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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03734
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03734

Full Text






r-fl ----.~


S UDLEY'S 4p
COR. ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE.
NEW 1974 MODELS

"THE VERY BEST"ru

ARRIVING SOON!

,Retusw with Postmaster of Bahamas for postage concessions within the Bahamas) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


'FL

S. 0 0"


VOL. LXXI, No. 80 Tuesday, February 26, 1974 Price: 20 Cents


Young Bahamians








'forced into crime'

THE YOUNG PEOPLE of the Bahamas are being
forced to turn to crime out of necessity, because tawc'c..s-
are high. wages are low and there arc no jobs. Nasa ,.."
representative Cleophas Adderley told the Abaco
Independence Movement convention in Marsh IHarbour
Saturday.
Mr. Adderley, an Independent in thile iHouse, was one of the
three guests invited to speak at the convention. lie dealt with the ,
crime rate and the increasing frequency with which members of
die public were being attacked.
The reason he said, was that the people had been looking Ior a -
better life even since the PLP came to power, but there thad been
no signs of the better life promised.


"Like the children of Israel
the people of the Bahamas
have been wandering in the
wilderness and will never reach
their promised land under
Moses Pindling," he declared.
It was his sincerest belief
that for the people of the
Bahamas to reach their
promised land God must raise
tip a new leader like God raised
up Joshua.
Older people however were
too sentimental to change from
their old ways. They celt that
the PLP was a black
government and therefore had
to support it.
"That is sheer ignorance and
stupidity," Mr. Adderley
deLlared. "These people must
learn that there is no sentiment
or emotion or colour in
government."
Government today was
ruling Bahamians with a rod of
iron, taking all away but giving
nothing. "Why have a lovely
seitniment oI a government
that is crushing you into
dust?" he asked.
"Why can't you wake up
and realize that this heartless
government is driving you into
the dust?"
Drawing an analogy with
nature. Mr. Adderley remarked
on how beautifully colour


THE ABACO Independ-
ence Movement is dedicated
to achieving self-determina-
tion and home rule for Abaco
through "peaceful. moral,
legal and constitutional"
means, its freedom plan
states.
AIM's Action Plan,
'/together with its platform
and constitution were
unanimously adopted at the
party's first convention held
at Marsh Harbour, Abaco on
Saturday.
Delegates had been
circulated with copies of the
three documents two weeks
prior to the convent ion.
The Plan of Action claims
that the Bahamas government
has been exploiting Abaco as
a 29th centre colony,
returning less than one third
of the taxes "extracted" from
the Abaco people.
It is the view of AIM that
the Nassau government is an
uninvitedd guest" of the
Abaco people and may at any
time be invited to leave, Its
refusal to do so would be
violation of the U.N. Charter
to which the government
claims to subscribe.
Such failure to comply,
says AIM, would also be a
violation of common decency
and would constitute trespass
under Common Law.
"It is inconceivable that
the Bahamas government
would thus fail to leave,"
AIM asserts.
In its "Freedom
Proposals," AIM says that to
ensure Abaco land is not lost




TABLE

LAMPS

0 NAISINU FEEIOIE
_ASSAU -- FREEPORT


By NICKI KELLY

blended fromn dawn to dark.
Why can't people blend
together in the s ime wayi'" he
asked.
lThe reason. het said, was
hatred and suspicion.
Mr. Adderley told his
listeners that goverirmlent must
always he the servant of thee
people. When they failed "you
are supposed to get rid of
them."
l)t S IR 1R ) i.S
lie said het held t gruitle
against the governimen because
it had de t t, ,,'! li the Bitth,tnis
"People .ic, perish rig anid
that is why there is an upsurge
in cilme It is because oft a bad
government e ln Since thlils
government has been govern ing
us there have been high taxes.
low wages and no jutbs
"The people see the
Ministers riding around in big

they turn to crime.'
Not all of our young people
ire bad. ( Mr \,il'rl',"
contended Those who
committed crimes were being
forced into it by necessity The
only way to correct this is to
change tilhe government or i
thile government to chtlant'' its
s,,a 5.5S


to foreign control, the
island's crown land is to be
vested in the Abaco National
Land Trust, shares of which
will be held by Abaconians
The Trust will also nake
available to each native-born
Abaconian adult one acre ot
la id.
According to the Freedomi
proposals, over 300,000 acres
of Crown land are invoked.
According to "knowledgeable
economists." leasing of only
137,000 of the 300,000 acres
of the available Crown land
would yield a yearly income
of $55 million which would
go toward support of public
services and payment of some
$15,000 annually on each
land trust share.
The land is to be leased
under proper safeguards
against pollution and
destruction of the ecology.
for commercial, light
industrial, tourist, residential
and recreational purposes, to
Abaconians and foreigners.
with an area set aside for a
world free trade zone and
port.
The benefits from these
transactions will be used lto
provide all constitutionally
allowed public services such
as police protection, courts,
defence administration,
hospitals and schools.
New non-Bahamians who
come to Abaco after home
rule will be expected to pay a
small sum for the government
services they consume at a
rate estimated at $100 to
$150 a year.
No inport duties, income
taxes or any other form of
taxes or duties will be
required.
AIM recognizes the rights
of all, regardless of race,
colour, creed, beliefs and
religion or other personal
characteristics of life, liberty
and the pursuit of his own
happiness.


Ba a car;. (. corg i
( tumiantaros' 73-fo'ot
,tli iin niilu sloth p \\;as
scC'ouI l tit finish I th1
[lt -liti)gN'Is M K tiili-Nasa ii

I' list to finish on



ric ioi t1
Shc coIllplc'l' T!d I
IS4 1 ki.'I l T iu :-', 15 tic',lirp
,X i l 1 5 i tt ,1 1,\k

Slillti lHIl, 0W ictt r :l A ll
s, lcdl h, 1> ,J : I >Q k I ,, -, r t


S)scit Hllj,\ \ )
lciorc si -i-up.

'Si iltlicr i t ()c c':
nI i nt~'5, is( I


Sithe i'
Vi Ih


C'up R.icc rid 'lay.
Full report Back page.


Pinder


's looks


'not dishonest'


I \GI ISH stockbr.jker John
\Ictc' t il assioci. t md with
Walte'i \ !i ..-r and ('Compan ,
jml :i orimer frien.i of ltubert
l copi, d Pinder. stateds in his
eds ct;e in the i magistrates
coliir today that he would
tine'er lave belit.'ed tihe
e er- o I d l chartered
accountant to be dishonest as
"'his looks were ver\ iuch
,tgiinst ii"
lH'e aiso charged that he
knctw s otiling ol Pinider'
in.iarine to Nurse Diana Mary
olden li ili' he vias still
,llL ; "i d *" 1 I % !ie !:!a 1 AN e r


Close watch on Shobek


PRI I I\IMIN'RY lt it \

;it'rder agasit M1t chia Sliobek.
'l. ; \ ilv, O uk .e \ i ,l n i

1lo)n I ; tl e \ ,,d ', ii cT ]

('hi i. \ S ig I i e .\ i tIN:
lliet U'a, \\.'e l||. n[i|: per ns
allh \ 'i ni Ib .. .. "i ro i
during t lie hlii i
(hlo e \\a;tih Le.i, K.-pl ,on th!
yo \lis wh c ,it i'- i t)t it

escaping t ro il ci ist 1l\ \\S ',


Ti l ast lhuIrsdaI by a
!'.-,c of!c'r w''ho a'aught hill
Ill [lie Ictint\ ol t Last Street
ti'r he, had dashed from tlhel
Sc ,i!nal Poli,,- Station, Bank
I icne
Shbobi)k made his bid fo:
t lIeed'c ii ditring an intitervi'ew ati
the police station with I tS
\ie C'onsul Robert LloiJd
Shtltk ;.s btotng helhd i
n f .!toni with the murders
ol three Amenrican \ visitors
nl' t cl e' Decernbel I'. last year
uit lantiar\ 2(t


Pinder, made arrangements
with McGuiffly to attend the
ceremonyy as I witness on June
1, 1'72. btt he had never
.howed up. McGufy 's absence
caused a tixi driver to be asked
'o substitute as a witness, Mrs.
iiadc s (Golden, mother ot
Pinder's second wile said.
Mc Guftfs said that on several
occasions s he had been
-tuestioned about Pinder's
marriage. He first met the
accusedd in 19168 while he lived
with his wife. Mila and their
wo children, Susan and
rFrone at Wimbledon
Ie said that when lie asked
Pinder whether he had been
married to Golden hte h'ld hibn
'hat she had a baby h\ himi bitt
hey were riot married
McGuffv as a stock-broker.
was asked by Pinder to handle
shares purchased by five
different women.
Reading the depositions this
morning was attorney Keith
Duncomhe. prosecuting for the
British Government in its bid
to have the fugitive accountant
returned to England tor trial
on 17 charges of fraudulent
trading, theft and bigamy.
The case continues


Officials of the Hotel and Catering Workers Union and the Hotel Employers Association on their
way out of the Labour Ministry of John F. Kennedy )Drive after signing the two year contract. From
Left. Union secretary Bobby Glinton, national organiser Thomas Bastian, executive board member
Basil MacKenzie. treasurer Alexander Thompson. Paradise Island Hotel general manager Jack
Galloway. Association executive director Travelyan Cooper, Association president Steve Norton and
Union president David Knowles.



WE COULD HAVE GOT



MORE-HOTEL UNION


By MIKE LOTHIAN
THE HOTEL EMPLOYERS
were "very pleased" and the
Hotel Union felt "we could
have gotten more" after the
signing today of a two-year
pact ending a 14-day contract
dispute that threatened the
tourism industry with strikes in
the hotels.
Hotel Employers
Association president Steve
Norton said: "I am very
pleased that our 56 sessions of
negotiation are over. I think
the contract is a fair one
considering the cost escalations
we have faced in the industry
and that have also affected the
workers in the industry. We are
both caught in the middle."
Hotel and Catering Workers
Union President David
Knowles' comment on the
agreement was that "we would
have been able to get more for
the workers if our dispute had
been registered by the Minister
in November.'
The contract's provisions are
retroactive to January 7. It was
signed shortly after 11:30 this
morning by Mr. Norton and
executive director Trevelyan
Cooper for the Associatior and
by Mr. Knowles and secretary
Bobby Glinton for the Union.
Labour Minister Clifford L.
Darling witnessed the
signatures.
The signing was delayed
slightly by last-minute
jockeying for advantage by
both sides.
The effective date was
originally to have been "the
first pay period following
January 6" but was changed
',imply to Jan 7.
Deleted from the final draft
was a provision that any
employee presently receiving
S150 a week or more would
get no pay increase.
Another point in contention
,it the last minute was whether
hotel security guards should be
covered by the contract. The
Union said Mr. Darling had
earlier recommended their
inclusion, and that right up to
the signing the Association was
de! tng'" the recomnmenda-
tion. In the end, both sides
agreed to send the matter to
the Indiistrial Relations Board
lor airbitratlion.
Ihe new contract provides
increases in the mininmumn basic
wage payable in the various
worker categories ranging from
S5 to S20 a week, and
averaging just over $9.50.
M minimum across-the board
increases range from S4 to S0
and average just over $5.
Considered the most
significant innovation in the
cent ract are provisions


When government paralyses


BI NIC'KI KFLL.Y
Villt \ tG0\'I RN\tl NI etlms
h t Ill I ll t o It IN t'
people's initiatiu e io ll
ai, ill' on [ hei: t n\\ i I)i
.Il IS L) spet s %.i dt i)n Is
kI' ti ailcdress t'eltirc rlhe


hIti Hisers. \s ho s;it
iwared ib I nisn griat ion ,iit
MaIrsh Hlarbour inot Io make
political speechclies, lnted Ins
e\.upllnlcs 'ii)verniinleit
int'i teicnI c It to he niilct
St at es
Author ot "I ib'rtarinanisin
.\ P litical ut l Philosophy for
t oll I ros .'' I)' 1114) f1,c'T'
' ,)n Ii irow ,t I) HosIpei's
oit 1iine0d lie lii1ilosophical
con I'epts bcliittd t he
I i ertlii ani titove lent, M which
chlie\ s in tlie mint imal not
liiaxitnii ir'le for glernmente
in society .
I colnotl ic trecedom. lic said,
is often misundtelrst(od What i

imeanIt wa,Is tr'ecdoini of
production and trade. "If this
11 utr ia it e e haid bee n
incorporated in the United
States constitution we would
have had the host of laws that
tiae helped to destroy or cut
down the econoint ot the
I .S.." ic declared.
'Such freedom was of vital
iiil'aortance to any country.,
large or small," Dr. Hosper,
said.
NO FRIF TRADI
"'If you want mnore
priodtIcioln in a country don't
sliange thie goose that lays the
golden egg. This is hi.I'pP, iI
all over the world, and
increasingly in the U.S. which
no longer has a free econtiom "
Dr. Hospers maintained that
the most prosperous nations in
the world were those that
permiitted free trade.
Under such a sx stein
however, there were no
guarantees for business strival
.tnd in a free economy, the


Dr. HOSPERS
A warning

government didn't help you
out," he emphasised.
"'On the other hand, if you
succeed, no one will take away
your earnings." The secret of
economic prosperity was to
leave the economy free, allow
freedom of production and
take nothing away from a
man." Dr. Hospers said.
He noted that it would be
much more difficult for a
Henry Ford to appear today


because he
death.
Govern m
economy %
said, as c
spurred by
take away f
achieved.
LESS

As the st
and more p
doubled
Productivity
and there i
produce.
"The ma
not from
but from th
Hospers dec
He argue
should stay
because it
This resulted
which in tu
sought to
increased ta:
"If you
enough, do


guaranteeing tips for
employees through the levying
of service charges.
In the housekeeping
departments blanket gratuity
systems already in effect have
become a contractural
obligation for all conventions,
promotions and other
organised groups of visitors,
with a promise that
management will "endeavour"
to obtain at least 50 cents per
bed.
In the food sections, a ten
percent service charge is to be
added to all buffet meal bills,
and 15 percent is to be levyed
on all other kinds of food
services. Bar service will be
subject to a ten percent charge.
The gratuities provisions of
the contract take effect on
April 21.
The previous contract
expired on January 6. Months
before negotiators had begun
working towards a
replacement.
The talks broke down on
November 5 literally before
they started when the union
filed a dispute over the fact
that the Association had
refused to submit any
management proposals rto new
wage scales until cost
increasing improvements in
working conditions had been
agreed to.
A brief wild-cat strike on
Nov. 15 at eight major hotels
on Paradise Island and New
Providence was followed by
intervention by Mr. ).irling.
who ordered management to
submit counter-proposals on
pay so the talks could get
underway.
In subsequent negotiations
deadlocks were reached at least
twice, and each time werle
broken only by Mr. Darling's
intervention.
By February, 8 the two sides
had apparently exhausted their
bilateral powers of negotiation.
and arrangements were made
to continue the talks under the-
chairmanship and mediation of
Chief Industrial Officer
Lambert L. W. Parker.
Instead of progressing,
however, both sides have
conceded that in the one week


of mediated talks they in fact
moved further from a
settlement than they had been
before.
Meanwhile, a deadline for
negotiations had been set, and
if no agreement had been
reached by Feb. 18, Mr.
Darling was expected to refer
the dispute to the Industrial
Relations Board for
arbitration, a move the union
made it clear, it was not
prepared to accept.
Despite a Ministry ruling
that the Nov. 5 dispute filed by
the union could not be
properly registered, unionists
had on Feb. 3 voted
overwhelmingly in favour of
striking to force the issue,
rather than allow the matter to
be deterred to the Board.
In eleventh-hour talks on
Feb 15 and 16, Association
and Union negotiators, acting
without the benefit of Ministry
mediation, hammered out a
tentative agreement which just
barely headed off the strike
action planned for that
weekend.
It was to the Ministry's
ruling on the Nov. 5 dispute
notice that Mr. KnAwles
referred this morning when ,ie
said more could have been
done if it had been registered.
The 53-day cooling off period
in that dispute would have
expired near the end of 1973,
and the union would have had
all of January and February in
which to pressure management
with the threat of a strike.

Road death
GRAND BAHAMA
recorded its fifth traffic
fatality of ar on Friday
when a We,' End resident was
knocked down by a truck
while on Bay Shore Road. at
about 3 am.-
The Ford truck was
reportedly owned by Ronald
Washington Pinder.
.-Inni Cargal. 23, was said
to be near the employees'
quarters of the Grand
Bahama Hotel when the
accident occurred. the
Ford truck was reportedly
owned by Ronald
Washington Pinder.


ROBBERY CHARGE


A 28 -YEAR-OLD
American, Donald James
Jensen, was charged in
Freeport Magistrate's Court
this morning with armed
robbery in the early Monday
morning hold-up of the
Stoned Crab restaurant at
Taino Beach.
Jensen, who used to work
in Freeport and who hia. been


the people's in

would be taxed to profits to the man who gives
you the services."
ent control of the Governmnent's function, I)r.
was increasing he Hospers said, was to keep
certain individuals, the peace. But to entel the
envy, sought to economy in the realm of
rom those who had production and trade would
bring the people down to what
INCEFNTIVE he described as "splendidly
equalized destitution."
tate becomes more He told his listeners that
powerful, taxes are during the depression the only
and trebled. railway system in the United
becomes smaller States which did not go
s less incentive to bankrupt was the Great
Northern, and that was because
in danger today is it was privately owned.
one's competition In a free market people will
e government," Dr. get what they want at a price
lared. they are prepared to pay, Dr.
d that government Hospers said.
out of business Housing was another area in
lacked flexibility, the United States in which
ed in inefficiency government intervention had
mrn the government proven unfortunate. As
cover up by property taxes became higher
xes. and higher, owners found it
want service badly unprofitable to provide good
n't begrudge the services.


a frequent visitor to the
island since 1963, according
to police, was charged with
taking $2.393.24 from
Stoned Crab manager Mack
Shaw shortly after 12:30 a.m.
Monday.

Police said Jensen was
arrested Monday "very
shortly" after the robbery.



itiative

Consequently buildings fell
into disrepair and the
government was then forced to
take them over When it did so
it kept rents low for welfare
tenants at the expense of the
general public which had to
pay the taxes to support such
projects.

Asserted Dr. Hospers: "Most
of the poverty in countries has
been brought about by
government which has
strangled trade and blocked the
efforts of the poor people to
improve their lot."




OMEGA


IIN$1


AIM's plan



of action


__ __ I ______


~t -- ------- -- -- - ------ -- - -- --- ...











Tuesday, February 26, 1974


iSh GribunR


Missing balloonist may have ditched in Atlantic


EXILED Soviet Writer
Alexander Solzhenitsyn plans
a belated trip to Sweden
during the Nobel festivities
next Dec. 10 to pick up the
Nobel prize he won in 1970.
Solzhenitsyn, who
remained in Russia rather
than risk exile the year he
received the award, made his
plans known in a letter the
Swedish academy made
public.
The prize money, $88.000.
has been deposited for
Solzhenitsyn in an account in
Switzerland.
Solzhenitsyn left Oslo by
express train for Copenhagen
today.
Nothing had been decided
about where Solzhenitsyn
and his family plan to settle
permanently in the west.


NORTH VIETN MIFSF
and Vietcong troops have
inflicted heavy losses on
South Vietnamese forces in
the Mekong Delta, field
reports said today.
Communist troops, moving
under a heavy artillery
barrage, overran 500-600
militiamen on Sunday south
of Can Tho, the capital of the
delta about 85 miles
southwest of Saigon.
Reports said 26 militiamen
were killed, 22 were missing
and 36 were wounded. There
was no report on Communist
losses.


THE PRICE of gold soared
through the $ 175
psychological barrier todav
amid widespread reports Arab
oil producers were carrying
out their threat to change
their big dollar holdings into
the precious metal and some
European currencies.



AN IMMIGRANT Russian
aLientist has explained to the
American Association for the
Advancement of Science his
hypotheses that once Venus
and later Mars nearly collided
with earth,


WASHINGTON


National Meteorological
Centre estimates that
missing adventurer
Thomas Gatch jr. had to
ditch his balloon "Light
Heart" in the Atlantic
ocean some 900 miles
from the African coast.
A spokesman for
Gatch relayed the report
from the Federal
Weather Agency as
rescuers continued


The searching the sands and


seas of Africa in vain for
any sign of the
48-yvear-old balloonist.
G a t c h from
Alexandria, Va., was
striving to become the
first man to cross the
Atlantic in a balloon.
He was last sighted
Thursday morning by a
Spanish freighter some
two-thirds of the way
across the Atlantic,


drifting at an altitude of
only about 1,000 feet.
The spokesman for
Gatch said the
Meteorological Centre
estimated, on the basis of
the sighting and known
wind conditions, that
Gatch came down Friday
night about 900 miles
away from the coast.
All air and sea traffic
in an area off Spanish
Sahara and Mauritania
had been alerted to keep


watch, the spokesman
said. He said the Defence
Department had agreed
to despatch a search
plane to the area where
Gatch was believed to
have ditched.
According to the
spokesman, Gatch had
flares, reflecting mirrors,
a strobe light, flashlight,
emergency locator
transmitter, a life vest,
life raft and ample food
supplies. The gondola of


his balloon was designed
to float at sea.
Ten helium-filled
balloons pulled Gatch
aloft as he left Harrisburg
Pa., nine days ago. He
lost one shortly after
leaving the United States
mainland.
When sigh ted
Thursday by the Spanish
freighter "Meridian,"
Gatch's gondola was
suspended from eight
balloons, the spokesman


Grenada food ransom call


for stolen Vermeer


O()Nt)ON An anonymous telephone
caller has threatenedL the destruction if
the ,tolen Veriteer painting unless 51 15
million worth of food is distributed to
the people of the Caribbean island of
Grenada.
[he caller. who had a West Indian
accent, dentmanded the food li f O ii ,
within two weeks "or we will do another
ra"id
lic told a reporter for The (;uardian
that Vernmeer's 'G(;Ltar Pla rc.' which was
stolen from a .suburban muriseCtum Saturday
night, was being held in llighatC, a ,suburb
in north London
"We are from (Irenida." thie .allei said&
lie wanted S1.5 million worth of food to
b given ito people in G(rcnada. "AndI it
inist he given within 14 dai s or we' .1


do another raid."
There was no immediate comment
from Scotland Yard, but an official of the
Greater London Council, which
administers the museum from which the
17th century Dutch painting was stolen,
said it would not meet the ransom
demand
The picture's value has been estimated
as high as S4.4 million.
The telephoned demand was
reminiscent of those made by the
Symbionese Liberation Army after it
kidnapped publisher Randolph Hearst's
daughter Patricia and by urban guerrillas
in Argentina who extorted food and
medicine by 'li.ii .'i ig to kill Ford
executives.


Anguish mounts for


the Hearst family


ll ilt 1 sO R)it ;ll
\r'therfc' eek A| .anguished
wsms tg h.is s-,uet lor theh
ainulylx ,t ki dnapped ness',papei
heires.s Patricia Hears't
"I here is nothing to do and
it is trusirating,. J st waiting"
said Jay Bosworth. son-m- nl.
of liss Hearst's father.
newspaper executive Randolph
A Hlearst. 'We feel she is still
Wlive and healthy
IThi Hearst uilntl is,
awaiting Jn ai'-we tir from the
terrorist rrotp h il h ab-tildicted
Miss liearl the Sitmbhionese
lOiberation Armyy. to an offer
of .i, aqhir 54 mitilion in f'Bod
in es\char"e for the release of'
the 20-se ar- old niversits of
C'alifornia coed.
Ilearst and :i Hearst
tfaniils futiirndation have dlread


ma.de S2 million in food for
( .Iornia's needy available
I ie terrorists have
threatened to kill Miss Hearst if
an attempt is made to rescue
her.
Ihe SI A said she would be
held as a "prisoner of war"
until SLA demands for food
for the needy and other
demands not yet specified met.
Meanwhile. SLA members
Joseph Remiro, 27. and Russell


FUNDAMENTAL rights
and freedoms are respected in
few nations of the Americas.
says an international labour
leader. "Authoritarianism and
repression of freedom of
thought and inalienable rights
of the human personality are
a commonthing. "said Otto


Little. 24. pleaded innocent to
the murder of Oakland
School Supt Marcus Foster
last November The SLA
claimed responsibility for the
killing.
A.ilh..'nritijs have speculated
that the ultimate SLA demand
in return for Miss llearst's
freedom might be for the
release of Little and Remiro.
SLA messages have hinted at
that. (AP)

Kersten, secretary general of
the International
Confederation of Free Unions
(CIOSL). He spoke at the
opening session of the eighth
congress of the Inter-
American Regional Labour
Organization.


$220 down on Winnie or a win


STRETFORD 'Itere s
another floater." Irned lhe
weary campaign worker swhf:
had just rung another doorbcil
in suburban Manchester
Winston Churchil anmet
looping down the street. blue
Conservative party rosette
flying from his lapels, bounded


i.\er I he pn ir e t ic iie and
pl.'ted hltresf, politely bhut
argiilei'tarlti _'l \ on the door
step the housewife who said
.he'd "hadi it with Labour' bUt
couldn't make her tintind tip
between I Consernative and
Sitheral
Flashing a boyish smile and


mild es es of unblinking
earnestness, the grandson of
Britain's indomitable wartime
leader pleaded the merits of
keeping the Tories, as
Conservatives are called in
power and. in particular.
ret u rning himinself to
parliament


Best taste


on the is


lan


d.


'-t


II

'I


/A





II


It~. l lfyrMOSTOIACCO COMPANYi WITON SLN c u A


SoGood.


"'You could do with havingg
me husbandd 'ere," the woman
said uncertainly.
'1 could do with having
your vote," the candidate
answered over the boom of an
advancing loudspeaker truck
that kept up the refrain:
inst ir Churchill, your
Conservative candidate, is now
in Davyhunme Road. Come out
and meet hinm."
Housewives in pin curlers
and aprons appeared at their
garden gates, with an
occasional pensioner puffing
on his pipe or a working man
at home because of Britain's
three-day week.
House by house, the
33-year-old politician and
sometime journalist urged his
listeners to ponder the issues of
the campaign
House by house, they
pondered the famous profile.
"le's niore like his
grandmotherr" pondered the
woman at Nor 143
"lie's got receding forehead,
all right," si/ed up the elderly
gentleman across the way. "hbut
he wants the pug nose that
made us call Winnie the British
bulldog-"
Down at the end of the
road. Minnie Churchill, the
candidate's tall. handsome
wife. had discovered another
"floater" in a tiny cottage
wedged between two bay
windows already flaunting the
poster "Win with Winston."
Young Churchill. literally
running for parliament, took
off again across lawns and
fences in his long-legged stride
to a chorus of barking dogs and
booming amplifier truck.
"The floating vote is what
we're after, the ones that aren't
sure," he explained over a
quick lunch fish and chips
on a newspaper: white wine in
a plastic cup that was. like
his constituency, a nice blend
of the working class and tihe
upper crst.
With an aggressiveness
worthy of his grandfather,
Churchill had been hitting the
hustings since 6:30 a.mt..
r meeting the workers coming
off the night shift at the


Grenada is a Caribbean island group
that received its independence from
Britain earlier this month. It has been
wracked by demonstrations and strikes
against Prime Minister Eric Gairy. whose
opponents claim he is trying to set up a
police state.
Police were watching airports and sea
terminals. and European art dealers were
put on the alert for the Vermeer painting,
a 20 by 18 inch canvas showing a young
girl playing a guitar. It is one of about 40
pictures Vermeer painted before his death
in 1675.
It was stolen from Kenwood House, a
mansion in Hampstead that was left to
the nation along with a collection of 60
old masters by the Guinness brewery
tycoon Lord Iveagh.


Police said the theiL e' broke
through a barred ground-floor
window, grabbed the painting
from its frame and escaped
before the alarms went off.
Earlier, a detective said
whoever stole the Vermeer
masterpiece most likely had a
customer in mind for the
painting.
"It is likely there was a
customer waiting," said
Detective Robert Volpe, head
of the New Yok Police
Department's art identification
squad.
Another possibility. Volpe
said, is that the painting was
stolen on order from a
Venneer-crazed collector who
plans to keep it. But such cases
are unusual because the
collector would never be able
to display his treasure without
risking detection.
"Part of the collecting thing
is wanting other people to see
what you've got." Volpe said.
The detective said one
theory is not plausible: that a
common thief stole the
painting for a quick sale. (AP)



Electim

Week


Kellogg's corn flakes plant,
jumping on buses, canvassing
house to house. stopping
people along the street to hold
the constituency he had won
from Labour in 1970 with a
majority of a little over 4,000.
An afternoon of more doorbell
ringing and an evening of rallies
and pub crawling lay before
him.
When Parliament is not in
session, young Churchill
occasionally returns to the
journalistic career that he
inherited from his father.
Randolph Churchill. with
whom he coauthored a book
on the 1907 Arab-Israeli war.
lie covered a portion of
Senator George McGovern's
campaign for the American
presidency and remembers
being. overchargedd for a press
flight to upper New York state
1 think they wrote off the
excess as a campaign
contribution.'
lleartened by a prediction of
victory in the local paper, the
candidate once again bestrode
the battlement'; with his blue
rosette and a large "Win with
Winston" placard.
A pensioner outside the
tobacco shop called out
encouragement: "If you do
like your grandfather did for
us. we'll do all right."
But a man on a passing
bread van put it more
succinctly: "Get to work,
Winnie. Me and me mates got
100 quid on you."
That's $220.


said. He said that was
enough during daytime,
when the sun's rays heat
the helium, but not
enough to keep his craft
aloft at night.
Gatch is the son of
Vice Adm. Thomas L.
Gatch, who commanded
the battleship South
Dakota in World War II
and was the chief
investigator in the crash
of the airship Macon in
1935. (AP)


Edward


G's son

is dead


LOS ANGELES Edward
G. Robinson Jr., the son of
one of motion picture's great
tough guys, died today
shortly after he was found
unconscious by his wife, Nan,
on the floor of his West
Hollywood home.
A sheriff's spokesman said
Robinson appeared to have
died of natural causes.
although the exact cause of
death was unknown.
He appeared in several
television shows during the
early 1950s and in the film,
"The Screaming Eagles."
But the younger
Robinson's efforts to follow
his famed father into the
acting profession floundered.
He was convicted several
times for drunkeness and
drunken driving in the 1950s
and 1960s.
In his autobiography, the
senior Robinson wrote of his
son's drinking escapades:
"Whatever amonies of
spirit forced hin into these
behaviour patterns are
matched now by my own
agonies as I remember them."
The father was working on
the book shortly before his
death at age 79 in January
1973. His last film was
Soylent Green.

Wreckage seen
WRI (KAG(; of a missing
Liberian-flag ship has been
sighted off Sicily but no trace
has been found of its crew of
29 men. tfie Italian Navy
Ministry said.
The 6,500-ton freighter Sea
Gull, owned by a Zurich-based
company, has been missing
since Feb. 17 when it informed
the port authonty of Augusta,
Sicily, by radio that its journey
was being delayed b\ a huge
storm. ( AP


Cholera toll


CHOLERA killed 121
people in Mo/aimbnhique from
Jan. I to Feb 21. the head of
Pubhc Hlealth Services said.


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-WHY I WON'T


RESIGN


-BY NIXON


WASHINGTON President
Nixon said last night he does
not expect to be impeached
and will not resign because "I
want the presidency to
survive."
tHe said the ;.r.',iol .
cannot become hostage to the
popularity of the man who
holds the office.
"...We have a lot of work
left to do. more than three
ears left to do. and I'm going
to stay here 'til 1 get it done,
he vowed.
Nixon said he expects
Republican candidates. allies of
the administration, to do well
in next November's elections.
despite W.iit-c.. and other
Wo es.
But Nixon said he will not
resign even if it appears later in
the year that (GOP candidates
are headed for wholesale
defeats in the congressionall
elections.
"I want my party to
succeed, but more important.
want the presidency to
survive." he said. "It is itatll
important that the
president of the United SLates
not be hostage of what
happens to the poptularnts, of
what happens to a president., at
onle time or another."
Nixon's comments on miaior
topics at his news conference
OIL SHORTAGES: The
President said the nation has
passed thrmifh fthe timee ot


CAR BOMB
BFI FAST A terrorist car
bomb exploded today outside
the Belfast headquarters I; the
middle-road Alliance Part, a
partner in Northern Ireland's
coaliltin administration.
lThe blast badly damaged
the building near the city
centre and hit a score ot stores
and offices. Brit ish n\rt
headquarters reported.
Se eral people received
slight injuries Others were
treated for shock. including a
family showered with debris as
ihey ate breaktas: in a nearby
house
TIle terrorists. who the
British said were believed i.. be
an Irinsh Repiiblieain Armr
squad. telephoned a newspaper
with a warning two minutes
before the bomb detonated.
Police ,had n-i tune to clear the
area
I he I R \'s die-hard
provisional winhg has vowed to
wreck the coalition and a
hfridge-uilding agree rent to

FNEW... on the scene..


heating-oil shortages and there
now is a "much better than
even chance" that gasoline
rationing will not be needed
He predicted that car lines at
the gasoline pump will grow
shorter d iing the spring and
summer and that gasoline
prices will not drop until more
fuel enters the country.
INFLATION: Hits
administration will bring
inflation under control this
year and that the real answer is
"to get the supplies up that
can get the prices down."
ECONOMY: The nation is
"going through a downturn in
the economy at this point, but
not a recession." He said
prospects for the future are
good.
WATERGATE: He rejected
a request by special prosecutor
lIeon Jaworski that he testify
before a grand jury. But he said
he is willing to answer written
or verbal questions from the
prosecutor in private.
FUTURE: He does not
expect to be impeached and
said he will not resign because
the presidency must not "be
hostage to what happens to the
popularity of a president."

ELECTIONS: The 1W74
congressional elections will
favour candidates "who stand
for this administration.' a*nd
peace and prosperity will hc
the major issues. (AP)


BLAST
establish a Council (
All-Ireland with the
neighboring Irish Repuhblc
that the coalition signed it
Sunningdale, England. in
December. ( AP)

Seafood mine
A RUSTY old naval nine
used as salty decor at a popular
Miami seafood restaurant bicls
a crater six feet deep and 20
feet wide at the county's boimb
disposal dump. officials say
A customer at Mont 's
Conch Raw Bar kicked the
tour-foot thick sphere last
week and three chunks fell out
Police bomb experts said the
'it I.-ild chunks were an
explosive similar to TNT.






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Tuesday, February 26, 1974

EDITORIAL


The great design

By ETIENNE UPUCH
GRAND CAYMAN, January 20th This island is a place of
complete relaxation for my wife and me.
We have a room that overlooks the Seven Mile Beach with a
stretch of ocean that merges into the distant horizon.
It is true that a great many people who have lived in the
Bahamas are here. They know my wife and me but we have no
real social ties. We have no commitments of any kind. We have no
obligations.
We are alone ... just my wife and me. And we are sufficient to
each other.
I love people. I love to do things for people. But I am not
really a social animal. I find my greatest happiness in solitude.
I realized when I was at St. John's University 47 years ago that
I could have easily become a Monk and lived a life of
contemplation in the serenity of St. John's Abbey that was
attached to the University.
There, too. I was a loner, with no friends, no ties, no
attachments except those I chose to make.
I remember, when all the boys went home on vacation, I was
alone in this vast place. The Priest who was in charge of the
library gave me a key to this quiet retreat. He must have had great
confidence in me because I was told that this had never been
done before. I had to keep it a secret because it was against the
rules.
I spent my time between the library and wandering alone
among the beautiful forests that surrounded the university and
along the banks of Lake Sakatagon which had the reputation of
being one of the most beautiful lakes in this State of a :hiiussnd
lakes.
Here in Grand Cayman there is no radio, no TV, a telephone
that never rings ... just "no nothing" but ourselves and books.
And writing articles for this columnn.
1 have been reading again abbreviated biographies of some of
the great men and women in history.
You know ... Queen Victoria's great Jewish Prime Minister
Disraeli later Lord Beaconsfield advised: "Read no history;:
nothing but hi,,',aplli for that is life without theory."
Because of the way history is taught in schools many students
find it a boring subject. It is dull because too much importance is
attached to dates. Biography is fascinating because it is the story
of men down the ages who made history live.
I find the story of Alexander the Great particularly interesting
because the things he tried to achieve are relevant to the times in
which we live today.
His story goes back to the year 356 Before Christ. That is the
veal he was born.
Like Lord Mountbatten of Burma today, Alexander was born
to greatness but. as Shakespeare aptly put it. some men are born
to greatness, some have greatness thrust upon them, while other
men carve out greatness for themselves and hold it in their own
right.
Alexander's father was King Philip of Macedon and he had
Aristotle, one of the greatest philosophers of all time. as his tutor.
Macedon was one of the many small Greek states that were
warring against each other.
Alexander was iriejil\ influenced by the aims of his father and
by the philosophy of Aristotle.
Philip felt that if the small warrior states such as Sparta and
Athens would stop fighting among themselves and unite as one
people, they would be strong enough to resist the threat of the
great Persian kingdom to the east of them.
Philip tried first by negotiation and then by war to bring the
Greek people together ... but failed.
At 18 Alexander was placed in command of the left wing of his
father's army and in a great battle proved himself to be an
outstanding leader of men and a fearless warrior in battle.
When he was 20 his father was assassinated and lie became
king. He quickly carried out his father's objective by conquering
the Greek states and establishing a united Greek kingdom. Hie
then went on to conquer not unlv mighty Persia but also the rest
of the then known world.
I think it is correct to say that, although Greece has produced
s>oie of the greatest warriors, philosophers, scientists, artists and
architects in history, Alexander is the only one to whom the title
of "Great" w-' attachedd by his contemporaries.
And yet t' is man was dead ... at 32.
When you look through the pages of history and study the lives
of men who made deep footprints in the sands of time and died
in their early 20's and 30's it would almost seem that we of toja'
are pigmies by comparison.
The personal courage of this man and the battles hie wont
simply stagger the imagination but it was his approach to
government and the people hIe conquered that is really important.
Hie believed that racial division among people was the cause of
human conflict. Although he waged war every day of his adult
life, he did not believe in war .... he wanted peace. But he felt Ihe
could achieve this objective through wars that would eventually
bring all races and peoples together under the umbrella ot one
government. He waged war because he believed that this was thIe
only means by which national barriers could be torn down and
racial differences erased.
He believed that peace could be achieved through trade. He
realized that the only thing most of tIhe people in the world
wanted was to be left alone in peace to earn a living through
trade,
And so he issued a single currency for use throughout the
world he had conquered and built great cities on deserts and on
vast prairie lands so that people could settle down and carry on
trade. Alexandria, which is still the second most important city in


Egypt, is an example of the trail he left in his path.
Most conquerors leave death, devastation and ruin in their
wake. Not so Alexander. He built cities and settled them with
people engaged in peaceful pursuits.
Also unlike conquerors of his period, he was kind to the people
who came under his rule.
When he conquered a country lie treated the defeated king like
a king and tried to make a friend of him. He protected women
from abuse and treated the ladies of a conquered king's
household with courtesy and consideration.
Hie went further ... hie married the daughter of a king whose
country he had conquered. The defeated king had fled when his
army was crushed. But Alexander proved by marrying his
daughter that he had only friendly intentions toward the people.
The king returned .. and Alexander made a friend of him.
Alexander ordered his officers and men to marry Persian
women so that, in time, the Greeks and the Persians might be
cemented by the bond of blood.
He believed that through conquest he could carve out ai
peaceful world ... and his tools were trade and intermarriage.
But the whole structure he had designed fell apart because he
did not live long enough to give it secure foundations. It was a
grand design that might have succeeded had it not depended on
the span of one man's life ... and, in this case, a particularly short
life.
One cannot fail to be impressed by the greatness of this young
man. At 32 he was stricken by a mysterious disease. It is felt that
he might have been poisoned. At the time he was engaged in
planning one of his greatest enterprises. But although stricken by
a fatal illness ... he continued to direct the operation right up to
the last moment of his life.

Since that distant day several attempts have been made to


he Gri tttne ___3


Bahamas capitalists have no social conscience


EDITOR, The Tribune,
I would be most glad if you
would allow me space for a
short attack on the enemies
of the consumer and society at
large.
For ages major business
institutions have been credited
as important elements in our
society. This is true even
today.
However, this is one society
where major business owners
have in the past, and at
present. indulged in merciless
attacks on their prey, the
consumers, who have not been
able to shoot because they
never possessed the key to
their arsenal.
In view of the accepted fact
that as time passes on the
attack becomes more
burdensome the consumer
cannot afford to sit back and
watch the cannons. Fire must
be applied before the cannon
goes off
One would think that the
duty of any business that sells
to the public is to make a
reasonable profit: an inconte
sufficient to allow an upkeep
of such business and avoidance
of consumer exploitation, It is
-4- _


just the reverse. Bahamian
capitalists possess no social
conscience, their basic aim is to
enrich 'hemsr,hes at the
expense and hardship of the
poor.
Let's take a look at some of
these capitalistic institutions.
What about the insurance
companies?
People are purchasing
thousands of insurances every
year. Those who purchase
know the cost. those who seek
claims know the definition and
true meaning of present day
insurance.
Out of the millions of
dollars the insurance
companies collect every year
from property owners only a
few thousand dollars are
returned to the consumers.
Some people have referred
to insurance as a gamble, It is
in fact so. except that every
one knows the winner What
'' ii ii does the consumer and
the public at ',r'.. derive from
this gambling game. Certainly
nothing whatsoever Perhaps it


bring the world's people together under a single government. But
.,11, .,., through conquest .. always depending on the success of a
single man and the life span of the individual.
Like Alexander. most of these men died young and with their
death their grand design fell apart. Napoleon is another example
of a man who wanted to rule the world by 'i" ii, .i, E, urope under
.he control of a government centred in France.
Even in this detail Alexander was different because. after
conquering the world. he intended to make the centre of
government in Persia, not in his native Greece. This was another
example of the wisdom and generous nature of this man.
In introducing this article I said that the story of Alexander
was appropriate to the times in which we live today.
How could the aims and ambitions of a man who had a short
meteoric career on this earth over 2300 years ago lie applied to
our times'?
It can be applied because today it is more than ever realized
that people must either learn to live ti...ili. i in peace or be
destroyed apait by their own deadly devices.
In Alexander's day the importance of establishing the doctrine
of the brotherhood of man was a high ideal conceived in the mind
of a great man. Today it is more than an ideal. It is imperative
that this relationship should be brought about il the human race
is not to perish at its own hands.
For the first time an elo irt is treing made to unite Europe
through peace ful means.
In tihe European Common Market the idea of Alexander that
people can be brought t,, ih.,i through peaceful trade is now
being tried. If this effort succeeds it is conceivable that, over the
long stretches of time,. urope might develop a ini.,vk government.
even though the peoples of this vast continent miight retain, to a
large extent, their individual characteristics.
I think that Booker T. Washington. the great American Negro
educator. put such a prospect in its correct perspective when he
said about the aspirations of the American Negro in a white
society: "In all things that are purely social we can be as separate
as the fingers,. yet one as the hand in all things essential to mutual
progress.
AII.. 1',r great step in the direction of promoting the concept
of thie i.i.tli,:'r Il... of man lies in the objective set for the
Atlantic Colleges under the direction of Lord Mountbatten of
Burma. This new approach to education ... designed to bring
together under the same roof '.....ll,, selected young people of
different races and religions, who display leadership potential, is
another great step towaids breaking down elements that have
fostered hatred and hostility in the human family.
* * * *
Once again these efforts may fail but this new approach to a
Randd design for humrian progress seems hopeful for the simple
reason that it doesn't depend on the life span of any one man.
,t least it is a great effort ... and we in our time can make our
owtn contribution towards its success through unselfish work ...
and ,.',e
FOOT\()ll TO Illitn)R' iAnother bit of history might be
appropriate at this time. It is the story of King Henry V of
England who conquered France. lienry's greatest victory was at
tlie Battle of Agincourt in 1415. e finally married the daughter
of thie King of France and it was agreed that, on the death of tite
French king. lHenry would beonice King of England arid of
France. In this w va Ienry hoped t(o unite the two countries.
But. unfortunately. lHenry died at thIe c .l age of 35 and was
buried in Westminster Abbey in 1422 after having reigned for less
than 1 0 years.
When ilenry became king England was a small and
unimportant country. It was he who realized that England needed
a navy to protect her coasts.
In a story of his life the author writes: During his short reign
Henrv had created something inr 1ngland which was never to dire
out: a pride in being LnglishL "
When I look at England today and see how the labour unions
are destroying this great nation at this time of national and world
crisis I wonder what has happened to the English spirit that
followed Henry at Agincount and responded to Nelson's famous
signal at Trafalgar: "Thi/s day En'rgland expects ieery man to do
Iris duty. "
I feel that at this time someone in England should start a
crusade that might help tlie Englishman to remember that he has
a history of which he has reason to be proud.
England today needs the booming voice of a Churchill to
remind its people that greatness calls for s.i mfiue in peace as it
demands ,oiurJL',c in war.
I would think that Lord Thomson of Fleet. with his wide chain
of influential newspapers, should be able to find one man or
woman in the nation with enough imagination to record the
glorious history of Britain in such a stirring manner that it would
arouse in the hearts of the British people that sturdy character
which made Britain "Great" ... so "great" that it earned for her
the respect and admiration ... and also the sneaking envy ... of the
rest of the world.
In a nation that has produced so many great nen and women
there must be still one person left who would be capable of
making the English working uran realize that he is being made the
instrument of alien interests whose single aim is to reduce the
great British people to the level of mediocrity.

THOUGHTS FOR TODAY
Your sole contribution to the sum of things is yourself
FRANK CRANE
* * *
The meni who try to do soiiimcthing and fail are infinitely better
than those who try to do nothing and succeed.
LLOYD JONES


might be advisable for the
Government to take over such
businesses along with the
casinos as an additional source
of revenue.
For years Bahamians have
been selling their lands for1
little or nothing to land-hungry
capitalists who in turn sell it
b.i I to them and their
children at exorbitant prices.
In other words, gifted and
unfortunate Bahamians take
years to repossess what they
had been given b\ the grace of
God.
We hear everyday about the
Satn Andros deal, the
Yamacraw development, along
w ith many others. But are
these land development
schemes intended for the poor
and landless majority or are
the\ aimed at perpetuating the
present trend of economic
d i discrimination' It is
undoubtedly the latter.
The burden that is brought
t, bear by the food sellers need
no explanation. This is clear to


BOUQUET

FOR PMH
I editor. The Tril-n,
I would be grateful if you
wo ld insert the following
message in your newspaper.
My wife and I wish to thank
publicly the staff of the
Emergency Ward at the
Princess Margaret Hospital for
their prompt and courteous
attention given to our son,
Wayne. on Saturday. Feb. 9,
when he was admitted with a
suspected skull fracture.
The doctor's examination
was thorough, the X-rays were
taken quickkly and efficiently
and the diagnosis (which
t han kfully negated any
fracture) was passed on to us
t.r il +on
MR.& MRS. DOUGLAS
P.O. Box 6224. H.J.JONES
Nassau,
Feb. 15, 1974.



ErOIdiE


everyone who consider food a
means of healthy survival,
What is surprising is the
dilemma and acquiescence of
the workers. R,. ntib,
someone commented: 'Strike.
don't make I die laughing' "
This was made as a source of
humour, but is still a true
description of the workers'
dilemma.
If there is to be economic
and social equality for the
masses, if the many


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hard-pressed are to moderate
the attacks of the capitalist
employers and sellers, they
must understand their true
power.
This true power can beat
social conscience into the
heads of the common enemies.
There is a definite need for the
Bahamian working force,
young and old, to take a
militant stand against the
capitalii, .. attitude of their


enemies.
At the same time a scrutiny
committee should be
appointed by government to
investigate the fraudulent affair
of the major industries in the
Bahamas as well as the working
conditions of the labour force.
A blow today can save
tomorrow.
CARLTON MARTIN
P. O. Box N-4535
Nassau,
Feb. 10, 1974.


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NA









Tuesday, February 26, 1974



De. f tilow


By Abigail Van Buren
0 1974 bY ChicaI Tribu-N. Y. Newt Synd., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: Our son, Peter, who is 21 and a senior at
college, came home for the Christmas vacation. He invited
six couples to the house for a New Year's Eve party. My
husband and I planned on staying home, altho all the kids
were 21 and didn't need a chaperone.
Peter's invitation read as follows: "If you plan to
drink, please plan to stay all night. Sleeping bags will be
provided."
I didn't like the idea of a coed slumber party, and said
that no daughter of mine would be allowed to accept such
an invitation-even at 21!
My husband sided with Peter. He had the party, and
everybody stayed all night. How would you have voted,
Abby? MOM
DEAR MOM: Not with you, Mom. Sorry. All the kids
were 21, and I think your son used excellent judgment.

DEAR ABBY: A writer recently inquired about provid-
ing a simple funeral for himself even tho his wife insisted
that should she survive him, he would be given an elabo-
rate funeral with all the trimmings. You advised him to
seek legal counsel.
Abby. the California Laws Regulating Licensed Funeral
Directors and Embalmers [Sec. 7100] states that "prior to
one's death one may direct by written instruction the type
of burial he desires, and those otherwise entitled to control
the disposition of his remains shall faithfully carry out his
instructions"
I think it would probably be safe to assume that most
other states have similar provisions.
A. S. H.: LONG BEACH. CAL.
DEAR Mr. H.: Thank you for the information regard-
ing California law. But I have learned [the hard way1 that
when it comes to state laws, one may not safely assume
anything.

DEAR ABBY: I can't believe I am actually writing
Dear Abby, but I have a solution for people who want to
know how to get off those junk-mailing lists.
Write to: Direct Mail Advertising Association Inc., 230
Park Ave, New York, N. Y. 10017. Request an application
form, and it will be sent to you free of charge. Fill it out
and return it. I did, and some days, I don't get any mail at
all! ANTI-JUNK MAIL
DEAR ANTI: Writing this column has been an end-
less education. And I'm still learning. Thanks, friend.

DEAR ABBY: Cheers to you, Abby, for telling that
bride that merely saying, "Thank you for the lovely wed-
ding gift." when she accidentally bumped into the giver in
a restaurant one evening is not sufficient. All wedding gifts
should be acknowledged with a written note.
Or to borrow a phrase from Sam Goldwyn: "A verbal
thank you isn't worth the paper it's written on."
J. B. S.: CHAMPAIGN, ILL.

DEAR ABBY: Recently a massage parlor opened up in
our town. It's strictly for men, but they get worked over by
i.im,1n moi.sl young and pretty, or so I'm told.
Now, why should we women sit home steaming, and
wondering what we can do to combat this sort of thing?
I wonder why some brilliant woman doesn't open up
massage parlors for women only, and have young, good-
looking men there to work the women over?
The same idea could be applied to "girlie shows"
where the men flock. What would be wrong with having
places where women could go and look at men's beautiful

















-n the waterfront at East Bay & William Sts.
PHONE 5-4641


S

bodice


on's New


Wbh tribunr


Year's house party was a sober idea


FAIR PLAY


"dead," and fired him.


DEAR FAIR PLAY: Your "idea" is already a reality in Moral: Always get it in writing.
many cities. But for some strange reason it hasn't enjoyed
the success of its female counterpart. Problems? You'll feel better if you get It off your chest.
((NFIDENTIl\L TO "NAMELESS, PLEASE": Your For a personal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. 69700, L.A.,
situation reminds me of a story I once heard. It went like Calif. 9009. Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope,
this: A college president told a coach [who was, at that please.
time, turning out a winning team] that he could have his For Abby's new booklet, "What Teen-Agers Want to
job as long as he lived. The team then lost three games in Know," send $1 to Abigail Van Buren, 132 Lasky Dr., Bev-
a row, so the president called the coach in, pronounced him early Hills, Cal. 90212.


ARRIVI I) TODAY:
BaIhamai SStar. irarc ld Sc.is
S II l IV(Ia from \hUI I. 'I rupic 1.aI


Da\ tromi Wcs, 'li Palm Bc.
ARRIVI\(,; I MORROW
Berinmlud (;,aind Turk tiir'm
Miaini. Joinla hunm JaJkMinvillc
SUN
Rists 6.37 a.mI


Set-, 0' 10 p .m

MOON
Rises Q) 31 ai.m.
Sets 1 1.24 p.m.
TI DES
High 10.54 .m.


D'll.
ltow 4.03 a.m.
ia .i


nd 1 1.28

and 4.1 1


s?9












Eat and Grow Younger


Tuesday, February 26, 1974


ihe g ributtp


U.S. PLEDGE


Bloodshot eves reveal that TO FOREIGN


youth may be vanishing


Bvy 1.11 ish ri',


Dull, strained, blooshht
;vc vc, i that '.list vL, 5
ftatur- Beaut, ad v:i-r' i
ea'dei to void the .











lo ..w.* **" -kf:. K d 1:T 5 :-
w 0 y . i t

, : \ *- k --
H"H a U 'H i "*


E~t~D


.. .. 1, -'


NOTNI
iU


"JTOM~tv --.'1
Lo]D. ON Wet r^ ,
? rR E T [.,i t i *
-OR iN^.*
a-;m v r .-


~*
a.


'5


Ii'


E$ NOT oQ _SEE

s can

"he r





r- the without the need for a disfigur-
ar -up g network of blood vessels-
e he ri hflavin in the blood back
p of the eye combines with oxy-
en in the air to supply the
Si-k .;li' part of your eyeball.
t '' what happens to this in-
'.m aus oxygen-supplying sys-
in f there isn't enough ribo-
in the blood back of the
Then nature sets up a
-..best system by creating
: :' -:: o d v ss'l< to bring ox-
S : ". to the outer eye


I' -, hen a lack of riboflavin
S nature resort to this
< that ytour eyes are said
iodht, as indeed they
S- shot thr-uh with tiny,
St ,v reard bhlild vessels.
S p wh'ch dues more
o retain the appear-
outh-a head of thick
hair or a smooth skin.

S I ABlt T YOUR HAIR
f:rst :.. what's
S. hen woir hair begins to

-; : ach single hair is
i f rotcin, your hair needs
U' phur supplying amino ac-
S:- d iTn c-a yolk. (This al-
Srue fr hi.althy finger-
Sdin't eat
: f those particular ami-
. v r hair becomes
triand i lacks heen
} proteins into our
A li. t f nutrients that
f ,ur hair But what about


If -, r diet is not providing
-;Ii .lamin A. you may ex-
;,: .a de ad -l, king hair with
; :w powdered with dan-
ir ff\ And if you permit this vi-
tarn. n deficiency to become more
sc .-re. your hair may grow
c-+iro- and ugly. then begin fall-
:; ;,-' LIack of inositol. one of
h- i vitamnns, also causes loss
oif hair
The question is often asked
whf in- w becomee bald more
readi'v than women The an-
.. :- !hat men need even
r ',antities of the import-
-: i '; vitamins than do women.
h' their more serious lack
.f f d elements reacts on

S. uh}v do."t y iu men concen-
: t.r: kecp,'nig vour hair
thru I.h feeding it, rather than
d,.-:n;g it with .... i. tonics?


MINISTERS

PAUL L. ADDERLEY,
Minister of External Affairs,
returned to Nassau Sunday
after attending the Conference
of Tlatelolco held in Mexico
City. Mexico February 18 -
23
The final day of the
Conference was confined to
writing the Declaration of
Tlatelolco
Attending the Conference
with the Minister of External
\Xftairs were: The Bahamas
Ambassador to Washington and
the United Nations, His
SExcellency the Hon. L. B.
Johnson: Mr. Ernest Strachan,
Deputy Permanent Secretary
to Ministry of External Affairs
and Chief of Protocol. Mr.
George Stewart. First Assistant
Secretary, Ministry of External
affairss and Mr Carlton Wright
of the Ministry of External
affairs .
Today Mr Adderley
declined to comment on the
Conference until he has
communicated the report of
the Conference to the
( government


PLEDG
On Sunday the United
States accepted "a special
responsibility" in hemispheric
development and pledged to
maintain present aid levels to
the region.
he ic14-page Declaration of
Itatelolco climaxed three da\s
ot talks between US Secretars
tof State Hlenry Kissinger and
t,'reign ministers from 24 Latin
\merican and C(aribbean
nations
Promising to bring "a
new dialogue to hemispheric
rclt ions. Kissinger met with
ihe ministers behind closed
doors at the Mexican Foreign
Ministry for what was
described as "frank and cordial
discussions.
I he final declaration set the
stage for future relations
b1itwee-r the United States and
its hemispheric neighbours as
equals and not subordinates.
"'In adopting this document
the foreign ministers expressed
thnra confidence that the spirit
of I latelolco will inspire a new
creative road in their
rciations," the declaration said.
"Ihey recognize that they are
at thie beginning of a road that
will acquire greater significance
through regular meetings and
constant attention to matters
under study."
FIRST TIME
\lr Adderley said that it was
the very first time that a US
Secretary of State had ever sat
down and discussed matters
with Latin American States.
I atelolco i, the name of the
site where the historic meetings
were held.
I he document also
emphasized 'that one of the
principal objectives is the
accelerated development of the


School visits sponge exhibition
THE TOP GRADERS of the Greqorv Town. Eleuthera Public School made a special
trip to Nassau to see the historical exhibition on the sponging industry at the Public
Records Office, Mackey Street. Above, from left to right are David Wood, the Assistant
Archivist; Mr. Frederick Kelly, Head Teacher at Gregory Town, Michael Darville, Jullette
Scavella, Ann Thompson, Jeanne Thompson, Rosa Johnson, Nelson Neely, Maria
Johnson, Kirk Johnson, Sam Johnson, Colin Scavella, Peter Scavella, Theola Thompson,
and Archivist Mrs. Gail Saunders. (Ed. Note: Spelling of the Exhibition's title should be
corrected!).


countries of the Americas and
the promotion of the '..l .
of all their peoples.
"'In this regard, the United
States accepts a special
responsibility: and the more
developed countries of the
Americas recognize that special
attention should be paid to the
needs of the less developed."
And the United States
promised to 'ni.iini. n, as aI
minimum, present aid levels
despite growing costs."
DIALOGUE
Kissinger and the foreign
ministers also agreed to
continue their -spirit of
dialogue" on April 17 in
Atlanta. Georgia when the
annual meeting of tlhe
Organisation of American
States takes place.
A number of US proposals,
including the establishment of
a fact-finding board to settle
disputes involving US
companies operating in
hemispheric countries, will
continue to be examined.
The US boycott of Cuba was
barely touched upon in the
final document. A number of
foreign ministers whose
countries recognize the Fidel
Castro government had pressed
for an easing of the relations
between Washington and
Havana.
D)r. Kissinger told a news
conference on Saturday that
the US did not feel that the
foreign ministers' conference
was "an .,pipr .-pr i forumi"
for that subject.
The document did state
however, that "inter-Anierican
relations should be based on an
effective equality between
states, on non-intervention; on
the renunciation of the use of


force and coercion .iid 'on the
respect ior tih right ott
countries to choose their own
political, e'conolmic andl social


systems... and that it is the
duty of every state to refrain
from intervening in the affairs
of another."


JERUSALIM (AP) IsraelI
waited in suspense Tuesdal for
I S.Sec.retary of State llcntr
Kissi.ecr to start diplomatic
moves th a separation ol
eniemiiy forces on the S rian
war front, anld forcign minster
Abba I.ban said everythingg
now depends on Syria."
\h Fban said Israel was
entering ta nesw stage of Mideast
Ipace efforts "'in an authentic
and sincere desire to bring
abol ut a d isengagement
agreement parallel to that
which we haves achieved with
Egy pt."

But Israel will not negotiate
until Sria discloses the names


of about 80 Israeli c atives
held incommunicado since the
October war, Eban reaffirmed.
The Israeli government hopes
Kissinger will bring the list
when he flies here from
Damascus.
'Now we wait in some
suspense in the next 48 hours
to hear from Kissinger
whether Syria has overcome
the obstacle to negotiation,"
Eban told a convention of the
American Jewish Congress
Monday night.
Keeping war prisoners held
in secret and forbidding Red
(ross visits are violations of the
Genreva Conventions, [-ban
said.


-.... ..........

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Tuesday, February 26, 1974
Attention
all poets &
playwrights


THE Creative Art, Centre of
the Departnmnt ot
Extra-Mural Stludies is
mounting a Npe iCal
programme for the 25th
anniversary ot the
University. As pjrt of this
programme it is sp...nsoring
competitions in pla.i rating.
poetry and fictinii. open to
all West Indianr, or thuse
resident in the \test Indies
( This include, the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas).
There is no limit to the number
of works which ma\ be
submitted.
Playwriting: The pri.'e ot the
best full length pl. w~ ill be
JS200. The winning enrtr,
will be announced before
the end of the aciadeini. ear
1974 and the (reajlie Arts
Centre will attempt _Subiect
to the author's .pprodal. to
have the winning play
produced at a suitable date.
Poetry and Fiction: The prize
in each category will be
$100. There is no restriction
as to length and, in the case
of poetry, the Centre will
make every effort, subject to
the author's approval, to
have the winning entry
published in the most
suitable place.
All entries should be submitted
no later than May 15, 1974


Royal Wedding.
It will be shown at 4.45 p.m.
S I at the British High
Commission, Bitco Building,
I iFast Street.
Anyone interested should
telephone 57471/4.

Matinee 3:00 & 5:00, Evening 8:30-'Phone 2-1004, 2-10051

P*AA*ISHMET00COLCA MOM
YUL BRYNNER RICHARD BENJAMIN
PARENTAL DISCRETION ADVISED.
Reservations not claimed by 8:15, will be sold
on first come, first served basis.
I Us
I Starts Wednesday Wednesday thru Friday
Matinee starts at 2:00 Continuous Showings
Evening 8:30 from 3:00
"FISTS OF THE "THEY ONLY KILL
DOUBLE K" R. THEIR MASTERS" PG.
Henry Yue Young James Garner,
PLUS Katherine Ross
"THE HOUSE THAT PLUS
DRIPPED BLOOD" PG.
I 'Phone 2-2534 "THE BIG MOUTH" G.
No onie under I will be admitted. Jerry Lewis
NOW SHOWING
Matinee Continuous from 1:45, Evening 8:30'Phone 3-4666
BLACK GODFATHER IS BACK
...and he's takin'
S ..nover the town!
tFRED WILUAMSON coL.on.... U.
Plus! "THE HUNTING PARTY" R.
NO ONI-: UNDER 18 WIILL BE ADMITTED.


ehr Tribune


r


I I I


Tz[


'~" --


I













(ihe fribunt


Tuesday, February 26, 1974


CLASSIFIED


SECTION


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


REAL ESTATE


I I


C13672
2 COMMERCIAL lots
Carmichael Road 212 ft on
road to 160 ft. deep. $8.000
each.
CHESTER THOMPSON REAL
ESTATE 2-4777.

C1366b
FOR GOOD buys in residential
and commercial lots and a wide
selection of attractive homes.
Call Bill's Real Estate Agency
Ltd. and let us arrange terms, to
suit your pocketbook or qet
the best cash price Call us
23921

C13662
SPONGER'S Cottaqe Business
wAth prope ty 1 'polgOie
Liottaqt Busivess w It lease o;,
pr o p .' t' L onta t T he
Manae, Telephone 4 1052


FOR SALE
WINTON HIGHWAY
t,... two bedroomin hilltop
.j ii-nent block with space ,>
j:.,'i,' q for additional units
'. one acre with manificent
Currently qti ossn
S 0 l00.00 per JrnE-L
r-- r ice $130 0 00
BAY STREET
or.ntal site' o' East B .
b; *e?** 46x125 Lo J'ed
t e C h ri tie, & A ,-i' :.
S '-- on the so,'e,, de o
} .' '> P u I ( :j ; *
it 00
GAMBIA
&O a. ,'e quartt-i ,'. '-tJ
lesj'al site. We B-. bt'ee:
1e ; Orange Hill One he
St- .ome Nt- e,.
uce ad -ne
n: f- n ~ghe-t hiif. A.' J;^.,t-e

Mu.,- i.e tc aPD'eite

LONG ISLAND

B-, wi, -

t -ea ci ,--f

GREAT EXUMA
At- r foont lot ,n dees wa,
i .,t-c ted h ebo.r o
eI -viTion +. 'o 45 feet 1 &
ti, U George Town a, i
Pi C.e price $6.000 00
CONTACT MP- PERSON &
BROWN REAL ESTATE
LIMITED
Toi ci ho. 8s0 22680,
Te' Ch r. s 22680. 22681,


1 3604
LOT 118' < 155' MONTAGU
HEIGHTS, CHmpletetl
I r vi v ,i d with ear rit fruit
$18,000.00 Phoine
5435 12

L13027
BUY NOW!
SAN ANDROS
LOTS
14,500
sq,.FEET
Almost 1/3 acre
$45 DOWN, $45 per MONTH
CALL OR VISIT
FRANK CAREY
REAL ESTATE
P 0. Box N4764
BAY & DEVEAUX ST.
Tel. 27667, 248 15


DA'VSO, b RP AL ESTATt
O LT ).
S, -tatc Broe -
Ph, 178 5540F
P 0 bex N-4648
N.]-Sa- Bahamas
Pr. !ud. present
SM-AS"l', REAL
ESTATF 3ARGAirS
THAPOUGHOUT THE
COMMONWEALTH
2. 3 i-,d 4 BE DRFOO '


F S '- ROA


SAN S) 4
BLA R V IF -
GLENISh t A(, rN--
WINTOr1
THE GROV, (West Ea,
SKYLiNE HillC.t1S
NASSAU EAST
SEA BREI z[
VILLAGE ROAD
GOLDEN GATES
HIGHLAND PARKI
PROSPI Cf "i)GE[


WESTWARD VILLAS
C 0 N D 0 M I U
APARTMENTS in PARADISE
ISLAND
EAST BAY STREET
WEST BAY STREET
HOTELS and HOTEL SITES.
BEACH LOTS, COMMERCE
IAL LOTS, RESIDENTIAL
LOTS
ACR E AG E FOR
DEVELOPMENT IN THE
NASSAU AND FAMILY
ISLANDS SUCH AS GRAND
BAHAMA- LONG ISLAND,
ELEUTHERA, ABACO.
45 ACRE CAY IN THE
EXUMAS WITH DEEP
WATER HARBOUR AND
MORE
CALL
DAVSON'S REAL
ESTATE AGENCY
Phone 21178 or 80932 21178
P. 0. Box N-4648
Nassau, Bahamas.


REAL ESTATE


C13661
FOR SALE
3 bedroom 2 bath house
financing available. Phone
2 1495 or 6

13559
4 BEDROOM. 2 bathroom
unfurnished house with carport
and -sewing room FOR SALE
call i31 71- 31b72 (9:00 am.
12: 00 2 00 p m. 5.00
p 1. Week-cIavs).

PUBLIC AUCTION
1367(
PUBLIC AUL-T ION To be
,ondui'cted b, B PLGRAVE
A T uCT ION E .RS, : t't daL ..a
.. >h d. ] 74,1 i.rn 0 30
a OUR F RiEND DRV
L .. ~' STOR[ != t "'r,'et
.- -. Street) W est ,r ,
L oTer 'V!"k UDepo' ned a
-AIen' iMen's & Ladies' We'ai
-ou sehoi Goods. Mate-' as
) po i ,n ce- G i "t 0! .

v"4T !R SF TOCK V

L *^ '{ STOCK MUST GO'



C i 3538
FOR RENT

COTTAGES and apart-n
r 1thl, air c i.om itron, i
)V('' ''i iht l i lc' i
.,ji -le v ovely ,a''crn an'i
r'"p i ioIl. T'lephoel
31297, 310cr


2 e bed'om 'fu lly furnimshed

S:ct io 5 80t 9 Don-


C 1 t-"-y u hd
2-ASIC AL6 i Y 'ui 'i -hed f
* *;; ,,"-, ( ] h io m a,r


t",, r d) 1 bath
-'a- & di n g arb-.t .
: e M ntros.-
T nenepn o 2 1 /22
2-38:_b


wash gi ru
Averuec
5 o tio


C13600
BASic ALl Y furrif-hrd 1
bed-um. I bath. kt- hr;
'viqt rtd dt inq are'.'
itotol u i Ave'ri. T-.'lephfun
2 1722-5 and 2 3865

C 13630
LARGE spacious 1 bedroom
apartment. Walking distance
from town and shopping
centre. Phone 23709 34881

C13633
NASSAU HIL LCR F ST
TOWERS
laundry facilities
1 bedroom apartrnert $250 per
mon th
2 bedroom 2 bath apartment
$410 per month
(available Aprif ist)
Fully furnii hihed Lease
required. Contact
7.8421 2 Evening '7'b

C 13658
HOUSE ,tl't tri hi tin or
offie Maom i i St 'ct facnrq
Shopping PIr,!. Contact
23170

C13671
2 Bf DROOM rif iniheed
duplex apart en!r t ri ir .... .,,
Avenue, Stapledon Gardens.
See propi ito r. on ermises
$180


CARS FOR SALE




,71:1, an- h i;' 7i -i ,. lo
Call 3 o, 1 4

C 1324
1170 F (DP 4 do,.4 Ofkp
-i.vw NiJ-'i a i-r -
teiephl'

C 33 /9
L LALC K H VROLE
CAPRi(i r l leto ,
:ondition L J Knr Wi', T-T-;
I5 81 34


F 13670
1t59 ROLLS
Call 74295


ROY(L $i9500


cI 3L.'8
19,n8 M G L Gt Per ert
otirri.. .lltl l Al t r otor
Aski'inq ivn $1 ,00 o r O earest
of'pr Call /13O1 Dupulh


Cl 3bu73
CHEVY MALIBU one vear
old. aircondit loned, i adio etc
Like new. P.irne 247/7 days
Evening 3- 142-


FOR SALE

C 13632
5 PIECE Dinnette Set $75
Hollywood Bed $85
WE GIVE CREDIT RIGHT IN
STORE
CENTREVILLE DRUGS &
DEPT STORE
Phone 5-9342

Cl3657
1 LOT in Littile Blair
1968 Buick Skylark. power
steering, power brakes. 2
doors, alc ii-iTii..-nri,-ri
I wood desk and chfan
Phone 2 2386 ( 8 to 5) 3-2023
evenings.


FOR SALE


(13594
Beauttify tOi j g,iaden
DutLhl F lowI Bull,,
Dahli,,
Gladjuli. eit
MODERNISTIC GARDEN N
& PET SUPPL Y
2- 2868


I iSHE R Ampilerse 500120
Watts
Kerwood Radio Stic' tLuner
K T 7000 Good bargain
$400 Phone 5 7 3 aftea 6

DINING GUIDE
C13t29















,,ge'
Friendly Big "Al Collie"
Hostess Ms Penny Kemp
FHE BRIDGE. INN
NOW' SERVING LUNCHi
DOre"- 1:00 a m b 00 p m.
Dinner Served 5 p.m. to Midnight
I REE PARKING
C1361i3
ORDER YOUR TURTLE PIES
AND NATIVE DESSERTS
FLO MAJOR
TELEPHONE 3-1 111
C 13668
SETTLER'S PUB & INN
Beaumont Arcade, Bay Street
Tomorrow's Special
'.'i- iliD GOA1
*MINCED CRAWFISFH
*L MA BEAN il


MARINE SUPPLIES
C13381
PACEMAKER 44 ft
L urinous CrL snr' g vafcht
Phone 3-2371

C11894
1969 31 ft. CHRIS CRAFi
Commander Sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. eriginres
with less than 200 hours.
kitrchcnettp, good corditic,
Call 2426,7. 5401 1.


CARD 0F THANKS
C13652


The family of P.C. 638 Sidney
Sweetirn wish to thank all
those who sent floral tributes
and caids of sympathy during
bereavement Special thanks to
Dr Bethel and Dr. Gumbs,
Sistet Coiakley, Nurse
Mi Kenrtie. the staff of Princess
Margaret hospital. The Royal
Bahamas Police Force and
Bu tleI' f iuneral Homer




NOW AVAIl ABI F
1 9 74 Wor ld B o

Duitori!vy ajnd Atlas and also
19/2 and 1 "93 yelar book Call
( W. Sends Enter p ses Ltd
23921

PETS FOR SALE
C13b67
DOBFRMAN Pticher guard
dogs male eleven months
female five months Phone
after eight nightly 41568.


WANTS TO BUY
C1367b
GRAND piano needed for
church. Call Mr. Cole 5-8770
or 421l61 Mr Saunders
4-2215.

SCHOOLS

C 13386
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 ani
8:30 a.m. or after 6 p.m. or
35084 anytime.


I ELPWANTED

C 13b58
WANTED. Mle Bahamia-,
labouriericombination yardman
and janitor, to keep four or
five acres of grounds arid serve
as janitor of large building, 5
days per week.
Please write Box N81 54, listing
previous experience and
References


I ---- I _I __---- -.


1


C13659
BANK OF MONTREAL
(BAHAMAS & CARIBBEAN)
I IMITED has the following job
vacarncy:v
Manager International
Branch
The applicant must be
knowledgeable in all aspects of
banking and have had specific
experience in the foreign
Exchanges, Eurodollar Lending
& Funding, and Corporate
( i.li Analysis. He will be
responsible for expanding the
Bank's International business
and should possess a solid
background of international
trade and marketing functions.
Interested persons should
forward detailed resumes inl
confidence to the Personnel
Officer, P. 0. Box N-1118.
Nassau.

C 13639
JUNIOR CREDIT ASSISTANT
IN
INTE NATIONAL
BANKING
Must have following
qualifcat ions:
I. Graduate of recognized
university preferably witn
degree in accounting, business
administration, economics or
finance, or
2. Good high school record arind
minimum three years banking
experience with emphasis on
a na lysis of f i ria inc ial
s t a t e ments, o a ns
documentation and related
correspondence.
3. Foreign language helpful but
not required. Applicant will
receive indoctrination in
various banking departments
and activities for an indefinite
period before being assigned
specific duties arind
responsibilities. Starting salary
co m e n c u rat e with
educational background and/or
experience.
Attractive fringe benefits,
Only Bahadnian applicants with
above quJalifications need
apply. Please send curriculum)
vitae to Adv C 13639 cio The
Tribune, P 0 Box N-3207,
Nassau.


TRADE SERVICES
C13607
LANDSCAPING and for all
V ur g a r d e n ing needs,
tr tirirngi hedging, pruning.
tree felling and beach cleaning
call 57810 LAWNS AND
i r)G F Pr rmpt
i reasonable and eff cient
service.


-I


C 13498
FOR your building needs ar.d
CRANE hire see,
ISLAND BUILDERS
LIMITED P 0
N 4559 Phone 31671 3167

C13391

/1nder; Cu om

Bgrokera dL'td.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU. BAHAMAS
P. O. BOX N3714
!ATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
'4EAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
"-IECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINULE'
OR JACK CASH
PHONE:2-3795, 2-3796
2-3797, 2-3 798
Airport 7-7434
F PE ESTIMATES


1 TRADE SERVICES


C13390
T.V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for homes
apartments and hotels
SALES AND SERVICES
Call 5-940-'
WORLD OR MUSIC,
Mackey Street
next to Frank's Place.

C13663
UNLIMITED commercial
Freezer space to 10 degrees
for any and all users. $3 00/cu.
ft. per year. Apply Adv.
C13663, c/o The Tribune, P.
0. Box N3207, Nassau.


I ELP WANTED I
C13651
5 MEN Urgently needed for
(Farm Work) Report to W. I
McKinney, Lincoln Boulevard,
P. O. Box 1312, Nassau,
Bahamas-

C13446
SPORTSFISHERMAN boa'
c,,rtain. Must have 5 yea,.
experience with diesel engines.
Permanent position. Give full
information: Worldoil, P. 0.
Box N7776, Na.s,u.

Cl13h13
SALESMAN required in
nursery Must have fuli
knowledge of all tropical
plants. Apply in person
Modernistic Garden & Pet
Supply, Madena ShoppinQ


C13677
Lxpetienced, dressmaker
only Bahamian need apply.
Phone 36175.

C13674
TYPIST TEL EPHONIST
requiredd for Nassau business
c O n U I ng com pa ny
Applicants should be capable
of fast. accurate typing, have
experience in suitable business
office and not expect to be
closely supervised. Pleasant
offices on eastern edge of
town. Write to Jones.
Bardetmeier & Co., P. 0. Box
N-7/90. Nassau, Bahamas.


ANTENNAS
Island Tv 2-2618

AUTOMOTIVE
Lucas Batteries
Bay Street Garage 2-2434
BODY BUILDING
Wong's Barbell Club
5-4506
BOOKSTORE
The Christian Book Shop
5-8744
BUILDERS
Richard's construction 5-708C
BUSINESS FORMS
Executive
Printers 2-4267/5-4011
CAMERAS
John Pull 2-4252/3

CARPETS
Lee's CarDet Craft 3-1993

DRAPERIES
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993

DRUGS &
PRESCRIPTIONS
McCartney's 5-6068/5-2127
ENTERTAINMENT
Movies
Film & Equip,Service 2-2157
GARDEN & PET
SUPPLIES
Modernistic Garden
& Pet 7-2868
Nassau Garden & Pet
Montrose Avenue 2-4259
HARDWARE
John S. George 2-8421/6
WRECKER SERVICE
Gibson Wrecker
Service


TRADE SERVICES

C13656
FOR EXPERT
RADIO TV SERVICE
contact
Channel electronics Ltd.
T V S n ,. i ,
Wulff Road. Phone 35478.



C13503
DECALS, riimpei Stic-k-i ,
poster s, quantity sign'.
quantity printing on plastic:
work, metal paper, fabrics etc.
ARAWAK ART. Phone
2-3709, Montiose Avenue.


I .I


1AHAMA I



HELP WANTED

C13664
THE BAHAMAS OIL
REFINING COMPANY is
seeking personnel uoi its
Refinery operations.
Applicants should be skilled
and experienced in one or
more phases of Shop and Field
Machine Woik. Industrial
Electricity, Instirumentation.
Welding, Pipet it tig, Boiler
Making,. Engine Ovehhaul
(Heavy Diesels and
Automotive) and HIeavv
Equipment Opeiation (Cranes
and Trucks). Work involves the
daily repair and overhaul of
applicable refinery equipment
and fa ilities.
Applicants should have a basic
education in mathematics.
leading and writing. Preference
will be given to men who have
had previous refiteriv oi
ind ustial plant expert ence.
Starting salary corninlensuI ate
with expel ience and education.
Qualified persons rec;uiing
fii theri lifoimation. should
wi ite to Bfoi co Personnel
Office. P. 0. Box F-2435,
Fteeport. Grand Bahama. or
apply in pei son to MinistrV or
LabouL in Nassau


5


HOUSE PLANS
Evangelos G. Zervos 2-2633
LAUNDRY
DRY CLEANING
New Oriental Laundry
2-4406
MEN'S & BOY'S WEAR
The Wardobe 5-5599
MEN'S WEAR
Fashionette Ltd. 2-2376/7

MUSIC
Cody's Records 2-8500

OPTICIANS
Optical Service Ltd. 2-3910/1

PRINTING
Wong's Printinq 5-4506
Executive
Printers 2-4267/5-4011

RADIO & T.V. SALES
Carter's Records 2-4711
RUBBER STAMPS
Wong's Rubber Stamp
Co. 5-4506
SPORTS GOODS
Champion Sport Land 2-1862
TRAVEL
Playtours ?-2931/7
R.H. Curry & Co.,
2-8681/7
TRUCKING SERVICE
Gonzalez Trucking
3-1562/2-4726

TV REPAIRS
Channel Electronics Ltd.
3-5478
WINDOW/DOOR
REPAIRS


2-8896 Window & Door Specialists
S 5-4460

FOR THE ACTION i YOi WANT


mmmmmmm-- mm m mmm mm-
Shop Nassau Merchants

For Business And Services


Brother Juniper


"They're all out of step but my son, Harvey.


"When radio and TV konk out you never know when a
brown-out's coming."


NASSAU -


BUSINESS PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY


Save Time


SHOP .





bll Nk l l tim 1l 2186 E1XI.

I UIN hrMlltk '' 2 Im Pirnh ith 'l1


SAVE TIME SE M Y


|._


__


_ __ _ 1


a-


- -


GRAND B



HELP WANTED


C6714
BODY AND PAINT MAN,
own tools, 5 years experience.
Kent Motors. Box 384.
Freeport (352- 7231).

C6713
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT TO RESIDENT
INNKEEPER. Must have
excellent typing and
shorthand; r1,ust have -worked
in large hotel for at lIast two
(2) years, must be abie to act
for Resident Inrkee)er when
he is not available; nust have
worked a, exocutiv.' seuctary
before. Must be a graduate of
high school and business
college.
For the above pil-ase apply to
the Peosoinel Department,
Hollida Inn of L ucayan Beach,
P 0. Box F-760, Freeport,
Grand Ba',ama. Phone
3/3 1333, Ext. 28.


1 i L .


---I--*---


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F


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Tuesday, February 26, 1974


fi~DEIX


I]


W O0King F.e.ImI. Syndiclt, Inc. 1 74. W.,o4 irigU. ,M~tnL
"We'll work well together once I get over my silly
idea that you're too stupid to be my supervisor."


'FUNNY HOW T JN G60IN' DOWN MAKES
EVERYTHING SOI ONAOM -


"0 c77 AM


"Consolidated Oil Company9"


CROSSWORD

PUZZLE
ACROSS
i Let up j5 UnL". I In
S Tuber Parts!s
36Art . 38 Crw
;3 G, pet ng 40 F.. -
SPacr for Per ,
the press p:
16 Bravo 43 Wic
i Moist 45 W r.d War II
19 Allot


Bills
Scepter
And not
Broadway
dramatist
Food at a luau


46 G- '. 'i

49 Elxsts
50 Bre.isrv,
51 F!oss
53 Sed ,mert
54 Docket


R EPJA POLAR

OR RASK

EN CARD PE



A6AN CALLS
VALSEE OFFISH
AISISET SF.TITEE ;:
SOLUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE


DOWN




4 D nerr disil


5 Texas senator
6 Cleopatra's
nemesis
Yeast
Foreign
9 Lone Ranger's
friend
10 Enrol
11 Snapshot
15 Street sign
1 Compass
point
?1 Piggery
?3 Dowry
2? Senator
Ervin
78 Slippery
30 Debatable
3? Shoe width
33 Endemic
34 Notched
35 ilr.- fn,1i, rn
36 Exterior
37. Hauteur
39 Rapture
42 Dross
4. Dingle
47. Electees
48. Ocean
52 There
Jolly I


Qhr Zrtimut


I CARROLL RIGHTER'S


from the Carroll Righter Institute

GENERAL TENDENCIES: Morning favors
making decisions about what you want to do in
the future Afternoon and p.m. bring the chance to reduce
these plans to a successful working mold
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr. 19) Complete those matters of
policy with associates in a.m., then get into the details of
actual operation Earnestness brings greater happiness and
success.
TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) Quietly decide what you
want to do in am., then state your aims to key persons. Make
sure you gain support of influential person
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Make plans in a.m for what
you most want to do, both in business and social life Extend
and accept right invitations.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Get the okay from
bigwigs for any plans, then meet with allies to carry them
through Go after information you need.
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Take an excellent new idea to
bigwig for backing A letter arrives in the nick of time to be of
great help to you.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Handle obligation early, then
go where you can make big headway. Find new romantic
interest, if not married.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Reach an agreement with a
clever partner for future success. A situation develops that
requires action without delay
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Do work early so you can
devote time to a partner who has a fine plan for greater mutual
success Buy new clothes to make right impression.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec 21) Get into the
amusements that ease tension early. Then clear up that
unsatisfactory situation quickly. Smile more. Show generosity.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Plan with kin to make
your home charming, comfortable. Then go out together in
pm to place of amusement. Buy new appliance.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Handle home affairs in
am Attend to financial chores. Analyze some puzzling.
situation and get it righted properly.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar 20) Come to a meeting of minds
with regular contacts in a.m., then jump right into the work
connected therewith. Avoid moocher.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY. . he or she will have
ideals balanced with practicality, and will love to read, learn
and put ideas to work successfully. There is skill with tools.
Give the best education available and equip this youngster for
a happy and successful life. There can be more than one career


in this lifetime
"The Stars impel, they do not
your life is largely up to YOU!


Bridge
By VICTOR MOLLO
When a defender is a trick
short to beat the contract, he
may have to rely on a little
imagination. When he Is two
tricks short, he needs a bit more.
as here:
Dealer West: Both Vul:
North
SK Q87

West


48
SA 10
0AK87653
4Q32
West North East
10 Dble 26
Pass Dble Pass
Pass 34 Pass
Pas 34 ALL PASS


South
Pass
3t


All follow to the OAK. Where
can West hope to find three more
tricks?
If South has the +A, he will
surely make the rest. So East
must be presumed to have it.
which, of course, would be con-
sistent with the bidding.
West must find one more trick,
in addition to his VA, and again
the bidding points the way. If


4 A 5 2
9 3
S109
4J 87654
South
*10 9 7 4 3
Z) J 6 5 4 2
A Q 2
4 10
West leads a third diamond,
conceding a ruff and discard. It
does declarer no good, but allows
East to discard a heart. When
he comes in with his +A, he
leads his remaining heart to
West's A and ruffs the heart
return.




11 words of
ff o u r letters
Sor more Can
-- you make
from the
0 letters shown
0 T here? In
making a
word. each
I L L letter may
be used once
only. Each
word must contain the large
letter, and there must be at
least one elght-letter word In
the list. No plurals; no foreign
words; no proper names.
TODAY'S TARGET : 22 words,
good. .' words, very good ; .
words, excellent Solution
tomorrow.
SATURDAY'S SOLUTION :
Acne acorn acre action actor
aeon aerv ante arty atone cane
canoe cant canter canto cantor
c-any care caret carney heart
carte carton cater coat cornea
cran crane crate crayon earn
enact ENACTORV etna nacre
near neat nectar nectary notary
oary oaten ocean octane orate
orea ornate race racy ranee
rant rate rayon react recant
recnat roan rota tare tarn
tarot tear trace trance tray
yarn yean year yearn.


iolly-22


Crouching beneath the trapdoor, Rupert and backs are turned Rupert creeps from his
the Gomnie hear the men's rage when they hiding-place. Next moment he has taken the
discover that the little bear is no longer in statue and is back underground, quietly
the room. Presently Rupert ventures to peep closing the trapdoor behind him. "They've
out, and sees the two men at the door. He been using this to trick Mary's grandfather,"
couldn't have escaped," Marcus is saying. he whispers, showing his tiny friend the statue.
" Yet where has he gone ? The statue has
been left on the table and while the rogues' ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


compel." What you make of



Chess
BY LEONARD BARDEK













Last month at Hastings Soviet
grandmaster Gennady Kuzmin
(White. to move) beat Bill
Hartston, England No. 1. with an
instructive type of finish, which
often recurs in play. Solve the
puzzle, and you may well find a
chance to pull oft a similar
coup in one of your own games.
Par times: 10 seconds, chess
master or expert: 1 minute,
county vplaver: 3 minutes, club
standard: 5 minutes, average;
15 minutes, novice.

Chess Solution
I BxRPI PxB; 2 QxRP ch,
Kt-R2; 3 R-R3, Resigns. Black
cannot stop the double threat
of Q x Kt mate and Q-B8 mate.





I j FC3


USE


(hP iribunt


CLASSIFIED

ADVTS.


-O I I

pPF
IA I I I
II







L
-*1 1 -U


No 7.381


by TIM McKA%
Across


I. Mechalenil gear. (1))
8 Famous clown. (4)
9. Encountered. (3)
10. Ham, tongue. salami. etc.
(4. 5)
12. Garden Item. (3)
13. Hurried. (3)
14. Material. (3)
15. Devises. (7)
20., large birds. (4)
2t. Mustlral Instrument (44
22. Priwin rrmoo. 4)
:t. Stitched. (4)
24. Names (4) 2., SIster Down
I. Ituldlina expert (9)
t. Staff. (4)
3. Iistlncttive facial feature.
(0 4)
4 So let It he. (41
3. Destros. (.1. 4)
6. Complete. (5)
P. Dark thought (H)
8 HIrd nolse. (3)
II. Girl's apparel (1.
1(. It p l-
t a yion,
e Apeel-
ally It

1e. ~4e liar
(5)
i. Ut n der.
g r found
t r a Inq
1t). HIll t
fire
(4) YV*t r4qsM*R *No,,,


I he Comic ae


I REX MORGAN, M.D.


By DAL CURTISI


B1-DAL-CURTIS i


JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLS


APARTMENT 3-G ByAlexKotzky


STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard


Rupert and the


I _











Tuesday, February 26, 1974


( 111 I IO I \ll M 1IR .




Dazzling

Donna

ST JIOH N S ( .od c : ,
valuable player Donir. R- klc't
scored a garle high t Iit'
posts esterdas Iceadini ih.
Wri t t crtn DiVisiti pt-nni1ait
w rim 'rs to an I )S- t vii \t('r,
qg..iinas ( ollegc .c ,s and t Si '
Inter-Scholastic inint ,n I
basketball championtiJup
Overcoming great Jclrn..
trom the Aces. St John'-,
the icad 6-2 at the .ctidin thi
third quarter in i 'oinnnlid
14-5 Reckley swiho I ii I dica l
both rH rds siorcitd ,i> t-
in that period.
FromI then on, ] .i .
for St John's, Fhe \c,', lnct
great got a innl l
momt)entum together alth, tlh
they cut the lead thi ,i\ p in i
niodwas in the final pcrit.
Phillipa Woods vhho1
topped Aquinas Ltih fiii;
points headed thai r i
Rosemarie Davis smircd th i.-
then.


F


L)NDON esul ts ii
sMtcer galnles Ioday


i r iIsh


I nglishl eageiie
I )lvisIon ()fie:
Leeds I Leicester I
Liverpool I Southampton 0
I)ivision I wl"
Bristol City S Millwall 2
Swltdon 0 Luton 2

14 HOUR
EFFICIENT NIW
EUWBER DIRECT
STAMP
SERVICE 0 P N
& STAMP .
PADS 45


WuRG'S EIR SAMiPcc.
BRADLEY & MADEIRA


AQUINAS College senior bos\s teain
captain Clifford Rahming is a true
leader
"He knows his respotnsihili\ is
captain, he knows his responsibility ion
the floor and he knows that lie has the
obligation and option of talking to the
relfe e about situations that do come
tip," commented head coach (err\
Harper "I think he is a great leader in
everything he does -
Rahminng ho this season captainedt
the Aces to an undefeated Id
championship is the TribunehC' choice
for all-high school 'sport sian ot thlie
year
Cliff' is a quiet but very responsible
individual He is student council


1)1 S ll I I ll 1 I I< 1 \ I
chldI It! II t ,
.i 1: th l .i :,t, ,, .A ;
ji' id;:.. .i r !'!i iLli r !.
I.Icu" r! \!V!IJ, ,r k .... :I
!li-' s \ k A; .' !.









\1., 1t h!,' : t



ht ,. 0 h i nli \ I ln ) ,


,t I i Jt





E'A I AIt
We cu e lirl oi a ua, i l.catio
tbrI n l- .













faoh Bli 66' MA itiPh .D
tI ll I.











attend FI or no atr Hghe


Suit e 25, South i F 33143
Phfo305)666BA MA PhD


NOW SERVING

LUNCH

From 11:00 a.m. Till 5:00

DAILY SPECIALS DRINKS ONLY $1.00

DINNER SERVED 5 p.m. to Midnight
1 I-------------1 li


Plenty of FREE PARKING

EAST BAY AT THE FOOT OF BRIDGE N
y^^^'^^^Z2^--?^'r^b


-, ,n i l ol I, I, Ind i l
1 I i l t .11,1il ll


1 ) cif I I ,,i I hI t
! it), : il k D i'It ie l it h 'l
\, ; ih S ilil/ t -.i i tlst' 4





I i c' i J
- ; I lit l55- ,i !n


, i : : i t i l - i .' l i l, l t i i

- h - tl i 'f t 1

-tittt i, lilt itt I

il h t It .l .t I Ih I I I


S hi t I IIk I


-high top sportsman


president and has been a student
leader during hlis whole five years at
Aqu inas
AI would sav that he is given a lot of
aitthorit\ by the lacully and the
administration because of the fact that
lie can handle responsibilityy" noted
coach Harper.
"Our 140 provee, that we work
together as a team." explained
Rahming reerrming i their domination
of this \ear's series "1-verybody helps
each other and that adds points to the
score." The team respects Rahmning's
decisions aidl to him. lie gets 95
percent co-operation playing like an
all-star team with each person doing


Third choice Ray Rose (guard
Prince Will). Charles Albury (guard St.
John's) Andrew Albury (centre St.
John's). Kevin Rolle (forward
Sweeting High), Jeff Brown (forward
Aces). Coach Vince Ferguson (St.
Augustine's College).
Coaches of the year Peter
Thompson and Tom Grant of
Sweeting High: Rookie of the year -
Grathon Robbins (Aquinas).
Honorary mention Carl Alburv.
Phillip Turner, Michael Bowe. Tyrone
Hamilton, Edgar Moxey, Horace
Pierre, James Clarke, David Cleare,
Dexter Rolle, Dereck Vogt, Greg
Cooper. Keith Symonette. Danny
Stubbs and Leroy Whylly.


.i*'
I .- ,

-i -


SI-
.-l .


Baldwin Darling (pictured) clinched the senior division of
the 1974 Mr. Grand Bahama Physique Contest held last
Saturday night at the Jack Tar Hotel and Country Club.
Darling, a former Mr. Bahamas junior, was also awarded the
most muscular award. In second place was Neil Dean of
Grand Bahama. Dwight Palacious, of Freeport, was third.


Knowles

asked

to stand
I)RWA\RD KNOWLIS. ,ian
outstanding international sailor
h1as been asked t,, stand as
Commodore of the FamnilN
Islands. Regatta Committee.
allit notti cei Mi t tarold
Munnings, co-ordinator of ithe
committee.
In i1973 Mr Knoiwles. sailing
it his Star cl.iss boiat. came 2nd
in thie North Amierican
championshipss and 4th in the
World Chtamplonships and
among his rnumerousl other
achievements he won a
coveted gold medal int the Star
Class at the 1964 Olympic
(;aliies in Tokyo
,Am s I tie Independence
Regatta committeee did such a
good job last sear. in arranging
the scenes ais part of the
Independence celebrations int
July. 1973, Mr Knowles had
been asked to again head a
cotnnlittee which includes
many of last year's members,
in order to make the upcoming
Family Islands Regatta on
25-27 April another
outstanding success.
Mr Anothny Roberts.
Minister of Agriculture and
Fisheries and Local
(;overnnient has appointed
Mr. Iiarold Munnings.
Permanent Secretary of his
Ministry to co-ordinate this
event
Mr D)onald Pratt, Director
of Local Government, has also
been appointed to stand as
-Assistant Coordinator


le.nid toi the t illst litnc in the
tii., mrrtaking lihe 'iire f-5 i)
st ilit/
I 1h lead was inre',iseid when
Roberts singled in I ugene
II Iggs iand DIemeritte Schlit/
lti rtunnecrs on secionid and
tlhrd again hutil failed to add
iotllher i11n.
Slith two men on bises II
lt' seventh Will mtas fnned
\'tiiii\ Jactques to end th"

Schll / led -5 in the b bottom
ot lhe ninthll a ind tlhe Becs
ltlreCAitlned but Willu iiis held
-n i1tler allowing .a single riuni
PicedIlmg the galMe bot1I
I "Ilis were intrrod uceI to t
P' i i M mister 1 \ nden
indlhlting by BB.A Pretsident
SOswaili Brown. I he Prlunel
\Minister theln tossed out the
first ball to get thI e seasonti
lin dwcl ss .


TENNIS SEEDS


ARE ALL SAFE
BH I% AN JOHNSON


\ l I 1 II )1 )I) pla .I Is i n ltle
iii'ii ,ingles nii luit es si ncgle"
Stt i at l tI lilt' B I I A

( h 11tiqll ph t li t ne xt ierke it
i ,U ls ul ni\\ It.ie t op nigl
'5i u lk n't oi itl e tou lrl ne t l tt

li il l Ilt 1 'c" l IC'Ilil c' ii i
I I ld I II l f

o I S ,li\ ll( i < l, o ilcct, BoJ
I ..i, .. lca l Ste ciin R ollec
S 'p I 4. IB.lII\ I r .m In gtoI ll.


I ts t ll ithe N\ o t ,c l t I ait 0 .
S ti t til 1t1 i. It I
S li II,\ it. N 4 lsc t. Bil\l
I I I t1ll t'on inJd BIidsle\
I' k i Ienn'Il I e IINil I tI u Ip it N allt
S I I. 1o d ,ind B N tit)Iolls .



In Jtop i n
I ji! ri g ,ia t. i ,1 t1 1110 1

Lt,,t pi,i i.~ in t l' to ai e\
\M I \ ; I .'l i \ on th lIe
L 'iI .I I[ _' ; i i \ 1[ .i r l l
\1:, I',l"kc'il ;' ,, t ; c c i, h d ll



1l .N ~ l ll h \ d \ l l I .Id il lh
I', ll Ul \,, 3 iouin ced


I


Diine D vis (0-1, 6-0f
On Sunday the ladies No 2
s'cil J.,1inc Wiherg advanced into
IIne\l 't'eeket'di round with a
Lcomllt ible (n-2. (-4 win over
W I tpI-1b urn and the No 4
seed IBeulah Richnlond did
1ike i5 s, iith'n shte cide ateIl (i;
(. 1.. .. .2. 6-4
Satalt;i\ 's imatcthes.
Mitn'l s singles I-. ('ancino
hi J Knntsle's detault; J
I .iinr ton ht t J Thompson
-1 n-2, B I artington ht 1 ..
Sinion i -l -I i-2. S Hall ht J.
Ford Jr i -3. -3. M Hale bt J
Rautlie t -I. -O; P lHale ht S
I'slt ick' l -0. 6-0, I Bethel bt
(, (ianet 4-0. 6-3. 60-2.
Senioi mIen's singles (.
(are h bi 1 J. I ord t-2. 0- 2. ('.
Doinaltson ht I Baillargeon
6,-4 ,x -'
Men'Ilis uiles B, Niiholls
,. I J 1 or l bt I) Robert s &
I Stlichan i 0-3. t-4
I alies lingles J W iteri g bt
\\ itcpbi n t (-0. -O0. B.
RKihuiin dl 'h d( (;alho)\ iy 0-2.
,- 4 A I)ohcti\ bl J Ihiutchins
-" 0-3. 0i-2


Men's si gVlt'es i I ick s ht
I M iller 7-5, 4-i. 0-2. J
I jit igthon btP I' Knoiwle's -0.
0 3 1 II.ile bl I ( ancimo ( -0,
-I0 I VWest bt P Hale 0-3. f-0:
V Peinnetinan t B IBarnington
o-4. -S. o-'. ( R1ilchniond ht
I ( w art\.it l t -i. l u-(l 1Barnr
I-arinngtn htt J Strachan 6-1.
0-2. P l 0 b () Martin 6-2.
o-3 R ls. ts n| S Rolle 0-3.
hi -I-

cMienl I loiles A'
\itIt lings k ,i Isa:.iacs bt R
Kiio les .& I Kni ,le s 0-1,
I-,;. Burtnu,,os & Saunders bt
Rauitlie & \ll)miald 7-5, 0-3,
Rogeis, & I)aiille hi t Matin &
R u l tl'irtio d -' -2. 1) Isaa s,,
& I Bethel h blI Hale & M.
IHale -7, -4 Richmond &
Hodge ht Buri,,ws & Saundters
0-1 0-1 I Barr\ Iarrington & B
l)emeritlc ht I JI -ord & B
NiLtiolls 0-I 0-1. J Farringtont
& M HIlalc ht S Knowles & (G
(Garner 14-1 2, 1-7
Ladies doubles K Sieler &
S Miller hbt A Knowles & G.
Saunders 6-4. 6-0,


-EQUATION HOME


IN RECORD TIME


their own thing, no team can win like
that. Cliffy sees to it that Aquinas
Aces remain whole.
The following are the Tribune's
choice for the inter-scholastic senior
boys basketball all-star, first choice
Barry "Mossah" Smith (guard. Aces).
Clifford Rahming (guard Aces),
Grathon Robbins (centre Aces),
Reggie Forbes (forward Aces). Harvy
Roker (forward Adderley High).
Second choice Brian Cartwright
(guard Sweeting High). Prince
Hepburn (guard Aces). Lenny
Thompson (centre Adderley High).,
Maxwell Albury (forward Prince Will)
Bennett Davis (forward Aces).


order, include Baccara, George
C ou in a n t o rs" 7 3 foot
aluminum yawl: Sassy, a
(l-oot (' & (' designed sloop
owned by Dutch Schmidt of
l)et roit. Sorcery, James
Baldwin's 61-footer designed
and built in Port Credit.
Ontario Phantom,. Ralph and
Skip Rider's new (' & C 66;
Robon,. another (' & C 61
I rank's 54-foot aluminum
Newport Beach, Cal.

R-inning Tide, the 19 l71
SORC champion, a 60-foot
Sparkman and Stephens
ciustoni sloop, now o,,wned and
sailed by Al Van Metre and son
Al. of Anna pols. finished
se clith on elaps'Cd time.
toI llo\ed t itbs Wai Batl\, Dora
I \Misker,. l.: I orza del
Ik-sinio. Jubilee III. Kahili II.
and N\aiis i n Class A.
IHlie iris (las.1 B boats in,
inchidcd Yankee (irl. the Olin
SteIphens designed sloop owned
hb\ Daid Stecrce of Dallas and
Bostoni Inhe slop. ibusll bt
Pilnmi-i Johntson o the
linerlqt tonil ( ill j,-;. Rules.
applied for the first tune in
I' ftinislhed in 1P hours.


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that PAUL FALCON DIXON of
Coral Harbour Nassau is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 26th day of February
1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship. P 0. B)ox N7147, Nassau



NOTICE


H NOTICE is hereby given that GERTRUDE ELIZABETH
HIGGS of Lincoln Blvd. Nassau is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
-* knows any reason why -'i,.,,.it-'rn should not be granted
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 26th day of February
1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.



NO TICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CERAMENT BELIZAIRE of
Dwen's Town, Andros Bahamas is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written ans signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship P. O. Box N7147, Nassau


* ~


SK-S


Quiet Cliffy for a


I I-


I QUA [ION, a swift
centreboard ketch owned and
sailed b. Jack Potter ot Oyster
Ba\, N.Y shaved almost 38
anld a halt minulltels oft the old
Miami Nassau sailing record.
She finished illn 1525 hours, a
li1t1le ovci I house and 15 I
minutes.
lihe old record, held b\ tilhe
late Bob Johnson with his
[- report -buil \VWind\\ ard
Passage. \\ ais 15 tiours. 52
riinutes ,ind I seico- nds. I hat
rccordi \\as set in 195l Ithe
first icalpaign lor Johnson's,
73-looter
I1 equation has contistentll\
stood highi in Southern Oceian
Racinu ( onterence aciL-tionl. nild
tiisCnll,\ sta s 0,ls in I liC Iss \.
I lhe as\\ indts took thlie
toll. ,is t'ee C lass (' C a .l
N\titti\ elih ran I oo close i to
Northeast Rock at (,IrlcI
Isaac,s. and broke up. All 1I1
cresmeinthbers \\%eic pickedl tip
liy Ospie)\. .in llinidcr 41.
owneICd b M 1 JFisliher ofI
Munci. Indi Wimowech a
46 i-A ti)! wJs I M\,ineIl I\ lhi e
I outis nAid IIIt I l i 1 ri0 nple
Bron. \1 J Haltstoi n .lid 1
Coleman
Other earl\ finisliers, int


Schlitz hum in




to silence Bees


REWARD




5,ooo0000





A reward of $5000.00 is offered for information
leading to the conviction of any person or persons
in connection with the robbery of the Chase
Manhattan Bank at Freeport International Airport
on the 25th of January, 1974.

Any information should be made available to the
Police at C.I.D., Freeport, 352-9775, 352-5048, or,
to C.I.D., Nassau, at telephone 2-2561, 2-2562,
2-3049 or 2-2311.


RUNS THROUGH WED.27th FEB.TO MARCH 16th.



30%OFF FOOTBALL HELMETS

tOFF LADIES' TENNIS WEAR
%0 v i LADIES' GOLF SKIRTS

300o0FF TENNIS BAGS

30% O FF i DART BOARDS
j 20% 0FF

70 2 OFF ADIDAS TENNIS SHOES



30% OFF SOCCER BALLS
AMERICAN FOOTBALL SHOES
AMERICAN FOOTBALLS
SHOULDER PADS
RUGBY BALLS


ALSO SPECIALS ON MANY MORE

ITEMS



AT








CHAMPION SPORTS LAND
STAR PLAZA MACKEY STREET, NASSAU
P. 0. BOX 3042 PHONE 2-1862


PUBLIC AUCTION
TO BE CONDUCTED BY BELGRAVE AUCTIONEERS
Saturday, Mar. 2nd. 1974
from 10:30 a.m.
AT
OUR FRIEND DRY GOODS STORE-
I lint Street (off Last Street)
WVest from I ornmer Milk Depot near Ir Allen's
Men's & Ladies' Wear, Household Goods, Materials.
Appliances, Gift Items, Novelties, Notions, etc., etc.
Entire Stock Must Go!


10 _hr Zribunt


I.. J
.


,' ff. ': .. .