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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03735

Full Text
No __


(Registered with Postmaster of Bahamas for postage concessions within the Bahamas.)


'ritbutw


SDUDLEY'S
COR. ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE.
NEW 1974 MODELS
"THE VERY BEST" "PI....."
ARRIVING SOON!


VOL. LXX1, No. 81 Wednesday, February 27, 1974 Price: 20 Cents


THE GO\IR\\1INT is K
"seriously" considering the
development of a full scale
convention and conference would
centre for the Cable Beach area that
to make hotels there more dowI
competitive with those on lMr
Paradise Island. Wlou'
Recommendation of a W
convention complex on this I) y
side of the bridge is one of a record
number of suggestions made b% new
the Florida consultancy firm of alloy
Dacyton-Keenan, Inc u which t
was engaged by the Ministry of roon
Tourism in May last year to view
make an indepth study of the foun
hotel indust ry. OC cO u
The findings of tlh',' firm It
have now been published, and to c<
its general recomnmendations, but
together with the government's rang
reaction, were communicated Re
to the House today by Tourism cons
Minister l 'ement Maynard. A
Leaving reviewed these for
Tr coinvnle nation' the u nit
'-+rn.rrmci: has dt. to butu
accept mosn of the within a ni
budget limitations, and to S45-
pursuen the objectives with 400-
vigor." Mr Maynard told said
lmeinbers. Sll
Prelitminars talks and calle
planning were already miaki
underway, notably concerning as I
while convention centre, lie said. la dl
In general, lhe Minister iladd
noted, "thile prt.ograiiiie aims Io ( t
increase the e growth rate (lf gues
Ballarnas tounstit, to assist 1llprt
hotels in raising their level i clear
profitiabiit, and to encourage ca
a positive approach to sersic.e liani
and attitudes in all facets of disti
the hospitality business not
onls in regard to staff hbut at It
n middle and top ndiaiia geicrit re p
levels also." look
The study focused attention least
,n the tact that Paradise Island an il
hotels are ad antageously visit
situated compared to their Nass
Nassau and Cable Beach
counterparts because they are
isolated from city traffic, enjoy i
planned landscaping ',r tile T
entire area and have superior DEA
convention facilities, gourmet o
restaurants and a variet\ f oP
entertain ein n addition to a m
casino. of F
"C'(onsequently the govern- Mon
meant is seriouisl considering tlhe
development of a full scale requ
convention and coitLerecric expe
centre in ('able Beach arej, week
''Mr Ma\ nard discosed active
Such a centre usotild have
ranrd convention hall capable wait
of handling up to 3,000 people for
for meetings or banquets, be ete
equipped with nimodern gaso
conm nm unicat io, l ta cil!ti Ce prolr
in c l u d i ng Im ult Iilin gU Tal i
translationn equipment a nd wit hi s
supporting food and beverage dsoit
preparation and serving voi e
facilities, ample storage space lneel
nd anll appropriate nii ber it coul.
snallecr ineeting rooms infoi
equipped wit i iiodern happy
audio-v isual and othei A
corimmunicat ion tacilities. neetl
SHiOP BAZAAR
In addition t lie comip lex
would also have ,a shopping
bazaar emphasizing local A
products and handicrafts and a chlar
lighted walkway adjacent to haint
the road along Cable Beach so her
that guests could move easil\ was
at night from one hotel to I-in
another, y,
"'It is believed that a Cable Ba
Beach convention complex the




RATTAN girl
LIVING ROOMS ploul
from HONG KONG cont

Sasd YOU SAVE! ub





SMEARED


By NICKI KELLY

Id be a boon not only to
area's hotels but to
town properties as well,"
Maynard advised the
se.
while h o w ever the
ton -K een an study
nmended a mnoratoriumr on
hotel connstrction to
V visitor volume to catch
with pihsr ntis available
is. it was the government's
that other ways could be
ld to increase room
rpancy rates
was the po,.i. therefore
continue new hotel building
with e rmnihasis on middle
Sacconmmodat ions.
ecomnineidations by the
cultanits alo included:
review oht demand charges
power lor hotels. Power
costs were not excessive
". ':a, g- Fvableus
rinunum. ar e mid to run
$50,000 annually for a
roomrn hotel, thie report

econdly the consultants
d for a concerted effort to
e the Bahamas as attractive
brochures. advertisements
television commercial Is
e it appear, utilising a pait
per diem and departure
ts taxes to effect
o)N cIlvents ra lngimig iro
ni-up and beaut tiication
pa i gns to designing
liwork and clothing with a
inct ie Baharran flair,
TRANSPORT ('COSTS
wuas also important, tilhe
rt said, to take a closer
at transportation for at
two reasons: with an
lal mTovement of a million
irs each year through tihe
.IL and IFreeport airports.


N I SYI AR-)1 D girl.
ge in the lower court with
ng a quantity of cocaine inI
possession this morning
fined $S1,500 by Magistrate
tanuel Osadebay.
vonne D)ebbie Charlow. of
Street, pleaded guilt\ to
offence. She was given a
sonth alternative sentence
*fault of payment.
Iourt prosecutor Ch. Insp.
SCartwright said that the
was arrested following a
Ce search of her apartment.
r pieces of tin foil
aining a white powdery
tance was found in a
ver in the apartment and
acknowledged ownership.


it was unusual for taxis or
small motor vehicles to be the
sole means of transport.
Secondly, the absence of
public transport has cost
individual hotels between
$60,000 and 5100.000
annually for the movement of
employees and guests
The hotel studs also
reviewed the ro les tof
management, labour and
governmnenIt iIIn assessing (ihe
position of tilhe hotel industry.
Manage nrcrnt's responsibility\
consisted of ecmiplosying
experienced andl qualified
professionals who would help
lift the level of service as the\
contributed to proftitaihtt
Although top manageilient
had its dedicated professionals,
l)ayton-Keenan concluded that
'soIne expatriates in the
industry lacked experience in
other resort areas, Mr. Masnard
said.
S M o st i e n ern.it Io()n a I
operate ions rot ate top
1imanagenrment personnel cver
three Nears in island properties.
having found this to be
beneficial to the individuals,
and the hotels
"In the Bahamas. according
to Dayton-Keenan, 'there is a
certain resignation in evidence'
and '1an element o docilit\ in
accepting ii o1i dit s ins hanmltul
to l11hC I diusti\ .'" the M1n le!
de cla, red.
M1r MaI\ nard advised
members that ltie hitel stludi
was length .i nd com-
prehensive lHeretore the was
tabling a Iop\ of the full
report Tand also king copies
available to Individual
i Ce 111 b e r s I n d u s t r \%
representatives and tlhc press
The House adjourned at
lunch to March 20.


[anna silent after cable


HE PETROLEUM
NLERS Association, who
Sunday asked Deputy
e Minister and Minister
finance to meet with them
day or Tuesday, has
d even to reply to the
est, and the dealers were
ected to meet later this
k to discuss further
n.I.
uhe dealers have been
ing since January 16
Government to put into
:t the revision of the
line price structure
sised them.
heir patience running out.
dealers met Sunday to
iss the situation, and
d to ask Mr Hanna for a
ting so that the Minister
d give them up-to-date
rmation on what is
ending .
telegram, requesting a
ting no later than


Tuesday, was sent to Mr.
Hanna Sunday aftlrinoon. He
was asked to contact
Association secretary Algie
Darville to reply to the
telegraphed request.
Up to noon today there
had been no contact, and the
dealers' deadline forli the
meeting passed.
Association officials were
believed to be ins the process
of arranging a dealers'
meeting for later this week.

GUIDE MEETING
1111' RI is to bhe C
important meeting I to girl
guides tomorrtc at S p 1 ii.at
;irl Guide hlcadtLuariteis All
leaders have been asked to
attend as important business
concerning the Vt i \ it of the
Commissioner tor Oversea',s ind
the calimp-site tund raising
\week. \lMach 10-17. will be
discussed.


-l'e arcrst took pl ce almound
9.4) p No\en mber 2), last
year.
Man stabbed

to death
A 46-year-old Carmichael
Village resident, Charles
Newbold, was stabbed to
death with a broken bottle at
about 11:30 Tuesday
morning, reportedly
following an argument with
other Village residents on
Carmichael Road.
Police said they are
holding a 15-year-old boy, an
18-year-old youth and a
29-year-old woman in
connection with the death.


A 21-GUN salute boomed out over Nassau
Harbour yesterday as Governor General Sir
Milo Butler stepped aboard the British assault
vessel HMS Fearless for a luncheon as guest of
Captain John B. Rumble (left). A cocktail
party aboard the 520-foot ship was held last
night for local dignitaries.
This afternoon about 50 underprivileged
children were welcomed aboard for a guided
tour of the ship's facilities which include a
three-storey stowage area for assault troops.
vehicles and landing craft.
This evening Prime Minister Lynden


THERE ARE "signs of
hope" that the Catholic
Church in the Bahamas is
beginning to recover from its
lack of religious vocations,
Diocesan Vicar General
Monsignor Preston Moss said
today.
Msgr. Moss, discussing the
"vocations" theme for the
month of May in the
diocese's year of preparation
for the 1975 Holy Year, told
a press conference that
although attention will be


VISIT TO ELEUTHERA
SCHOOLS BY MINISTER
hDU('ATION Minister
L ivingstone Co ak le y
accompanied by Rock Soumnd
M. P., Preston Albury. and
Governor's Harbour M. P.
Philip Bethel, are visiting all
government and independent
schools in those constituencies
today and tomorrow.
The Minister is accompanied
by senior officials of the
Ministry of Education and
Culture. Today they visited
schools from Tarpum Bay to
Bannerman Town and
tomorrow they will visit
schools from Savannah Sound
to Gregory Town.


Pindling was to be a guest of honour with Mrs.
Pindling at a dinner aboard. Other guests will
be the Deputy Prime Minister and Mrs. Arthur
Hanna, Foreign Affairs Minister and Mrs. Paul
Adderley, Tourism Minister and Mrs. Clement
Maynard and Chief Justice Leonard Knowles
and Mrs. Knowles.
Tomorrow the giant assault craft will be
open to the public from 1.30 to 5 p.m. and is
scheduled to leave on Friday morning.
Aboard the vessel are 30 sub-lieutenants and
120 midshipmen on training from the
Dartmouth Royal Naval College.


Holy Year aims to make us




a nation, says Bishop


By MIKE LOTHIAN

THE CATHOLIC Church's
1975 Holy Year is a "fortunate
coincidence for our young
nation as we seek to grow as a
,people," because it is designed
to meet the neeT "for healing
all areas of our life to make us
a nation, a family, a Christian
people." the leader of
Catholicism in the Bahamas
said today.
Bishop Paul Leonard
Ilagarti said the 1975 Holy
Year, following a tradition of
the Church in celebrating "the
course of the centuries every
25th year," will have
"reconciliation and renewal" as
is; central them e.
Bishop llagarty called a
pi ess conference this morning
to disclose plans for a year of
,activit to prepare Bahamian
Catholics for the "'lubilee year
In I IQ 775 "
It s\as explained that 1975
hias been designated the year of
Jinbilee for observance all
around the world, but the
tocus will then be on
Catholicism's capital in Rome
I he individual dioceses will.
however, stage events and
prograliutmmes inl localised
observance of the .ubilee
during, 1974.
Bishop liagartI told the
Press that 1974 will be "a year
ot reconciliation with God,
ith our neighbour and with
our own conscience: a Crear of
renewal and exainination ot
our relationship \with (Iod and
our fellow human beings
"Reconciliation," hc con-
i citl. "'is tlie re-establishli ent
ot 1 relationship ruptured bi
illan because of Ihis selfishness
and insensitivity to his
neighbour, because lie just
wants to do his own thing no
mtattet who gets hurt or %who is
left behind in the process of his
getting ahead.
"Ihis is so evident in our
Bahamian society today
He c npihasises that renewal
s a "'spiritual renewal which
leads to practical action," and
explained that by improving
thcimselIes within their souls
thlioughli reconciliation and
renewal. "'it is logical that it
would show forth in acts more
pleasing to CGod."
Chancellor of the diocese
\Monsignor Preston Moss added
hlial through reconciliation and
renewal withinn, people would
learn also "how to build a
better society in terms oft
relations with each other."
lite Bishop went on:: "ec
feel that the occurence of this
.uubilee year is a very fortunate
coincidence for our young
nation as we seek to grow as a
people We feel the need and
necessity of healing all areas of
our life to make us a nation, a
family, a Christian people and
so on.
And so it gives us an
excellent opportunity to gow."


Catholic Bishop of Nassau Paul Leonard Hagarty, centre, at a press conference this morning.
From left: Guardian reporter Vern Darville, Diocesan Chancellor Msgr. Preston Moss, Holy Year
committee chairman Basil Christie, committee member Paula Mitchell, the Bishop, ZNS
reporter Wilma Armbrister, committee member Lyn Holowesko, Vicar General Msgr. John
Finger and Tribune reporter Mike Lothian. I'i, ntrc' I'i.1LIPSYMONIETTI.


Bishop Ilargart. said tie
local observance ol the llol\
year would be laun.lchd iat
4 30 p.m. Sunday Marcli 31
with an open air lass at iitheI S
\ugustine's Sports Field oll
Bernard Road.
Ile said the c ibisc rvs v'
woutild begin iIn Marih rahe
than in January as locaildioce'ses
were given "somile ilec''vli iIn
their own starting datcs, and
because it was hoped that theI
annual f eme of the Lenten
period, itself stressing personal
renewal, self-evaluation and
examination., could he
continued throughout thL \car,
Ih e year has been biokeni
i 11 int 11 t hl y th l ie'-,


\Iarchi sell renewal. April
lccreniice lor liifIc, May
ScoCn lios. JuTne manhood,
Jul\ \oulth and Ldscovery of
(;,. \lugust Catholic
worship. September Word ofi
(;od. OItober womanhood,
\oN\ cii cl br tie Church
s tI erng,. I .)ieem er the
linily. January church h
units auhd I'ebhruary
thanrksgiving.

In addition to the local
celebration ot Holy Year, the
Bishop said, internationally the
ol'ser\aicTl'e w hll di inax \ ith a
pl glrimage to Rome inr
Oitobher. I"' .ind w'' arc
pllalnnimi lor as m.inV or ou i


people who can make this
pilgrimage to represent our
whole people."

The committee organising
the Bahamian observance of
IHoly year consists of chairman
Mr Basil Christie. Msgr Moss,
Sister Annie Thompson, Sr.
Margaret John Cooper, Mrs.
Lyn Holowesko. Mrs Paula
Mitchell, Mr. George Sherman
and Mr. Rudolph Cleare.

At the press conference this
morning in addition to the
Bishop and Msgr. Moss were
Vicar General Msgr John
Finger. Mr. Christie. Mrs.
Mitchell and Mrs. Holowesko.


given to careers generally, the
focus will be on religious
vocations.
"We are in deep need of
young men willing to enter
the priesthood," he said. "We
are fortunate in that interest
is deepening again and we
have signs of hope."
Explaining, he said that at
present three Bahamians are
in seminaries, and five others
have shown a definite
interest.
He said two Bahamians are


-i


at St. John's in Trinidad, and
a third is studying at St.
Meinrad's in Indiana. One of
them is in his third year of
study and the others are in
their fourth year, he said.
In recent years practically
all of the Bahamian priests
have rejected their vows and
returned to the laity, at least
one without seeking the
Pope's dispensation to do so.
Msgr. Moss is now the only
Bahamian priest in the
Bahamas.


FNM on gambling


I 111 FREF National
Movement today reiterated
their view that Government
should not nationalise the
casinos and take on the
responsibility for their
operation.
"Such a policy is bouna to
result in more serious adverse
effects on the country's
economy and will expose to
further temptation a
Government which is already
plagued with serious
corruption," the FNM said in a
press release.
The party believed that it


was better for Government to
remain the policeman in casino
gambling rather than to
become the house man, and it
said there was no reason why
the issue of government versus
private ownership of the
casinos should be sidetracked,
as it claimed had been done by
church leaders.

TOWN HELD OVER
THE TRIBUNE's weekly
feature "Town and Around"
does not appear today due to
pressure on news space and will
be published tomorrow.


convention












THAT'S THE IDEA TO BOOST


CABLE BEACH HOTELS


anyone wishing to know the
latest resultss in the British
general election. "It is hoped
that more detailed information
about voting in individual
constituent e s will also be
available," spokesman said.
The Phohe number to call is
5-7471 to 4.


Nassau and Bahama Islands Leadine Newspaper


Bank with




SBarclays


MARITIME

MOVES

'CRUCIAL

TO THE

ECONOMY'
THE DRAFTING of
legislation to clear the way for
the Bahamas to become a
maritime nation is "crucial to
the expansion of our
economy," Transport Minister
George A. Smith told Fort
Montagu Kiwanians on
Tuesday.
Although he emphasised the
need to replace the
colonialistic British Merchant
Shipping Act with indigenous
legislation "intended to benefit
purely the interests of the
Bahamian people," the
Minister gave no indication in
his prepared speech of what
stage the drafting of the
legislation is at, or of when the
proposed bill is likely to go
before the legislature.
Mr. Smith told members of
the Kiwanis Club that he
envisions the day "when
revenues accruing to us from
ship registration and other
elements (of sea use) would
raise the economic importance
of the sea to a place in our
country not so far behind our
biggest breadwinners: tourism,
banking and finance."
Basically, the proposed
legislation would make the
black, aquamarine and gold of
the Bahamas a "flag of
convenience" for international
commercial shipping, and that
in turn is expected to lead to
the Bahamas becoming a
maritime registration centre.
Anticipating a question on
why there would be "an almost
automatic shift toward our
country by ships seeking
registration," the Minister
spelled out the reasons that
make uo the answer.
"There are r:? corporate
taxes, no personal income tax,
no capital gains tax, no profits
tax. Additionally there is
freedom to repatriate assets.
"There is direct access to
supplies, raw materials and
technical personnel from
abroad.
"The Bahamas' international
airports provide prompt
contact withe United States,
Canada, Europe, South and
Latin America, Mexico,
Autralia, Japan and the
Caribbean. Seventeen shipping
lines connect the Bahamas with
important world markets by
means of 64 scheduled sailings
per month. Interisland shipping
and air services are available.
"A Sl1 million enlargement
has made Nassau a major
deep-water port, capable of
docking the largest ships.
"Bahamian currency has
maintained parity with the
American dollar Full
convertibility is extended.
"I nulik many developing
countries, the Bahamas has
become a world financial
centre, where more than 30
banks and finance houses
flourish.
"Telephone and telegraph
communications are easy and
efficient, as are telex
connections which put major
investors immediately in touch
with important points all over
the world."
Other advantages the
Minister pinpointed included
an adequate labour force and a
commitment to democratic
principles.
In addition, he pointed out,
"our geographical position puts
us astride and adjacent to some
of the most heavily-travelled
shipping routes in the world."
U.K. ELECTION
THE BRITISH High
Commission is setting up a
special "Election Service" desk
at the Commission tomorrow
from 5:45 to 11:30 p.m. for


Guns boom as Sir Milo steps aboard


'SIGNS OF HOPE' FOR CATHOLIC CHURCH


Girl fined $1,500


Al


LhP












Wednesday, February 27, 1974


2 ih UP ributtr


Grenada strike 'about to end'


,; I i -%i thousand
ivooplt itn Ott resort town ol
"oerto de la Cruz reported
in a balloon today. The
Spanish News Agency CIFRA
it was the balloon of
aii\'il! American adventurer
r1o11t1a, Gatch jr

aL tXANDLR Solzhen-
ils wile. who says she
S lea\e Russia without
h.0 hoitinad' books. said
tri.it S i ;:!thorities have
i.)J 11s it % !ir t ike at least a
>n!; !o approve the
i !,, personal library.

I RLTARY ol State
Kissinger flew from
o Israel today on his
Sr hMideast peace mission
aid his talks with the
go'nellllie t "made
r .iri-ss oi som, e of


r lc.K nation
S tirsi g
*h, \ear airn,
lhl gt.ernne
) Lt h ii lrlti tr


SI RO
!,i! i t ope
ii +- s t rIt a'll
itlh
.! Pt.; )" pr<

l -;.ard





h 1 t, I I




. I'.,1 t : t i il
-tit r '' l'
:t'
d !


a -


A NEARLY two-month-old dock strike that
has throttled shipping in the eastern Caribbean
island of Grenada is about to end, according to
Grenada Prime Minister Eric Gairy.
Gairy in a telephone interview said that
"thousands" of Grenada workers would
assemble Thursday to demand an end to the
walkout by waterfront workers.
The strike, called by the Grenada Seamen
and Waterfront Workers Union, began New
Year's Day. Since then, imports and exports
have been virtually paralyzed, expect for a
trickle of goods arriving in Grenada aboard
small schooners that do not use longshoremen





MESSMEI




STEPS


for cargo handling,
Grenada also was without electricity
telephone for one month, beginning Jan. 2
due to a walk-out by utility company worker
In the interview Gairy noted that nutm
shipments have been cut-off due
the waterfront shutdown. Grenada produce
one-third of the world's total nutmeg supply
and the commodity represents a major sour
of the newly-independent nation's forei
exchange earnings.
Bananas, another major Grenada expoi
have piled up awaiting shipment.


DOWN


ost crucial PARIS The government of
I ench Premier Pierre Messmer
resigned today after months of'
million workers increasing economic problems
wide today in and complaints that he was not
general strike of responding to the nation's
d at protesting needs. A new premier was to
nt a failure to be named quickly. perhaps
t d a y according t o
I ntirmaittlr Minister Jean
Phi hppe LIcat lFinance
N I' I) with MinIister Valer Giscard
-rational costs a dl s ruling was regarded as a
lion in winter possible replacement.
tihe Caribbean M\c-essmer', Cabinet had been
ose.,ct, for the I offi' snce July 172, when
ig stuminier, he took over troim Premier
Islands \ir jacqtes (Chaban-l)elas, who
At decided to ht betn fred by President
three I C-1I (;'eges Poimpidou.
,c' discardd d Tstaing. 48, is the
fender of the independent
tor P'resldent Repl bli'.an Parts,. a partner oit
itti n I S state the (aullists it thIe Nationali
ti iinanll the .sse,, bl m ai ortl
he i nite l States t I e stte radio also
lte u bench. ;at 'ned iFore ien Minister
saiworld open 11,,tel J -rt i nd l ,,,,,, it
m1 unwariranted. ioister )liricr (;uichard. Both
and an loy al (Gaullists. as .,.. .i.
niil il1po"ition' placemen ts
',- flilt' lawyers Ponipidou accepted the
M esse in r (;over nmn went's
v','2 ',ti i*, l', resignation at a Cabinet
meeting with praise for its


a, a-Il it,




4- la-a.
r; Ir a
,, ,itv r ,


- \ i -.x



12 a i


elffciency and action, Iecat
said. But he added that it swas
"necessary today to increase
the cohesion, solidarity and
concentration of the action
supporting the premier."
Messmer has come under
wide attack for lackluster
leadership and failure to inspire
confidence among ordinary
F renchmen.
Under the Filth Republic
constitution worked out under
former President Charles de
Gaulle. Pomnpidou holds most
real power in running France
and can hire and tire premiers
at will as long as he has a
parliamentary majority behind
himl
It was therefore unclear
whether the .ih.'IL inr
gove rnmenrit signaled anyi
im portant changes in French
police

Journalists in

walkout
LONDON Journalists .it
the Daily Telegraph began a
24-hour walkout Tuesday as
labour unrest spread "hli.,.-'h
the British press.


HUGHES SUIT

TRIAL OPENS
IlOS ANG(,Lt.S The trial of Robert Maheu's S17 3
million ciMl suit against sal-rl t n Howard Hughes opened
with junr. selection, and the judge declared, "this case may
take a nuinber of months to tra ."
Willi Mahen present but lHughes. as expected, absent.
Judge Hlarry Pregerson began questioning prospective
irras lHe said he would choose six regular jurors and six
alternates who would be kept in reserve for possible
mergeniL ser-vice it any rof the original six drop out.
I he trial s opening was delayed slightly when some of
llie 45 prospective jurors reported bh phone they would be
l. o !,'.ca.ise tihes were waiting to get gasoline for their cars.
l i udg whoC has Ls said he hopes to spend only about a
diO .,I ursinag the jury, noted that he will do most
q ilest L1r1ing in open cotirt but will qui/ the jurors privately
in aiimbersr about whether they have been exposed to
pretaial public il about the case


NOTICE

,,TOMOTIVF & INDUSTRIAL DISTRIBUTORS
r ON WULFF ROAD, JUST EAST OF MACKEY


51 T WILL BE CLOSED
A OR ANNUAL
ST '.K-TAKING
rf FOLLOWING DATES:

tiH RSDAY 28TH FEBRUARY
Fni'.7 I ST MARCH
17 )UPoDAY 2 ND MARCH


I~~ sc U


AL4


AID

I


MIAMI Described as
much improved after a night
in the hospital, entertainer
Sammy Davis Jr. (pictured)
was being held for
observation of a
gastrointestinal disorder.
Physicians at Mt Sinai
Hospital said the 48 year old
performer would be
discharged 'in a few days."


Kidney

donor
'still


alive'


BIRMIN\( I\\1 A manm
pronounced dead by doctors
and selected as a kidney
donor was found to be alive
when a transplant operation
began, Selly Oak hospital
said.
The man, a bachelor in his
60s, was removed from the
operating room and given
emergency treatment, but ht
later died. His kidney wass
then transplanted success-
fully.
George B ill ington.
Birmingham City coroner.
said: "My officers are making
detailed investigations, all the
evidence will be brought out
at my public inquiry."
The man had been the
victim of a road accident.
Doctors who pronounced him
dead at the hospital were not
part of the transplant
operation team.
Hospital officials refused
comment on whether the
man died from the accident
injuries or the incision made
during the transplant
operation. They seie t wo ild
be improper to anticipate the
coroner's inquiry. (AP)


REWARD

UP FOR

RETURN

OF

VERMEER

I ONDO)()N Municipal
authorities ihave offered a
rear lr t ihe recoera of a
Vermeer masterpiece stolen
Il'ini a I ondoni museum
I hIi- nstnri deepened over
v h. seized lthe priceless
p.l I itin g
Ill sd lliimiton. d deputy
leader tI lhe (;riater london
C('ouar cil. t I1t Cgoverns the
Britisl capital, said: "We will
Sin ialdny circumstances enter
into any discussions involving a
massive atmoutnt of money."
Ihe masterpiece "The
iGuitar Play er'" by 17th century
)Dutch artist Jan Vermeer has
bent valued by ,it experts as
high as $4.4 million.
It was stolen Sunday night
from Kenwood House, a holmeT
bequeathed to the nation by
br-ewery magnate Lord Iveagh
when ihe died in 1927.
Harrington made the vague
re ard offtter after a maan mlieii
himself Harry telephoned a
British newspaper Monday
night and demanded about
15 million afor food to be
d.tabinlued to the poor o t the
tr 'tbld Caribbean Island oft
(re ainda l o I the sale return of
the paintin?
Ier piatntting would be
destroyed it ilie money was not
p.Jld over ii 14 days. lie said
( reXnd a Ich gamred
i ttd.pcnd, cita .a ft n' ll] riitain this
month.li hls been troubled by
stkes that hae paralyzed
es-''tal srv aj" ,' nd tood
distribution t shc i rland s Prime-
Minister. Erc (;airy said in a
tel-ph,'one interview ol the
u u denrmid:l "d renada isv
: i t; i ie'es d Ia t liat I p'|e ol
n tne t ;is il
I llrri-rgtlo:. v.iIsh anxious,
io',. ne e Weh\ are
d ei will I -rp l o are
Ii--ing tIt >-1 d if in ITiIll W eVC
das',t belie e tlht, (re -jd a call
w.ij, ,i ahlo. IHe ape.iled to
tI thie,- es it ,oa Il t a.' ia n thle


aniino itiy tor thle people
repona sible and the' c -i rt
S -o l ,ind Yard -tectives
;i'"d lh ye> el, Iiecvec-d the
oo 1f 1,r-h -,-.;"" ra tsomn
j J t;; i .ti t r le
a I lood by
aie.,ip l'e c ;1i) e Raindolph
\ H[ea :i ( iht,'friifia, who ais
Iyin to l i 'i edil t for his
kali,'pp d d lal'hlter Patricia
Il, Cwea t \t!0!er l detectives
"n t1: lt iat Ih 1!J r i.m A a t n
will .i u Itsh a. ntt telephoned
.! I omld t' t tli talon
I lhe a.ianon l 'i-s in r said it
Awoldi' I., ia-ned once
I)mo11 i d, ,insi l Nl.il.'-a Price, tswo
Norilt ern lelaiinl sisters jailed
foar i lo tior bombing
laids in I oit itn List year were
mranrts te .'m troit I english
tarna.iiIa


-It's tough for the women


LONDON The record
number of women candidates
running in Britain's election
-- 143 of them -- are
finding the campaign trail as
tough as the men.
In Stevenage, north of
London, Socialist Shirley
Williams saw her re-election
path blocked for a while by
an elderly lady who heaved
rocks at her car and jumped
up and down with what Mrs.
Williams said appeared to be
"apoplexy."
"A traditional Conserv-
ative. I would imagine," she
added.
Earlier in the day Mrs.
Williams was presented with
an apple by a shopkeeper
who said the purpose of the
gift was "to shut your
mouth."


.Election

Week


Perhaps the best known of
the women candidates,
actress Vanessa Redgrave, is
generally considered a
sure-fire loser in London
where she veils her femininity
in a lumber jacket and
blockbuster boots and
exhorts supporters of her
Trotskyite Workers'
Revolutionary Party to "take
up power or be
smashed." Another Labour
candidate red-haired Joan


Jeremy's




the man




they want


SI\ l)(Jt\ Debonaire
Jeremy Thorpe. the leader of
B ritain's middle-of-the-road
Liberal Party has emerged as
the man most Britons want as
Prime Minister.
Until last year the joke was
that his minority party had so
few legislators compared with
the major electoral contenders
theLabour and Conservative
parties that he could take all
five to parliament in one
London taxi.
A string of special election
victories pushed the number to
11 but his party still trails far
behind the big two.
The lean-faced 43-year-old
Thliorpe has boosted his party's
chances by being named the
party leader who has most

Prime Minister Edward
Heath's government has
reported the biggest trading
loss in British history. It said
the nation would need
massive foreign credit to stay
solvent.
The deficit was said to be a
record $842.6 million. Last
October it was $800.8 million
based on the current
exchange rate.
impressed the nation in the
bitter campaign-
On the last day before
Britons sote the Daily M.i
newspaper reported that
1horpe topped a personal
popularity poll with 33 per
cent That was a six-point leap
since the last poll five days ago.
Prime Minister E-dward
Ileath. silver-haired leader of
the incumbent Conservatives.


tumbled into second place with
25 per cent. down from 27 per
cent. (Labour leader IHarold
Wilson stayed put at 20 per
cent. Twenty-two per cent of
Britons questioned waoulid nt1l
commit themselves,
Thorpe. an ex-lawyer and
television personality given to
sporting velvet- collar d
raincoats. brushed aside ithe
accolade.
Personality cult polls, he
snorted, are "a lot of old
rubbish. I think politic, arc
more serious than that "'
His surge in popularity camir
as a national opinion ;:...' gave
the Liberals 22 per cent o! vole
utip from 1i.I in oune oi its
surveys five day sago the
party only took seven per cent
in the 1970 parliament r
election.
rhe Conservative percentage
tumbled from 43.4 five days
ago to 40.5 and Labour's from
37.8 to 35.5. the poll reported
The Liberals have rapidly
gained on the two giant parties
Their reported break through
could signal the end of the
once-great party's half-century
in the doldrums and
theoretically win them as ians
as 60 seats in the fi35-member
House of Commons


Lestor, encountered problems
at Eton College, Britain's
most exclusive private school.
where pupils showered her
with water bombs.
The incident had almost a
traditional air. In 1970 the
inmates of this same
establishment pelted her with
eggs.
But the real battle will be
at the ballot box. The 1970
elections sent 28 women to
the House of Commons out
of 630 members elections
then. Eighty women had
tried.
On the Labour side this
time, Mrs. Williams and Dr
Shirley Summerskill.
opposition spokesman on
health affairs, both have
tough fights. For the Tories
Damne Joan Vickers, a
blue-haired old-style
suffragette, could see her
19-year run in Plymouth
ended by a redrawing of
constituency lines that
benefits her labour opponent
Interest in newcomers
centered on 24-year-old
Ehelene Middleweek a
doe-eyed economics graduate
representing Labour in
Wolverhamrpton suthil .,i
abandoned by Toie
right-winger Enoch Powell
after his final split from
Prime Minister Edward Heath
earlier this month.
If she wins, Miss
Middleweek will be Britain's
youngest member of
parliament since Bernadette
Devlin joined Parliament in
1969 at the age of 21.
A long shot by her uwn
admission is Susan Inkster, a
Cambridge student of politics
representing an (omrn
munist-style Agrarian
Movement. The Diggers.
named after a group that
flourished in 1649 and was
history by 1650.
The Diggers urged their
supporters to seize wasteland
for the starving to colonize
and cultivate during the rule
of Oliver Cromwell Mtsv,
Inkster doesn't want
cultivation of college Quads
but demands "self-sufficiencv
in food and energy, and
people before growth and
money," (AP).


McAllister HotelI
aI()W NIi (sk N t I x %t I



ahinlai Rates

Single $ 9
Double Sll
Triple $S
Quadruple $16

Home of the
AMERICAN-BAHAMIAN
I, FEDERATION


Anne steals limelight


CA ',b i RK <\ Princess
Anne stole much of the public
limelight from Queen t li/abeth
and the Duke of Idinburgh
when the Queen arrived in
Canberra today' from Porrt
Moresby, New Guinea.
A crowd of about .000O at
an informal pltple's welcome
on Canberra's (it\ I lill threw
Anne three bouquets as the
royal party s.ill Jd among the
people


The QOueen will open the
second session of \ustsralia's
28th parlitaiImentl tIomorr ow
before lea\ing tor London
I ast night I she at1 lclded aI
oIticial dilinner at dil, crmirent
I House gi vean i\ \ rmoilr
generall Sir Paiudl lialuck lhe
guests, incluIleCd Pitinc % !jlult't
(otitgli \liitl.ini. l-t(he! J tisi ace
Sir Gartl ei Bairw k and
former (i ran'ei i (;aiCei.il l ord


BEAT


INFLATION!
Real estate investment is about the only way to
beat inflation. It's good even in the sticks of
Alsaka. And, it's that much better in the towering
pines of Nall Audrvy Andros.
Besides, San Andros is just 15 air-minutes from
home. You can enjoy San Andros recreational
facilities while you wait for your property to
increase in value. You won't have to wait long!

You don't have to rob your bank account
either. Just $45 down and $45 a month makes you
a San Andros investor with more than a quarter
acre of the future. Let Eric Davis explain how you
can visit San Andros and decide.

VISIT

DAVSON REAL ESTATE
COMPANY LIMITED

Bay & East Streets (upstairs). Phone 2-1178
Sanii Andros (Bahamas) Limited


--- -- --


1


- -- ---------


B3SBBATHE









Wednesday, February 27, 1974


bt p XIribuue
NULLIUS ADDICTS JuRAB IN VEMBA MAGIS,
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Lit., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 1917-1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B.,
Publisher/Editor 1972 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 24532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Wednesday, February 27, 1974


EDITORIAL


What's happening elsewhere


By lTIFNNL DUPUCH
GRAND CAYMAN, January 22nd U CThere is a great debate
going on in the U.S. as to how serious the energy crisis may be.
There are those who believe that the crisis has been
exaggerated by the White House to divert attention from the
Watergate scandal that seriously involves the reputation of
President Nixon.
There are others who believe that oil interests have seized this
opportunity to boost their profits.
But it is generally accepted that there is a crisis even though
the U.S. may not yet be feeling its worst effects.
There is one encouraging hope for America. It is that she still
has vast resources of energy that have not yet been tapped ... and
the great hope for England is that North Sea oil and gas will make
her the only nation in Europe that will be completely
independent of foreign supplies within the next two or three
years. By that time she should be exporting these products that
are so vital to any industrial nation. The new source of national
income should give new hope to a failing nation.
II* * ** *
There is one good feature about the energy crisis. It has made
people in affluent societies conscious of the great waste that they
have indulged without thought or care for the future.
It is to be hoped that economies in fuel consumption that have
become necessary at this time will be practised after the problem
has been overcome,

I think it should be interesting for the people in the Bahamas
to know measures that are being taken in other places to conserve
fuel.
The hotel at which we have been staying notified its guests
today that, in order to conserve fuel, airconditioning in the rooms
will be cut off from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. and from 7.30 p.m. to 10
p.m.
These are the hours when most of the guests are on the beach
in the early hours of the day or in the dining room for dinner
during the evening.

This hotel has a new Resident Manager. He has held positions
in hotels in Freeport, Nassau and on Paradise Island. lie joined
this hotel from a similar position at Paradise Island only a few
.days ago.
He told me today that bookings are way down in all the
resort hotels in the Bahamas ... and that the prospects do not
look very good. He didn't know whether this was the result of fihe
energy crisis or that the Bahamas was slipping as a tourist resort
but he said that it is possible that some of the big hotels in the
Bahamas may close down because of labour problems and poor
bookings.
I was talking with him while I was checking out of his hotel.
There was some misunderstanding about how long we planned to
stay. At lunch time we were told there was no room in the Inn ...
we had to leave because they were completely sold out.
They managed to get bookings for us in a charming guest house
at the other end of the island. It is a very nice place but the first
question the lady of the house asked us on our arrival at her place
was how long we planned to stay.
She was relieved when we told her we were leaving on Friday.
"I hope you will be able to leave in the morning." she said,
"because we have full bookings for that date.
Happily we are leaving early enough in the day not to
inconvenience her.
I don't know what is happening in other tourist resorts but it
would appear that so far this island has not been affected by the
energy crisis.

This has been a busy week for the business and professional
community of Grand Cayman.
I met a lawyer friend today who was yawning all over the
place. le said his wife was still in bed and that lie was bone
wear)'.
"We haven't had a night's sleep for over a week," he told me.
"There has been a party every night for delegates to a tax seminar
diat has been held here. The guests from the U.S. are on holiday.
They don't have to work during the day and so the parties have
been running until 3 and 4 o'clock in the morning.
When we arrived here we noticed banners stretched across the
street welcoming delegates to the Tax Seminar.
I didn't know what it was all about until 1 ran into Sidney Pine


in the elevator at the hotel yesterday morning. Hie gave me a brief
outline of the events of the week.
Sidney Pine is the American tax expert who worked closely
with Sir Stafford Sands in developing a tax policy for the
Bahamas that resulted in attracting foreign investment to the
islands and made Nassau a great financial centre.
Everyone I talk with here emphasizes the desire not to get too
big too fast.
"We don't want to go like Nassau," both white and black
people say quite openly. This was the theme of the conversation
of a black taxi driver with whom we rode today.
But slowly perhaps unconsciously they must be moving
into the "big time" when they solicit the aid of tax experts of the
calibre of Sidney Pine.
The Pines have a long association with the Bahamas. They have
a house at Eleuthera.
"My wife spends a good deal of time at Eleuthera," Mr. Pine
told me, "but my services are in such great demand in so many
places today that I seldom get any time for a vacation."

I ran into another interesting man in the dining room at the
hotel today. David Richardson will be remembered as the
manager of the Fort Montagu Beach Hotel which is now closed.
He was at the Montagu for many years.
For several years now he has been General Sales Manager of the
Department of Tourism for the Cayman Islands with offices in
Coral Gables, Florida.
Getting back to the tourist prospects for the Bahamas this
year. Prime Minister Pindling is not too cheerful about the
situation. He has forecast the possibility of a bad year in tourism.


W,\Aslll\ IN \ \Pi
The Soviet I Ioln ha !;;ed 0ihe
third in a series N i :l i ipl1 '
warhead m issile re,'t i | thc
Pacific, the Pentagon said
Monday T'he SSX 1 f sa resd
from I iratili iT k eitiiaT
Riu slsia ali--,ut 7.- O(; ... .... dri
dropped iIn the Placitti .about
400 miles north ot MidLwa\
Island on Saturday
Pentagon spokesti.in Jerri \
W. Freidhiemi said thtLere wct
"several" warheads -poted l'\
U S. observers th teo' o, the
SSX 18 was the third in i le las,
two weeks
A continuing testIlng
programme ,coincides witl h he
opening of the second round of
the strategic iar,:; limitation


1w 1 ibu


ONE DAY LEFT for buying
raffle tickets on this 1974
Pontiac Firebird Sport Coupe.
Selling tickets is Mrs. Edwin
Deal in front of the Royal
Bank branch in Palmdale. Van
Rahming makes the purchase
of the dollar ticket while his
friends Rodney Eve and Trevor
Davis give the car a close
inspection. The raffle is in aid
of the Sir Victor Sassoon
(Bahamas) Heart Foundation.
Other raffle prizes include an
RCA Colour TV, a trip for two
to Luxembourg and the fourth
prize is a heavy duty vacuum
cleaner. Drawing will take
place on March 15 at the
Drumbeat Club during the
annual "Drumbeat for Heart"
show,




NEW
,: .. ... : .


Who to thank for goodTV


E)DI IOR, The I ribuinc,
With retcrcfn c to i .l't!er to
the Editor appearing onm page
of your February 2" issue
entitled '(loi R..vp! .on I
would like to ,orre t the
record that n td aicaed t kvinin
reception was hetig reiCccieLd
due to the Forhsat atellite
This statement i in -rre t
The television rc. option
coming to the Bahaimas is being
transmitted fronr the I i ,.;
Westinghouse balloon sstemi


op rand Bahat a island.
I his i at ion is
Xperunen tal. not commerce
operation tu introdIuce to t
word a, new lowco
te Ichnlogic-dat concept
national telecommunication
It involves TV A.M,1 IFM ste
broadcasting as well
telephones, telex, telety


Waks in (t= oC'a
I he Sovi'ets hita satid tin
test ing i t gr. ni ill hI
t.',l; de through M\arch i,
MRS. MALONE DIES
M1RS tla> \.lonle o
!-pic I -.iw. Abao died
[Itiesday al her to ic town
SO e v w ,4irv n d b y th i .c s -,' -.
I i d re. lars Jr and
Sharires tio ,t d fighters, Mrs
I dgar .turry and \lrs Ihomias
Sands 1 1 grandchildren and
io gleatgrandchildreni
Stih: is a i;so survived b> three
sis i. M\tr'., Ilia Bethel. Mrs
M, r'i I owe. Mrs Jamles Lowt.
anid one brother. Bernird
Malone.
Il icsral ervice, waere held
)e'terdav at Nbaco


lie blames it all on the eiciLi\ ciisis
Well it's up to you folks io belihee tliti or not
because I know better.

A lttOUGHTl FOR Fl)ODAAY
Would ye learn the road to Langhlter-tokwn.
0 ve who have lost the way'\
Would ye have young heart .liili our hair is gray'.?
Go learn from a little ihild each day
Go serve his wants and play his play
And catch the lilt of his laughter gay.
And follow his dancing feet as they stray
For he knows the road to Laughiter-Town
0 ye who have lost the way'


K.ATIIlt RIN. BLAKE


thp Zribunp


mobile ph,.ces, paging and
other t eCoilMMtunincat ions
capability '
I he c i.. lent rc' ption
an from the present experimental
ial. colour TV broadcasts ij a good
the example I ,t the t.'chnical
)st. excellence o: th" elect tronic
of s, stern's pers r onjiln, ini '
ns other areas


ro.
as
pe,


tr ... 1.*.,. -

11 -




Qtemn~od'


MR. MICHAEL LONSDALE Information Officer at the British High Commi
shown talking to members of BAMTAD.


The role of a British press


information officer outlined


)Our principal oblectike iln
n ailn t ai ni1rg iln tor mat ioni
services abroad is to assist in
thie execution of the (Britishi
goverlllme t's policies ,.i i
by making them .is 'iidely
i.l lH. l'!. is possible and b>
seeking to avoid mis
it n dersta, ending .'r iis
terpretation "
This was told to menbhers -'f
Baliaiaois Manpower 'Ft.it!ti ti1
and Devclotpnient last 'iscck I'.
Mr Michael lonsdalec. British
Information Offi et at the
BritLsh High (Conmiissio n i e,
Speaking at j BA1\lI \i)
luincheonat the N.,-.San ila [Nu,1
Cluh, Mr Lonsdale sd I t hat
the "infoirm tit'a tlonl il "'
embraced the wholc ttild ol
British policy fo; ri;t: an'd
domestic, politi.ai c.o', iiiin
and coi nierc ilt "li [ ". i' ed
to Britain's ctlrentl role it
international relf.tions td it
ililSt reflect heI; -fso alt
econonilC aind tech.trli',i .d i


progress at hot.'" said Mr.
Ltonsdale
tie said that the methods
hby which an information
officer is Aible to further the
interests ot his country must
vary widcl! 'r tIii post to post
"but the --,eWntial requirement
is to w him to be able to
Lottn!.iad a hearing wihenevier a
specific interest is at stake. It
s''- without sa.sing that it is
e ,ie o achieve this objective
,aalinst I background of
goodwill. built tip ovCer the
ears
\sI ut officer esponsible
n1 t mission il 'r-cas hle itmust
closure il.it kih.it lie says is
aclC a ite .i prcipeil reCtlect,
ti 4 views I !Her \1.iests',
tmiia, jrnim l i he sid
Mr. l.on .dle said that ai:
dipl matic oicersr itias bc
sie-ced at ne l' ilt-e oi anll thel
in !!:e course oa their cireeti
serv e i n!i'iO[ al iton 'tfis rs


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EI22,,; -







4 Whr Eribunt


Thursday, February 28, 19


4t Le Il


4


HARDING' S
P.O. Bnx 5290 ES


WATER MAID RICE 5 Ibs
CAMPBELL'S VEGETABLE SOUP
CARNATION CREAM large 3 tins
BLANCO BLEACH Gallons
MAXWELL HOUSE Regular Ground
COLD POWER Giant
IRISH SPRING SOAP 3 Bars
VEL LIQUID 22 oz.
ROBINHOOD FLOUR 5 Ibs.
AJAX CLEANSER 17 oz. 2 Tins
COLGATE TOOTH PASTE Large
JEWEL SHORTENING 3 Ibs. Tin
HATUEY MALT TONIC 6 Bottles
ARMOUR CORN BEEF 12 oz.
COKE 5 Tins

FO0$ -


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FOOD MARKET


I 1


PORK CHOPS
FRESH MUTTON
SPARE RIBS
MAPLE LEAF BOLOGNA Sliced
BULK WIENERS
BEEF LIVER
PIGS FEET
FRESH PORK
BOILED HAM
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lb.
lb.
lb.
lb.


$1.29
$1.10
89C
99C
$1.00
89(
35C
$1.15
$1.65
700


pa0_ 0au 1portionI
(Control Centrr
TELEPHONE 2-3237 5th TERRACE, CENTREVIfLLE
OPEN 'TI L 4 P.M. SATURDAYS'
-- --------------------


HOMEOWNERS. .BUY WHOLESALE


MEATS

FISH

POULTRY
IN10 LB.
CONTAINERS


F


SPECIALS FOR THIS WEEKEND

U.S. PORK CHOPS 10 bs $13.00
TURKEY WINGS 1 obs $6.50
TURKEY DRUMSTICKS 10, bs. $6.50
GLEN FRENCH FRIES 5 lbs $2.25
FRYING FISH Grunts, Margot Fish) Ib. 65
I US .D.A. CHOICE FRESH CUT


SSTRIPLOIN STEAKS
womnmSTRI


- ---__ I I 110 =a- I I I -


Ii 1. I


MADEIRA FOOD STORE
PHONE 24524 P. 0. BOX 6143 1


PILLSBURY FUDGE CAKE MIX
S -l U L- l


75


TROPICAL FRUIT PUNCH
48 Z. 73
PALMOLIVE LIQUID FOR DISHES


OVALTINE


(22OZS.) 90
16oz. $1.25


CHAMPION TOMATO PASTE
10oz, Tin 500
SURPRISE GARDEN PEAS
Pk 25C


LIBBY'S
TOMATO CATCHUP
20 oz. 75C


U.S. CHOICE
T-BONE STEAK


approx. 8-9 (8-10oz.)


MAXWELL HOUSE INSTANT COFFEE 10 oz.$2.10
MAXWELL HOUSE REG. COFFEE 2 lb. $2.38


C: :.i 1 CLEANSER 21 oz.
ZEST BEAUTY BAR Bath Size
CHEER DETERGENT Giant
MOTTS APPLE JUICE Quart
KLEENEX TERI TOWELS
RAID HOUSE & GARDEN BOMB
KLEENEX FACIAL TISSUES 200's
DR. RAL IARD DOG FOOD Beef


.36c
.35c
$1.05
.73c
.59c
$1.20
.46c
4 Tins.99c


hl $2.79


U.S. CHOICE
PORTERHOUSE STEAK lb. $2.89


U.S. CHOICE
CHUCK ROAST

U.S. CHOICE
GROUND CHUCK


!b. $1.49



lb. $1.79


Centreville Food Market
6th TERRACE EAST PHONE 58106 P.O. Box 5714


STORE HOURS Monday to Thursday am S 30 p ,n.


Friday vand Slaturday ;i.m.


Stid;l(


9p.m.


8i n. 10 am.


SPECIALS FOR FEBRUARY 28th TO MARCH 3rd.


U.S. CHOICE
SIRLOIN TIP ROAST


L
U
*
*


Ib. $2.19


BLUE CHEER
(Giant Size) 99


KRAFTMACARONI
& CHEESE DINNER
ZEST SOAP
IRISH
SPRING SOAP
REGAL


Ib. $2.29 I MALT TONIC


7 4 oz. Pkge 2 for
TBith Size) 3 cakes for

(Bath size) 3 Cakes for


93C
99C


LIBBY'S
PINEAPPLE JUICE
46 oz. 75C Can


FREE FREE
PEPSI COLA 16 oz. bottles
6 bot. pack. Buy 1 carton at regular price and
1 cnt. Free Plus Deposit


48 oz. Can
69C


BLANCO BLEACI
(Gals.) 99C


(Super Size) $1.25 Te,

FRESH VEGETABLES & FRUITS


CABBA G ES Native Grown)


99C


20c


LIBBY'S
CATCHUP /
TOMATO
20 oz. Bot.
69c U


II


get




H


'1
.4




a
B
U
*1




a


L


&14.00


REG. HAM Whole or Half b. $1.20
, BLUE CHEER GIANT $1.10


oI
i NI.
'PIPIR C~tOIN


U.S. CHOICE
TOP ROUND STEAK


U.S. CHOICE
BOTTOM ROUND ROAST lb. $2.09



GLADSTONE FARMS Fressole lb. 89C


Ctn. $1.39


ORANGES Ih Bags $7.29
Cello
CARROTS 29c Pkge


- I II I II


- -- r s - -~


~ ~s~T~e~


--


I


__


~B~ie~rLtP~asa~r~masa~lg


e


Nwan
BE
House
Y^.S.S eC


AL


X;


r7


i~


I


PIC-NIC HAMS


Ib. 900










Wednesday, February 27. 1974


Gh trihbun


-GIRLS'DEPT


LADIES' DEPT.


Slacks
Seersucker Slacks
Short Sets
Swimsuits
Bikinis
Beach Jackets
towellingg)
Beach Jackets (lace)
Bra Slips
Bras
Nighties
Girdles
Blouses
Skirt Suits
Panty Hose
Raincoats
Stockings
Sweaters
Leisure Dresses
Gloves
Sun Glasses


$1.00
$12.00
$3.00
$8.00
$4.00
$8.00
$4.00
$3.00
$2.00
$5.00
$2.50
$4.00- $7.00
$16.95
50c
$15.00
2 for 50c
$6.00
$8.00
95c
1/3 OFF


PIECE GOODS
Printed Polyester from $2.00 per Yard
Overall Laces from $1.50 per yard
Bonded Crepe $2.00 per Yard
African Print $3.50 per yard
Prints & Stripe Fabric by Klopman $1.70
Many other bargains at th s counter.



SHOE DEPT.


Men's Shoes
Ladies' Shoes
Ladies' Boots
Ladies' Slippers
(small sizes only)
Girls' Shoes
Girls' Sandals
Boys' Shoes
Infants' Shoes
Infants' Tennis


Long Sleeve shirts 1/3 off
Striped Tee shirts from $2.95
Swim Trunks $2.50
Pyjamas from $4.00
Bermuda Shorts 1/2 price
Sweat Shirts $1.00
Ties $2.50 & $5.00


St. Michael Trycel Shirts Now
Long Pants Sizes 8 through 18
Suits
Sport Jackets
Long Sleeve Shirts (Bell)
Ties
Long Sleeve Shirts sizes 3, 4, 4T
Short Sleeve Shirt sizes 2, 3, 4T
Short Sleeve Shirts sizes 6, 8
Tee Shirts Peter Pan sizes 2-12
Rain Coats
Robes
Belts


Short Sleeve Shirts Asst. Sizes From
Sweaters 10, 12, 14,
Tee Shirts 3, 4, from
Coveralls by (Healthtex)


Work Pants
Sport Jackets
Belts
Pants by Levi
Tuxedo by Guards
Briefs by St. Michael
Vests by St. Michael


$3.50 & $4.50
Now $2.95
$19.95
$9.95
Gay Cols. $7.95
75c
(Healthtex) $2.95
(Healthtex) $1.95
$2.95
$1.95
$1.50
$2.95
95c


from $5.00
from $1.00
from $9.95
$1.00 & $2.95
from $3.00
$2.95 & $3.95
$4.00
from $1.00
50c


$2.95
$9.95
$2.50
1/3 & 1/2 off
$19.95
$1.00 (White)
$1.00


$1.00
$4.95
$1.50
$2.95


1/


I^


NO EXCHANGES NO REFUNDS
ON SALE MERCHANDISE


2&

PHONE 23706


NEW STORE
HOURS


SON


EFFECTIVE MARCH 1st 1974
MON'- FRI. 8:45 a.m.- 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAYS 8:45 a.m.-6 p.m.


DEAR ABBY: On Dec. 10th, 1973, you published a
notice in your column advising runaway kids anywhere in
the U. S. A. that they could direct dial a number FREE
OF CHARGE and request that their parents be called and
told that they were alive and well. It was understood that
there would be no lecturing or counseling, and their calls
would NOT be traced. And if the parents wanted to leave a
message, the runaway could call back in a day or two to
get it. dfhe program is called "OPERATION PEACE OF
MIND," and its purpose is to re-establish communication
between runaways and their parents.
Abby, you gave us the most wonderful Christmas pres-
ent we've ever had. Our 17-year-old daughter had run
away from home two years ago. We received a call Christ-
mas Day telling us she had called in and wanted us to
know that she was well and working her way thru college!
Her father and I cried most of that night. We left the
message that we still loved her and wanted to help her any
way we could. When she got our message she wrote us a
letter saying she would come home after she finished her
school semester!
Please, please, publicize that toll-free number again. It
should be posted wherever runaways gather. God love you!
CAN'T THANK YOU ENOUGH
DEAR CAN'T: Don't thank me. Thank those wonderful


ARRIVED TODAY:
Bermuda, Grand Turk from
Miami: Joma from Jacksonville
SAILED TODAY: Joma for
Jacksonville. Grand Turk,
Bermuda for Miami
ARRIVING TOMORROW:
Tropic Haven from West Palm
Beach
SAILING T 1)RRU\\
Bahama Star, IEmerald Seas,
Flavia for Miami
TIDES
High 10:54 am. and 1 1:28
p. m.
Low 4:49 am. and 4:56
p.m.

WEATHER
Wind: North-east to
east-north-easterly 10 to 20
m.p.h.
Weather: Fair and cool
tonight, sunny and mild
tomorrow
Sea: Moderate
Temp: Minm. tonight 54
Max. tomorrow 73
SUN
Rises 6:37 am.
Sets 6:10 p.m.


Their Christmas gift?


Message from daughter

volunteers in Houston, who man those phoes 24 hours a
day.
I'll repeat the message: If you are a runaway OUT-
SIDE THE STATE OF TEXAS who wants to give yor
parents a message, direct dial 1400-231-0484. If you're IN
the state of Texas, direct dial 1-00-392-352. If you're IN
Houston, dial 524-3821.
The only question that will be asked of you Is, "Do yju
need any help-medical or otherwise?" If so, you'll be told
where it is available FREE wherever you are. Please.
forget the past and let your parents know that you are
alive. They'll sleep better tonight--and so will you. (4d
bless you!

DEAR ABBY: I hope it's not too late to add another
gem to your collection of far-out Christmas card message:
"Joe and I hope you have a very nice Christmas and a
wonderful New Year. We will never forget all the good
times we had together. Please understand, tho, that 'we
intend to continue with our lawsuit against you. Lo"e,
MAVW"
Sign me . ."SUE~"
DEAR SUE-D: It's never too late for a good chuckle.'

CONFIDENTIAL TO ZENO 8. ON ALLEN COURT: If
a line or two Is dropped from my column, I prefer to
believe that the editor felt that in the Interest of saving
space it needed slicing, rather than that in the interest of
saving face it needed de-spicing.


,, Id all -.o.e a -





CONTACT THE TRIBUNE ADVERTISING
DEPARTMENT AND SEE HOW YOU TOO
CAN BOOST YOUR SALES POWER BY

REGULAR ADVERTISING. ...I


CALL 2-1986 or 2'27(


*~v- ~


VA
\r ,


A*


., J~


S
S
~4


~~flv


A splendid cassette changer for parties. Pile 6 cassettes into the circula-
tor and forget you are the party host. Non stop music for a complete par-
ty night, In stereo!


N 2401.
2 x 8 Watt music power Three digit counter with zero reset. Connections
for alt sound sources. Recommended loudspeaker boxes
type RH 401, RH 411 or RH 412.
dimensions: 390 x 240 x 140 mm 15'/i" x 9'/I" x 5'/2".


PHILIPS


TAYLOR INDUSTRIES LIMITED
P. O. Box N-4806 TELEPHONE 28941-5


5


Junior Miss Long Pants by St. Michael
Junior Miss Dresses
Children Dresses by St. Michael from
Sweaters from
Body Blouses & Tank Tops
Hand Bags
Socks from
Panties from
Shorts from
Polo Shirts
Hot Pants
Tights by St. Michael


HOUSEHOLD


MEN'S DEPT.


BOYS' DEPT.


CR.


ROSETTA STREET


OPEN ALL DAY FRIDAY


-~---


$6.00
$9.95
$5.00
$2.95
$3.50
$2.00
50c
.75c
$1.50
$2.50
$3.95
$1.50





Wedn


6 itt_ UPritbun


H


EXRA LARGE EGGS

ZEN89


~gju~i


HATCHET BAY
WHITE MILK


GALLON


TCHET


B


SPECI



ILUES


L


HATCHET BAY
ICE CREAM


HALF
GALLON


WALT"
*


FOR


I*1


HATCHET BAY
WHITE MILK


HALF
GALLON


HATCHET BAY
CHOCOLATE MILK


HALF
GALLON


REGAL MALT TONIC


THIS


EE


HATCHET BAY
CHICKEN LIVERS

LB. 9


(BAHAMIAN GROWN)
ORANGES


no
1XfRA DO


SIX PACK


ARRID LIGHT POWDER
OR EXTRA DRY
ANTI PERSPIRANT


6-OZ.
CAN


~wl
I ~fl


LANTIC SUGAR


b LB. BAG9


APPLES


LB.
BAG


LB3 AG
LB. BAG ^
hhh


START ORANGE FLAVOR


CANS


TOMATOES
LB. 250


MAXWELL HOUSE
INSTANT COFFEE

lo-oz. I
JAR


mHEAD


CARROTS

LBS79


Y VAN CAMPS
PORK AND BEANS

1S-OZ
L CANSR


POTATOES


S


I.-


1


I


TIToRlk,


pppp-


i


arqg


-s


a







arwy 27, 1974


Uhre (rtbntm


rsERE


4


QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
PRICES GOOD THURSDAY FEBRUARY 28, THROW SUNDAY MARCH 3, 1974.


fiin-GLADSTONE FARM
.; WHOLE FRYERS



LB. 65A


W-D GROUND BEEF


LB.


W-D SMOKED
PICNIC HAM


LB.


THRIFTY MAID ORANGE, GRAPE,
APPLE OR FLORIDA PUNCH
DRINKS


46-OZ.
CANS


PINK,
BATH SIZE


N


W-D 5 to 9-LB. AVG.
TURKEYS


5-f89
BARS O


ALL FLAVORS
CHEK DRINKS


OZ.
NIS9




STRAWBERRY, MANDARIN
ORANGE, RASPBERRY
PINEAPPLE OR PEACH
FRUIT FLOAT



S9


N


LB.


NELLMANN'S MAYONNAISE


W- ALL MEAT OR
DINNER FRANKS .......... 1.29
W DALL MEAT
BOLOGNA ...................... 1.29


GLADSTONE FARM CUT UP
FRYERS .................... 76
NATIVE PORK
LEG PFRTinis in 11


NATIVE PORK ............... LB .99
DAISY CHEESE...................... LB.89
FRYER QUARTERS ................LB.86
GROUPER FILLET................ LB 1.


32-0Z.
JAR


P SUNNY DELIGHT PUNCH


HALF S
GALLON


SLICED AMERIC



PKG.(


IXIE KERRY GOLD BUTTER
AN CHEESE


3LBS 99',
OZ. BORDEN'S
YOGURTS ......... 2 FOR .69


ARROW GIANT SIZE
DETERGENT


4-OZ.
PKG.


I
A
44t~


SUPERBRAND
ICE CREAM


HALF
GALLON


11 Z0 SWANSON'S CHICKEN AND TURKEY
T.V DINNERS


PINK ARROW
LIQUID DETERGENT


32-OZ.
BOTTLE


DIXIANA POLY BAG MIXED
VEGETABLES, GREEN BEANS AND
GREEN PEAS VEGETABLES


24-OZ.
PKG.


J-I


f^asy


INTERSTATE
CRINKLE CUT POTATOES


117OZ. PEPPERIDGE FARMS CHOCOLATE FUDGE, VANILLA
AND COCOA
aI aWvNs iame* 4 A


oLD EVAPORATED 14OZ. CAN LASSIE CHICKEN. LIVER. KEF
4 FOR .88 DOG FOOD ...3 FOR .99
LLS 480Z. BOTTLE
SOUP 5FOR .99 WESSON OIL 1...... I


5-LB. UAC
MAHATMA RICE
s-LB. BAG ROBIN HOOD


2.19


.................................... a


S FTWEAVE WHITE AND
ASSORTED OR LADY SCOTT
ASSORTED
TOILET TISSUE


2-PACK
PKBS


STRAWBERRY OR RASPBERRY
BEECH'S JAM


-
~


S.i


TI ttFloat.


9 3/4 -OZ.
CANS


FII


STOKELY'S CATSUP


20- OZ
BOTTLES


ABSW
AQ^


I


I




Wednesday, February 27, 1974


w THE
BAHAMIAN


SUPERMARKETS
If it's value you really want,
you really want Super Value Il
- -A B T P -- -4 .-, ,


SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK FEBRUARY 28TH, THROUGH MARCH 2Ni3, '1974.


RICE 10 =lb.D]l
12 *9
S L A
GRPEDI N
32oz
2/99


y


BAHAMIAN GROWN
WHOLE
FRYERS o
(Limit 2 with/; 15 00 order or more)


BAHAMIAN GROWN
PORK LEG.29
BAHAMIAN GROWN
PORK 1.19
ALL OTHER CUTS Ib.


CHUCK
ROAST


. .29


F j U.S. CHOICE
,,RIB STEAK PER LB. 2.49
U/.S. CHOICE
GROUND CHUCK PE LB. 1.39
U.S. CHOICE
DELMONIC STEAK PER LB. $2.69


VIRS. SMITH
APPLE PIES
(REEN GIANT
CON-ON-COB
dREEN GIANT
SRUSSEL SPROUTS
IMf NUTE MAID
GRANGE JUICE
II


26-OZ


4-ears
10-oz.
12-oz.


$1.35
$1.05


850
850


SUNNY DELITE
ORANGE PUNCH
FAMILY FARE SLICED
AMERICAN CHEESE


DANICA BRAND
BUTTER


64OZ $1.09


12-OZ


$1.29


8-OZ 3/990


I VS.CHIC MAT0:





I


he Xrtbunm


I MA TDEPR TEN 7


I


REGAL
MALT TONIC
6-Pack
$ 1+29

SDMRAG
POWDFR 16-07.
$1*65


PEPSI-COLA Ilk
12-oz. Cons


I ROEFODETS:


DABZDLHTS






Wednesday, February 27, 1974


ht grtbunt


or


On the Horizon...
Great Values!


RED DELICIOUS $149
APPLES 3-bs Baogs 1


ICEBERG

LETTUCE


Each39


'RROTS 3/99


0


LEMONS


5/59


. . . OVERNITE


KRAFT
FRENCH DRESSING....
MUELLERS
REGULAR SPAGHETTI..


HEFTY
TRASH CAN LINERS.
GREENS


MOUSSE


12's


16-OZ . ...


S . . . .16-OZ.


. .. . .20CT . .


LEMON & ORANGE . . .


GREENS
SPONGE MIX.....
VEERASWAMY
CURRY.. BEEF & CHICKEN.
SHARWOODS
STEM GINGER ......
MAXWELL HOUSE
INSTANT COFFEE.....


. .. 4-OZ


..... 5/95


. .9-OZ .


. 9-OZ. . . .


.85


.*1.59


I- SANDW IATSf1


OSCAR MAYER SLICED
COOKED HAM
OSCAR MAYER SLICED
LUNCHEON MEAT
OSCAR MAYER SLICED
COTTO SALAMI


RATH
SLICED BACON


6-OZ
8-OZ

8-OZ

1-LB


$1.35
890


890


*1 THE
BAHAMIAN
SUPERMARKETS
If it's value you really want,
you really want SuperValuel


$1.69


B ..








1 B 0
TOMATO PASTE.
01.o Z


PAMPERS


. 1.39


.79


59C


.1.89
3/45C


-- --- -r -- --- -- -


GARDiENFRSH


IRM- G R


I







10 Wenesda, Febuwy 2, i97


Thousands of fair-goers crowd around the


n.71


St. Michael's M. P., Mr. George Mackey and his two
children Michelle (left) and Phaedra visit one of the food


Jr.


-. zz~- -~


Youngsters at the hoop-la table.
HERE. ~AN THR


GOSPEL FILM
AT ACADEMY


jImd isin ti, free and no
: i taken at the films.


I l 11 B ha::id. " [h
lv ... i ;..... ill.. ROYAL SOCIETY
s? .... i ",-:: l EXAM ENTRIES
S I \L R1 S stating
.. H I./ v h v Wl^ rittcLn in the
R I i vjm ation tu be held
/' \ ", :' : *' r rn; I) l- i r 74. ho1 uld hu
i t i o' -in;, i t( iturc. Shirlc\
Si '.'t .- .tr inot later than
: t n and further
S p ti lar nia b obtained
Sfrom the 1 ini'try (,' Fducation
W_ t^ *ld Hr. h ^. nd (Cuilturc


Salem

refreshes

naturally!
Natural Menthol is why.
0ii 1 s on n\ltuLral tmenthol
ni ,t thi rit( ,d l kind lhat s \,h\
s.il.f ,'1,(. t, r- (. h )irh r r hot















S L I


- Extra
.ng


7-




\ f .5.
~


St. Michael's M. P., Mr. George Mackey, opens the fair.
The Lord Bishop, Paul Leonard Haggarty is shown at the
left of Mr. Mackay, while Mr. Leroy Mitchell and
Monsignor John Finger listen to Mr. Mackey's opening
address.


Cause da temperature
didn't fall
rite on da mark...


4d 5tOHf1d in Sec
SoWernment .%


BLENDED
Azvr*^ VyUltrtlV


Planned Savings

with the Commerce.Together

we'll make beautiful things happen.


There's always something beautiful
worth saving for. The day you become
engaged, for example. Whatever the occasion,
you'll find that Planned Savings can work for
you.
Each payday, why not put part of what you
earn into a Commerce Savings Account?


Soon, you'll have saved the money you need
for that special occasion. We help your
money grow by adding interest regularly.
That's why we say, "You and the Commerce.
Together we're both stronger".



CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE


You and the Commerce.
Together we're both stronger.


... at the


"Don't
give up
the ship!"


-


Wednesday. February 27, 1974


10


10


- ,iafy .,


0s


(hP (UhrmP








wednesday, February 27, 19/4


ehr Oribtme


Florida's Complete and Only General Merchandise Show

-P nwW FLORIDA
MERCHANDISE SHOW
OPEN TO TRADE ONLY
MARCH 17 18 19
PLAYBOY PLAZA HOTEL-MIAMI BEACH

A One-stop Shopping Center with HUNDREDS of
EXHIBITS, Nationally known companies showing
every kind of CONSUMER MERCHANDISE

HOUSEWARES GIFTWARES JEWELRY. NOVELTIES
TOYS HOME ENTERTAINMENT. XMAS GOODS, ETC.
BIGGEST ORDER-WRITING SHOW
for general merchandise in Florida with buyers
offending from in and around this State. plus Puerto
Rico. South America, Bahamas. etc.
SPECIAL ROOM RATES ON REQUEST.
f ,,r,' ii V Ajr .y Ad sTIHr, t i 3.t i ...,d,, a I ,, i ,
wr te or call LARRY KAREL, PRESIDENT
FLORIDA MERCHANDISE SHOW
2373 COLLINS AVE.. MIAMI BEACH, FLA. 33139
Ph: (305) 534-4321
-_5&1? Sacee4f7iuadt S4es sumt 7952


Now there's a
Toward Johnson's Motor Lodge
Just 60 seconds from
Walt Disney World.
Si froiii nfm\ on, no ne nini to g.tl iir lamily
1,,,, it I tihe mousl than 11 (1 an. A\ (i \ e v'cg' ot
'reveryt1hii t Heatted pool. Sepwiitii. children's pool) &
r:.laaygr.uid chiklrci uilr 12 Ii iree in pare'it's room).
Puittiln: .' .. 1 .,,i 1 I. . (;.1 umi pletr gi.am e &
billiards n iirinli (i' kt;idl lum ii'll. R -.tlainiiut. ('ollr TV'
double hfds N duitble \h niti[ in v(r\ Ioom.)i.
ilintiuic cil. i;> di.l| sd .iiulji in 'sI a rd', i(, iiitiins.
Frv- p ra t kin l I rI -l n | ilt i ;( a;ila|h tl t andI 1rm l
Walt I)isnji \ \r(' i L r hi-.' i ri cios to I ihe Keiii d(I
Spact, ( t'-Itftr "c ( ) ( ird n 1 );i\ tona Beach.
SeatMuI iiAn TA ti0 i; I ,iZlI (aidfiijs,
lF-or r!es'*il ii lt t c ll \ )il tra\tfl ui ,ilt, m1 o ir
nicarfst I lowa;r lo (,n% s Molor ILody<
hI%% ard joihnon' i Mot),i r i dodge lMain (ate DI ist i, V world
L.S. 192 & SNH.I -,43 1 n ile st ,,t \\all I)isteu
World intranire). K isimnmer. I la. 'hone (305)
S46-35010. itoh'rtl .AI t.i i centrall M\anager. i
)Deeloped & operated I, 'ontinenti.l Services Ciirporation,
Miami. lorid., I a( h .rlr",',. Il..Mi n iecoutie \ice President/
Operations Pli,,,>1( 1i t I 1 ,.24 4l


LIMA


BEANS
LIMA BEANS are now
available at the Potter's Cay
Produce Exchange. Like the
pigeon peas, these limas are not
for the lazy vegetable cooker.
They must be shelled and you
end up with green fingers and
grubby finger nails but it's
worth it.
Try these recipes for a
variation on the old
litias-and-butter theme.
killeded lima bean soup has
an added benefit. Divide the
soup in half, serve one half and
freeze the other. Cut off the
green part from six leeks. Wash
the white part thoroughly and
cut into one-inch pieces. Put
the pieces in a soup kettle with
six cups lima beans and three
quarts (of chicken stock. Bring
to a boil, cover and simmer for
half an hour. Add a few sprigs
of parsley, a teaspoon sugar.
half a teaspoon nutmeg and a
little salt. Puree in a blender or
force through a food mill.
Divide the soup in half and
freeze one half. For the other
half, cool and add six
tablespoons heavy cream. Place
in soup bowls and chill. When
you want to serve the frozen
part. let it thaw, stir in the six
tablespoons of heavy cream


and chill,

Lima beans freeze well and
they can help with the food
budget when the beans are no
longer in season. Shell eight to
10 quarts and rinse. Bring a pot
of water to a rolling boil and
season with salt and a
tablespoon monosodium
glutamate. Add the beans a
quart at a time and boil for 30
seconds only. Drain and let
them cool. Pack in freezer bags
in meal sized portions and
freeze. To serve, cook as any
other frozen vegetable.
Here is a good creamed lima
bean dish. Cook two pints of
lima beans in lightly salted
water for 10 minutes or until
tender. Drain them. Return to
the pot and over medium heat,
stir in two beaten egg yolks,
half a cup of light cream and a
dash of chopped dill and
savory. Heat but do not let
boil. Garnish with a little
freshly grated nutmeg.
Try lima beans and pork


chops in a casserole. Saute
eight pork chops until they are
golden. Remove from the pan
and cut the chops into
bite-sized bits. In a Dutch
oven cook two minced onions,
and two cups of rice in three
tablespoons butter. Stir until
the onions are golden. Add two
peeled, seeded and chopped
tomatoes, a pint of lima beans.
the pork and six cups of
chicken stock. Reduce the
heat. Add a bay leaf, a pinch of
rosemary, salt and pepper.
Cover the pot and simmer for
half an hour without stirring.
Fluff the rice before serving.

This lima bean dish has a
slight bacon flavour. Saute two
slices of bacon finely diced
until transparent. Pour off the
fat leaving a little in the pan.
Blend in half a tablespoon of
flour and gradually add half a
cup of chicken stock. Cook
stirring until thickened. Add
two pounds freshly shelled
lima beans, half a tablespoon
of grated orange rind and a
dash of pepper. Cover and
simmer over low heat for 20
minutes or until the beans are
tender. Stir now and then. Add
two tablespoons heavy cream,
a tablespoon of finely chopped
parsley and salt and pepper.
Lima beans are good
salad material. Cook and cool
three cups of lima beans. In a
bowl, combine a cup of sour
cream with a quarter cup of
mayonnaise, a quarter cup of
finely chopped green onions
and a quarter cup of finely
chopped dill. Mix in the lima
beans and season with salt and
pepper. Place in a salad bowl.
cover and chill.
Or combine peas and limt;
beans in a salad. In a bowl,
combine one and a half cups of
cooked, cooled peas with a cup
of cooked, cooled lima beans.
half a cup chopped celery and
a quarter cup each chopped
green pepper and onion. Add
half a cup of mayonnaise
combined with one and a half
tablespoons each of tarragon
vinegar and Dijon-style
mustard. Toss the salad. season
with salt and pepper. Cover the
bowl and chill.

An interesting luncheon dish
calls for lima beans and eggs. In
a skillet saute a chopped onion
and a chopped carrot in a
quarter cup of butter until
soft. Add two-thirds cup of
chicken stock, half a cup of
tomato sauce, a quarter cup of
chopped parsley, a quarter
teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
and salt to taste. Simmer for
five minutes. Add three cups of
fresh lima beans. Cover the pan
and simmer for 20 minutes or


until the beans are tender.
Make depressions in the beans
with the back of a spoon and
break an egg into each
depression. Sprinkle the eggs
with salt and pepper. Cover the
pan and cook the eggs until
they are set. Take the pan right
to the table.


; NOW SERVING


LUNCH
From 11:00 a.m. Till 5:00

DAILY SPECIALS DRINKS ONLY $1.00

DINNER SERVED 5 p.m. to Midnightj

Plenty of FREE PARKING

EAST BAY AT THE FOOT OF BRIDGE
a ^^^^TT^^^^^^^^^ ^^~fc^^.x^


TALK OF THE TOWN g

In. the Nusmu Beach Hotel |

present ts





























SWAIN and the DYNAMICS
I-






















(BetweenSTARTING FRIDAY, MARCH 1tShows)










"IT .ELEP-EO3WE 77711
I WE'VE G T LIFE!


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NOW IN STOCK



ELECTRIC. FOOT & HAND OPERATED


Cor. Christie & Dowdeswell Sts.* Phone 2-1197


PUBLIC AUCTION
TO BE CONDUCTED BY BELGRAVE AUCTIONEERS
Saturday, Mar. 2nd. 19/4
from 10:30 a.m.
AT
OUR FRIEND DRY GOODS STORE
Flint Street (off Fast Street)
West from I ormer Milk )epot near i-r. Allen's
Men's & Ladies' Wear, Household Goods. Materials.
Appliances, Gift Items. Novelties, Notions, etc., etc.
Entire Stock Must Go!


I 1


MA. ---1.

IF YOU SEE YOURSELF IN THIS HAPPY GROUP PICTURE, CLIP IT OUT AND BRING IT
TO - BUTLER & SANDS COMPANY, LTD. WAREHOUSE OFF SHIRLEY STREET JUST
BEHIND THE MOSKO BUILDING - PICK UP A FREE FIFTH OF YOUR FAVOURITE
LIQUOR:

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RULIM SCOTCH GIN


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THIS lf-'IR /IS 11llDL )10 0.\l I. ii 1 P tR I/R TRSO.'
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12


Wednesday, February 27, 1974


Chr ribumwt
Eat and Grow Younger


-ropsday a


! Skin showing wear & tear? Maybe


you re starving it.

By LELORD KORDEL A/7S-p-
Xirdu,. 1Vinrtcen of a Series (F'OR "SK'i
Your skin, the same as your hair, is made of protein.
I1 fact, it s possible to produce ulcers of the skin merely
by keeping the diet extremely low in protein. Yet these
skin ulcers can be healed quickly enough when abundant
quantities of high-protein foods are restored to the meals.


CANDLE -LIGHTING CEREMONY
MEMBERS OF THE BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL WOMEN'S ORGANIZATION
in Nassau last week observed International Night with a special candle-lighting ceremony
held at the Sonesta Beach Hotel. During the ceremony, the history of the International
Federation of Business and Professional Women was narrated through the various colour
candles. International Night was observed all over the world where there are federation
affiliates.




SUPER STAR

BOOKING AND ARTIST MGT AGENCY
presents
"The First Annual Bahamian Entertainer of the Year Award Show"
UNDER THE PATRONAGE OF
THE DEPUTY P.M. & MRS. HANNA

Special Artist


BROOK BENTON
SATURDAY, MARCH 2 AT 8:30 P.M.




PRESENTATIONS OF AWARDS

KAREN B[RkE

*TREND FASHION MODELS
RONNIE & THE RAMBLERS

*C ROBERTS *ROSE RICHARDSON
BEEDIE MckENZIE & THE CITATIONS
MISS BAHiMAS
THE BIOSIS NOW
SWAIN & THE DYNAMICS

MC FOR THE EVENINO
FIREBALL FREDDIE
FRESH FROM A TOUR OF THE U S.

POLARIS HALL HOLIDAY INN
PARADISE ISLAND


step, or arise from a chair with
as much grace at 70 as you did
at 30. But you cannot abuse -
and by this I mean starve -
your bones and muscles, and
still expect them to provide you
with a firm foundation for con-
tinuing to look and feel young.
What are the food elements
essential to healthy bones?
Most commonly recognized nu-
trients are calcium and phos-
phorus. Our bones are composed
mainly of these two. As an av-
erage person, you can lose near-
ly an ounce of these precious
minerals every day. Constant
replacement through the diet is
vitally necessary to continued
good health and strong bones.
Powdered skim milk, and the
various kinds of cheese, particu-
larly cottage cheese, are relia-
ble sources of food calcium.
Lean meat and eggs are other
food sources of calcium as well
as protein. Phosphorus, the oth-
er "bone mineral," is also found
in non-fat milk, cheese, eggs,
and feet, resembling a bad sun-
burn with blisters and cracked
skin.
No doubt you're waiting for
me to tell you that such-and-
such food will "erase" the wrin-
kles from your face. That I can-
not do. But I can tell you that
a skin which is not allowed to
become dry and roughened, ei-
t'-rr i)ecaiaso of external abuse
-r internal starvation, is far less
likely to develop and retain
wrinkles than a poorly nourish-
S' .! skin .


- Sinmlaris. a reducing diet (or
any other diet, for that matter)
which excludes fats is bound to
result in a dry, wrinkled skin.
S l ihe -anut, sunflower seed,
:-iflwel and codliver oils con-
tamn certain unsaturated fatty
,.ids whi h are essential to the
..i" : h (if the skin.
A dry. scaly condition of the
,k: is kely to develop when
an insufficient amount of these
fatty a cds is eaten. Although
fou;d in cream and butter to
so*-. extent. these skin-condi-
tioninr unsaturated fatty acids
S are mnire generously available
in ti..- eils mentioned.
BEAUITI 'i, SKIN
Anyone who has travelled in
Mrdit.rr:.nean countries where
oli-e iil fl.ws like water' has
notice the .*. i j; if snm oti: skin
so prevalent among women of
those ',coutries who use it in-
ternalIv and externally
If v ur i--dy, as a whole, is
n it properly rnurithid the skin
1, usually oie oif the' first organs
to) show signs of a rnutrtior.al de-
St dii t doies not con-
tain ,'ugh vitaminn A. an ,ar-ly
symptom is a pimply eruption.
Th e' 'e'wwncyv dis.tase caused
t V 1 11 n,-Ifi :; k -' 'h.1 B ita -
riin ac. Iii ;n p; artw -ilar, is
chara terized by severe skin
tr,,ibles thii ,0'': n on the hands

I ' J .
- eri


'Shortage cause of

food price spiral'


Your bones and muscles can
be tattletales, too. No firmly es-
tablished law of nature decrees
that a man or woman must go
creaking and shuffling through
the remainder of his or her
lean meat, fish and poultry.
But all the calcium-rich foods
you may eat are not going to do
your bones-or the other cal-
cium craving organs in your
body-much good if that cal-
cium cannot reach the blood-
stream to be distributed where
needed.
Therefore, even though your
diet may contain plenty of cal-
cium, little of it reaches your
bones (or your heart, muscles,
glands and nerves) unless your
stomach acids are strong enough
to dissolve the mineral and
keep it in solution.
There are two ways in which
to increase the concentrated
acidity of your digestive juices:
First, by having your stomach
acids tested by a reliable physi-
cian, who may then prescribe so
many drops of dilute hydro-
chloric acid to be taken in wa-
ter with every meal; and sec-
ond, by adding liberal quantities
of vitamin B-complex to your
diet, since this group of B-vita-
mins greatly influences the flow
and acidity of stomach juices.
No mention of calcium and
phosphorus for the bones is com-
plete without including vitamin
D, the "sunshine vitamin." We
know that vitamin D, in some
mysterious way, controls the re-
tention, absorption and distri-
bution of these minerals in the
bones. That is one reason why
the serious lack of vitamin D in
children will cause rickets.


EDD BURROWS
Proprietor/Manager


KENTUCKY

SPRINGS

HOTEL
Fowler Street South
ASK ABOUT OUR SPECIAL
DAILY ROOM RATE:
$8.50, $10.50, $12.50


visit our intimate Dining & Cocktail Lounge
MEALS ARE HOME COOKED.
SERVICE: TO MAKE YOU WANT TO STAY
WHAT YOU SEE ... IS WHAT YOU GET.
HOURS: 11 a.m. to 4 ajn.


I 4


TICKET SOLD AT $8 & $10
(BRIDGE TOLL INCLUDED)
Ticket outlets: Book & Pencil, centre, (Market St.) G.R. Sweeting,
International Men's Wear, Bay St., next to Beaumont Arcade,
Sawyer's Studio Ltd., East St. Beri adette's, Star Plaz








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Beaumont Arcade/P. 0. Box N-3706/Nassau, Bahamas.


- I I: T = ;i .iiii I z -r --- L


dFc--~-_










Wednesday, February 27, 1974


(Sht Bribtt___


VETERAN jockey John
Bain captured the Britannia
Beach Hotel cup race atop
Anonymous in the fifth race at
yesterday's 16th meet at the
Hobby Horse Race track.
Bain, presently placed
fourth in the jockey's standing
with 12 wins, also captured
wins in the seventh and eigth
races to complete a successful
day's racing.
John's brother, Garv.
defending champion jockey.
mustered only one win when
he rode Dogerlossa to victorv
in the sixth race. (;,.rv leads
the jockeys standings with 32
wins.
Results and pay off's of
, Tuesday's meet:
FIRST RACE 4/2 Furlongs
Complete Image (6) R
IHuewitt $14.20,$5.3S. $5.35.


SPECIAL

NOTICE

The Gospel film "The
Unfinished Task" will he
presented FREE TO THiF
PUBLIC at the activity
centre K ingsw:i y
Academy Bernard Road
on Saturday March 2nd.
at 8 p.m.
A special invitation is
extended to you and
your friends.


2. Sweetness (2) 1). Patel
$4.80, $6.20.
3. Miss (t10 (7) Ant. Saunders
SS.3S.
Sl.('(CONI) RACI('i 4. rulongs
1. Sih (3) Hi. \Woodside
$101is, S3.95, $2.90.
2. Clint (4) Ant. Saunders
S3.35, $2.10.
3. Kimho (6) (; Serchwell
$2.60
Daily Double (6 3) $40.20,
I first Quinella (3.4) $9.45.
t IRfI RACEI 5 'urlongs
1. Security (1) N Ssweeting
Si 0o05. SS.90, S4 oS.
2. (;olden Guinea (H) (; Bi11n
SS SO. S3.80.
3. last ILeg (s) M. I ewis
Second Quinella (I ) i 15.25.
FOURTH RACI 4C,
IlUR LONGS
1 Pete (2) M. Brown
$54.40. S 16.55, $4.70.
2. lour V s (1 ) J. liain s5.5,
3.4 S.
3. AlI'\ Twist (7) ,;. iHain
S3. I 5 .
Fhird Quinella (i 2) S568.3S.
It11TH RAC(I ii I urinhgs
1. Anonymous (6) J. Bainl
,6sS.S $4.40. $3.00.
2 lamrette Dial (i ) I \.
Saunders $8.35. $4.85.
3 l-ads Marina (2) S. \l Neil
S4.20.
I fourth ()uinella (1 6) '2295.
SIllXTH RACI 9 1lurlngs
I i)ugerlossa (7) (;. Bain
4.55. S3.85. $2 60.
2. Magic Prince (9) S. McNeil
$5.30, $580.
3. .(enghis Khan (4) (.
Serchwell $3.15 IS.
I ilth Quinella (7 9) ,i 3.95.
SF VI NIHi RAtcI- 6 i u1rhones
1. Desparido (4) J. ainl
$14.45, $6 25, $3.40.
2. Nohody's C Bu siness (2)
McNeil $1l 1.OS. $ 3 15.
3 \ oil tHunter )(i) \
Saunders 5 3.65.
Sixth Quinella (2 4) $26 70.
I(;III'll RACI. 6 I urlionigs
1. Jungle Pie (4) J. Iain
$6.25, $2.75, $2.25.


1
c
II
M
c
(-
g
f
s
>

(
e
t
S I


NOW SHOWING
SMatinee 3:00 & 5:00, Evening 8:30-'Phone 2-1004, 2-1005




PANAeISO'METBOCOXOR MGM
YUL BRYNNER RICHARD BENJAMIN
PARENTAL DISCRETION ADVISED.
Reservations not claimed by 8:15, will be sold
on first come, first served basis.


Now Showing Now thru Friday
Matinee starts at 2:00 Continuous Showings
Evening 8:30 from 3:00
"FISTS OF THE "THEY ONLY KILL
DOUBLE K" R. THEIR MASTERS" PG.
Henry Yue Young James Garner,
PLUS Katherine Ross
"THE HOUSE THAT PLUS
DRIPPED BLOOD" PG.
'Phone 2-2534 "THE BIG MOUTH" G.
No one under s1 will be admitted Jerry Lewis



NOW THRU FRIDAY
Matinee Continuous from 1:45, Evening 8:30'Phone 3-46661
BLACK GODFATHEFI IS BACK!
...and he's takin'
S over the town!


FRED WILLIAMSON coLoR .... [] em
Plus! "THE HUNTING PARTY" R.
NO OVI UN/ R I1 171/I HI ADMITTED. I


OBED: THE
By GLADSTONE THURSTON opening
M.\NA(;['R Mike Dundee own. A
an see nothing but a brilliant such a
Stu re for Bahamas' everyth
n defeated welterweight Mike
hamp Elisha Obed. promote
1 I li. is progressing right Austin
in schedule and there is no worked
loubt in my mind that he has night.
got to the point where he can Mike
eight just about anyone." he not o0
aid during an interview everyth
Vesterd ay, perspec
Unless some other boxer credent
oimes along. Mike feels that champi
)hbed will be the greatest boxer Obed
ver from the Bahamas. "The camp
beautiful thing about it is that prior t(
have the time and the "and fi
patience and the willingness to heads t
ct things go at a regular pace," a deal
said Diindee. "There is no Elisha
reason to rush." deal fr
Obed who turned 22 years "I fe
Old on Februarl 21. last night benefit
succVssftlly defended his more
.inbcaten career of 44 fights good
with a seventh round knockout more
of Mexican Vincente Medina. am g(
Ihat marked Obed's 27th possible
knockout victory, future.
"I really see 'things As f
happening since he fought the w
Bunny n (;rant," Mike weight
continued. "There has been a world
tremendous change in him. ie far aw
has become a very aggressive Mike s
fighter. Hie doesn't wait for an Altl
yet de
relinq
divisic
full-t'le
"It
explain


(011NS. 6: 30 Shows start 7 p.m.
('ili.)RFN lUNI) -R 12 t REE!
Sei 2 .'uatures late as 8:44
STARTS TONITE! *
"Di)til's (ardern 7 & 10:29
")D il's Nightimare" 8:44
SHE WAS POSSESSED
TO SATISFY HIS 1
ONLY HUMAN
DtSIRFI


SPORT ONE


g, he goes and make his
knd that jab he has is
potent thing. It sets up
ing he throws."
along with Bahamian
er Wilfred Coakley and
"Moon" Ramsey
Obed's corner last
is enthusiastic and yet
overconfident. "I want
.ing to be in the right
:tive. I think he has the
tials for being a world
ion."
d joined the Dundee
a little over a year ago
o the Sandy Torres fight,
rom then on we got our
together and worked out
whereby we felt that
would benefit a great
om it," Mike explained.
eel personally that he has
tted from it. He fought
often; he is making a
income from boxing
than just a living; and I
ping to do everything
e to enhance his
or Obed becoming either
elterweight or middle-
champion of the
"I don't think he is very
ay from that right now,"
said.
hough Obed weighed 155
Js last night, it is still not
determined whether he will
uish the welterweight
in and become a
edged middleweight.
all depends," Mike
ned. "I feel like he's in


E Knowles first in



for Bahamas


IT LOOKS like Bahamas
swimming champion Andy
Knowles will be the first
Bahamian competitor in action
at the Central American and
Caribbean Games being held in
Santo Domingo. He competes
tomorrow in the 200 metres
freestyle heats and the 200
metres individual medley races.
He is also entered for the
400 metres freestyle and the
1500 metres. Andy is reported
in top shape and flew into the
Dominican Republic capital
last night with his coach from
Fort Lauderdale.
Hurdler Danny Smith and
champion sailor Pierre
Siegenthaler have also arrived
to complete the 42-man
Bahamas contingent to the
Games.
The weather in Santo
Domingo is reported "hot and
stifling" although the soccer
and volleyball squads are
"rearing to go."
National soccer coach Dick
Wilson reports that his team
are still nursing a few knocks
from their final weekend
match in Freeport, but have
had two practice sessions that
have gone well.
"The communications down


here are very poor and
generally the organisation is
pretty chaotic," Wilson told
The Tribune today.
The soccer boys still don't
know when they will be
playing possibly tomorrow
or Friday. And they don't
know whether the games will
be in daylight or under lights at
night.
However, they know they
have drawn the strongest group
Group B and face Mexico.
Bermuda, Panama and the
Domincan Republic. Ranged in
Group A are Cuba, Nicaragua,
Barbados, Puerto Rico, and
Trinidad.
Mexico and Cuba are
recognized as the two strongest
teams. The top two from each
group go through to the
semi-finals and Wilson believes
his team can win through in
Group B.
The soccer boys have only
four pitches to practise on and
they have to compete with the
other nine teams. As a result
each national team has been
designated practice times and
the Bahamas team found
themselves having to get up
Tuesday morning at 6 a.m. for
a two-hour session that day or


forfeit their practice. "They
got up," says Wilson, althoi:)'
they were very tired having ],(-
Nassau at 5 a.m. Monday.
Yesterday the Bahamas flag
was raised at the Games
Village.
It's believed the volleybalic'r,
will see action on Friday.
The girls squad will play
round-robin amongst the eight
national teams and the result
will be decided on the best
win/loss record.
Mexico are defending girl
champions and Cuba second.
others taking part are Virgin
Islands, Venezuela, Puert,
Rico, the Domincan Repubhli
and the Bahamas.
In th,- men'ss volleyball the
Bahamas hias been drawn
against the top-seeded Mexic n
players for their Friday
opening. Also in the Bahamas
group are Puerto Rico. the
Domincan Republic, and the
Virgin Islands.
In the other men's group ,re
Panama, Cuba, Venezut-
Haiti and the Netherla,. -
Antilles. The top three tears
from each group go through b -
the semi-finals.


between a heavy welterweight
and a light middleweight so he
could probably go either way.
"lie's growing and he'll
continue to grow and probably
this time next year he'll be able
to weigh anywhere from 155
to 160 pounds." Obed last
month undisputedly claimed
the Bahamas' junior
middleweight title.
Obed has the gift and ability
to punch hard with either hand
and that is understandable. He
has one of boxing's best ring
veterans in his corner Moe
Fleischer.
"What I think is a wonderful
thing that has happened with
Moe training him is his ability
to get Elisha to have such a
potent left hand jab," noted
Mike. "For his size, pound for
pound, Elisha is probably one
of the most powerful jabbers in
the fight game today."
Mike explained that Obed is
not just a boxer but "an
electrifying puncher. lie can
take somebody out with either
hand. At the pace he's going
now, he's six months away
from fighting for the title."
The Commonwealth title
Mike said is more within range
at this time than the world
championship. "In my opinion,
he and Clyde Gray will be a
great fight to look at and I feel
Obed will beat Gray.
"I have a lot of faith in
Elisha," Mike confided.
Fight report and pictures
- Back Page.


By Gordon Lomer
AMERICA JANE 1I, a
39-foot Sparkman and
Stephens Class E yacht sailed
to corrected time victory in the
Miami-Nassau Race. The
Dutch-built custom yacht,
owned by George Tooby of
Newport Beach, Cal., also
captured class E and stands
second in both class and overall
standings in the Southern
Ocean Racing Conference.
The final race of the six race
series is the Nassau Cup Race
Friday from the Nassau
lighthouse to Booby Rocks
and back. The race starts at 10
a. m.
Second place in the 184-mile
Miami-Nassau run went to Ted
Turner's Lightnin, another E
class S&S one-ton. Country
Woman, owned by Robert
Barton of Chicago made it a


clean sweep for one-tons by
sailing to third place. She is a
new Cranbare 34, and also
holds down third place in class
and fleet in the overall
standings.
Robin Too II, Ted Hood's
self-designed one-ton came in
fourth and took the lead in
both class E and fleet for the
SORC title, which will be
decided Friday with the Nassau
Cup Race.


Class D) winner w,
Golliwog, a Cuthbertson a;
Cassian designed 39-foot
owned by a Larchmont, No.
York syndicate headed i
Graham Hall. C-Miraee.
40-foot C&C sloop owned I
Gerhard Moog of Toronto -.1.
the class C division and
Windliese, a 48-foot slo *p
owned by William Gahagan
Oyster Bay, N. Y. capture
class B honours.


Jamaicans win


THE NEW Providence rugby
squad combined with the
touring Jamaicans on
Saturday to produce a superb
game of running rugby.
displaying individual skill and
co-ordinated team work.
The Jamaicans emerged
victorious defeating New


Hockey trial


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James Garner

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Fromownm,, ID Parental Guidance Suggested.


THF SECOND ladies trial
game was held last Saturday at
Hlaynes Oval to select a
Bahamian XI to represent the
Bahamas in the annual hockey
tournament in Barbados later
this year.
The selectors are having a
difficult choice in selection as
competition for field positions
is keen.
In a mien's game. Arawaks B
moved into first place with a
2-0 win over Paradise A. Wardy
Ford and Chris Sherman scored
both goals.
Paradise A played fine
hockey as its passing


combinations kept the
Arawaks defence busy.
However, the alertness of
Michaels and Green gave the
defense an air or respectability.
Thompson and Jones provided
the main threat, but they were
continually harassed and so
found the going difficult near
the Arawaks penalty area.
Sherman, Parker and Ford
mainly relied on their speed
and dribbling to break through.
Deane. Brown and Price gave
them little room in which to
manoeuvre and, therefore, the
Arawaks had fewer scoring
chances.
A sad note was the amount
ol body contact in the first
half. especially by the
Arawaks, but this decreased
appreciably in the following
half.


Providence Rugby Squad h%
32-26.
The teams began to run-l .
ball from the very beginning r'1
the first half, and l h.
Jamaicans were first to sco.-
with two penalty goals.
jumping to a 6-0 lead.
The New Providence Squad
soon retaliated with incisive
running from Tutton wh(
proved to be a constant threat
with his illusive agility. [he try
came after an impressive run
from the centre with a swi,
Dyer scoring in the corn<
Aspry converted to equahl.e
the score at 6-6.
Tutton and lDyer combined
efforts again to scorn
another well executed try with
the winger getting his second
score of the game. The reliabi'
Aspry converted stretching the
lead to 1 2-6.
Centre Peter Hillard scored
his first try which wa-
converted, tying the score :I?
12-12.
Another fine player wa'
wing forward Randy Herber
who posed a perpetual probhit
for the Bahamian Slqu,id
swerving and side stepping'
his way towards the try line. 11e
proved almost unstoppable
with his well-balance running


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MORALES OTHELLO,
ALIAS WALLACE OTHELLO of Deveaux Street, Nassau,
Bahamas is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for naturalisation as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why naturalisation should not be granted should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20th day of February 1974 to
The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JANICE ROCATA HALL of
Baillou Hill Road Nassau is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 27th day of February
1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ST. LOUIS FENELON of
Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 27th day of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship. P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.


-I .. I


RACING RESULTS


Obed and Medina clash in last night's fight- report and pictures in Back Page.


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14 Wednesday, February 27, 1974


~itw L1rihnur


SPORT TWO


cuts out


Medina


in


THEN COMES TITLE

CHALLENGE WITH GRAY
by GLADSTONE THURSTON At the ringside


BAHAMAS' 22-year-old
welterweight champion
Elisha Obed has been offered
a title fight against British
Commonwealth welterweight
champ Clyde Gray of Canada.
This was confirmed last
night by manager Mike
Dundee after Obed's
hard-earned victory over
Mexican Vincente Medina at
the Miami Beach Auditorium.
"Clyde Gray's manager
Irvin Ungerman said that he
will be ready for Elisha any
time, any place and
anywhere," Dundee said.
Obed, in his seventh
straight knockout and his
44th consecutive victory,
stopped Medina 55 seconds
into the seventh round. The
Mexican suffered cuts around
the left eye and a blooded
nose.
Both Ungerman and Coco
Conde manager of world
welterweight champ Jose
Napoles observed Obed last
night from ring side. "Obed is


Medi ni scores to tI- h lIly a, Obed moves in


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too young to fight Napoles
right now," commented
Conde. "Maybe one or two
mor years and he will be
ready."
Although Conde respects
Obed. saying that he has
youth to his advantage, he
adds: "Napoles is a tough and
smart fighter. He is a good
puncher and can take a punch
too ... but he is 34-years-old."
Amidst over 2.041 cheering
fans, Obed took control from
the first round with left jabs
spiced with uppercuts and
various combinations which
had Medina bouncing around
the ring.
Obed could not understand
what kept Medina going so
long. "He is one of the
toughest I ever fought. I hit
him with about everything
and he just didn't go down.
The shots that I knocked him
with, if I had knocked any
other guy I know they would
have gone.
Bleeding freely from his
wounds, Medina made a
desperate but futile attack in
the sixth round scoring with
combinations to Obed's head.
"I know plenty of people
would think that he was
hurting me but I wasn't
feeling those punches. I'm
not bragging but he just
couldn't hurt me."
Obed who weighed in at 155
pounds two and a half
pounds more than his
opponent opened the
second round with two stiff
lefts to the head which had
Medina grimacing in l?ain -
something he did many times.
He was unable to evade
Obed's left jabs and went to
his corner at the end of that
round spitting blood.
Obed in the third round
brought out a devastating


It's all over ... Referee Cv
(oltt ried stops the fight in
the seventh round.


body attack which evidently
spelled the end for Medina.
Going into the fourth,
Medina gathered new
momentum and tried to slug
it out. A bloody nose was all
he got. Obed returned to his
corner savouring cheers of
"Nassau Bahamas, Nassau
Bahamas."
Medina obviously was in
shape in order to take such a
peppering. However, late in
the sixth, Obed eased his
attack. "I shouldn't really.
My trainer always tells me
about being sorry for a guy.
But with this guy, after blood
started coming from his eye
and nose I sort of got sorry
for him."
Medina's face literally
burst into blood within the
first ten seconds of the
seventh. 45 seconds later
referee Cy Gottfrieed put an
end to the bout.
Trainer Moe Fleischer was
also surprised at Medina's
stamina. "I don't know what
held him up there.
"Elisha showed me that he
took shots that he did not
have to. He did what the
other fellow wanted him to
do." This is something
Fleischer always warns Obed
against. "He started mixing it
and showed the guy that he
can take a punch."
In other bouts last night,
former light weight champ
Freddie Major was held to an
eight round draw by Eladio
"The Cuban Kid" Leal,
Heavyweight contender
Bob Freeze dropped a
unanimous decision to Tony
Green.
Bahamas light heavyweight
champ Baby Boy Rolle takes
on James Scott in next week's
featured event at the Miami
Beach Auditorium.
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14


Wednesday, February 27, 1974


ISO,


~ia