success and happiness otherwise indicated. Bigwigs
will assist your youngster easily, provided there is support of
them and not roundabout criticism A fine artist
"The Stars impel, they do not compel What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


Winning


Bridge
By VICTOR MOLLS
"I ASK ftr no favoum" sild
South witAh a xwn k oat
dhis Guardian Angel,"l I &o
expect a hand By.
whIch qires no mre tha
reao ad p ay." Te o.A.
Deasle Souh: E/W Vul.
North
SA 109
O K 6 6
9-A 9 6 2
S62 5 4 3
VQ10964 J
KQJ 9 10 7 42
*KQ105 i J 8 7 3
South
4 K QJ8 7


Seeth Nor th
1 i 2 N T
30 44#


6 4+
West led the *K. Wnnng
with dummy's 4A, Sout oud
aee eleven ta trks. heart
ruff would be the twe i 8o
he led a heart, captured Eaast'
VOJ with the VIK and cmtitnued
wvth the VA, which aimt iAn-
MIdADy muffed.
South was about to expostu-
late, when a chod snapped on
the mope harp and the scales
fell froamn it eyes.
So ne as he didn't run into
a 4-1 tump break, the con-
tacvt was ad.
Fie shuad ldhve ruffed a club
at tUik two and crosmng to
dny twice with trups, he
should a. ae ruffed two more
clubs. 7hat would lweve no
more p thrmps e d hbad,
but crowuwhto U OK 0 i
woul drawthe last trutip from
dunMny and ather dunmy's
three trumps, te 4A and t hee
club muff.s two top hearts and
twree d rileondS.



H- rOW many
t o u r letters
or more can
you make
from the
H letters shown
here? In
making a
SI word. each
S E L letter ma y
be used once
only. Each
word must contain the large
letter, and there must be at
least one eight-letter word In
the list. No plurals; no foreign
words; no proper names.
TODAY'S TARGET : 17 words,
good ; 21 words. very good ; 26
words, excellent Solution
tomorrow.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION :
Bile bilge blue bluing blune
bugle bulge bungle elan engulf
file fling flue inning flung fuel
rlfe FUNGIBLE glen glib glue
gu le gulf Ingle Ingulf tlet lien
leu life line ling lune lung
lunge nubile unlile.


steps out to find himself at the edge of the
wood. First I'll let Mummy know I'm afe,"
he tells the Gomnle. "then I'll Mo Mto May'
grandfather." He races to the village a on
teaching the shops he sees his friend May.
" I simply must show her this statue." he pents.
ALL, RIaOHT$ SERvIO


27e Comnic Pale


REX MORGAN, M.D.


I JUDGE PARKER


By PAUL NICHOLS I


Chess
By LEONARD GARDEN











gin


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard


"A finish In the claeical
style" was one expert's com-
ment on the play after 'this
diagram from a recent to-na-
ment. White (to move) clewasy
has a good attack; how did he
win ?
Par tines: 10 seconds, Orand
Master: 20 seconds, ohess
master: 1 minute, chess expert;
3 minutes, county pha*er; 6
minutes, chut standard; 12
minutes, average; 30 minutes,
novice.

Cess- Solution
I R-Q7! BXR; 2 QxP ch!
RxQ; 3 RxR ch. KtxR: 4
Kt-B6 ch. K-RI; 5 KtxP
mate.


-i
4 -V-I-la
5)







JJI F E


o


NOW/ -WE TURN IT DOWN A [LITEW TO ME, FERRIT. NO DICE, VANCE! ITS
CAN TALK WITH- LITTLE, MI5 I-rVE DECIDED NOT TO / ONE TOO FAR WNOW
, OUT-'-U--" -5MITHI-'I CAN'T -.TO HAVE THE---UH. NOMAD COULD PUT US
DISTRACTION! EVEN HEAR JOB DONE ON MY AL HOT GREASE.
SYOU NOW/ !PARTNEREITHER!
A ITWAS MY
A. / WIFE'S IDEA


YOU'RE A RARE WOMAJ, MPS.CANTPELL
NOT MAHY WIVES COULP HAfNVLE A /
PHONE (ALL INFORMING THEM, THEIR ,
HUSBAND WAS .. PEAP... AS WELL
i.AS .C.U .u .


(/oe P21giot^'LL


No ;.:li3 h. rmi i'k t


Arroo-%.
A SrollinS alll. (IlO
Little derill. 3)
American Itale. (4)
MIddilli.-stronsg wind
l.ight meal (3)
(.erm&an emperor (ft,
Sl'4. mawl (A
Ire maf.. < 4)


4 t. 4


tower. (4)
thur.rh table 4(1
tmong (4)
(Irl In the faiiilly i;)
1.111. (4)
Htih*prl'i (3)
Emhbro 43)
IMIlillre t )
Child (:i
Not the eti qulalit.. (t.. 41
In a word *iI|in g 0S1WIiflul
i hixher -.landIlg. 4!Of
iopiilar rh thm ill
4.ame ird, (9)
tIn. .1*
'hbllered ha.'h. 4)
Holt) ior Inslanme. )
li4lded i>4)

r 11r a umh iRBC is


THIS STRING
WILL REMIND YOU TO
PICK UP THE DPRY
CLEANING ON THE WAY
HOME


Io rn rr
(4)
19 T a *
d't'rber-
girl MfI
tl simple
1lml 1:0


SHE SHOULD REALIZE =
I'M A GROWN,RESPONSIBLE
'---.. ADULT


WI-AT'D SHE SAY T IS )
STRING WAS FOR AGAIN



7' -


9


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- ~~~~`~~`~'------- 3


-" Y


ICE


I-


By DAL CURTIS


0Ki n Srzt. 197. I 1, ,u il,. r,


r-I T 1 4 -
- XI 11 :91


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If. --_-- ------ __ _L


Thu


irsday, February 28, 1974


ANGRY PROS WALKOFF


l,


Turning their backs on the game: The Pros leave


Officiating unfair, they


claim after trailing 78-61


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
TH1 CLASSIC Pros
,torncd oft the court 1.57
minutes beHt're the cndd of
their clash with the
kentiuck; olonels last
qight.
t nabI '.o con.'itend with
what the, termed "unfair
-fiticiating.' the Pros refused
p. laa amn further.
this gave th (Colonels a
-.S i. victor, a:id a 2-0 shut
,it in the best of three
h .hab s An~ateucr Basketball
Association. q.i.rter tinal
;!a\ offs
I'he Pros protest acutallt
',egan six niinities into the
-cond hairf when player coach
, leave Rodgers atler being hit
-vith his fourth personal foul
is.unitroned his team to leat;r
Finailli suIbdued, the Pros
r -turned only to be hit with
three techni al fouls as players
\linky Isaacs and (elemnti
Longle left the bench and
walked onto the court and
Rodgers who was on the court
tt the game briefly
By this time. the fans tha;
packed the .\ F Addernes
.itn were in near Chars Somie
,\ rtnpathised with li-w IP'-'
others booed.
Addressing them Mr- V1nc
[ e e' 'i 11on1 ptresidi -ril rt '.
1 \ B A said 0I ,port
.on>ilg t-> brin g t .''i \ rs' II
p ople then i1 ou iil hjivi t.
"I k :no :t I- .!;!
unfort.ialt. hat I:v
wilil 'e ci't gt'i0'A \i t i .0 A. ,' c i
npevtr bhe ibie :, ,ipp!' .,i

beings but wsc ill -\
that we dm wwi t t ,r il
garmein i)! -' r ,li l) i 'Ind wec
is ll ,pprc .itl l' p;t '. t r,
Ssill ,,T.v'c"' i'a h :." he
sa id
Mr I eri-ts d w 1 %

present "'V-c .c.. '' t 's-i\
ha\e m'b ";ir< ri o
It y u a n '
rules the' > I ...i a
an! t k .1', ,n
a I' 0ther '


who want to profess mob rules
A 11 have to come and put on
the games oursell
Meanwhile, the Colonels
showed no signs of emotion
and convincingly overcame a
I 2-point performance by Gary
Symonette that brought the
Pros nine points behind.
Six-toot nine Sterling Quant
wixo topped the Colonels with
22 points and 23 rebounds
teamed up with Keith Smith
and Bruce Russell to once
more open the gap b. 15
points when the Pros again got
infuriated and made their final
exit


Quant
RonhhIns
Smith
Tlh)ompsoii
IlI'stwir k
R use sll
PoIiltier
Mart in

I' Ingraham
MoSsweeneys
Siougers
N Ingrahurn
Symonette
S i ultrie


i1
7
3


4
4
PROS
2
3
1
7
5


JR()ROM BARNEY scored a
gairie high of 20 points and
captured 12 rebounds while
guard Bernard Davis added 16I
points and gave off five assists
in Strachan Auto's 64-41
'ctkry over John Bull
cilirnaling them 2-0 in the
bhet lf three quarter tinals.
Ailie Roile's 18 points and


12 rebounds topped the Bulls.
Merill Johnson added 15
points.
Bertie Johnson s scored 10 ot
his 14 in the second hall the
same in which Davis added
eight as the Mechanics
outscored John Bull 14-24 bI
thile end of that period
***** ************"
DA\NNY I)DGCOMB and
Bradle\ Knowles combined for
2 points in the second halt
leading Pinder's Basket ball
CluO to an 8 1 80 edge over the
('ontainer Saints and a 2-0
Nictory in the quarter finals.
K nowles who topped
Pinder's with 2?8 going 13 for
20 from the field and two for
five from the free throw line
scored 14 in the first halt Basil
Burns added 15 ot his 21 along
with eight assists as Pinder's
held the half 44-40.
Kermit Rolle with 23 points
and 20 rebounds topped the
Saints Noel Rahming added 24
points and 12 rebounds.

DI 1 I \l\I (;GUARD ) eter
Brown scored 10 points and
gave seven assists in Becks
Cougars' 79-'2 victory over
Rodgers.
Rodeers who held the half
38-31 fell to the shooting of
Fred "Slab" Laing who scored
all his 15 in the second half.
Godfrey Burnside scored 19)
for Rodgers. Frankie Brice and
Leo Johnson also scored 19)
Rookie Jeff Brown captured
20 rebounds.


/
W .


i

Pi, nires I"' sI -At I (II .V
..NN .,


BLACK ANGEL


MA. F(IllE S leading to
tonight's finals were completed
in schedule at the Blue Hill
Court's this week
In men's semifinal matches
Bob \1 'riiginier .. seeded Noi
1. advanced to the final with a
oit fortable win over Ivern
avis Dl)avis made i c-r\ slow
-rtrt losing the first game 0-9.
Mnid although he was ..du i.
belginining to) play himself in to
ius trmAe form. iMontgo nier r
kept up the pressure and took
the neit twio gales 9-2. 9-5 for
h'c mniat h
In the second seminlfinal


Keith Parker made a fine start
in a furiously paced game
beating Lancaster 9-5.
Lancaster recovered well
however to even the tally.
taking the second game i-4.
Lancaster. No 2 seed. then
really piled on tie pressure
hitting si//ling low drives down
both sides of thie court and
took the third game 9-0 Parker
managed to get back in witli a
chance during the touIth igian
as the score slowly climbed to
3-3.
Lancaster's pow er again
pulled him through however


SCORPION No.1


Jerome Barney goes up f
two more of his 20 po
contribution to Stracha
Auto.


and after iani exchange of
several series and long r.ilies at
7-4 again hit two unieturnable
shots to take tlie g;iame 9-5 and
win the exciting match
Ini the "Plate" events for
players wihi lost in the first
round of thli, major tournament
play has been very keen. In the
men's even1it Iloi Hlephurn
defeated Roger Jones before
narrow i \ losing to G(rahame
yearss 3 2 in the semi final Van
Jolinsin gained a semilfinal
place bh beitating Li''eon Poitier


for
mint
n's


-Saints

warm

things

up with

13-0

victory

DEL JANE'S super Saints
behind the pitching of right
hander Wardy Ford
overcame the low 60
degree temperature that
enveloped the Queen
Elizabeth Sports Centre and
exploded for 1 I hits
enroute to their 13-0 shut
out of Carroll's Food Store
last night.
Led on offence by the
two for three batting of
centre fielder Eddie Ford
and designated hitter Sidney
Wilkerson, Del Jane
collected four runs in the
first inning, two in the third
and seven in the fourth.
Under Bahamas Baseball
Association ruling, a team
trailing by 10 or more runs
after five innings lose the
game.
Carroll's just could not
get started. They sent 16
batters to the plate and only
one got past second base. It
was designated hitter
Glenrov Saunders who was
the lead of batter in the
second inning. The
remainder were retired in
one, two, three order.

Ini. JA N


Jo hnsoni
I lFord
\\ilkersoni (h)

ik'heel
how, m


( AR RO I 'S
lean 2 0
Rahmnirg 2 0
Saunliders (dti) I 0
Nlos" 1 0
C'larke 2 0
Sainlters 2 0
hullard I 0
J h iiIs()l r i


111 1 ASTII RN Division
of th'F I xuina Schools Athletic
Competition took place at
Williams 'ITown
Forbes Hill emerged overall
win nets outclassing (George
I )i (2nd) and Willianms
To wn (3rd)
ResulIts
Senior ll ins i Iilianis iNn 3.2
1 orhes 1ill 26 George tlown 24.
Interniediate,s 1 orbes Iillr 32':
\ii tliams tos n 22'. eo(rge
I o% n 17.
J tiUrnrr. (;ei-rge tii ri1 25'z
I orhes l ill 23.1' Moss l,'iwin 17".
Outstanding athletes: Senrir
hb)s % Kendal Rolle, V\illiumss
loiwn 16 Karen Rolle, Williams
lown 14 Vernetta Sears, t. orbes
Iill 13. Intermediate Boys John
Morlet I orhes IIill 1 Vernidolrn
1 ergu son. Iorhbes Hill '.: Karen
Daries. Rolle loni '4.
Junior Bo' I srone Bullard.
horses Itill 13 Junior Giris
Delgliia. Marshall. George lr wn..
13.
Ne\w records Junior Bo's tIigih
Jurip; Jelf C'larke, Moss 1o>\r 4'
7".1 A 1g Jump (;renor tBose. Roullt
xI ,w V 1 4'', Junior (Girs Shot put;


By Ivan Johnson
THE BLTA championship
swings into action again this
weekend at the Emerald Beach
Hotel courts as the last 16 in
the men's singles event battle
for places in Sunday's quarter
final matches.
All eight seeds in the men's
singles will be playing on
Friday and Saturday with top
seeds Leo Rolle. Bertram
Knowles, John Antonas and
Anthony Munnings appearing
in their first matches in the
tourney.
Leo Rolle. men's singles No.-.
I seed and three times winner
of the tourney meets Ian
Bethel in his opening match at
2 p.m. on Friday.
Also on court at 2 p.m.
Friday will be No. 4 seed
Anthony Munnings who plays
Vince Pennerman, the No. 8
seed Peter Isaacs who takes on
Ernie West, and Bertram
Knowles seeded No. 2 who
plays Dr. Quintin Richmond.
John Antonas. seeded No. 3
and considered by tennis fans
as being the main threat to
stop Leo Rolle gaining his
fourth title, plays his opening
mntch at 3 p.m. Friday against
Anchorage Hotel pro. Willie
Lightfoot.
Veterans George Carey and
Bob Isaacs battle for quarter
final places on Saturday.
Carey. seeded No. 5 plays
Hans Schopper and Isaacs
seeded No. 6 plays the
promising youngster. John
Farrington. I. Both these
matches will be played at 2
p imi
Barry arrington seeded No.
7 also plays on Saturday He
meets Mlichael Hale at 3 p.m.
In tie mhen's doubles third
round matclihe,,s on Saturday.
tie No. I seeds. Ieo Rolle and
John \ntonas meet Stanley
1),r 'l and -\ Rogers while
.h No 3 see-ds. G;eorge Carey
.and e1rtram K nowles pla\
Quintini Ricnhmiond and Don
Lodge
In the lidies singles on
I rida\ No. 1 seed and
defending champion Vicky
Knos lesc pla\s Joan Farringion
in the quarter final rounds and
in the other quarter final
niatch No 3 seed Idith Powell
plays Ildwyth Roberts.
.mLne Wiberg and Knowles
No I seeds, team up in the


)el'ttliciii Marshil.l i.e rge % Town
27 9'; iintermncd ti.i' o Is Iigh
lum np ienson knowles, Williams
'Iot Nn 5 3" Senior Borns high
Julmp. W'e ('larkne. (t org e Ilwn
5' 2". Senior t Is I orig JumpI
Kenidal Rolle. ilhians Tlown 19'
O". Seiuor o\,s I)istius,. Keith
Baker. George l1own 1 17' 0",
Senior IBs 400m. enildal Rolle.
\rilliimrs Town 5'0' Os; Senior (irls
100in. Verneilta Sears. I orhes IHill
12 s+,
TFll WFSTFRN division of
the I 1 iua Schools Athletic
Competition took place at
Rolleville.
The Stuart Manor school
team were overall winners.
with Rolleville second and
Mount Thompson third.
Results
Seniors Rolle\ ile 38 Stuart
Manor 32 Mount i lionlipson 19.
Intermediates Stuart iManor 29
Rolleville 23 Mount Ihompson
14' .
Juniors: Stuart Manor 28'
Rolleville 18'". iokers I'oint
Fhe lIorest 13. Outstanding
Athletes:


quarter



final spots


ladies doubles in Friday's
semi-final match to play Powell
and Sindall at 5 p.m.
In the two other ladies
singles quarter final matches on
Saturday, No. 2 seed Jane
Wiberg plays Anita Doherty
and Beaulah Richmond, No. 4
seed plays Sandra Miller.
Ladies doubles No. 3 seed
Beaulah Richmond and Sue
Jolly meet Anne Parnell and


C I GIBSON High junior-
boys basketball squad
(above) coached by Tom
Casson and David Patton
dominated that division of
the inter-scholastic series
romping to an undefeated
championship following a
68-50 victory over. A. F.
Adderley High Tuesday.
Led by the 24-point
12-assist performance of
playmaker guard Jeffery
Stubbs Gibson High led the
half 40-14 and held off a
fourth quarter rally to win
their 14th consecutive.
A. Newton who topped
Adderley High with 14
scored 10 in the final period
which saw the losers closing
the gap to 15 points.


Eldwyth Roberts in a quarter
final match, on Saturday.
In the men's senior
division George Carey meets
Charlie Donaldson in the final
scheduled to be played Friday,
March 8.
One men's singles quarter
final match will be played
Saturday. Leo Rolle (or L
Bethel) will play Peter Isaacs
(or E. West) at 4 p.m.


30,000 see

Games open

SANTO DOMINGO
More than 30,000 spectators
jammed into the new
$17-million Juan Pablo
Duarte olympic stadium
today for the opening of the
12th Central American and
Caribbean Games.
President R oaquin
Balaguer, of the Dominican
Republic, standing in thp
middle of the cheering
throng, officially declared the
athletic competition open to
participants of 23 countries.
The ceremony got
underway under a blazing
Caribbean sun to the rolling
of more than 100 drums, and
a presentation on the field
below by thousands of young
Dominican girls. (AP)

FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157



-SPECIAL


NOTICE

Ihe Gospel film "The
Unfinished Task" will be
presented [IRI E TO THE
PUBLIC at the activity
centre K ingsway
Academy Bernard Road
on Saturday March 2nd.
at 8 p.m.
A special invitation is
extended to you and
your friends.


with the strong action
against BACKACHE
and MUSCLE PAINS


Senior Boys. Chester MtLKen/ie
Rolleville l ; Alfred Rolle
Mount Thompson to.
Senior Girls, L.ula Rolle Stuart
Ma nor 1 ;. Susan Stuart Rolledille
10.
Intermediate Bovs. L.evan Rolle
Rolleville 15. Keith ('aracus
S forest I I Intermediate Girls
I hiabeth Fo \ Stuart Manor 1 2.
Junior Bo)s. F'railk Arnmhrister
I orest i I Junior Girls rotilee
Rolle Stuart Manor 16.
Nesv records were set for Exunia
as tollows
Junior N) Bo s. 400nm irarnk
Armbrister Forest 1 :02.5; itigh
Jump. Prince Hart Rolleville 4'
8'. Junior Girls. Shot Janet
Bannister Rokers Point 28 1":
Junior Girls. High Jump F-ntilee
Rolle Stuart Manor 4'11" Int.
Bo ys Short Le va n Rolle
Rolleville 39I 6',,. IntI Bovs
I)iscus L esai Rolle Rolleville
115s 0". Int. Girls Shot, Eitenor
Curtis Stuart Manor 30' 9-.": Int.
GirlsD iscus I'llenor ('Curtis Stuart
Manor 83'6". Senior Bovs, 800m,
Alfred Rolle Mount Thompson
2:17. 4; Senior Boys, 1500m. Basil
Curry Rokers Point 4:50.7;
Senior (irls, Discus Susan Stuart
Rolleville 89s3"


Last 16 battle for


Exuma schools athletic results


Montgomery goes through


WRESTLING- WRESTLING


FLORIDA T.V. STARS ARE BACK

FRIDAY NITE 2th F INDEPENDENCE SPORTS ARENA
FRIDAY IT 28th FEB. OAK & LOGWOOD -FREEPORT


SATURDAY NITE -1st MARCH

BIRDLANMT. ROYAL & CARE NASSAU

__ as


SENSATIONAL BAHAMIAN GRAPPLER




-- DOORS OPEN 7:45 p.m.
FRI.- INDEPENDENCE SPORTS ARENA -Freeport
SAT.- BIRDLAND- Mt Royal & CAREW -Nassau

PROCEEDS TO BAHAMAS VOLLEYBALL FEDERATION

BECK'S the BIG one will be tbere...will you ?
Distributed by Wm. Brewer Co. L.td.. Nassau


/


The class C sloop Stuart Little, a 44-foot S&S designed racer skippered by Dick Williamson of Fort Worth, Texas, heels
over sharply crossing the finish line in Nassau Harbour. Joe Edwards of the Bahamas Tourist News Bureau captured the
Palmer-Johnson built sloop with a 500mm lens from Arawak Cay on its finishing port tack. Stuart Little finished third in her
class.


Q hPe Gtribun


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