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SThursday, February 21, 1
i 4 hE ritinr_


The biggest little car on the road


THE MINI Clubman Estate is one of "the fabulous four" Minis available at Bahamas Bus and
Truck on Montrose Avenue.


BAHAMAS Bus and Truck have in stock now a group of cars
which they are billing as "the fabulous four", the biggest little car
on the roads today British Leyland's Mini.
There are more Minis on the roads of Britain today than any
other car and one of the reasons in this energy-short age is the gas
consumption which is an eye-opening 40 miles to the gallon.
Motor Magazine road-tested the Mini 1000 and verified the gas
consumption as well as the performance of 0 to 50 miles per hour
in 13.7 seconds. The Mini 1000 is a very hard vehicle to catch
The front wheel drive and the independent suspension gives the
Mini excellent road holding qualities. With a length of just over
10 feet and a turning circle of onls 28'2 feet, the Mini is a natural
for congested traffic and easy parking.
The Mini has room for four people and their luggage.
The four models available at Bahamas Bus and Truck are the
1000, the Clubman Estate, the (Clubman Saloon and the 1275
GT. There is a choice of two engines, the 848 cc. for maximum
economy or the 998 cc. for a bit more energy.
The Mini 1000 has a sporty remote-control gear shift. The fully
automatic transmission is an option The 1000's instruments
include a speedometer and fuel gauge. water pressure and oil
pressure gauges.
A single stalk controls the horn. the headlight flasher,
dip-switch and direction flashers The design has been upgraded
by new badges, new door handles and neatly recessed hinges.
The trunk capacity is a large five and a half cubic feet which is
incredible for so small a car. More innovations include wind-down
windows, padded door trims and seats shaped for better support.
The Mini Clubman is the latest addition to the Mini family.
The Clubman has many features which give new style and luxury
to small car motoring. There are wide, soft. contoured seats.
The new fascia has recessed instrument cowls and face level
fresh air ventilation. There is a new steering wheel, wind-down
windows, padded doors and ill-rt. ..il carpeting
The bonnet is longer and sleeker with a stylish grille and
built-in headlights. The Clubman, too, has all-around independent
suspension and front-wheel drive. The 998 cc.. four-cylinder
engine has been used in the Clubman
The Mini Clubman Estate is the small car for people who want
space as well. It is really twvo cars in one. With the rear seat in
place, there is plenty of room for people.
With the seat down flat, the car gives all the space of a local
delivery van. The estate has double swing-open rear doors for easy
access to the cargo space \vhih is 30 cubic teet with the rear seat
down. The sides do not stick out giving added protection against
dents and bashes
Clubman estate offers a new style fascia, new steering wheel
and fresh air ventilation
Top of the Mini list is the 1275 (GI with a spirited 60 h p
engine and special radial tires lor excellent cornering and road
holding. The disc/druni brakes are power boosted to stop lading.
The GT has a 1275 cc. engine swith performance of 0 to 60 iii.p h
in 13.5 seconds.
Exclusive to the GT is a three instrument layout with ire
counter and speedometer, fuel iand water temperature guages I he
steering wheel has a smart leather covering and theie .ire
directional fresh air vents
The VIP treatment is carried through in the new seats which
give extra support, door-to-door carpeting, padded door trim.
wind-down windows and luxurious trim throughout
The GT also offers a sleek bonnet line and matt black grille.
bold GT stripes, exclusive (G badge and smart wheels with
radial-ply tires, all as standard equipment
The fabulous four Minis are all on view at Bahamas Bus and
Ti'uck on Montrose Avenue


I OM M IN


THOMPSON

PHONI 56739


BLVD. OPPOSITE DAVIS STREET

BOX N3741


WE TRADE/FINANCE, INSURANCE AVAILABLE!


I .










Thursday, February 21, 1974


hr frtibunt


A $2 child's paint box that




changed her entire life!


IN 1966 JUDY CUNINGHAME was living in a New York
consultant husband, John worked on a feasibility study.


hotel while her management

connoisseur came to the hotel
room, looked at all of Judy's
paintings and said "I'll have
that, that and that. Here's a
cheque for $1,000".
Then, her husband, John,
told me last week at Cable
Beach Manors, where they are
staying on this, one of their
frequent trips to Nassau, "I
woke up".
The marketing of Judy's
talent after all is right up the
street of a management
consultant.
One month after Judy
bought her $2 paint box her
paintings were selling on 57th
Street and Park Avenue and
hanging in a 5th Avenue Art
Gallery.
Wherever Judy went she
painted. Mostly she painted
flowers but sometimes she
branched out into village
scenes (in Jamaica), birds, and
in London she painted one of
the Royal homes. For Judy's
teenage ambition was to be an
architect.
While in Bermuda the idea
was conceived for her paintings
to be printed in a book.
Now Judy is the "author" of
six books, flowers of Bermuda,
the Bahamas, Jamaica (fruits
and recipes), flowers of the
Cayman Island and a little
book of flowers of the islands.
Now Judy is hard at wucrk
on her seventh flower book
which is a mammoth project.
She is "painting a book" of
all the state flowers of the
United States including that of
Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands
and the District of
Columbia.The Secretary of the
Interior has already written a
forward to this book which


Their only daughter, Susan,
was married with children of
her own.
And, Judy, for the first time
in her life found her hands idle.
She went out and bought
herself a paint box.
The following day she
returned the paint bo'x
complaining that the colours
were awful.
The sales assistant suggested
that if she really wanted to
paint she should buy artists
colours rather than a $2 child's

Y/----


Wl


Saturday Only February 23rd.


SIZE


Lichine Beaujolais
B & G Nuits-Saint-George, Vintage
B & G Nuits-Saint-George,
Calvet Beaune Clos de la Feguine
Drouhin Pommard, 1969
Drouhin Pommard, 1969
Engel Clos Vougeot, 1969
Engel Vosne-Romanee, 1969
Hallgarten Nuits-Saint-Georges, 1970
Latour Chateau Corton Grancey, 1969
Lichine Gevrey-Chambertin
Lichine Gevrey-Chambertin


Sichel Nuits-Saint-Georges, 1966
Sichel Nuits-Saint-Georges, 1966
Lichine Chateauneuf-du-Pape
Cruse St. Julien, Non-vintage
.Eschenauer St. Julien
Chateau Pontet-Canet, 1968
Chateau Ripeau, 1969
Chateau Ransan Segla, 1968
Cruse Barsac, Non-vintage
Cruse Sauternes, Non-vintage

Calvet Rose
Calvet Rose
Chateau Chet de Selle

Bollinqer Brut, 1966


Charles Heidsieck, 1966
Charles Heidsleck Rose, 1966
Krug Brut, Non-vintage
Montvillers Brut, Non-vintage
Tacttinger Brut, 1966


Veuve Clicquot, 1964-66
Veuve Clicquot, Non-vintage
Veuve Cllcquot, 1962, 1966
Veuve Clicquot Grande Dame
Bosca Asti Spumante
Torres Gran Sangre de Toro
Riscal


pts
5ths
pts
5ths
5ths
pts
5ths
Sths
pts
5ths
5ths
pts

5ths
pts
Dts
pts
pfs
pts
pts
Sths
Sths
pts


REG. SALE
PRICE PRICE


$ 4.10
$ 9.00
$ 4.70
$10.30
$.9.00
$.5.00
$15.00
$ 9.30
$ 3.45
$12.00
$ 8.50
$ 4.45

$10.00
$ 5.20
$ 3.45

$ 4.20
$ 4.20
$ 3.70
$12.00
$ 6.75
$ 3.85


Sths $ 2.80
pts $ 1.60
pts $ 3.00

pts $ 7.55


pts
5ths
5ths
pts
5ths


pts
pts
pts
5ths
5ths
5ths
pts


$ 6.65
$13.00
$12.30
$ 4.80
$11.30


$26.00
$ 5.65
$ 6.65
$16.50
$ 2.75
$ 3.70
$ 1.95


1.50
5.00
3.00
6.00
6.00
3.50
9.00
6.00
2.50
7.00
5.00
3.00


$ 5.00
$ 2.50
$ 2.00
$1.50
$ 1.50
$ 3.50
$ 2.50
$ 7.00
$2.50
$ 2.50

$ 2.00
$ 1.50
2.00

$ 5.00


$ 5.00
$10.00
$ 9.00
$ 3.00
$ 8.00


$15.00
$ 3.50
$ 4.00
$12.00
$ 1.50
$ 2.00
$ 1.50


SHOP EARLY-BEAT THE RUSHI




BAHAMAS BLENDERS

Warehouse J.F.K. Drive

y F^11 lw^>Pi*i ^!


JUDY CUNINGHAME -
"at home" in Nassau at Cable
Beach Nanors. Photo: Andy
Toofood.

will tie in with the
bi-centennial commission of
1976 and will be intimately
involved with the preservation
of the environment -
something very close to Judy's
heart.
Judy, who was brought up
in the English countryside, has
a deep rooted affinity with
nature.
She told me last week of the
dangers of losing an important
dimension of living "unless the
whole world wakes up and
realises it is burying itself
under materialism."
An example of the way we
have lost our eyes for the
beauty of nature uncultivated
by the hand of man happened
to Judy in the Cayman islands
when a woman friend
questioned Judy as to how she
could paint the flowers of the
Cayman islands when there
were no flowers there.
Judy, in her excursions into
the scrub bush of the Cayman
Islands, found many beautiful
wild flowers unseen by the
'cultivated eye' of her woman
friend.
The originals of Judy's
paintings hang in many private
collections and galleries
throughout the world.
The originals of her state
flowers will go on exhibition
all over A merica at
Horticulture and Garden
Societies.
They will also be reproduced
on China, playing cards and
place mats.
Which state flower will be
the joker might be no joke for
the State so selected!
Judy has a busy schedule
ahead of her including many
appearances on network T.V.
There is and will be much
speculation about Judy's art.
She has been called a
"Grandma Moses" whose
talent suddenly postmaturely
developed.
And yet, listening to her talk
about her childhood and life
up to 1966, I suspected that
Judy's talent had been with her
all her life and had found
expression in different forms.
For Judy has been creating
all her life.
Up until 1966 the form this
creativity took was in the
traditional area of women.
Her love of architecture
resulted in the Cuninghame
family living in houses at least
four hundred years old. At
once, after moving into a
"new" house, Judy would be
impelled to effect architectural
and structural alterations. Her


^MP5P~P


paint box.
So, Judy, who has never had
ii painting lesson in her life,
bought the artists' paints and
painted what she had closest
affinity with flowers.
.New Yorkers bought roses
by the dozen. English Judy
bought them singly.
Within a month her
paintings were selling.
Douglas Fairbanks Jr.
bought the first one a
perfect yellow rose.
Another friend and art


ITWNandAROUIND I


CALVIN LOCHART, Bahamian film star, on (and off)
our T.V. screen last week in "Halls of Anger".


I



husband John, in writing about
her, said that she "is never in a
house long before a staircase,
wall or fireplace must be
moved."
One such home, an old
farmhouse in the English
countryside, was the subject of
a "House and Garden"
coverage.
Another area of Judy's
creativity was cooking and her
husband John describes her as
a "gourmet and cordon bleu"
cook. One day tired of eating
avacados in salad Judy filled
the avocados with shrimp and
covered them with a Mornay
sauce and baked them. Result:-
a gourmet's delight said her
admiring husband.
Judy also designs and makes
all her own clothes and if there
is a wedding in the family Judy
designs and makes all the
outfits.
Last week when I saw her
she came in from the pool side
at the Cable Beach Manor
apartments wearing a beautiful
coverall and matching hat of
her own creation. Her husband
also showed me a stunning
evening dress Judy had made
from a turkish tablecloth.
Lying close at hand where she
sat was her knitting and on the
window sill of the little living
room were the most lifelike
family of Eskimos I have ever
seen. These were merely pieces
of coral to which Judy had
added two eyes and a nose.
The only Judy-made alteration
to the pieces of coral was to
flatten their bases so they'd
stand upright.
So if Judy is receiving fame
at this period of her life it is
not because she has suddenly
started to create.
When Judy found herself in
that New York suite in 1966
with no house to tear apart and
recreate, with no family
wedding to design and make,
with no kitchen in which to
produce gourmet meals she
said she "looked around for
something to do with my
hands". It was then that she
went and bought her $2 paint
box.
If Judy had never been in
that New York suite with idle
hands I believe that she would
still have been an artist albeit
an unsung one.
For patchwork quilts do not
usually hang in galleries. They
are used and worn out as are
high couture clothes. Gourmet
meals are eaten and homes are
lived in (and subsequent
owners might not be artists and
architects).
But these things are still art.
And Judy Cuninghame I
suspect was an artist long
before the world recognized
her as such.
A RECENT arrival in town
is the new veterinarian for the
Humane Society, Dr. Norman
Smith, who is now ensconced
in his new home with his wife,
young son and, of course, dog
Heidi.
The Smiths arrived just in
time to meet the Humane
Society's big annual
fund-raising event, their
February raffle.
A beautiful new Dodge
Avenger will have a raffle
ticket holder's owner on March
5th at the drawing at the Cat
and Fiddle. There are eight
lovely prizes for others who
have the luck of the draw.

Congratulations to Mr.
Lewis V. Tay,, Super-
intendent of the Boys'
Industrial School (from 1948).
for being this year's Golden
Heart Award winner.
I hear that this year's heart
ball was a real win-dinger.


...by Daphne Wallace-Whitfield


Photo: PHILIPSYMOONETTE.
While on the subject of film
stars (Bahamian) and T.V. for
the Bahamas (Bahamian or any
other kind) Bahamian film star
Calvin Lockhart was
frustatingly "snowy", was on
"our" TV screens last week in
"Halls of Anger". With the
apparent complete demise of
any movies of any value at our
local theatres in town watching
Calvin Lockhart in his highly
dramatic role in this tough
realistic movie on TV would
have been something of a
,compensation if we could have
:seen or heard it properly!.


S1"" Paul Bowe, son of Mr. Roy
Bowe of Nassau, is a newly
enrolled student of Florida Air
...50 on Academy in Plantation,
Florida.


Sidney Poitier's birthday
Sidney will not be ashamed
to admit his age. He will be 50.
After all, nobody will believe
he could possibly be fifty.
He is 'though. He was borr
on February 24th, 1924 while
his parents were visiting Miami.


SIDNEY POITIER
Sunday.


NOW AT ONE BIG LOCATION

6th.TerraceCentrevile

TEL: 2-2347 2-8150



NEW ARRIVALS


DETECT VELVET ROSE ESEMBLE

-SHOWER CURTAINS

ALSO

NEW BEDSPREADS WITH

MATCHING DRAPES

HOURS: Monday through Friday 9:30 a.m. 6 p.m.
Saturday .............9:30 a.m. 9 p.m.


BAHAMAS

WORLD

AIRLINES



FOR TWENTY FOUR (24) HOUR

WEEKEND FLIGHT

INFORMATION AND

RE-CONFIRMATION SERVICE

PLEASE PHONE:
2157
WEEKDAYS PHONE: 21257
l t- lil[ l I A


DR. NORMAN SMITH Humane Society's new veterinarian with his dog Heidi.


IE SALE

9 a.m. 4 p.. *


AMONG THE MANY DISTINGUISHED GUESTS who attended the tenth annual Sir Victor
Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Foundation Heart Ball were (left to right) Prime M nister, the Hon.
Lynden O. Pindling; Mrs. Ronald Spiers, His Excellency Sir Milo Butler; Lady Sassion, Mr. Ronald
Spiers, United States Ambassador to the Bahamas and Mrs. Lynden Pindling. The Ball was a great
success with hundreds of guests from the Bahamas and abroad. Music for the evening was
provided by the internationally renowned Meyer Davis Orchestra and the Blind Blake Trio played
during dinner. The Golden Heart award winner was Mr. Lewis V. Taylor. 1- 7 -Wendell Cleare


_ ~ __ ~__


~d~ba~bB~Ea~lL~I~


"


An expatriate friend of mine
says that in seven years of
(her) heart-balling this was
"the best ever". There were
more Bahamians patronising
the affair than ever also which
would indicate that "heart' is
here to stay as the Bahamas
becomes more and more
Independent.
Mrs. Pindling, I hear, as
usual stole the haute couture
show in a stunning gown
covered in rhinestones.
The fashion reports on her
husband were not so flattering.
Drainpipe trousers and a fat
dotted bow tie did not qualify
him to be one of the
best-dressed men.
But, in all fairness, fashion
isn't his business, I don't think.

SUNDAY will be Bahamian
Academy Award winner


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The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03730
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03730

Full Text














ritbutt


(R ,,, ee* .....smat e


VOLLXXI No.76 Thursday, February 21, 1974Price: 20 Cents


Bomb


FREEPORT

CLASSROOM

FLATTENED, S l

STUDENTS

SENT HOME ,

AFTER

EXPLOSION set


A BOMB blast ripped through a block of the Freeport
Hliph Schiootl today, demolishing one classroom and
c'xtcnsic'l\ ,J.i,..cJiii'j a scconld room and the boys'
restroom.
The e\plosion wasw heard by a number of residents,
including Mr. toward Hanna of tihe Freeport fire
department.
"'It occurred .it exactly 0( 40 a.m.. because I looked at my
watch immediately," Mi. IHatnia told The Tribune today. The fire
officer lives aboutit a tinile-and-ai-hall from the school site onil


Sunrise Highway. tc waited toi;
was not alerted until i 20) ;a.i
Damage was estimated ,
$00,000.
Because the school is in the
business district and there was
no smoke. (he source of the
'\pk,'im '.' "lo! detectcd until
thle iiior wentt t.: open rthc
prt raises.
When the tire department
w, a cai !cd t!,," o:i; ,'ei len c," ot
i'- was a. few pieces t b'lr-'.ng
qoth and some silo ol "insg
papers
Hbc.ause of the earlh ihour
h hool %was cmpt Ai. n hour
Lijtcl the school 1 ,a'd was t i;led


a call Irom his department. but


By \1(tKI KELLY


with stdicts"
P: die at report said the
-\p!osion was the result of
siic' ktid of bomb
h' mi l'h F tibune
i'i .erst jlnds, hltwever. hat
dJr iv.ite ha.i been ruled out
becaiS there were no signs of
fragments or the after smell
as soiatcd with this type of
explosion. A expert was on


blast


likes







iool


thce
ult
C I
T
k no
adic
olow
A
stm
told


school was to have closed
tomorrow for half-ternm.

contact the principal Hugh
Davies as the school's phone
iL was believed to be out of
order
YToday's bombing is the
tirst such incident since 1970
S.. when Freeport was hit by
several mysterious explosions
that caused thousands of
dollars damage.
Fhe Kentucky Fried
Chicken building on Queen's
^Jf 8Highwa. was dyndmite-bomrnb-
Principal Hgh Da es ed twice the first time in
Principal Hugh Davies em l and again in
December 1969 and again in
June 1 10. The two incidents
prI. n.-,: tody carty ing cost the ,ompan S 1 20,000.
irv. tigati 'ns on bchall of A sc,.nd explosion, also in
D. at Freeport June the same year, blew up a
-he -emolished classroom is power pole carrying supplies
itle ti ,i', ,) teret in p
wi to have had alln t .re *,
S kihen he stove In September 1970 an
over kwaselectric not gas. explosion completely
Swaselectricnotgas destroyed a $ 25,000 dwellingin
s a result of the damage. Queen's Cove belonging to a
tents were sent home and French -anadian resident of
to return Iuesday. The Freeport.


Bahamas has definite




role, says Spiers
d46/ 9 O


t S \ \1f \SSA \)OR
Ronald 1 Apicis t'ld a Nassau
audi'ce lc odt !i expe, ts to
st'c .1 1-ritil inl ere.,t til'mon.
lh't d il i iiBhall 'itlslII I ss e,e
ol lforcg: at !ilt and that the
B.iliamas las a ttde init role to
plas in the process of delfiing
agieed goai- for th'e nations cI
the' world 'o' pursue
lIe said i thit ll t I S.
w0'e silllces the c'iturren i .'t'tine
ot ster cln e iphee I g
Miistis t currently union erway
ill \1e'xic o ('it\ whlitch the
BahamasI is attending, and
stressed that the I'. S does
not want a framework k
iusni'iatcd b\ the LA.Mtini ol b\
the I'nited States'. siit Otle iIn
w h i c h t he 11 a.i 1 e'r.
p r e l o nl s l I t \i bIack.
nglisih-Npeakting ou iti[ses ot
wthe !emisphcre ,ce value in
terilis ot their ownt initerests as
well."
Amtlba'ssador Spiers' remarks
canle dii rttsi a speech delivered
to thle Nassau Rtar Cluhib
West', liegular Ieetiing i t the
Sonesta Beach Hotel Tlhc
speech wias entitled "|,-4
The Year ini Forcigni Affairs"
and in it the UI S Ambassador
outlined his vie\\ of foreign
policy developments during the
past year and his estimate ofi
the principal topics coming ip
in the ear ahead
]The Ambassaidor otioed that,
as a 1new1 indet pe dent itt ittill.
most otf the Bahamias' alten tionl
was centred on domestic issues
and that, as a small couintti .
the nation might not be
expected to play a very active
role on the world stage. iIe
emphasized, however. that
"small countries before have
played a role disproportionate
to their si/e, and have
produced statesmen of
international prestige."
"Imaginative, intelligent
leadership is by inot means
limited to tlhe big and
powerful." lie said.


VELVET

THROW
CUSHIONS

I ASIIN FIIlNIT
IK ALSAU- FROE1EPOR T


Ambiiassador Spiers a 1d bhat.
s i Ice n d p n d c r. e
responsibility lo Bahamiani
e\terial ,iaffai.rs "'is : 1 Batathaximiin
ha nds oil have a Ministry ot
I xtcrnal Affairs. you lhasc
dip lomatic missions in
%% .iliiI' and LonridonI. tou
have lined the n it ed Nations
and some hal f-dto/te'nL other
related institutions 't our
Minister of External Alair is.
ifI uas say viso. a tIsan ol
unii usual a ability and

I'hc U S, diplomat expressed
the hope that he could


nlrib' te ito thle Btahamian
public's isiaig inteces; ii world
affairs b\ outlining his estimanatc
oI global fss.es Trom' th l .
point of vi ew
WAR NI)
"For the LUnited States, the
most important development
int 1473 Iw5as the ending oI our'
participation in the war in
Vietnam", the Ambaissador
said. "'The mtl st i1lpbortanl
product of this setttenitt was
the de-fusing of a divisive'
national issue and the creation
of condition which allow us as
a nation to turnit to morc
positl e tasks."
lie listed "a fundamental
'ealignmentt" of traditional
Cold War relationships as a
basic task for L.S. foreign
policy and said that this
re-thinking of post World 'A ,r
II relations includd ltnot on
detente with China and the
t S S R but recognition of
lie economic strenutli oi
I urope and Japan "'' Ilhis is a
i1 it e i c r c rea i e
statesmanship, and it is a time
w hen the .United States cannot
play the exclusive role we did
in the p., .t Vat era others
have the opportunity to


Lady Butler's progress


Lady Butler is makingg good
progress" at (Government
House after a minor heart
attack that kept her in hospital
for ten days.
She returned on Februar,
14 and is not accepting an\
official engagements for the


SIt I R .\ services ior
75year-old Druscilla ('arey,
who died in the fire that
destroyed her John Calnan
Road home on Sunday
afternoon, are to he conducted
at Wesley Methodist Church
this coming Sunday hy the
Rev. Charles (urry.
Funeral services will begin at
2:30 p.m.. and interment will
follow in the Western
Cemetery.
Mrs. Carey is survived by her
son Reuben, who suffered
s,,nd-dlegree burns in a vain
attempt to rescue her from the
blaze, her aunt, Mrs Belle Dean


next two i three weeks, a
G over ment IHouse spokesIlman
said.
Lady Butler became ill onl
I cbruary 5 and was played in
the intensive care unit. During
her stal in hospital she was not
allowed visitors.














DRUSCILLA CAREY
ot Clarence Town, and a
number of cousins, nieces and
nephews.


excrcsise relatively new anit
iinportant ",-p. *; t1,, ie'C' ,

Ambassador Spiers said th
1'.S is beginning a series
dialogues with key groWiups
states, and that these dialogues
are reflected in recent meeting-
with European nations oin
energy and security matters.
and in the current Mexico Cit'
meeting at which Minister os
I external A.ffairs Paul L
Adderley is heading the
Bahamian delegation.
I he Ambassador listed three
problems ahead in which
international cooperation is
essential: law of the sea, food
supplies and the energy crisis


- Shobek

makes

freedom

dash...

for one

minute
TRIPLE -MURDER
accused Michaia Shobek had
a few seconds of freedom
late this morning when he
made an unsuccessful
attempt to escape from
Central Police Station.
Shobek was brought to
the city from Fox Hill
Prison this morning for the
continuation of a
preliminary inquiry before
Chief Magistrate Wilton
Hercules into the three
charges of murder he faces.
The 19-year-old native of
Milwaukee, Winsconsin,
returned from the court
hearing shortly after 11
o'clock and made his break
for freedom minutes later.
just as he completed an
interview with U.S. Vice
Consul Robert Lloyd.
Mr. Lloyd was
interviewing Shobek in a
room just to the left at the
entrance of Central Police
Station, in connection with
the suspect's personal
effects while incarcerated.
As police officers
approached to retuirr.
Shobek to his cell he dashed
past them, out the door and
towards East Street, where
pursuing policemen caught
him less than a minute later
Shobek is charged with
the murders of three
American visitors: Ohio
attorney Paul V Howell,
50, on December 5 at the
Holiday Inn on Paradise
Island, New York
accountant Irvin Bernstein,
44. at Yamacraw Beach on
January 18 and Michigan
school-girl Katie Smith. 17,
in Garden Hill Estates on
Jan. 26. Shobek was
arrested hours after the
discovery of Miss Smith's
body.


OPERATIONS at radio
station ZNS were ,,.i
back i)tot normal today after
.'employ11 ees in tihe various
departments staged a two-day
"sick-ol t
It is understood that one
rsnoutncer wa.is back todtiay as
were three news,, reporters and
the engineering staf.if.
[lhi wave of "sickness" hit
Ihe station l i -... sis the
d iisissal oIt one emp loyee
xw hose obscenit ies were
accidentally carried oiln the air.
the demotion of anotherr and
the insistainee b niantaleeiTs!
that a senior :atoullitncer read i
com n er cial he foutndt
"offensive "


Picturee' PIILIP SY YMO \ 1T
Bernard Bostwick (right) 23-year-old domestic worker and
resident of First Street, The Grove, and Frederick Rahming, 20. a
Crooked Island Street mechanic (hiding his face) were jointly
charged before Magistrate Emmanuel Osadebay this afternoon
with armed robbery in the Monday morning $38.914 45 hold-up
of the Royal Bank of Canada in Lyford Cay The two were
arraigned also on a number of related charges.


I he sick-o' began 'uctdtas I

[th"?\ \\cr." r
wo s'nl't d s it n i i.nic srs
ct': et 's das ,s ites nn'i!Ul ilk
os nmers and news st' t i.ed
.ia\ i;Jd in!g h c o f th l
c\c 'SC .sit!i ;' thar dlie lite
;a !;(i isi as cd : t' 1i. ;i;cii
WeirQigliotit the d >

'thi'er the res' ;;i os'on t ofi
-I H s H 'i sd- a s 'o


Stewardesses

'given notice'

BAHAMAS World Airlines
reportedly served notice on a
number of its stewardesses
today that their services will
not be required from
tomorrow.
The Tribune understands
that at least 20 of the
approximately 50 cabin staff
are involved.
The dismissal letter said
that: "Having taken into
consideration all aspects of
the airline's operation we find
it necessary at this time to
further reduce the size of our
cabin crew."
Each girl was offered only
one week's severance pay.
BWA recently completed its
massive charter airlift of
pilgrims to Mecca. It also
operates charters from Nassau
to Brussels and Frankfurt.
Neither Mr. Andrew
Maynard, BWA vice-presi-
dent, or chairman Everette
Bannister could be contacted
,for comment.

DEALERS MEETING
THEF PETROL I .,M Dealers
Association, still waiting for a
revision in the gasoline price
structure. have scheduled a
meeting for 8 p.m. Friday at
if ,r ', ,r, ,a 1i Arm s


Pinder again


with

D NFFFN( .11:orn ; h:
Hubert 'Illu'ih" I'ld-
extradition hbiariing rn mw S 'orc
the lower court i n it. ti ,,rI
day again failed to appe-.'; ifl'
their clieIt who sal ou 1t ,o11a1 s-
proceedings alone, taking notes
before the Bar
The 3,t-year-old Sear's
Addition chartered accountant
an'.d former resident ul
I ngland supposed to be
i-pr:sented b\ attorney s ('c5c i
Wallace Whitfietld and Henry
Bostwick, senior: cos. sel ior
!he deen e
But despite t yesterday's
Comments froim the bench that


ut lawyers

the B h i--- ..
luiisdiction iI i he world where D .'prtment
lawy ers haCe si chl dis-espr e t I: li s'trS a
tir te minagstrate" neih' pirating lu 1
iaw 'er :-rippeared in c oi' B13i,,sh Cortn
today 'ist. v s
5ttorie\ Keith l)uncombe, attoinev Du
prosecutltlng for the ('ro,,vr. this b P senior
inorring cntinred ihe Br tJih lI 't,,, ernt
Cto,.e:nmtent's ase against the lndit try. D
tugit "-e accoiititallt witlh the said ;hat his
read mi! of several ',:{n ss the 1 P .S
de t...1 ion-. business to
I !- r eposiitons, wer1;- C. in not able to
ospp.-r of charges i :.itnst j; ialso sh
P 1 .t ;n "e i ;.. h i 's ; h f ',
Illsp
Jeir-, w h i r l-.! Insnt : c e ti;
Pru!c-,;i j! Sj0lesni i. I 1" i Liub; riptii






; 1)11d Ib SSir i ,hn
i IR I su rI I I Sil J -hlr
I': t., ] I's'w s-. Ct r iC, Siurr. d ,'; f
S. I l -. I inle Muligrave cha ai-d n, h
.] ii r 'i!k I J!;ilwood n 4on0 4
i\ I !r i; i> d i ici' lties ws itlh i .
,",^. ';l* ^r. s llc. \ .ex iv' d
-:*:; -'cc- [i'; tilth p.!\ ;pepls

, ,.,. ,, Jl ,I .;o .; p,,;n ied -'*, :-

..:*h J 1,.-l *' ",'.('O "
1 1-J j


jranri of the
of frade and
nd found to be
n breach of the
pans Act.
deposition read by
incombe and made
examiner of the
of 1 rade and
'erek F. Fitzgerald
investigations into
Ltd.. found the
be bankrupt and
pay its bills.
owed that although
an'y had been
Tg im embers'
on lees, no
was being issued
c aie' director of
litd. upon the
oft Mr Spurr in
':ai v'"s was the
I Ceig ict do,-n by
Several occasions
was the company
I PS \Mr Spurr
is deposition.
r. in his deposition,
S in stage he felt
had been able to
!. '-, oi n Sir
take himn in "lock,
arrel ."
o also one of the
: against Pinder
,, -'. swindled him

iarinng has been
No 1: 'day morning.


New move to end 'undesirable practice


By MIKE LOTHIAN
tGOVE)RNMINT is nows
drafting and hopes to soon
introduce legislation to end
'"un desirable real estate
practices." a senior
Development Ministry official
told the Bahamas Real Estate
Association on Wednesday
Deputy Permanent Secretary
Vincent Lotmore outlined
some of the proposed
provisions of the Real Estate
Act It would, among other
things, require licensing and
bonding of all brokers and
salesmen, and prior
Government approval ofi all
advertising.
Land dealers have been
coming under increasing ti:e
from several quarters, including
the House of Assemblb, tor
allegedly failing to fultil
development promises, and tor
allegedly being too quick to
forfeit earlier investments byx
defaulting clients.
Mr. Lotmore, disclosing
Government's plans to dsal
with the problem, was speaking
to about 50 members and
guests of the Association
during a lucheon meeting at
the East Hill Club.
The official pointed out that
although real estate dealings
have always been "a significant
factor in the economy," there
has also been "a significant
lack of protection and
guidance for all those


o nlce r n e d t 11 h land
transactions, including real
estate brokers and sadesinen.
investors, the ordinary citiu/ei
and, in settle instancers.
Governtilnti as well '"
te' said the Bahamian
resources otf sn sand and sea
spurred intense larid
speculation, leading in turn ci
Bahamian liand being offered
on the internati onal real estate
market But to date the onil
related legislation has been the
Building and lHealth
Regulationss. the 1961 hTovw n
Planning Act and the 1h0l
Private Roads and Subdivisions
Acts, all of which deal with
land use rather than with
persons trading in land.
.L NDII SIR '\BLI.
"The absence of legislation
controlling these activities has
led to instances of undesirable
real estate practices.
complaints of which have been
directed to my Ministry from
time to time." Mr. Lotmore
said. "This has been a matter
for concern," and the proposed
Real Estate Act is a
consequence of that concern-
In discussing the terms of
the "preliminary draft" of the
Act, Mr. Lotmore emphasized
that "the Real Estate Act is
still in the drafting stage and
any proposals which I shall
mention here today may or
may not appear in the final
legislation."


IIe ', ,l 2 ,iI' i ,
would .Ile e x' cr.i! respt n



ti crn Ir-I ien Crai 'C k.
r-(m e is nr!ra 'H
d.iI'.i ,; the I P m, i i,

I the i M sister tit
\ Reai ,titc It ,
.iptpo ited b' ithe Pti'
'h t'' r f!oti i ;:iemIt' erls 1: s !i1
Redal I sta.i e ssoiatis i.
advise he Reg tr-Iar on litter
relc hired to it
appeals s I rom decisions i
the Registirar will be to tIhe
minister and. where applicable.
to the ( 'Coit ot Appeal.
"The bill proposes the
examination based oin al
estate practice and knowledge
of the Act registration and
licensing of persons as real
estate brokers and real estate
salesmen, the payment of tees
and posting of bonds in
connection therewith."
CONTROVERSIAL
lie added that the
examination clause was
controversial and "open to
discussion."
"All persons engaged
either as brokers or salesmen
should be required to take the
examination before being
registered. It would be illegal
for brokers to offer
enrmluo mnernt as salesmen to


S :'


'Is


''ilt.
is SA'tl


B hCi"'C m, \l;':.:i.Pl .ui'O
ihe Ir'.i e issle .
peron involved
'c c s inpa nd i ng co 11 a
secturlit, or by a guar'a
other than a coiml
approved by the Fin
\Minister aiso
accnompain ing collateral
The bond may be fort
it the bonded person iom
an offence sunder the Act.
involved in fraud, thett
conspiracyy to defraud or s
or where bankruptcy
winding up p;,reedinigs
been taken out
lri\esigaition of comply
against brokers or sales
could lead to inspect
removal of records
confidence), reports to
Attorney General or an o
to "refrain from dealing
assets."
In addition, the Asi


" .liirt i
'! .,i br-oker keep books
S !l r 2,-'rd .tratIsactionis.
't muist etabltsh a trust
l for real estate dealings
CsJC.i[ate from monies
,. I to himself;
he must file financial
.l satements whenever required
S y hlic Registrar,
Ihe must not trade in real
'" .;" ste until registered
l "S I '.irther, anr person wishing
; trade in respect of
subdivisions, condominiums,
S quaiels, etc. will be required
v ', tfile with the Registrar the
S pr.- I.:.'d prospectus for
th approval before commencing
tera an trading." Mr. Lotmore
ltor. said
pany No one can publish any
ance advertisement relating to land
SIth11 deals until the advertisement is
approved by the Registrar.
cited
milts Mr. Lotmore said some of
or is the Association members had
t. or already commented on the
steal, principles underlying the bill.


or
have

aints
smen
tions,
(in
the
order
with
would


1 DUDLEY'S
COR. ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE.

NEW 1974 MODELS
"THE VE .. ... "
ARRIVING SOON!


CABOT'S CREOSOTE STAINS
NOW IN STOCK

BAHAMIAN PAINT PRI2Y8TI
BAY STREET PHONE 2-2386


ZNS 'back to normal'


i


NEW

COSMETICS

fot !I-


rr


il p


j


__ __ --- -`-"-"













2 hr ribuur


Thursday, February 21, 1974


A FEDERAL grand jury
today indicted a Texas lawyvvver
on a charge of lying t's ,
grand jury about dairy
industry .uniiriburti,,ns to
President Nixon's re-election
campaign
Indicted was Jake
Jacobsen. 54, ot Austin The
indictment returned in U.S.
District Court charged that
Jacobsen lied in an
appearance before a grand
jury investigating whether
there was any connection
between dairy industry
contributions and an
administrat io decision to
raise milk price supports int
1971

\ B 1) L ( I 0 R S o f
newspaper heiress Patricia
Hearst ha e sent a nesw
coin iunication to thile amnilv
of the kidnapped girl. a
tarnill spokesman said today.
Co ntent'( o the message were
not iniimediatel, revealed

THE BIRTH rate in St
Vincent has dropped trom
37.' percent to 30 0 percent
oCer the past vear

BRITAIN swill pay all extra
22 pounds sterling a ton for
the 145.000 tons of sugar it
bought tromn Fiji in l '192.
Prime .Minister Ratu Sir
Kamisese Maru said,

THi SO\ IlT Writers
ULnioi expelled author
Vladimir Voirotich from its
rank-, the second time this
year it has ousted an
uii"spotkteii support ir of
balashed wrialt 1 alexander
S, +|/ +lIen tai "+I


Police hold



George Best

MANCHIIESTER Wayward soccer star George Best was
detained by police in a night club early today for questioning on
an 1i e'.:l theft.
Police declined to give any details of the allegation. but the
I o0rdon Evening News reported that it involved the theft of a fur
,.'it from Miss World, 19-year-old American Majorie \ %ill i;,:
lhe 2 year-old ,il ..' spent several hours in a cell at
Mlanchester's Bootle Street police station. He was later escorted
to London by two detectives tor further questioning.
Best was picked up at 1.55 a.m. in his Manchester night
lub. Slack Alice. Manchester police said he was detained at the
rCqluest of "senior officers" in London.
The Evening News said the theft was alleged to have been
cmnnitted it'tc Best spent a night on the town with Miss Wallace
last Friday.
lThe couple were photographed leaving a fashionable London
night spot. Tramps.
Miss Wallace is :n'rge. 1 to
marry American racing driver
Peter Revson After Friday s
night out with Best, she said of
the bearded star "We struck
sip a friendship three weeks
ago Fheres nothing niore to it
than that I find hiin ver\
attractive "
lhe mercurial Best. pla> bo>
at British soccer, has had
brushes with the lass iin the
past
lie was tound ,w hi, ,a
Mianchester court in Januaryi
last car ot striking a girl! in a
night club
lie was ordered to pa\1 00
pounds. then w orth s240


T HI I EAD R of
Grenada's New Jewel
viot enient. Mlaurice Bishop.
critis/cd tlhe Caribbean
go% ernments for their
failuree" to help resolve the
ec no lic an dad i',litical
--- problcm,,is 11 Greniitl

Bishop told new smtlen that
the atavoidance of meddling
in the al.i irs tt another
.untiiilr us inot a ,allid exLtsi'
lui tihe ti-II policy u
Caribbean giternments


BEST . out with
Miss World


Best was later charged with
burglary and theft from Miss
World. He was to appear in
Marylebone Magistrates court
later today. Newspapers
reported the American
beauty accused Best of
stealing a $4,500 fur coat she
received when she won the
Miss World title.

dollars, in compensation and
legal costs
Best. who has often ,lashed
with his Manchester t'nited
club over his whirlwind
socializing. has constantly been
seen with glamorous women
Fhose squabbles climaxed
last month when he was put on
the slub's transfer list, meaning
that an> club who offered
I united -nough money could
hut hinl
Best's worth was once
va .: ed at around 200,000
poun:d, aor $440,100 But he
5,d1 ; wt t week he planned to
irtie 'rm the game that made
hinm a -,w I because his
,cuI dropped him from its top
adl l


FAMILY LIFE AT THE BOTTOM


BE I1 1 SII.\NG.NE R, England
"We'll bloody starve before we givt
in," said Brendon Crossley. Twelve
days into Britain's miners' strike. hs
still is grimy with coal dust.
"We'll cope," said his wife Dorothy,
a quiet, calm woman of 28. "It's
getting harder every day, but we'll
cope. Somehow."
The Crossleys' home on the
edge of Betteshanger Colliery in
south-east England has three small.
square bedrooms, a kitchen, a parlour
and an outside toilet. They pay the
National Coal Board 1 pound 79 pence
- S3 90 cents a week in rent.
While the strike lasts. Crossley. a
29-year-old underground worker, is
drawing 8 pounds 30 pence 18
dollars 26 cents a week in state
welfare money for his family instead
of his usual take-home pa. of 28
pounds $62.
Fight pounds in Britain todas buys
two wool sweaters. 32 cutlets or 60


Selassie

call to

Third

World


ADDIS ABABA
Emperor Haile Selassie of
Ethiopia has called for a
common front among
countries of the Third
World to withstand the
present world economic
crisis.
He made the remarks in
an address to a conference
of trade ministers from 44
African, Caribbean and
Pacific (ACP) countries on
negotiations with the
Euro p ean Economic
Community (EEC).
Selassie said there should
be strong mutual
understanding and
collaboration among ACP
countries and others of the
Third World lest they suffer
as a group from
the prevailing world
economic crisis.
The 81-year-old emperor
said the getting together of
Caribbean and Pacific
countries with the African
group shows that these
countries share similar views
and goals with Africa as
regards trade between
developed and developing
nations.
Selassie praised the EEC
for its willingness to
negotiate trade and
economic ties with ACP
countries.


Watergate: a disaster sign for Republicans


\ s :ll \I I -\ I :;. *









I "h .
R p ... J. c!. \ j



. .I I [ :' 'i;. ,i n
Ili '', d s r'it hS thl



R 0--



Ri "k' .

,,I'll 1 . 1, J,:- rd h


.:: t 1 i stS thl 'tc
: i rtcr o a centuir\
S''s i \t' 'rcsiscnt Nixon
I J !- t il ,ta with that
"t c n m it irgin in thei
i !' lr.'qj titidl rcl ction.l
Ihv si -.lr ing Democratic
-r. k'' substancee to tilhe
R't pu' bli l ans that
'.i. '\ '. could be
.,: .t disisater tor the
i'' dI'. he Ntovermber

S, \. *\ hber ele tions,
; lm 4 5.-tiniber L S
I! .. I Representatives.
S n, the I1 united States
S- .- 'n ii sh is.inds of state
a'! : i .ilsb ranging from
'"' : '1 M' s itte' execuLtive
:' -"- t,, entorcer enter
.s a11, : s:! t'c ',c ted
R p.i.i, i \'Vie President
I .id -a.d i:- "as somtrewhat
"'!iIghi ,; i h\ ihci elect iln
il d] w II's toriler

i.'p," ..''' n. ci' ion.il c' lairiliian
( C 1 Hu i 1-,ti said he w as


I I




I ... Cut 2 sIces of hanm in
I "COUNTRY serving p ece. Brown on
CORN" both sides In lightly
WITH HAM buttered ski et. Remove
and keep hot Then saute
in har")Fat I tablespoon
each d; ed onion and
chopped gr eent pepper
I | |and 1 large stalk celery,
sliced. Add 2 cans (4
_* Ubb/ ^ cups) Libby's dra ned
Whole Kernei Corn. Heat.
I i .mw, Season .. salt and I
I SM pepper. Arange in I
I O p mount in center of
serving plate circle with
ham. 6 servings pieces.

QUIM TY OVER ALL SINCE M INI

DISTRIBUTORS THROUGHOUT THE BAHAMAS


PATTON STREET-PALMDALE PHONE 2 1551
AVAILABLE AT YOUR FAVOUR ITE FOOD STORE


sincried "
I he theme ot the campaign
ot the winning Democratic
,jndidate mi Michigan had been
that the election should serve
as a referendumi on Watergate.
Now- s the big political
question is what the
Republ,.an Part: can do and
will ds about the explosive
Hiatergate issue to forestall a
put'entl disaster for its
,andilattes in the November
ct'e lions
Iin, w.sas the second special
elet ion this year won by the
Demorats but the Watergate
issue w'as largely ignored in the
tirst one in the state of
Pennsylvania This produced a
Deimot ratic victory in a
*i ,,''.11 Democratic election
d'str ct tornmerly represented
b a. Repubhlian
One possible result ot all this
is that the pressure among
Republicans in Congress for
Nixon to resign will increase. A
turthet possibility is increased
Republiacan support for
impea.he in ent of the
president
Ni\on was quoted as
cornceding to Republican
le ad ers Wednsday that
Watergate possibt, was a fa,.tor


in helping the Democrats win
the seat Ford relinquished.
But House Republican
leader John J. Rhodes said the
president also told the
Congressional leaders that such
special elections, "often are
not harbingers of what might
happen'' in general
Congressional elections like the
one in November.
Rhodes quoted No,,r. as
saying Michigan auto industry
layoffs, the energy crisis and
Watergate were possible
elemnients in the )enocratic
takeover in Monday's election
of Ford's House seat and it was
"hard to say which was the
most important."
Rhodes said, in reply to a
question, that it Republicans
lost a half-do/en or so such
special elections they would
have to revise their campaign
strategy for November.
But Rhodes said he could
not imagine that such revision
would include asking President
Nixon to resign.
Rhodes said he believes
Republican candidates should
face Watergate head on "we
can't ignore it," he said but
should stress it was not a
Republican party operation.


heads of lettuce. It doesn't support a
wife and two young daughters.
Peter Muir, a 39-year-old father of
four, is collecting no pay and no
welfare money. The family is living on
the 12 pounds $26 Muir's wife Janet
brings home each week as a shorthand
typist.
"I went to the social securities
during the last strike and they played
so many nasty tricks I was determined
never to go back again," Mrs. Muir
said. "So I got this job."
Like most mining families, the
Muirs have no car, no telephone and
no money in the bank.
"Savings'?," said Yorkshireman
Muir. surprised the question should
be asked. "No. Every time we want to
save, we have to pay a bill for
electricity or something else."
In 17 years of marriage the Muirs
have had one vacation a week at a
nearby seaside resort.
The Crossleys haven't even had that


since Diana, 8. and Deborah. 6, were
born.
The Crosslevs ran a car until rising
prices forced them to sell 18 months
miles away.
That costs 18 pence 40 cents or
five eggs,
"Now we're living off what Dorothy
had in the pantry." Crossley said.
"Tinned stuff mostly. The television is
paid up a month ahead. But we've had
an electric bill come in and I don't
known when that'll get paid."
Crossley normally sets aside 10
pounds $22 for regular bills and
gives his wife every penny of the
remaining 18 pounds $40 for
food, clothes, school meals. bus fares,
cigarettes and household needs.
They can save nothing.

Through ill-luck, the Crossleys
hardship now is more acute than most.
They have received only 12 pounds
$26 in the past two weeks and are


- ON $18


ago. Since then Dorothy Crossley h.as
travelled by bus twice a week to the
nearest shopping centre more than five
still waiting for the first w,.r,,,
payment.
Immediately before the strike
Crossley missed 10 days' work and
lost 10 days' 'pay with a week's visit
to his sick mother and three days in
bed with flu.
The miners are angered 1,
Government claims that the strike w..
fermented by Communists seeking to
bring down the Conservative
administration of Prime Minister
Edward Heath.
They said it is about one thing and
one thing only money.
'A miner doesn't need to be
preached at by a Communist," sai.
Janet Muir. "He just needs to look at
his pay packet on Friday night.
"If we get the welfare money." sijj
Crossley, "we can make do for ev-er


I I


KIDNAP

WIFE

WAITS

IN HOPE
A I'ANTA Fatigued but
composed, Virginia Murphy
maintained a vigil by her
telephone today, hoping for a
call from the kidnapper of her
husband, Reg Murphy, editor
of the Atlanta Constitution.
"We haven't heard any
more." said the slim, brown
eyed Mrs. Murphy, called
"Gin" by her husband.
"I don't want to say or do
anything that will jeopardize
his life," said Mrs. Murphy.
tucking her stockinged feet
beneath her as she curled up in
an overstuffed chair in her
spacious living room.
Clad in a beige knit sweater
and brown plaid slacks. Mrs.
Murphy sipped black Lotl c
and talked with neighbours.
close friends and FBI agents.
Each time the telephone
rang, she ran to grab it. She
took calls from friends and
relatives on a separate private
line listed in the name of a
teen-age daughter.
Neighbours were in and out
of the home constantly, many>
bringing food.
The telephones rang
constantly.
The family minister, the
Rev. Robert J. McMullen jr..
came early and stayed several
hours. He and Mrs. Murphy
talked privately in another
room.
Later, he told newsmen:
"Reg is a very nice person and
a very strong person and we
hope that those who have him
are reasonable people."
lie was asked why Murphy
would go off with someone he
apparently didn't know.
"Reg was that kind of
person," the minister said. "If
he got a report of what he
thought was a good news story,
he would go."
The Murphys have lived in
their large, two-storey brown
brick home in an old
fashionable northeast Atlanta
neighbourhood for several
years. (AP)

Bomb attack
BELFAST Terrorists
killed an 82-year-old man and
seriously wounded a woman in
a bomb attack today at a
Belfast bar, the British Army
said,
The bomb thrown at
Connolly's bar in tihe turbulent
New Lodge quarter apparently
was hurled from a passing car,
an army spokesman said.
The army said Protestant
extremists were responsible for
the bombing. The tavern is
Roman Catholic-owned.
The fatality raised the
province's death toll from
more than 4'2 years of
sectarian violence to at least
957. (AP)


Support swells





for the Tories


LONDON -- Support for
ruling Conservatives in
Britain's national election
was reported swelling by the
latest opinion poll.
The findings came as
opposition Labour members
raged at a government claim
that they would be "putty"
in the hands of Communists
if elected Feb. 28.
The Opinion Research
Centre poll gave the
Conservatives a 6 per cent
lead over the opposition
Labour party equivalent to
a Conservative margin of
about 100 in the 635-seat
House of Commons. But
poll experts said sampling
errors of up to four per cent
either way must be taken
into account.
The poll also noted a
sharp increase in support for
the middle of-the-road
Liberal party, which had 11
seats in the house when it
was dissolved.
The ORC poll was the
only major survey which
correctly forecast the
surprise Tory victory in the
1970 election.
The polls, which
interviewed 1,609 electors,
tound 41 per cent would
vote for the Conservatives.
35 per cent for Labour and
21 per cent for the Liberals.
The remaining 3 per cent
were for independents.
Ten da,'s ago the findings
were 42 per cent for the
Conservatives, 40 per cent
for Labour and 16 per cent
for the Liberals.
The ORC was the latest
in a series of polls in the
past week which have
shown a steady lead for the
Conservatives ranging from
2 to 11 per cent. The polls
have also shown a persistent
increase in support for the
Liberals.
Meanwhile, Labour
accused the Tories of


descending to a "new low
level of scurrility" in a
television political
broadcast.
In the broadcast
Chancellor of the
Exchequer Anthony Barber
said Communist extremists
in the miners' union, now
on a nationwide strike, want
to replace the Conservatives
with "a Labour government
that would be putty in their
hands."
Percy Clark, Labour's
director of information, said
of the broadcast: "It's the
cheapest and nastiest thing I
have seen."
Meanwhile, Enoch
Powell, the rightist
Conservative who accused
Prime Minister Edward
Heath of staging a dishonest
and fraudlent election and
announced he would not
run. bounced back on to the
election scene.
Powell, often tipped as a
future Prime Minister, said
he will speak later this week
for a campaign that aims to
pull Britain out of the
European Commom Market.
The campaign is asking
electors to vote for Labour


who have pledged to
renegotiate Britain's
membership terms.
Experts, meanwhile, told
a government inquriy about
the risks and dangers faced
by miners, now in the 10th
day of a nationwide strike
The testimony was given
to the "relativities" inquiry
set up by the government to
decide whether miners
should be paid more than
the 7 per cent increase limit
set by the government. (AP)



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hr ribunrttt


Owhe ribune
NuaLus ADDICTus JURARE IN VERBA MACISTI
Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas Of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903 1914
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, O.B.E., K.C.S.G., D.Litt., LL.D.
Publisher/Editor 191 7.1972
Contributing Editor 1972 -
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,M.Sc., B.A., LL.B..
Publisher/Editor 1972 -
Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas.
TELEPHONES:
Editorial 24532, 2-2260
General Offices (15 Extensions) 2-1986
Advertising 2-1986, 2-2768

Thursday, February 21, 1974


EDITORIAL


The female of the species


By ETIENNE DUPUCH
GRAND CAYMAN, January 18th Earlier today I wrote
several columns about a heading I read in Newsweek magazine ...
"Up From Slavery To What?"
The words "Up From Slavery" stirred up memories of Booker
T. Washington, the great American Negro, who coined this
expression.
I recalled some interesting facts about the great educational
centre he established in the Deep South for Negroes in the early
days of emancipation ... and I recorded bits of his philosophy ...
also that of the equally great Dr. George Washington Carver, both
of whom had greatly influenced my thinking as a young man on
many phases of human development.
In writing that article I wove into the picture a pattern of
Bahamian history that most of our people have forgotten ... and
many of those who still remember would like to forget and
ignore.
But the facts of history are stubborn. They are there ... and
they refuse to be ignored.


Negro slavery is so much a part of the comparatively recent
history of the western hemisphere that, whenever anyone
mentions the subject of slavery it is immediately assumed that it
has reference to the black man.

A fact that is constantly overlooked is that every race every
nation has endured slavery at some period in its history.
What the Negro suffered was mild compared with what the
Jews endured under the Pharoahs and the Angles (English)
suffered under the Romans. Read English history during the
period of Queen Boadicea and you will learn of the wholesale
slaughter by the Romans of l-ngli'h tribes whenever they gave the
slightest trouble.
From a reading of a history of Rome you will also learn that
men of many races and colours were brought to Rome as slaves to
fight and die in the arena of the Coliseum for the entertainment
of the Emperor and his court ... and the Roman people as well.

As I pointed out in a recent series of articles on the rise and fall
of nations ... if people would cultivate an intelligent appreciation
of history they would develop a broader and more enlightened
outlook on life. Most of their frustrations and fears would
disappear. They would find happiness rather than disappointment
in life. Confidence would replace suspicion. And human society
would be more secure.

Now I have a surprise for you.
What Anne Taylor Fleming wrote about in her article had
nothing to do with the commonly accepted meaning of slavery.
What she wrote about was something new in human experience
the explosion on the world stage of a movement known as
"Women's Lib" in which women say they are seeking freedom
from slavery imposed on them by the male species.

I am not competent to write on the question of women's
slavery because this situation has never arisen in our house.
Always ... throughout my family ... in my father's house and
mine ... and, as far as I can see, in the homes of my children ...
there has always been a relationship of equality and cooperation
between man and wife. For example, I never have a thought or
make a decision without sharing it with my wife.
During the recent Caribbean Press and Radio Association
conference in Antigua the editors at this meeting developed a
curious interest in my wife's participation in my work.
She attended all the meetings with me but did not take part in
the debates. When a vote was taken by ballot on a question she
was asked to count the ballots.
At the last meeting the members expressed appreciation for her
presence. They said that when she came in on the first day they
felt that she might last one nimeling and then disappear into the
shops. They were amazed that she sat through all the meetings
and was at my side at aill the functions.
None of the other men brought their wives because they felt
that they would be bored.
I explained to them that my wife is in every sense of the word
my "help-meet" .. and, to till that role fully, I must keep her
fully informed of every phase of my activities. She reads
everything I write before it goes into print and can tell me when
she thinks I have gone wrong on any point.
I suiggesied that they should bring their wives to the next
meeting of the Association which will be held in St. Lucia this
sumnme r.
The question of Women's Lib would not arise if men took their
wives fully into their own lives and shared their successes and
failures, iovs and sorrows with them. Now, many women only
share the sorrow which is expressed in intolerable irritability at
the end of a difficult day.


': ,- ,* 1
'4 ,, --
*>."-

. "..! f
: *';I






/*


Picture: FRED MA URA
Tourism Director S. N. Chib, left, who retires next month after more than six years in the Ministry post, on Monday
hosted a farewell party at the Nassau Beach Hotel for Government and tourism industry officials. Mr. Chib has been Tourism
Director since September 1, 1967, and he is returning to his native India on retirement next month. He is pictured at the
party with Prime Minister L. 0. Pindling and Mrs. Pindling and his wife.


The buzzing of a price juggle


EDITOR. The Tribune,
Will you permit me through
your paper to draw attention
to a situation which, if it
weren't so serious, could be
one of the biggest laughs of all
times.
A few weeks ago my wife
purchased, among her general
shopping, a jar of "Billy Bee"
Honey at a certain branch of a
large combine retail outlet, the
price being $1.31. Last week
she went to the same outlet,
and the same branch, for the
same item; this time it was
priced at S1.39.
Deciding against buying at
the increased price she shopped
around for other items a
normal practice and entered
another branch of the same
combine outlet, where, would
anyone believe it true! bought
a jar of "Billy Bee" Honey for
$1.07.
I wonder what reasoning the
management can give for this
very unusual fluctuation in
prices. It can hardly be stated
that this is what is commonly
known as competition, because


the two items were being sold
by the same people,
busmnesswise Neither time was
the honey on the list of
specials for the weekend.
Here it may be added that
the lower price paid is, I would
1' rather high for the
commodity I I pound net
weight), but the others defy
comprehension Certainly it is
obvious that there is no
cooperation in the price system
at these numerous branches of
the combine. Perhaps there is
no price system even at the
individual stores.
No doubt the long suffering
public will have to face the fact
that these practices are
commonly accepted within the
community at large and that
nothing will be done about
them except by a determined
effort on the shopper to either
"look around", or do without
when the price is not right. If a
concerted effort is made inl
those two methods to defeat
the high costs the dealers will
soon "see the light" and the
mark-up prices will be reduced


such a case ... why not go the whole way and have the woman
also discard her husband's family name.
This is what Women's Lib is doing to ordinary human relations
in family life where its influences are allowed to creep in.

I ran across a very sensible arrangement in Ottawa, Canada a
couple of years ago when my wife and I attended the wedding of
a young lady whose father had been A.D.C. to Sir Charles Dundas
and, for a period, also to the Duke of Windsor when they were
governors of the Bahamas.
In this man's family, his mother's family name was dying out.
There were two sons. One took the father's family name, the
other took the mother's Iainil name. In this way the name of an
old family was preserved.
Many readers of this column will remember Napier Moore. a
distinguished Canadian magazine editor who made his home iin
Nassau when he retired and died there. His wife Marjorie was a
columnist for The Tribune up to the time of her death.
Mr. Moore had a son by a previous marriage. lie told me that
this was the first male offspring in his family in 200 years. In the
process several family names must have disappeared.
If his son doesn't marry and have sons the Moore name will
also disappear.
Now let us finally get down to what Anne Taylor Fleming had
to say in her article on female slavery. I will quote three
paragraphs from her article to give you some idea of the drift of
her thoughts.
"For a long time now," she wrote, "I've been going to parties
and hearing that creative people in America are like y.o,,li!n.
raisins and happily married couples becoming scarcer and
scarcer.
"Apparently my boast was hasty and naive. We may have come
a long way, baby, but if our first creative efforts the books, the
magazines, the films, the canvases, the TV shows, the plays and
the poems are any indication, it isn't nearly far enough. Tlihe
sad truth is that the words women are writing, the magazines
they're editing, the shows they're producing sound almost e\ ,,il.
like what their husbands, lovers, or masters, if you will, have been
turning out for years.
"In fact, women are going men one better: they're running
faster, swinging harder, playing rougher. The writing they're
doing in Ms. magazine is so hardedged, so tough, that it makes
any of the magazines for men look softheaded and mushy. Bella
Abzug and Shirley Chisholm, the new kind of female politician,
practice their art with a sharpness, a brittleness that their male
colleagues and opponents can only envy. Barbara Walters has a
stiffer upper lip than Frank McGee, one of her co-hosts on the
'Today' show."
And so ... there you are women are becoming note
masculine than men and. in the process, most of them are losing a
charm that had made them the most beautiful thing in all God's
creation.

As so often happens when boys and girls. who have lived a
sheltered life, are exposed to the harsh realities of a competitive
world, they go to excesses, just to prove to the world that they
have thrown off the yoke of their early upbringing.
This is what often happens to children of ministers who take
the wrong road in life. It is a form of complex. They seem to feel
that they have something to prove ... or disprove ... as you wish.

Now let us see where women came from ... and the ideals that
motivated them when they first became conscious of a special
mission in life in the early days of this century.
I have in my library at home an interesting book on the social
life in Britain during the Victorian and early Edwardian periods.
The social code in those days was really amazing. At that time,
for example, doctors were regarded as domestics. They never


Perhaps this example of
price juggling is worthy of
investigation by someone.
either fl, i (within the
government t'olio) or
business community (and
semi-oftficial ) such as the
Chamber of LCommerce.
Unless there is a functioning
Rice Control Commn mission
p-rhaps the Ministry of
Finance would take over this
ruie ot watchdog .
.A further obvious fact which
can he noted when making a
comparison in food prices is
that there is no real
competition between the
stores i )One but needs to
compare the "'specials" week
by week iand it is quickly
recogni ed that in man\ cases
these air' "on" at some places
but "'ot)'" at others, while a
reverse trend takes place
perhaps the following week. In
many cases also the "specials"
are the same prices no matter
at which st.)re they are bought:
this is particularly obvious in
the soft dri ks. Many specials


are, no doub:, the result of a
discount from the distributors,
but why should a standard
price be set by the retail
stores? Thi ; is not
competition!
If this letter makes many
people think it will have served
a purpose; but if it arouses
action against the price
structure of many essential
items in our lives it will be time
well spent.
Perhaps those who are
fortunate to be able to afford
the high prices., spciJ.ill, in
foodstuffs, will commiserate
with those less fortunate than
themselves who find great
difficulty in obtaining the basic
commodities of life due to the
exorbitant costs of stich items.
If all decide to resist being
"bled" by price structures,
these will begin to fall to more
reasonable levels.


Nassau,
Feb. 18. 1974.


PUZZLED


reached the higher levels of the social structure.
As for nurses ... even in recent years when I had the member of
an old white family in Nassau for tea he refused to sit down to
table with a coloured nurse from the hospital who was also my
guest. Hle regarded all nurses as I. .ne'tic'
One of the illustrations in the book showed Mrs. Pankhurst,
founder of the Suffragette movement, being taken to the
guardroom by two burly policemen for demonstrating outside
Buckineham Palace. Thev had her under the arms and were
literally lifting her oft her feet.
Another picture showed a group of Suffragettes guarding a
hearse in a London street with the coffin of a member who had
been trampled to death when she threw herself in the path of a
horse and carriage. She did this in protest against the mess the felt
that men were making of the world.
The Suffragettes wanted the right to vote. They believed that.
through the ballot box. they could reform the world. As there are
more women than men in the world this would have been
possible had 'lih, retained their high ideals.
The Suffragette movement crossed over to the U.S. In their
first march down Broadway thousands of women carried placards
declaring the\ were going itn outlaw bar rooms. shut down
gambling dens and put a stop to prostitution. They' charged men
with abusing their bodies.
A little woman Carrie Nation won a place in American
history bh\ ,' it.; into bar rooms with an axe. smashing bottles
on the shelves and chopping up the furniture.
Now women have the vote They have .'- r thing They even
have the pill to allow them to freely prostitute their own bodies
without the risk of bearing children .. and. in the case they make
a slip and don't want to go through with it, they have won the
legal right to destroy the life in the womb that God gave them.
Because of this promiscuity\ all moral values have been lost and
the race is riddled with destructive all moral values have been lost
and the race is riddled with destructive venereal diseases which
have got out of control in the U.S.
Now society moves forward ... more corrupt, more wicked,
more decadent than it has ever been.
It's extraordinary how mnen and women set out on a crusade
with good intentions ... and when they have achieved their
objective the, are often sucked in and undermined by the very
evils the- had set out to de'J ,1.
It takes a strong character to bear success and prosperity
without having his whole mental processes ... and thereby his
moral values ... upset.
Take the P.L.P. government. for example. They set out to
clean uip the evils in public life they alleged that the U.BP. had
fostered. Today the U.B.P. are spoken of as Sunday school boys
as compared with the P.L.P.
"I thought the U.B.P. boys were greedy," an investor told me
one day. "but these new boys ... they are really hungry."
And I am told that a woman who will tell you that she went
barefooted until she was a big girl. now rolls in the lap of luxury
and must have champagne served to her with breakfast in bed!
It's showing on her now too ... she's beginning to look
puffy. And who was it that got drunk and behaved
outrageously at a recent dinner-dance of an important charity?
Why does that kind of thing have to happen to ordinarily nice
people when they find themselves lifted out of their element?

I have often told you in this column that women did not drink
hard liquor and smoke in public when I was a young man. Nor
did they gamble.
Look around you today and tell me what you see:

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
Let loose ... is the female of the species really "more deadly
than the male?" DUPUCH


3


If


AIIW


Thursday, February 21, 1974


A man visited The Tribune recently.. After looking around a
bit, he commented: "This is Women's Lib in action."
lie made that observation because he saw women in our office
filling executive positions without losing their feminine charm.
This is the way it should be ... both sexes developing their
talents to the fullest without losing a sense of their individual
values in life.
God created man and woman to complement each other.
Neither is a full person without the other. And this is what is
meant in the marriage ceremony when it is declared that man and
wife become a single and inseparable entity, to be parted only by
- the cold hand of death.

- The other day I heard a conversation between two friends.
- One referred to the other's wife as Mrs. So and So, using his
Christian name.
The second man corrected his friend. He told him that she no
Longer shared his Christian name. She wanted always to be
referred to by her own Christian name.
Under this arrangement John Johnson's wife would no longer
be Mrs. John Johnson. She would revert to Mrs. Mary Johnson. In









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Thursday, February 21, 1974


UP Xrtbutw


A $2 child's paint box that




changed her entire life!


IN 1966 JUDY CUNINGHAME was living in a New York
consultant husband, John worked on a feasibility study.


Their only daughter, Susan,
was married with children of
her own.
And, Judy, for the first time
in her life found her hands idle.
She went out and bought
herself a paint box.
The following day she
returned the paint box
complaining that the colours
were awful.
The sales assistant suggested
that if she really wanted to
paint she should buy artists
colours rather than a $2 child's
y----IH


paint box.
So, Judy, who has never had
a painting lesson in her life,
bought the artists' paints and
painted what she had closest
affinity with flowers.
.New Yorkers bought roses
by' the dozen. English Judy
bought them singly.
Within a month her
paintings were selling.
Douglas Fairbanks Jr.
bought the first one- a
perfect yellow rose.
Another friend and art


hotel while her management

connoisseur came to the hotel
room, looked at all of Judy's
paintings and said "I'll have
that, that and that. Here's a
cheque for $1,000".
Then, her husband, John,
told me last week at Cable
Beach Manors, where they are
staying on this, one of their
frequent trips to Nassau, "I
woke up".
The marketing of Judy's
talent after all is right up the
street of a management
consultant.
One month after Judy
bought her $2 paint box her
paintings were selling on 57th
Street and Park Avenue and
hanging in a 5th Avenue Art
Gallery.
Wherever Judy went she
painted. Mostly she painted
flowers but sometimes she
branched out into village
scenes (in Jamaica), birds, and
in London she painted one of
the Royal homes. For Judy's
teenage ambition was to be an
architect.
While in Bermuda the idea
was conceived for her paintings
to be printed in a book.
Now Judy is the "author" of
six books, flowers of Bermuda,
the Bahamas, Jamaica (fruits
and recipes), flowers of the
Cayman Island and a little
book of flowers of the islands.
Now Judy is hard at work
on her seventh flower book
which is a mammoth project.
She is "painting a book" of
all the state flowers of the
United States including that of
Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands
and the District of
Columbia.The Secretary of the
Interior has already written a
forward to this book which


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B & G Nuits-Saint-George, Vintage
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Drouhin Pommard, 1969
Drouhin Pommard, 1969
Engel Clos Vougeot, 1969
Engel Vosne-Romanee, 1969
Hallgarten Nuits-Saint-Georges, 1970
Latour Chateau Corton Grancey, 1969
Lichine Gevrey-Chambertin
Lichine Gevrey-Chambertin

Sichel Nuits-Saint-Georges, 1966
Sichel Nuits-Saint-Georges, 1966
L chine Chateauneuf-du- Pape
Cruse St. Julien, Non-vintage
Eschenauer St. Julien
Chateau Pontet-Canet, 1968
Chateau Ripeau, 1969
Chateau Ransan Segla, 1968
Cruse Barsac, Non-vintage
Cruse Sauternes, Non-vintage


pts
5ths
pts
5ths
5ths
pts
Sths
5ths
pts
5ths
5ths
pts

5ths
pts
ots
pts
pfs
pts
pts
5ths
5ths
pts


REG. SALE
PRICE PRICE


$ 4.10
$ 9.00
$ 4.70
$10.30
$.9.00
$.5.00
$15.00
$ 9.30
$ 3.45
$12.00
$ 8.50
$ 4.45

$10.00
$ 5.20
$ 3.45

$ 4.20
$ 4.20
$ 3.70
$12.00
$ 6.75
$ 3.85


5ths $ 2.80
pts $ 1.60
pts $ 3.00

pts $ 7.55


Charles Heidsleck, 1966
Charles Heidsieck Rose, 1966
Krug Brut, Non-vintage
Montvillers Brut, Non-vintage
Tacttinger Brut, 1966

Veuve Clicqiot, 1964-66
Veuve Clicquot, Non-vintage
Veuve Clicquot, 1962, 1966
Veuve Cllcquot Grande Dame
Bosca Asti Spumante
Torres Gran Sangre de Toro
Riscal


pts
Sths
5ths
pts
5ths

pts
pts
pts
5ths
5ths
5ths
pts


$ 6.65
$13.00
$12.30
$ 4.80
$11.30

$26.00
$ 5.65
$ 6.65
$16.50
$ 2.75
$ 3.70
$ 1.95


1.50
5.00
3.00
6.00
6.00
3.50
9.00
6.00
2.50
7.00
5.00
3.00


$ 5.00
$ 2.50
$ 2.00
$1.50
$ 1.50
$ 3.50
$ 2.50
$ 7.00
$2.50
$ 2.50

$ 2.00
$ 1.50
$ 2.00

$ 5.00


$ 5.00
$10.00
$ 9.00
$ 3.00
$ 8.00

$15.00
$ 3.50
$ 4.00
$12.00
$ 1.50
$ 2.00
$ 1.50


SHOP EARLY-BEAT THE RUSHI


BAHAMAS BLENDERS

Warehouse J.F.K. Drive


JUDY CUNINGHAME -
"at home" in Nassau at Cable
Beach Mbnors. Photo: Andy
Toofood.

will tie in with the
bi-centennial commission of
1976 and will be intimately
involved with the preservation
of the environment -
something very close to Judy's
heart.
Judy, who was brought up
in the English countryside, has
a deep rooted affinity with
nature.
She told me last week of the
dangers of losing an important
dimension of living "unless the
whole world wakes up and
realises it is burying itself
under materialism."
An example of the way we
have lost our eyes for the
beauty of nature uncultivated
by the hand of man happened
to Judy in the Cayman islands
when a woman friend
questioned Judy as to how she
could paint the flowers of the
Cayman islands when there
were no flowers there.
Judy, in her excursions into
the scrub bush of the Cayman
Islands, found many beautiful
wild flowers unseen by the
'cultivated eye' of her woman
friend.
The originals of Judy's
paintings hang in many private
collections and galleries
throughout the world.
The originals of her state
flowers will go on exhibition
all over America al
Horticulture and Garden
Societies.
They will also be reproduced
on China, playing cards and
place mats.
Which state flower will be
the joker might be no joke for
the State so selected!
Judy has a busy schedule
ahead of her including many
appearances on network T.V.
There is and will be much
speculation about Judy's art.
She has been called a
"Grandma Moses" whose
talent suddenly postmaturely
developed.
And yet, listening to her talk
about her childhood and life
up to 1966, I suspected that
Judy's talent had been with her
all her life and had found
expression in different forms.
For Judy has been creating
all her life.
Up until 1966 the form this
creativity took was in the
traditional area of women.
Her love of architecture
resulted in the Cuninghame
family living in houses at least
four hundred years old. At
once, after moving into a
"new" house, Judy would be
impelled to effect architectural
and structural alterations Her


husband John, in writing about
her, said that she "is never in a
house long before a staircase,
wall or fireplace must be
moved."
One such home, an old
farmhouse in the English
countryside, was the subject of
a "House and Garden"
coverage.
Another area of Judy's
creativity was cooking and her
husband John describes her as
a "gourmet and cordon bleu"
cook. One day tired of eating
avacados in salad Judy filled
the avocados with shrimp and
covered them with a Mornay
sauce and baked them. Result:-
a gourmet's delight said her
admiring husband.
Judy also designs and makes
all her own clothes and if there
is a wedding in the family Judy
designs and makes all the
outfits.
Last week when I saw her
she came in from the pool side
at the Cable Beach Manor
apartments wearing a beautiful
coverall and matching hat of
her own creation. Her husband
also showed me a stunning
evening dress Judy had made
from a turkish tablecloth.
Lying close at hand where she
sat was her knitting and on the
window sill of the little living
room were the most lifelike
family of Eskimos I have ever
seen. These were merely pieces
of coral to which Judy had
added two eyes and a nose.
The only Judy-made alteration
to the pieces of coral was to
flatten their bases so they'd
stand upright.
So if Judy is receiving fame
at this period of her lfe it is
not because she has suddenly
started to create.
When Judy found herself in
that New York suite in 1966
with no house to tear apart and
recreate, with no family
wedding to design and make,
with no kitchen in which to
produce gourmet meals she
said she "looked around for
something to do with my
hands". It was then that she
went and bought her $2 paint
box.
If Judy had never been in
that New York suite with idle
hands I believe that she would
still have been an artist albeit
an unsung one.
For patchwork quilts do not
usually hang in galleries. They
are used and worn out as are
high couture clothes. Gourmet
meals are eaten and homes are
lived in (and subsequent
owners might not be artists and
architects).
But these things are still art.
And Judy Cuninghame I
suspect was an artist long
before the world recognized
her as such.
A RECENT arrival in town
is the new veterinarian for the
Humane Society, Dr. Norman
Smith, who is now ensconced
in his new home with his wife,
young son and, of course, dog
Heidi.
The Smiths arrived just in
time to meet the Humane
Society's big annual
fund-raising event, their
February raffle.
A beautiful new Dodge
Avenger will have a raffle
ticket holder's owner on March
5th at the drawing at the Cat
and Fiddle. There are eight
lovely prizes for others who
have the luck of the draw.

Congratulations to Mr.
Lewis V. Tay., Super
intendent of the Boys'
Industrial School (from 1948),
for being this year's Golden
Heart Award winner.
I hear that this year's heart
ball was a real win-dinger.


Sidney Poitier's birthday
Sidney will not be ashamed
to admit his age. He will be 50.
After all, nobody will believe
he could possibly be fifty.
He is 'though. He was borr
on February 24th, 1924 while
his parents were visiting Miami.
ii-b


...by Daphne Wallace-Whitfield


An expatriate friend of mine
says that in seven years of
(be-) heart-balling this was
"the best ever". There were
more Bahamians patronising
the affair than ever also which
would indicate that "heart' is
here to stay as the Bahamas
becomes more and more
Independent.
Mrs. Pindling. I hear, as
usual stole the haute couture
show in a stunning gown
covered in rhinestones.
The fashion reports on her
husband were not so flattering.
Drainpipe trousers and a fat
dotted bow tie did not qualify
him to be one of the
best-dressed men.
But, in all fairness, fashion
isn't his business, I don't think.
********
SUNDAY will be Bahamian
Academy Award winner


SIDNEY POITIER
Sunday.


... 50 on


CALVIN LOCHART, Bahamian film star, on (and off)
our T.V. screen last week in "Halls of Anger".


(.


Photo: PHILIP SYMONETTE.
While on the subject of film
stars (Bahamian) and T.V. for
the Bahamas (Bahamian or any
other kind) Bahamian film star
Calvin Lockhart was
frustatingly "snowy", was on
"our" TV screens last week in
"Halls of Anger". With the
apparent complete demise of
any movies of any value at our
local theatres in town watching
Calvin Lockhart in his highly
dramatic role in this tough
realistic movie on TV would
have been something of a
,compensation if we could have
:seen or heard it properly!.

Paul Bowe, son of Mr. Roy
Bowe of Nassau, is a newly
enrolled student of Florida Air
Academy in Plantation,
Florida.


t- 19. lf ,I I
AMONG THE MANY DISTINGUISHED GUESTS who attended the tenth annual Sir Victor
Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Foundation Heart Ball were (left to right) Prime M nister, the Hon.
Lynden 0. Pindling; Mrs. Ronald Spiers, His Excellency Sir Milo Butler; Lady Sassion, Mr. Ronald
Spiers, United States Ambassador to the Bahamas and Mrs. Lynden Pindling. The Ball was a great
success with hundreds of guests from the Bahamas and abroad. Music for the evening was
provided by the internationally renowned Meyer Davis Orchestra and the Blind Blake Trio played
during dinner. The Golden Heart award winner was Mr. Lewis V. Taylor. .'7 i: WendellCleare


NEW ARRIVALS

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NEW BEDSPREADS WITH

MATCHING DRAPES
I I i I [ I !11IIn


HOURS: Monday through Friday 9:30 a.m. 6 p.m.
Saturday ............9:30 a.m. 9 p.m.
II. .. . muTIim H u -


I


BAHAMAS

WORLD

AIRLINES


FOR TWENTY FOUR (24) HOUR
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INFORMATION AND
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PLEASE PHONE:
21WEEK
WEEKDAYS PHONE: 21257


DR. NORMAN SMITH Humane Society's new veterinarian with his dog Heidi.


Calvet Rose
Calvet Rose
Chateau Chet de Selle

Bollinqer Brut, 1966


IC


NOW AT ONE BIG LOCATION
6th.Terrace Centrevile

TEL: 2-2347 2-8150


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4 in an apartment


I too many for Joan


By Abigail Van Buren
C 1974 by Chicago Tribune-N. Y. News Synd., Inc
DEAR ABBY: I am a 28-year-old guy who came to New
York with a buddy. We teamed up with another guy, and
the three of us share a two-bedroom apartment. It's a great
location for all of us, and we split the rent.
My buddy the one I came to New York with! invited
his girl friend from back home to come to New York and
stay at his pad She's still here and plans to stay indefinite-
ly. IShe and my buddy share one bedroom, and the other
guy and I share one I
I recently met Joan, who's the nicest gal I've ever
known. She asked me where I lived, and I told her I lived
with two other guys Then I mentioned this girl who's
staying with my buddy. Joan blew her stack and said she
didn't like the idea of a girl living in the same apartment
with me even tho I have nothing to do with her. I'm serious
about Joan She's a very classy gal, but she insists that either
that girl should move. or I should. What do you think?
MR CI.EAN
DE R MIR. (cI.EXN: If anybody should move. it should
be your buddy who invited his girl friend to hunk with him.
That's not the deal you made originally. Joan's objections
are valid, so if the shacker-uppers won't budge, you'd be
wise to move. It's easier to find another pad than another
class> gal.

DEAR ABBY. Plcase reassure the wife who lamented
that shli had been smashing in bed. but short else here
during 27 years of marriage:
I A lad, s enthiusias.n has .i r ti..: to do with a
man's virility rh ymes with ability 1;
2 Love and sex are not synonymous, but 'i,,-% can be
might close kin:
3 Anybody can learn to cook, and I'll bet Whalshis-
name whistit s c'lde he fixes breakfast every morning.
OLD HUSBAND
DFI 11 H'SB Xi : Xnd I'll bet you're right!

DEAR ABBY Mc! own tendency to be late was cured
when someone ,ad Atat tardiness is the subtlest form of
self-love and aconce;' counting your time and convenience
more important tha "'r. 's.
Perhaps tha' is ahy the tardiness of my inlaws, r':'nkles
me so. They are con'-istentlv late, a half hour to an hour
and a half,s ven for a dinner when others are involved.
Dont .' that I give them an earlier arrival time.
One family rni'mnixm r did this, and when it was discovered,
retaliauion set un iHow would you handle this? fShort of
excluding th-es-e members from family gi.th rin, -
,PFF'r\Ti,:D AND BAFFLED
D) t i \ A\ 1It Don't sweat it. Invite them only on
those occasions when their late arrival will not inconven-
ience YOXU'

CO(nFIDE-NTI\Il TO "DOING IT MY WAiY"' You'll
never get away with it. The sins we do two b% two, we pay
for one b% one.

For Abby's new booklet. "What Teen-Agers Want to
Know," send $1 to Abigail Van Buren, 132 Lasky Dr., Bev.
early Hills, Cal. 90212.

Problems' You'll feel better if you get it off your che.
For a personal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. 69700, L.A.,
Calif. 90069. Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope,
please.
Hate to write 1-tters? Send $1 to Abigail Van Buren,
132 Lasky Dr., B, -ly Hills, Cal. 90212 for Abby's booklet,
"How to Write I rs for All Occasions."


NOTICE

NOTICE is he ebv .1, Vt TOR vORLTA GANOT
o Quairry Miss: R.ad. .; B is' applying to the
Minister responsible to' N :- itv and Citizenship, for
naturalization -ai i itOwd t O-' I 'O Bahamas. a' nd that any
peisori who knows -v -o .v natutiasation should
not t.e granted shoti l s' 1 : en and signed statement
of the facts within vwen. r,. s ti the 14th day of
f 'btuary 1974 to The .. o ble oi ". ..,[
ajd Citi'enshp, PO Bo Na





NOTICE
.,4OTICE 1- h.*,. : 1 ) .. AN[ R
',"'ATSON : : .. a'n, is
''1 1y4ir 0c 1, '': '. ,, '.: ; ',jl,' '' j :ia.: ,, i st,. et Jilt
iti/enlhip, fo i 0 Boxhanas,
rnd that aoi' ;', n : ;...- .. *,.aj-,.;. w hy
i,'qisti2tm; nSit i s a I, : '* *: 9:,+,:ld ,- i.; a wv,'itten
arnd siqgnf t. :. :" ,a* * :. .* [*i" **-* :t -aG tht days
f*ro m tin 14tlh J ** v 1" 74 : -I r: '.n tnstet

i 7. a a ,.





NOTICE
NOTi:i '. '::, t f ) OUGLAS
.AL '. : ,, ";. .'+! '' <.-, a.- P. O .
[o2 .f or




7"4 t'o
0. Bo : N7 14 N;.ss.;





NOTICE

SShip ; .' a d s
pp !"0pBuq ;x :' hi+. ,, r- ati alty and
ttl e "-1 p, * + ; ;" i **;. '-" ;* T '.Baham as,




N' 71 7'





NOTICE
1OTi j BTH
-O N r S :o' Jo t: 3..." "* *.; n .. 3 d c! {jha na '
r" a a
Cit, ze nip. .' : + : \. ` ."' :" 1 B a iamaI>.
.H'L {ir a'. 1* ,1 \ ;,-' = .: .'' "** J+", ; iso',on; w hy
t V: lVa

IroAm th-: 21 ; I' .; J str-
I ) poo sib Io f o ti,, .,; -i f Box
N 7147, Nassau




NOTICE








NNTC




NOTICE












:, = .. ..% + a+ h e. ,: =i ":? + ,: %}t i~ i=,
i,+ gu.s ".. ",ou" i:1 w m an oont. ,, {!< ~ oe; f ,3
; , t.h' '. t ".: f + a+ % -. t, . : + + at .=- ,,i
Febru } ": 7 4 + i, t } Th V ite. to v' :: .:


NOTIt hecthy uI .n' that 'h ;,! 0 t1' "L t'ui LC f UL cou l
Boulvai P! i ) b4 '..i ,,:'' ...' d, 1 ,ppl yiin tot
the %"inr.ti re! pjnsble f, N!ati ,,"v aI- Fd Cr,-gbs o. foi
reOist'a,'j s a ti/en oaf tih 3.<'ai''; a, jt: a that any
poison, hru i ws ; ny reason; I ,vh v *q [ Id I' I should nut
be iganrtd shan il seI d ,1 w f: ; .* "+! sin' u st -rnent of
th-o 'tlt- within two ntvtt qs ht ' ay- r'*_ th, 21st day of
V f r h ad v 1974 tu The M insist i f =5| s'tsibl fol Nationality
andd Citifenship. P 0 Bux N/14/. Ni satn





NOTICE

NOTICE 's hetebv. 9v-5n that EMMiANUEL IHOMAS of
Alice Tovwnr. Birman is ; .. to th, M.nte, responsible
for Nationality and (itiounship, fjo naiitcir station as a.
citizen of Thi- Bahamas. arnd that Jav persI'on who knows
any ieasotn why nvtto alisaition should nt be granted should
send a written and i aned statement of the facts within
twenty eight days from the 21st day of Iebtuary 1974 to
The Minister responsible for "J.i . a d ci ttIrishipD P.
0. Box N7147, Nassau


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ANN LOUISA MORETA
GANOT of Quarry Mission Road, N. P. BHS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 14th day of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MRS. PEGGY MARIA
WATSON of West End Grand Bahama is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 14th day of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N7147, Nassau.






NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GORDON SHURTLEFF
Ld ..1'iSLY of P. 0. Box F150, Freeport, G.B.I. is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalization should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21st day of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MR. ALEXANDER
BAPTISTE of Holmes Rock Grand Bahama is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
perosn who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21st day of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.





NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ROTHMAN MCAULEY
TUCKER of Eight Mile Rock Grand Bahama is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21st day of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.





NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MR. GRANVILLE
HEGERTON GARVEY of West End Grand Bahama is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citi/ensihip, for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
fiom the 14th day of February 1974 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P. 0. Box
N7174, Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MR. JOHNSON PREVAIL of
Grand Cay Abaco Bahamas is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nati onality and Citizenship, for
natuialrsation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
nut be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 14th day of
Februarty 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147, Nassau.





NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MR. ROLAND AUSTIN
POWELL ',f Freeport Grand Bahama, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 14th day of February 1974 to The Minister


I responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P. 0. Box
N7147, Nassau.





NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that KATHLEEN ISOLA
GARVEY of Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama. P.O. Box
F2659 is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration should not be granted should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14th day of February 1974 to
The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship
P.O. Box N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that L. McDONALD FORBES of
Freeport, Grand Bahama, P.O. Box 358 is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 14th day of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.


(4 Cri(nbtir


itegistration should not be granted should send a witten
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 14th cday of February 1974 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P. .0 Box
N7147, Nassau.





NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that RANDALL EUGENE
MOORE of Freeport Grand Bahama c/o Box F-61 is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 14 day of Feb. 1974 to The Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.





NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that NOMIKOS PELEKANOS of
Sea Sun Manor P. O. Box 1943 is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts w7hinh twenty-eight days from the 14th day of
F Tebruary 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship P. 0, Box N7147, Nassau.


NOTICE


U


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CLAUDE ANDRE '.n ',,. I
of Hawksbill, Grand Bahama, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registation
as a citizen of The Bahamas. and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should riot be granted
should send d written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 21st day of February
1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.


Cj a- ship, P, 0Jx N


Thursday, February 21, 1974




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that CALIXTE GUERRIER of
165 Sommerville Dr. Apt. No.4, Freeport, Bahamas is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
naturalization should not be granted should send a w, ,i,.
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 14th day of February 1974 to The Ministe,
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship P. 0. Box
N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ILL iE VICTORIA
WILLIAMS of Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahamrna s
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as a citizen of The Bahamas.
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration should not be granted should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight da;s
from the 21st day of February 1974 to The Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P. 0. Bo<
N7147, Nassau.





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANNIE ESTHER SIMONS
Eight Mile Rock Grand Bahama is applying to thli
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,. f,,
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that a'I,
person who knows any reason why registration should -nt
be granted should send a written and signed statement ,
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21st day
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147, Nassau.





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BERNICE LOUISE OUTTLN
of Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama is applying to t!I
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, fIr
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that a,
person who knows any reason why registration should ,i.1
be granted should send a written and signed statement i'
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21st da cl
February 1974 to The Minister responsible fot National:t
and Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147. Nassau.






NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that EUGENIO PETER BENINI
11B Turtle Cove Freeport, Grand Bahama is applying to
the Minister responsible for 'in. aii., and C ,,-n'.h I foi
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that apy
person who knows any reason why naturalisation shouia
not be granted should send a written and signed statemnc'
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 14th day ,
Feb. 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality acd
Citizenship P. O. Box N7147, Nassau.





NOTICE

NOTICE is heieby given that SHIRLEY LEATHiE MOOR'
of Freeport, Grand Bahama c.o Box F-61 is applying to tihe
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
registration as a citizen of The Bahamnas aid that a's
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 14th da of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship P, 0. Box N714/, Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that OLIVER ALFRED PRAT1 ot
Sea Grape Grand Bahama is applying to the Ministe'
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration'
as a citizen of The Bahanas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration should nrot be gianted
should send a written and signed statement of the falt'
within twenty-eight days from the 14th day of FebuaryV
1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality and,
Citizenship, P. O. Box N7147, Nassau.





NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ANDREW DONALDSON o3
190 Scott Avenue Freeport Grand Bahrama Box 63 is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration as a rtizeni of The Bahaimas,
and that any person who knows any reason why


IN
%0%-- --









Thursday1_ Ferar 1 17


Nassau firm wins International Safety Award


: VERSATILE

CUCUMBERS
SCUC'NIBERS are still
;available at the Potter's Cay
:Produce Exchange. There are
:still several weeks left to enjoy
-the locally grown product so
make the most of them. Here
"are some recipes to help
:whittle the crops.
SFor wilted cucumbers, peel
and thinly slice a cucumber
and an onion. Put them in a
.bowl with a tablespoon of
chopped parsley. Sprinkle with
-salt and pepper. Pour on
-three-quarters of a cup of hot
:beef stock and let the mixture
:stand at room temperature
until cool. Add a tablespoon of
wine vinegar and a tablespoon
of salad oil. Chill for an hour
or more.
These cucumber
"sandwiches" are excellent and
easy for cocktail parties or
pre-dinner snacks. Peel six
medium cucumbers and slice
thinly. Let the slices drain on
paper towels for half an hour.
Cut a pound of thinly sliced
smoked salmon into rounds the
same size as the cucumber
slices. Place a round of salmon
between two slices of
cucumber. Place on a serving
plate and sprinkle with freshly
ground pepper. Garnish the
plate with parsley or water
cress.
Peel the cucumbers, slice
and let drain for half an hour.
For these sandwiches, cream
cheese is the filler. Let half a
pound of cream cheese soften
at room temperature. In a
bowl, combine the softened
cheese with two tablespoons
sour cream, a teaspoon minced
onions and a little salt. Beat
the mixture until it is smooth.
Spread the filling between two
cucumber slices. Roll the edges
of each sandwich in finely
chopped chives. Arrange on a
serving plate and chill.
This cucumber marmalade
gives an extra taste pleasure to
meats. Peel and seed the
cucumbers and finely chop
them to make two cups. In a
saucepan, combine the
cucumbers with four cups of
sugar, a third of a cup of lime
juice, two tablespoons grated
lime rind and a few drops of
geren food colouring. Bring to
a:- boil stirring and boil
vigorously for a minute.
Remove from the heat and stir
in-half a bottle of liquid pectin.
Skim off the froth and stir the
marmalade for five minutes,
skimming off any more foam
as it rises. Spoon the
marmalade into sterilized glass
fars and seal with melted wax.
For dilled cucumber salad,
peel three large cucumbers. Cut
them in half lengthwise and
scoop out the seeds. Cut the
halves in thin slices and place
in a bowl. Add two
tablespoons chopped fresh dill
antd enough French dressing to
coat the slices.' Toss the salad
and chill.
:Saute tomatoes and
ctlcumbers for a vegetable dish.
S4ute 12 chopped green onions
in- butter until they are golden.
Add two peeled, seeded
cucumbers cut in quarter-inch
slices and cook for two
minutes. Add four tomatoes,
peeled and cut into wedges.
Cook, stirring for five minutes.
Season the vegetables with salt
and pepper and add two
teaspoons finely chopped mint.
An excellent sauce for cold
fish is made with cucumbers.
Peel a large cucumber, remove
the seeds and grate the
cucumber. Mix the pulp with a
cup of sour cream and a
teaspoon lemon juice. Stir well
arid chill.


For jellied cucumber soup,
peel a large cucumber, halve it
lengthwise and cut out the
seeds. Grate the halves and a
quarter of an onion. Add a
quarter cup of chopped mint
anrl the juice of half a lemon.
Stir the mixture into four cups
of jellied consomme melted to
the syrupy stage. Season with
salt and pepper. Pour the soup
into cups and chill until set.
This is a very easy cucumber
salad. Peel three cucumbers
and slice them very thinly.
Place in a serving bowl. For the
sauce, combine half a cup each
of water and vinegar, a little
salt and a little sugar and
pepper to taste. Stir and pour
over the cucumbers. Let them
stand at room temperature for
an-hour or more before serving.
Make your own cucumber
yuhurt. Crush a clove of garlic
and mix it with a tablespoon of
vinegar. Peel and dice a small
cucumber. Stir a pint of plain
yoghurt and add the garlic,
vitiegar and cucumber. Stir well
and chill.


NASSAU READYMIXED
Concrete Company plant
superintendent Martin
Ratcliffe, left, proudly
displays the bronze plaque
the company won as one of
five first players in an
international safety contest.
The award was made by
the National Ready Mixed
Concrete Association, with
ever 600 member-companies
in the U.S., Canada, the
Bahamas and the Caribbean.
Over three hundred
companies entered the safety
contest, and winners were
picked in five production
volume categories.
Nassau Readymixed
Concrete lost no work-time
due to injuries during the
year beginning July, 1972.
Ten members of the
company's 14-man cement
production crew proudly
display the individual
certificates that came with
the bronze plaque.
Pictured from left are Mr.
Ratcliffe, Thomas Mackey,
Arthur Lightbourn, Egbert
Stockdale, Arthur Saunders,
Oral Ferguson, Kendal Fritz,
manager Peter Andrews, Leon
White and Clarington
Ferguson.


Mrs. Kayla Lockhart-Ed-
wards will present a concert
at the monthly meeting of
the Baptist Young People's
Fellowship of the Bahamas
Baptist Missionary and
Educational Convention on
Saturday at Zion Baptist
Church, East and Shirley
Streets, at 7:30 p.m. There is
no admission fee.




Intimacy

and the

married

woman.


The need to be sure
It's so important for your well
being as a woman to feel sure
about the functioning and fresh
ness of your body.
Because douching isn't practi
cal. or even always advisable. cau
tious married women of today rely
on Norforms feminine supposito
nes.
Positive protection two way's
Norforms do a two fold job most
effectively. They protect you
against embarrassing problems
with their highly perfected germi
cidal formula. And they protect
you against offensive odors with
their rapid deodorant action.
Complete confidence
So simple and convenient. Nor
forms dissolve at normal body tern
perature to form a protective film.
Theydo not harm delicate internal
tissue.
Next time ask for Norforms, an
ideal way to have the confidence
you need as a married woman.
Sold at pharmacies in packages
of 6, 12 and 24.
Informative booklet, write to:
Norwich International
410 Park Avenue,
NewYork
NY 10022


Iam
4-
*


What's your





heart's desire?


A Royal




Savings Ac



can help




g it.


lank



count


you


The most important thing T,, \
about savings is to do it
regularly. When you do,
your money builds up.
Another important thing is
to put your savings to work
for you. Earning interest. In
The Helpful bank. Savings
offer security for rainy
days, future investments,
flexibility.
Savings also offer you something else.
Your chance to buy your heart's desire.
Helpful Bankers in Nassau and the Family
Islands can tell you about savings. Just ask one.


The Royal The Helpful Bank
ROYAL BANK
Branches throughout the Bahamas


i'- SMEARED


AMANA SIOR- HOR


COIPACTOR


Amana puts the pressure on trash. Shrinks a
week's household trash into one trash can.

Compacts your trash in low cost plastic bags
you buy at Super Markets.

A lock & key, stop & start switches provide
simple safe operation.

Only $320.00

This is a New Itemi



TAYLOR INDUSTRIES LTD.

P, 0. Box N.4806 Tel. 2-8941


U


j


I \ ---- -


Thursday, February 21, 1974


'7


4


Zhr hribunp








Thursday, February 21, 1974


is, t'ii, al, sit, tn is IW i
, l p l i \ h l ,j u ] H .* I i n i k .
in ,h,. h !ij .ind whilu ,tilitn
1h1Iit t hit % ll t ir nk, ('Guesi Model Pat Kemp, models rhis 'banana .1ul w hllih
P ,d i C 1 h .t r a.11 n ,i ,as designed and made b\ the model The pant, and jacket
111 ..'. eli"Is is called a banana suis becaud e of the designs 1 hananas ion
the jacket


Emerald CGlinrn one ii
(he model, i I he B.iahain.i
Sci'relars ,ANi"Cii Onl ,
fashion shiow hlii\s i hi- hnet

black spark I- Irr-,s Iroin
Denlma. in ile HrrIish
Colonial recedee shipping
Jrea


( hdirnu n .il t1he .t ril.it\
.\s a id n Ill hIangh liltill.
.the in.l Dani e nid,.1, ihi,
Inm ulli i. ,ioi lrn ed l I,,rl. 1 ,...l ini
dre,%% f r i- ( .ipi Il c I h,: I.lp
lI lihe ,Jr,-s, is .I lit id iI r Ill ,.
Jd It 1 iln pl l i i l ,I i \ I I t l. h i
l lid Il cdl .ll l l l lll ll .11111 11 1
dh-' e C ihe high A i i i aiihl ,.,i
ihe oilll1 i1


Modelling this Ilolwer\ evening dress from


i ... i i, r .alt\ ,i f blue \ ikk (.,rani the Flea Markel i Miss (, a\ lene tChristie,
i i iir enng Jres r ,li the %%ho is a member ,-1 the secreiara s
, ,1i association The outstanding design on this
dress is the diamond cut Onut on the black
halter top
........:. .:. ... ..
.................................................* . *. .* .* . *.*.:


Sii Allli C- m t1\ i ni i
P.r ll k m .n v 1111nd ll,
B r.,l n IP.' i f,, dtl l' I ll, .,%i
deisiii in ll, Aiii pf ll it r
ill I%% lll n .Il hl i u i,
P .il l, l f,. li, ,iidl.- % i n ,r i iib
evening dress with ostrich
like feathers living the iacket
This suit c o ies rom
Mademoiselle
%If NIBI RS t tir e l it i,iir
S e. c N dr "\ s N A -. 1 ; ,1 ; i l
deligh.lJ Ilh ir trIho ', tl.d
oth rs .it lhiii .intni.ai lahl
shorrv ld alu inter iheld .ri'
SatuLrd \ n irliit i a ith e .
Bea( c i lutcl
Mr Shria ltBilt r l r si oi
the Cp .iki. l r h th hti.L











Awsemh!? flut" i
was iii itct st I. tit n iinis i
snia l \ numb rl i l li tpli i
sorthe 1 .' 1 .at i l Stirt in rin
wear
Kenit yp (ifdi uirIlet Itc Bro ki
C'onvInti n irt in tl;i t the 'itor









in July
was Mrs Veirnce (Coperpc, arid
surprise appearairL es i %r t'C
performed biy Lollita Satricrs
and I)eacFOR 3 in
Par prtrceeds ot this !ashiotn
show will furnish otiir
scholarshiWps toERVICE
pursiin I secretarial stFU ICIs at
the C'. R Walker eOLthiCal
College TR he show;O L pro2 ds
will also assist in senldir'g a
small number oof 1.1 .',. Io
the 1974 National SecretlaJr's
(Convention in -tlanta. (d;eorgia
in July
FORF3in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE I
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-215,7


SEE THE TROJAN YACHT DISPLAY AT THE
MIAMI INTERNATIONAL BOAT SHOW -
FEBRUARY 22nd 27th


- --i1


P__Lit


L- ....
THE FIBERGLASS TROJAN F-3:i SPORT FISHERMAN.
Tlhre s-parilt-r sleepi iim ,areas. .\d i tfull-Sli zd lui'd will
slhownr. A\nd ,i Iautifull tol-t .irimitiid iatlley. Ail d ih!p plush
lver s.eni in ,a i i 'foret B t tniilmxth
An.\ d io.r Slidiii iiport clirs. lnl. d Al. ss ind h i ..lulll. inic:lilt< ie
slidh'ir .iti dlh rs ,ilid h.lt l h.ls. 'llli ntl fl optli l ltoo. ir co dll i-
lioning ii:-inullik!r-Irt(wr. nCom inhiliotin hi- labil iiand liquor
locker. Anidid a t itny kind of power y.ou ml ,1 il l dn lu I ..
Besidil- s llt Splort Fishermaniii m ttil VouI c:i t1 1! Ither i aSport
Sirdaliifh ilt a ridiuiori al Sedll(l Crutisur
Site it ii B M\ i iir H tlitni t s ,i anrdt ft or t t tll xvterior dtsiLuii
And li!i rnil b ,iintly ixdltsnl v\ it shlt until V IIu itrn lihr oil.




-^*.PLr ,'"
';A


Mo r ea c


HAt l


EA



SSaIle Starts FlIday,





F ebruay 22nd f 9a..




SUCCESS JEWELRY

PRINCE GEORGE ARCADE

PHONE 5-1638



SUCCESS JEWELRY


GOING OUT OF


BUSINESS





$100,000 WorthOf Jewellery at Savings up to



50% & More


Every Item in Store on Sale!

Nothing Held Back




Every Thing oes!


i:''
,:~..
Iiii
:.;.:.
:i:!::
',.;
,.,.,.
."'.;...
.0,,,,


I


I I ,


- -- ------- ------~


I i F


A._ W rbur








174



...


I


II


















































































V


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..


USE

he p ribunt

CLASSIFIED
ADVTS.


THANK YOU CONTESTANTS!
"NAME THE BABY- STUDIO"
Thank you tor sending 385 names for our new
baby studio. Each entrant is now being
acknowledged through the mail and a selection
of happy ideas will be published in the press
shortly together with the chosen name.


PHOTOOIAP4Y
on the waterfront at East Bay & William Sts.
PHONE 5-4641




Bahamas

Teleo umunications

Corporation



NOTICE




The Bahamas Telecommunications
Corporation wishes to announce that
telephone service is now available in Palmetto
Village.
Residents living in this area, who are
interested in obtaining service should contact
the Corporation's Commercial Office on
Thompson Boulevard, Oakes Field, Telephone
Number 3491 1, at their earliest convenience.
Information regarding lot or nearest Pole
Number. should readily be available when
applying for service.


I STARTS FRIDAY
*Matinee 3:00 & 5:00, Evening 8:30-'Phone 2-1004, 2-10051
EuJOT KASTNERP -s A ROBERTALTMAN Fnm
ELLIOTf GOULD.
"THE LONG GOODBYE".
NINA VAN ALLANDT-STERUNGHAYDEN
VO ONE0/ UNDER 18 WILL BE ADMITTED.
Reservations not claimed by 8:15 will be sold
on first come, first served basis.


Last Day Friday Last Day Friday
Matinee starts at 2:15 Continuous Showings
Evening 8:30 from 3:00
"NIGHT OF THE LEPUS"PG. "GEORGIA, GEORGIA"
Stuart Whitman, PG.
Janet Leigh Diana Sands, Dirk Benedict
PLUS
"THEY ONLY KILL PLUS
THEIR MASTERS" PG. "KILL OR BE
I PLUS Late Feature KILLED" PG.
Friday night Robert Marks,
'Phone 2-2534 Gordon Mitchell



NOW SHOWING
Matinee Continuous from 1:45, Evening 8:30-
'Phone 3-4666
BLACK GODFATHER t 18 BACK
B L ...and he's takin "' g .
S over the town 1


FRDWILUAMSON oRr-f %Val
Plus! "THE HUNTING PARTY" R
E NO ONE UNDER 18 WIL. BE ADMITTED.


THE ROYAL NAVY'S
assault ship HMS Fearless
(Captain J B Rumble, RN)
with a complement of 35
officers and 500 men,
including five officers and 85
men of the Royal Marines, and
carrying in addition 150
mid-shipmen on a training
cruise through the Caribbean,
will visit Nassau from 26
February to 1 March.
Tank landing craft that can
swim in and out; a flight deck
large enough to operate four
helicopters; Seacat missile
defence systems; assault force
headquarters. These are just
some of the features of HMS
Fearless and her sister ship
HMS Intrepid which are the
most versatile ships yet
designed for amphibious
warfare.
They represent a new era in
British amphibious capability.
Fearless displaces 12,000
tons, in 520 feet long and has a
beam of 80 feet. There are four
Seacat missile systems for
defence against surface and air
attack, and two 40mm Bofor
guns. The main machinery
consists of steam turbines in


'..


two self-contained units, each
driving one shaft.
First commissioned in
November 1965, she was built
by Harland and Wolff Limited
at Belfast in Northern Ireland
and launched in December
1963. She can land troops of
an infantry battalion or Royal
Marines Commando and their
equipment, a squadron of
tanks or Armoured Scout cars,
or a complete unit of the
Royal Engineers with their
heavy equipment.
An assault ship is virtually a
streamlined floating dock with
a three storey stowage space
for vehicles, surrounded by
accommodation for the ship's
company and military
personnel, and surrounded by a
flight deck. The dock is
flooded by taking ballast to
lower the ship in the water.
Fully loaded landing craft are
then floated out astern.
Naval and RAF helicopters
and when necessary Army
reconnaissance and
communications helicopters
operate from the flight deck.
During amphibious operations,
the ship becomes joint
headquarters for the naval and
military commanders.
In October 1968 the then
Prime Minister, Harold Wilson,
used HMS Fearless as the
conference venue at Gibrlater
for the second round of his
talks with Premier lan Smith of
Rhodesia. He was on board
again for the Lagos Conference
in March 1969 during the
Nigerian Civil War.
And it is not only Prime
Ministers and service personnel
who can visit Fearless. There
will be an underprivileged
children's party on board on
Wednesday, February 27 and
members of the public can visit
the ship at Prince George's
Wharf between 2 p.m. and 5
p.m. on Thursday.



ARRIVED TODAY: Tropic
Haven from West Palm Beach
SAILED TODAY: Tropic
Haven for West Palm Beach
ARRIVING TOMORROW:
T.S.S. Mardi Gras, Southward
from Virgin Islands.

TIDES
High 7:51 a.m. and 8:07
p.m.
Low 1:30 a.m. and 1:50
p.m.
WEATHER
Wind: South-easterly 8 to 14
m.p.h.
Weather: Mostly fair
Sea: Slight
Temp: Min. tonight 70
Max: tomorrow 83
SUN
Rises 6:41 a.m.
Sets 6:07 p.m.
MOON
Rises 6:37 a.m.
Sets 6:43 p.m.


NO 37
1973


IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Joseph N.
Winder
AND
IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER of All that piece parcel or
tract of land being Allotment number 24 of the
Malcolm Allotments and Containing 3.835 Acres
and Situate 1900 feet South of Soldier Road
and 775 feet East of East Street in the Southern
District of the Island of New Providence and
bounded on the North by a Public Road
Reservation known as Malcolm Road and
running thereon 318.12 feet on the South by a
10 foot Road and running thereon 357.10 feet
on the West by a Road 30 feet wide and
thereon 357.10 feet on the West by a Road 30'
feet wide and running thereon 530.32 feet and
on the East by land now or formerly the
property of Nathaniel Winder and running
thereon 474.10 feet.

NOTICE
The Petition of JOSEPH N. WINDER of the
Southern District of the Island of New Providence
in respect of: -
ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
being Allotment number 24 of the Malcolm
Allotments and Situate 1900 feet South of
Soldier Road and 775 feet East of East Street
and containing 3.835 Acres and Situate in the
Southern District of the Island of New
Providence and bounded on the East by land the
property of Nathaniel Winder and running
thereon 474.10 feet and on the West by a Road
30 feet Wide Separating it from land the
property now or formerly the property of Adam
Munroe and running thereon 530.32 feet on the
North by a Road known as Malcolm Road and
running thereon 318.12 feet and on the South
by a Road 10 feet Wide Separating it from land
now or formerly the Cleveland Wilson and
running thereon 357.10 feet.

JOSEPH N. WINDER the Petitioner in this Matter
claims to be the owner of the unincumbered fee
simple Estate in possession of the said parcel of
land and has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas under
Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have
his Title to the said tract of land investigated and
the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by
the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas in accordance with the provisions of the
Act.
COPIES of the said plan may be inspected during
normal office hours at the following places
A. The Registry of the Supreme Court of the
Bahamas in the City of Nassau in the Island of
New Providence.
B. The Chambers of the undersigned

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
dower or a right to dower or an adverse
Claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition
shall on or before the 15th day of March A.D.
1974 file in the Supreme Court in the City of
Nassau in the Island of New Providence and serve
on the Petitioner or his Attorneys a Statement of
his claim in the prescribed form verified by an
Affidavit to be filed therewith.
Failure of any such person to File and Serve a
Statement of his Claim on or before the 15th day
of March A.D. 1974 will operate as a bar to such
claim.
BETHEL GOTTLIEB & ZERVOUS
Attorneys for the Petitioner,
The Bernard Sunley Building
Situate Bay Street
Nassau Bahamas.


IN THE SUPREME COURT
OF THE BAHAMAS
Equity side


Thursday, February 21, 1974


THUNDER KICK
(P.G.)
AND AT 8:44

iDEEP 1HIISI
(P.G.)
Parental Guidance
Suggested
NIMSlTM Il1t [ll1


Youth

Corps

banquet
TH1, SOUTHERN Youth
Corps presents its second
annual presentation and
installation banquet at the
Crown Ball Room of the
it. '.i.., British Colonial Hotel
on March 9.
rhe Youth Corps is a youth
group for the young people of
the Coconut Grove and the
surrounding areas It's aim is to
upgrade the youth of the
Grove and to help them to
realize that the responsibility
for tomorrow's Bahamas lies
with them.
It was formed two years ago.
Throughout the first year.
there has been a clean-up
campaign, a drive to beautify
Coconut Grove Avenue and a
walkathon, proceeds of which
went to purchase a swing unit
for the children's emergency
hostel. Most recent events were
a summer school project and a,
trip to one of the Family
Islands.
The Executive Board
members of the SYC have
decided that having a
presentation and installation
banquet may encourage
members to try and excel in
such things as group sports,
leadership, and to have a
general interest in each other.
and in all youth organizations
of the Bahamas.








BAHAMAS

DRAMA CIRCLE
Presents

TTHEPRICE"
At

THE

UNDIAS CIVIC CENTRE

Fd.21 Thru.24

TIME: 8:30PM.
Tickets: $3.50 Reserved
$3.00 Unreserved

Call:22067
GOLD & SILVERSMITH
FOR RESERVATION
..|


9


Whr Bribunet


I


-U


NOW SERVING


LUNCH
From 11:00 a.m. Till 5:00
DAILY SPECIALS
DRINKS ONLY $1.00

Plenty of FREE PARKING

EAST BAY AT THE FOOT OF BRIDGE


'A


Big assault ship


to visit Nassau


,'-4 2.
_: -. :.: : .


*MIjjgm


m















Uibe ~ribunro


Thrdy Fbur 2,17


SI


inEASTWOOD
or
WINTON MEADOWS
Call Frank Carev
at 27667 or 24815
Frank Carey
Real Estate
Box N4764
Bay & Devw ,x Sts.

C13559
4 BEDROOM. 2 bathroom
unfurnished house with carport
and sewing room. FOR SALE.
Call 31671 31672 (9-00 a.m.
-12:00; 2:00 o.m. 5:00
p m Weekdays),

C13609
CENTREVILLE 4 lots
(60,000 sq.ft.) including
quality built building with
three units rentable. Ideal for a
Church. Professional -: i.l ....
Offices, Apartments etc
Valued $179.000 00 Owner
will sell for $150,000.00
MARLBOROUGH STREET
WEST opp. [-'t .r, Colonial.
three properties One as low as
$100,000.00 other two
relatively cheap. Good location
for tourist trade, or
rN t- 'ltrjT invest in high
class properties to beat
inflation.
ARCADE BUILDING
OPPOSITE. Malcolms on Bay
Street lowest price available
on ma'n street. See anytime
THREE UNIT APARTMENT
BLDG adjacent Racquet Club
Grounds 55 by 150 Income
$5000 00 yearly asking only
$27.500.00. With or without
terms.
DIAL NICK DAMIANOS, THE
ACTION REALTOR 22033.
22305. evenings 41197

C13561
HOUSE FOR SALE
Executive home wi t h ful'
Central Air Conditioning and
large :. ,.;rTrir iir,,i pool Located
on the hill top in Sans Souci
iand withiri 5 minutes o ive of
St Andrews School.

The house was constructed
four years ago on a large lot
and finished to the highest
standards and is now offered
for sale, fully furnished and in
immaculate condition
: hi go u t The
accommodatiurn comp'ise' th
following:-
Four Bedrooms
Two and a half bathrooms.
Study
Living Room
Dining Room,
Family Room,
Fully equipped kitchen,
Laundry & Garage

Outside accomrmodation- inlu-
des laroe Meditor-aneain i OoP,
extensive patio and barbecue,
custom-built bar. surroundlnq
the kidney-shaped swimminq
pool All grounds completely
landscaped and fully enclosed

Asking price $115,000.00
Would be willing to take
cheaper hou-,e ii part exchange
if required Teiepho e owner.i
at 42194. anyi t m-e


C1337-
DAVSONj' RE AL ESTATE
O LT).
Cert '-ad ",.)! S -! t ro-f er,
Phone. : :7- 55408
P 0 Bo- N-4648
N t-. Bah a ,,
Proudisy rri- r t
SMASHING REAL
ESTAiTE BARGAINS
THROUGHOUT T T-'E

2 3 ird 4 BED3POO7'
HOUS S ,4 th- r *!owho
area,
EASTERN CRO)A
"; t w-ater as wl
un the h tlls
SAN SOUL I
BLAIR ESTATES
GLENISTONi GARiP.it Ni
WINTON
THE GROVt (West tba)
SKYLINE 'IF IGHTs
NASSAU EAST
SEA BRE ZE
VILLAGE ROAD
GOLDEN GATIS
HIGHLAND PARK
PROSPECT Ril)G
WESTWARD VILLAS
C O N D O M t u
APARTMENTS in PARADISE
ISLAND
EAST BAY STREET
WEST BAY STREET
HOTELS and HOTEL SITES,
BEACH LOTS, C,'o r. Ft -
IAL LOTS. RESIDENTIAL
LOTS
ACREAGE FOR
DEVELOPMENT IN THE
NASSAU AND FAMILY
ISLANDS SUCH AS GRAND
BAHAMA LONG ISLAND,
ELEUTHERA, ABACO,
45 ACRE CAY IN THE
EXUMAS WITH DEEP
WATER HARBOUR AND
MORE
CALL
DAVSON'S REAL
ESTATE AGENCY
PInea 21178 or 80932 21178
S P. Box N-4648
Nassau, Bahamas.


I I I I I I


REAL ESTATE


C13321
BUY A LOT


'41'jSTi GARDEN
.r T SUPPLY
2-2o68

4 .' iI t $3.500 per
'o itu '- I uth Bedch in th'
S A U Hanna
Slern( -".itact Whylly's
F 'r n p - 4068

136i32
5 PIECE [ r.ntte Set $75
S .. .' Bed $85.
WF GIVE CREDIT RIGHT IN
STORE
CENTREVILLE DRUGS &
DEPT STORE
Phone 5 9342.

PETS FOR SALE
Io3610
DACHSHUND Puppy male,
10 weeks old, both parents
A.K C. registered. Phone
4 1485

CRS FOR SALE
C13569
1971 MUSTANG Fastback,
mustard exterior, ginger
interior. V8 302 V2 engine,
24,000 miles. Black rally
stripes, rally mirrors. F/Air
Auto trans. AM radio, seat
belts, new tyres. $4,300. Phone
32082.
C13624
1970 FORD 4 door like
new. Nassau Florist
telephone 2-4223.


C 13606
1968 M.G.B.T. -
condition Price $950.
36534 ask for Tony.


good
Tel.


CARS FOR SALE


C13470
2 BEDROOMS, 1 bath
furnished house, closed yard in
Retirement Road. Call after 7
p m. 74155.

C13604
LOT 118' x 155' MONTAGU
HEIGHTS. Completely
enclosed with bearing fruit
trees, $18,000.00 Phone
5-8512.

C13634
WHY continue paying rent?
Here is a chance to own your
own home. 3 bedroom, 2-bath
house for a low down payment
of $2.000 and monthly
instalments that you can easily
afford. For information call
Pandora Knowles at 2-3854

C13627
BUY NOW!
SAN ANDROS
LOTS
14,500
sq. FEET!
Almost 1/3 acre
$45 DOWN, $45 per MONTH
CALL OR VISIT
FRANK CAREY
REAL ES' ATE
P. O. Box N4764
BAY & DEVEAUX ST.
Tel. 27667, 248 15

L FOR RENT
C13497
2 one bedroom fully furnished
apartments Centreville
District. Ring 5-8679 Don
Pritchard.
C13580
FURNISHED one bedroom
apartment. W W carpet,
airconditioned $240 includes
phone, water and electricity.
Call 22698

C13600
BASICALLY furnished 1
bedroom, I bath, kitchen
living arid dining are,'.
Montrose Avenue. Telephone
2-1722-5 and 2-3865.

C13538
COTTAGES and apartment,
monthly a-- ,. ..n .' ...r,
fully furnished, maid service
available. Lovely garden and
swimming pool. Telephone
31297. 31093.

C13599
BASICALLY furnished 2
bedroom (1 bedroom air
i. itr '; 1 bath, kitchen,
living & dining area, washing
machine Moitrose Avenue.
Telephone 2-1 722- 5 and
2 3865.
3630
LARGE spacious 1 bedroom
apartment t ',', i. ,I distance
f, rT tower a-nd shopping
centre Phone 23709 34881.


SNAS AU HILLCREST
TOWERS

Sbedroomr aDartmert $250 pel
-^onth
Sbedroomn 2 bath apartment
$4 0 pie munth
,cavad abi, April 1t)
Fu! i furnished. Lease
requ i'1 d. Conrtait
7 841 2 Evening 7-7065.

FOR SALE


*4.
.

i ..

Manager
Friendly Big "Al Collie"
Hostess Ms Penny Kemp
THE BRIDGE INN
NOW SERVING LUNCH
Open 11:00 a.m. 5.00 p.m.
FREE PARKING


MARINE SUPPLIES

C13507


ATTRACTIVE, custom built
houseboat, perfect condition.
luxuriously furnished and
equipped. Washer, dryer,
dishwasher, deep freeze, fridge,
television, air conditioned, and
many electrical extras.
Completely screened lounge
with 18ft. ceiling. Cocktail bar
with ice machine. Immediate
possession. $24,000. Write
"Houseboat", P. O. Box
N1648, Nassau.


SECTION


MARINE SUPPUES I


C13381
PACEMAKER 44 ft.
Luxurious Cruising yacht
Phone 3-2371.

C11894
1969 -- 31 ft. CHRIS CRAFT
Commander. Sleeps six, private
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours.
kitchenette, good condition
Call 24267, 54011.


C13585
1973 GREMLIN, like new,
very low mileage call 5-4641.

C13631
1973 VOLKSWAGEN 1300
Sedan. Excellent condition,
radio, white wall tyres, low
mileage, licensed for 74 to '15.
Call 3-6611 4.
C13591
New Providence Leasing
Limited have the following
used cars for sale. Our deposits
have been slashed right back
and you will note that all our
sales prices are very keen ...
On the spot financing and
insurance while you wait Lot
located opposite Super Wash,
Gibbs Corner, Nassau You are
invited to come and check our
selection:
1973 HILLMAN HUNTER
Automatic Blue Licence No.
NP.W. 453 Price $2,850.00
down-payment $700.00
1970 CHEV. MALIBU -
Green Licence No. NP.C. 961
Price $2,450.00 down-payment
$600.00
19 70 CHEV. TRUCK
White Licence No. T. 6468
Price $2,600.00 down-payment
$600.00
1972 FORD CAPRI Red &
Black Licence No. NP.W 574
Price $2,650.00 down-payment
$600.00
1969 FORD TORINO
Green, Licence No. 6252 Price
$1,850.00 down-payment
$500.00
1970 CHEV. MALIBU -
Green Licence No. NP.S. 918
Price $2,600.00 down-payment
$600.00
1969 BUICK SKYLARK -
Red & Black Licence No. N
7758 Price
down-payment $600.00
1970 P LY MOUTH
BARRACUDA Green &
Black Licence No. NP.R. 774
Price $2,700.00 down-payment
$650.00
1972 PLYMOUTH DUSTER -
Green & Black Licence No.
NP.N 535 Price $4,500.00
down-payment $900.00
1970 RAMCLER HORNET
Yellow & Black Licence No.
NP.F. 938 Price $1,850.00
down-payment $500.00
1970 OLDSMOBILE
CUTLASS White Licence
No. N 2716 Price $2,700.00
down-payment $700.00
1970 PLYMOUTH VALIANT
- Yellow Licence No. NP.Z.
475 Price $2,800.00
down-payment $700.00
1970 PLYMOUTH DUSTER -
White & Black Licence No.
NP.A. 726 Price $2,600.00
down-payment $600.00
1972 TOYOTA CORONA -
Red Licence No. NP. T. 806
Price $2,550.00 down-payment
$600.00
1969 TOYOTA CORONA -
Tan Licence No. 7630 Price
$1 750.00 down-payment
$600.00
1969 BUICK SKYLARK
Tan Price $2,450.00
down-payment $600.00
1971 AUSTIN GT Automatic
Price $1,650.00 down-payment
$500.00
PLEASE COME AND LOOK
MANY MORE OF THESE



DINING GUIDE


SETTLER'S INN & PUB
-Beaumont Arcade, Bay Street
TC ,'..' i.'i.:i,' S SPECIALS
OKRA SOUP
MINC tED CRAWFISH


C13446
SPORTSFISHERMAN boat
captain. Must have 5 years
experience with diesel engines.
Permanent position. Give full
information: Worldoil, P. O.
Box N7776, Nassau.
C13560
ASSISTANT CORPORATE
SECRETARY required to
assist the Secretary in
coordination of all corporate
secretarial functions of an
important multinational group
of banking and trust companies
under a Luxembourg holding
company with subsidiaries in
the Caribbean and Europe.
Successful applicant can expect
position to lead to that of
Group Secretary in due course,
when a considerable amount of
travel will be required to
attend meetings of various
Boaids held in different
locations around the world.
Duties will include
coordination of planning of all
meetings, recording of
corporate decisions,
maintenance of all corporate
records, filing necessary returns
with authorities in various
jurisdictions, and other usual
and similar Secretarial duties.
Position requires a thorough
working knowledge of
company law applying to
Banks, trust corporations and
financial service companies in
both British Common Law and
civil code jurisdictions.
Previous experience of
international banking and trust
company operations essential.
A legal qualification, A.C.I.S.
or equivalent required, and a
good knowledge of French
would be desirable. Age: 28 -
35. Salary negotiable,
depending upon age,
qualifications and experience.
Be n e f i t s i include
non-contributory grbup life
and travel accident insurance,
medical insurance and pension
plan. Qualified candidates
invited to submit written
resumes of educational
background, qualifications and
experience to World Banking
Corporation Limited, P. O.
Box N-100, Nassau.


I HELPWANTED


C13618
SALESMAN required in
nursery. Must have full
knowledge of all tropical
plants. Apply in person
Modernistic Garden & Pet
Supply, Madeira Shopping
Centre.

C13625
WELL Established Firm invites
applications for the services of
an Assistant Accountant.
Applicant must have
experience in all aspects of
Book-keeping and Accounting
to at least Trial Balance. Salary
in accordance with experience
and qualifications. Apply in
writing only, stating full
particulars of experience and
qualifications and giving two
references to:
"Assistant Accountant" P. O.
Box N-8170 Nassau, Bahamas.

C13612
1FARMER. Contact Atchruel
Simmons, Malcolm Allotment
near Claridge Enterprises.
1 FARMER. Contact Milton
Martin. Winder's Terrace near
Soldier Road.

C13615
THE HOME INSURANCE
COMPANY seeks applicants to
head our Health Insurance
Department. The applicant
must have knowledge of
individual and group health
schemes and be of managerial
material.
Apply in own handwriting to:
P O. Box E. S. 6236, Nassau.


TRADE SERVICES

C13607
LANDSCAPING and for all
your gardening needs,
trimming, hedging, pruning,
tree felling and beach cleaning
call 57810. LAWNS AND
HEDGES. Prompt
reasonable and efficient
service.


SCHOOLS
C13386
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 an,'
8:30 a.m. or after 6 p.m. or
35084 anytime.

C13626
Aquinas College has scheduled
Saturday, March 2, 1974, at
8:30 a.m. in Garfunkel
Auditorium, for the entrance
examination for students
desiring to attend Aquinas in
September 1974.
There are limited places for
new students:
20 in Grade 8
60 in Grade 10
25 in Grade 11
Applications may be obtained
at Aquinas on Monday through
Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00
p.m. The DEADLINE for
completed application forms is
February 27, 1974.

WANTED
C13616
GOOD used daybed that can
be folded into davenport for
daybed use Call Telephone
36925.
C13619
PIANO in good condition.
Telephone 2-3252 Mrs.
Johnson.

HELP WANTED
C13558
WANTED, Male Bahamian
labourer,'combination yardman
and janitor, to keep four or
five acres of grounds and serve
as janitor of large building, 5
days per week.
Please write Box N8154, listing
previous experience and
-eferences.
C13595
REQUIRED urgently full time
real estate salesman. Applicant
should have at least five years
experience in land and
constructed property sales and
should be fully experienced in
closing and contract
prepa action. Succe ssf ul
candidate will be considered
for promotion to the post of
senior salesmananad knowledge
of land registration and staff
training will be an advantage.
Please write P. 0. Box N-3229,
Nassau, with full resume.
Many thanks for your kind and
piompt attention.
C13586
Experienced sales persons to
sell home appliances, working
full or part-time. Good
commission paid. Call 3-4351
or write P. O. Box N-9012.


C13573
WINDOW & DOOR
SPECIALISTS
We repair all types of
aluminum windows, sliding
glass doors, all types of screens,
awning windows, Jalousie
windows, anc doors, Phone
54460.
C13498
FOR your building needs and
CRANE hire see:
ISLAND BUILDERS
LIMITED P. O PcR
N-4559 Phone 3167 31672

C13390
T.V. ANTENNAS
Boosters for homes,
apa tments and hotels
SALES AND SERVICES
Call 5-940-1
.. :PL L) OR MUSIC
Mackey Streeti
next to Frank's Place.

C13391

Pinder; Cf ,o

r.okL, e id.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU. BAHAMAS
P.O. BOX N3714
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
-IEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH
PHONE:2-3795, 2-3796
2 3797, 2 3 '-
Airport 7-7434
FREE ESTIMATES


SCl 21986 XT. 5

2 LU hrfiut '1"


iM INf SAVI MY


ANTENNAS
Island Tv 2-2618
AUTOMOTIVE
Lucas Batteries
Bay Street Garage 2-2434
BODY BUILDING
Wong's Barbell Club
5-4506
BOOKSTORE
The Christian Book Shop
5-8744
BUILDERS
Richard's Construction 5-7080
BUSINESS FORMS
executive
Printers 2.4267/5-4011
CAMERAS
John Rull 2-4252/3

CARPETS
Lee's Carpet Craft 3-1993
DRAPERIES
Lee's Carpet Craft 3.1993
DRUGS &
PRESCRIPTIONS
McCartney's 5-6068/5-2127
ENTERTAINMENT
Movies
Film & Equip. Service 2-2157
GARDEN & PET
SUPPLIES
Modernistic Garden
& Pet 2.2868
Nassau Garden & Pet
Montrose Avenue 2-4259
HARDWARE
John S. George 2-8421/6
WRECKER SERVICE
Gibson Wrecker
Service
2-8896


HOUSE PLANS
EvangelosG. Zervos 2-2633
LAUNDRY
DRY CLEANING
New Oriental Laundry
2-4406
LOCKSMITH
Bahamas Lock & Key
2-4591 ext.C147
MEN'S & BOY'S WEAR
The Wardobe 5-5599
MEN'S WEAR
Fashionette Ltd. 2-2376/7

MUSIC
Cody's Records 2-8500

OPTICIANS
Optical Service Ltd. 2-3910/1

PRINTING
Wong's Printinq 5-4506
Executive
Printers 2-4267/5-4011

RADIO & T.V. SALES
Carter's Records 2-4711
RUBBER STAMPS
Wong's Rubber Stamp
Co. 5-4506
SPORTS GOODS
Champion Sport Land 2-1862
TRAVEL
Playtours 2-2931/7
R.H.Curry & Co.,
2-8681/7
TRUCKING SERVICE
Gonzalez Trucking
3.1562/2-4726
WATER CONDITIONING
Bah. Water Refining
3-4351
Miracle Water


WINDOW/DOOR REPAIRS 3-4351
Window & Door Specialists 5-4460
"'" FOR THN NATION ViO i T





Shop Nassau Merchants

For Business And Services


HELP WANTED
C13601
THE ROYAL BANK OF
CANADA, FREEPORT, Grand
Bahama requires an
Officer-in-Charge of Current
Accounts Department.
Applicants must be familiar
with the operation of a Current
Account Department and
should be able to work under a
computerized system, as the
officer will be responsible for
the preparation of non
financial input under the Royal
Banks' computer operation.
Responsible for the accuracy
and completeness of records as
well as inter-department work
flow. Bahamians only. Apply
in writing to Mr. N. G. Miller,
Assistant/Administration, P.O.
Box F61, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, or call for an
appointment at telephone
352-6631.

C6689

GARDENER: Previous
experience necessary. All
duties related to Nursery work
and outside maintenance. Must
be .- iing to do heavy manual
labour, grave digging, etc.,
Work outdoors in all kinds of
weather. Also must possess
valid driver's licence.
Apply: Lucaya Nursery &
Landscaping, Forest Ave., &
Yellow Pine St., P. O. Box
F-252, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.

C13602
THE ROYAL BANK OF
CANADA, FREEPORT, Grand
Bahama requires the services of
an experienced stemographer.
Applicants should have at least
G.C.E. in English language and
be a high school graduate.
Shothand speed of 00 w.p.m.
and typing speed of 80 w.p.m.
Bahamians only. Apply in
writing to N.G. Millar,
Assistant Manager/Adminis-
tration, P. O. Box F61,
Freeport, Grand Bahama or
call for an appointment at
telephone 352-6631.

C6705
STOREKEEPER
Bahama Cement Company
requires a Storekeeper. The
successful applicant must have
a good education, supervisory
experience and be 30-35 years
of age. Experience in industrial
storekeeping preferred, but we
will train successful applicant
with good educational
background.
Interested persons apply in
writing to: Personnel
Department, Bahama Cement
Company P. O. Box F-100,
Freeport. Grand Bahama. or in
person.

C6704
Executive Tailor Shop requires
3 PANTS MAKERS, 1
DRESSMAKER and 1 COAT
MAKER. Must be able to do
neat jobs.
For interview inquire in
person, 2 doors West of Deluxe
Laundry in Eight Mile Rock.
See Gibson.


-- ,II


C13503
DECALS, Bumper Stickers,
posters, quantity signs,
quantity printing on plastic
work, metal paper, fabrics etc.
ARAWAK ART. Phone
2-3709, Montrose Avenue.


TRADE SERVICES


C13572
ACT now before the burglar
comes. Call Scriven's
Maintenance Service for your
security requirements. Tel.
51748.


HELP WANTED

C6707
(1) Savin Copy Machine
Technician and (1)
Typewriter/Adding Machine
Technician. Must have 3 years
experience. Only Bahamians
need apply.
Please write to: P. O. Box
F-2628, Freeport.

C6708
OCEANIC DEL SUD, P. 0.
BOX F-2560, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA, has
temporary job opportunities
for approximately one to six
months available for
Bahamians in their offshore
marine pipeline and
construction operations for the
following positions:
STRUCTURAL WELDER
FOREMAN Needs 10 years
experience welding offshore
aboard marine construction
equipment. Must be certified in
accordance with AWS D 1.1-72
and able to cut and fit
structural members. Ability to
supervise welding operations
and welding personnel aboard
marine construction barge.
Qualified applicants should
reply to; Oceanic Del Sud, P
0. Box F-2560, Freeport,
Grand Bahama.

C6709
(5) JANITORS should be
able to handle floor and
shampoo machines, also
removal of trash and cleaning
of rest rooms. Police
Certificate is required.
Applicant should appear in
person to: Care Maintenance,
Bonded Warehouse No. 5,
Phone 352-2292.

C6710
ELECTRICIAN
Must have experience with low
voltage circuits and with use of
meters and testers. Required to
install conduit and wiring in
power plant situation with
minimum supervision.
Apply to: Personnel
Department, Grand Bahama
Port Authority, Limited, P. 0.
Box F-2666 or 30C Kipling
Building, Freeport, Grand
Bahama.


C6706


ACCOUNTANT with
managerial office experience
required. Must be able to
operate bookkeeping machine
and calculator. Type own
business letters. Prepare
monthly analyzed statements
closing of books. ilsj have
knowledge of credit
procedures. Experience with
U.S. and Canadian
manufacturing and banking
procedures.
Contact: Anglo-American
Electrical Co., Ltd.. P. O. Box
F-2504, Freeport, G.B.I.


Ui7 P ribunr
Published Daily
Monday to Saturday


i hP ribttu n

Nassau and

Bahama Islands

Leading Newspaper




DON'T WRITE IT


RUBBER









[St~Ir.


24 HOURS SERVICE


Call: The Tribune


2-1986


U-


7


CLASSIFIED


REAL ESTATE


SHOP-lll$.







i LIt hr k h i c' y


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESULTS-FAST
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE 21986 EXT. 5


I RADE SERVICES TRADE SERVICES


GRAND BAHAMA




CLA IFIED I


BUSINESS 6 PROFESSIONAL


DIRECTORY I

Save Time J


C13379
BLACK
CAPRICE
condition. L.
58134.


CHEVROLET
in excellent
J. Knowles, Tel:


- -----------L--c--~-





I7I


1-


'


I


I


I


-t


I


Thursday, February 21, 1974


I


--












Thursday, February 21, 1974


'NOW WE'LL OPEN IT UP AND LET
'EM ALL OYTAGAIN."


"Low. fat cows do NOT give low-fat milk, you low,
fat dum-dum."


CROSSWORD

PUZZLE


ACROSS
1. Fumes
6. Likewise
11. Indira's father
12 Obnoxious
14. Aphorism
15 Believer in
magic
16. Preeminent
17. Food deri': -J. y
19. Choir voice
20. Dagger
22. Exploit
24 Even poet.
25 Silkworm


Key group
Carved gem
Paronomasia
Clay
Dolt
Discordant
Factory
Beak
A.,i t,-P hp


5SA!C SR IOHIA
UtVA TEUN "E05

SI0 6 SES
OISE AI Q
ALEC EPAN E

CRIE UDEIE
AIIR AIIIE

T l lT lL olA


t'J' "' L. SOLUTION OF
Dim inuive
Tree moss DOWN
Loud sleeper 1 Insects
Listened Queen of
Noted golfer Thebes
Endures 3. Figure


.* *9 .'_











b"Who said anything about rescuing any-
body?" The Gomnie keeps his gaze on
SRupert while he joins the sweep's sticks
- together. "You ought not to be here really.
I've come to clean the chimney for Santa
Claus's visit." But please. I need help,"
says Rupert, and he tells the Gomnie how
.he was caught by the men pnd made prisoner.
the en
r'' t~


::m!iNow a


Winning

Bridge
by VICTOR MOLLO
If declarer took a little longer
to play to trick one, he would
save a lot of time-and many a
contract An example is thii
hand from Bridge D'ltalia.
North
J 64
KJ 6 76
West East
4A9732 K6
10964 3
J 10 9 A 8 3
Q 410 985432
South
10 8 4
SA QJ 8 7 2
0 Q7 5 2
4A-
North South
1 NT 3 0
3 NT 4 0
West leads the 4Q. How should
South play ?
This is what happened. De-
clarer went up with dummy's 4A,
discarding a spade from his
hand, took two rounds of trumps.
ending in dummy, and played the
4K, discarding another spade.
West ruffed and returned the
,J. Dummy and East played low.
but thereafter South couldn't
avoid losing two diamonds.
And yet, after the lead, 4: is
unbeatable. All declare ')eed do
is to discard a diamond, and not
a spade, at trick one.
After drawing trumps, he leads
a spade. If West wins and leads
the >J. the trick is won by the
'Q and a second spade puts
East on play. He can do no harm.
The defeace fares no better if
East wins the first round. Either
way the 4Q remains as an entry'
to the clubs.


Chess
By LEONARD BARDEN


-









White mates in two moves,
against any defence (by I. Kisis).
Not too hard. but novice solvers
should note that obvious rook
and knight checks fail to long-
distance discovered check replies
from the Black queen.
Par times: 1 minute, problem
master: 2 minutes, problem
expert; 5 minutes. good: 10
minutes, average; 20 minutes.
novice.
Chess Solution
I Q-Q6 tthlreat 2 R---K2.
If I .. R-K4; 2 QxR, or if
P--B: 2 Q-Kt6. or if P-Q6: 2
Q V QP. A trap for solvers is
I Q-Q7? Q-R4!







WI" N


-B --
F "-- -
11l



Li ~ III


No. f7.5 . h, TIM
Across
i. Hunt. (3, 3. 3)
C:ontalners. (4)
10. Hint or the dinner
12. lad. (d )
It. iDevon hill. 43)
l. Mall 14)


MCKAY


h 41


i L.eooks. 4)
Ill. Part o the toot. <3)
20. Makes money (3)
21. Dull nolse. 14)
Down
I. Return wIth -peed to the
mloilele. i.04)
Meet. (i)
3. i'hlntel Demrnus. ($)
4. K tensive coislgnma l t.
4u down to a few words.
6 Produce a molar.
(3. 1. 4)
S. More pleasant. (.i)
49. VIvaelous .9l
II. S RI all -
hi o i l
CN)
14 U8 C -
t sh
v a leev
(4)
i It.I S i'
Is tier

F i Cuon
(it)
c Irtf' Wne
3)C restIrde4 A ,tOR


USE


hp Tribune


CLASSIFIED

ADVTS.


YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
4. Work unit
5 Litigant
6. Cupolas
7. Mountain in
Crete
8 Girl's nickname
9 Wcrked I
3 10. Eviction notice
13. Memorial .OW many
18. French assent words of
S 21. Shoe width N T our letters
or more can
23. Medieval you make
shield rro o t ii e
letters shown
26. Kiwi R E 'T/t-^T,"
26 Kiwi h e r e? Is n
28. Bits of interest --- m a k I n a
29. Vaction spots H lU T er a
30 Non-citizens he used once
Snly. Eachll
31. Blind poet word must contain the large
9 32. Greek letter letter, and there must De at
35. Bergen's least one eight-letter word In the
Mortimer tlst. No plurals; no foreign Words;
Morimer n proper names. TODAY'S
37. Dr. Salk TARGET : 20 words, good;
38. Cirumsct 2't words, very good ; 31 words,
8. Circumspect excellent. Solution tomorrow.
39. Enjoys books YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION :
41. Italian money 'ive glven giver ignite Inert
Snlaider Invert Invite nitre reign
43. Inlaid work rein ,ceving rent rating rite rive
46. Souchong riven rivet RIVETING tern tier
4 ctin ring tiger tine tinge tire trine
2-23 48 y cean vein vent vert vine.

e Jolly Holly--18


By the time Rupert's story has ended the tiny
person has swept the chimney. "I see," he
says. "Well, as the door's fastened why not
get out the way Santa comes in 7 We live
underground, you see, so he brings our
presents down this chimney and leaves them
here. We fixed up those iron rungs to make
it easy for him." ALL RIGHTS RESERVE!


CARROLL RIGHTER'S


^ cHOROSCOPE
'from the Carroll Righter Institute
\ / GENERAL TENDENCIES: Getting some
worthwhile things accomplished early in the
day could quickly change to a big argument, but if you keep
calm you find this soon passes. The afternoon is splendid for
adopting new course of action. Be openminded.
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) Being with good friends is fine
now but avoid one who is overly dynamic and could get on
your nerves Engage in social interests
TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) Stop procrastinating and
seek the advice from a bigwig in a most tactful manner. More
precision is needed in handling routine tasks
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Some new ideas that come to
you can be helpful in your career. Take a more kindly attitude
toward others Plan any trips wisely.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Take time to do
finishing touches on a new project you have begun. Figure out
how to have more rapport with mate. Be happy
LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Steer clear of a bigwig and this
becomes a successful day for you Try to be more cooperative
with associates Attend the social tonight
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Co-workers can be of great
help to you today, so coordinate your efforts more
intelligently. Show others you have excellent taste
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Talk policy matters over with
associates early in the day Take mate to special amusement
you mutually enjoy Avoid one who gossips.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov 21) Morning may start serenely
but later gets hectic at home so take steps to sweeten
disposition of km. Be sure to keep appointments.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) Make and keep
appointments of a business nature early and then get busy
improving home affairs. Converse with good friends tonight.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Use wisdom in coming to
decisions of a business nature in the morning Later discuss
them with allies. Use more skill in your work
AQUARIUS (Jan 21 to Feb 19) Being as gregarious as you
like is fine provided you are not too forceful with others. Be
sure to take health treatments you need.
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar 20) Make plans that will bring you
greater happiness and success in the future. Remove stumbling
blocks in path of your progress
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY .. he or she will
make a big success in life because of the fine ideas always
ruminating within this mind. Give the finest education you can
afford, and your gifted progeny will soon command a very
large income at whatever outlet is decided upon. Be sure to
give religious training early in life
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


Ihe COnmic Pa



REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS

THERE'S SOME QUESTION iS HE 71 ET YOUR COAT AND I'LL MEET
Si OF CORD DAMAGE / rTERE PARALYZED YOU IN THE LOBBY/ I HAVE
WE'L LEAVE A ONCE NT A NEUROSURGEON A COUPLE OF PATIENTS
WE SHOULD GET THERE PARKE RSVILLE /
IN ABOUT TWO HOURS'













JUDGE PARKER sy PAUL NICHOLS

YES... IT WAS IN DO YOU VAGUELY! WASN'T YOU WERE APPOINTED BY JUDGE
DID YOU FIND THAT TIE INACTIVE FILE' REMEMBER IT A MURDER PARKER TO DEFEND KARL WAKEMAN!
WAKEMAN FILE IT'6 ON YOUR DES; ) THE CAE? CASE? THERE WERE SOME MITIGATING
GLORIA CIRCUMSTANCES AND HE PLEADED
aizer GUILTY, THROWtNG HIMSELF
UPON THE MERCY OF
THE COURT!











APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotzky


IM NOT ABOUT ; ALL HE'S INTERESTED N YOU M MARGO? THIS IS TOMMIE!
-TO TO GO IN T TELLING HIM IS WHETHER OR NOT I HAVE TO LEAVE FOR
rTHE SERGEANT IS DETAILS! YOU WERE IN THE HOUSE AT THE ATHE HOSPITAL SHORTLY
WAITNG FOR YOU TIME OF THE ACCENT! AND WON'T BE
POWN IN THE L .FR' I E HERE WHEN YOU
HE JUST HAS A FEW I WASN'T! GET HOME---
LES'T ONS TO ASK --- HE KNOWS BUT THE
ANo YOU SHOULD E PROFESSOR

SIMPLY NOT M E Ae TO SEE YOU!







STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard


ihp (rtbutt













Qhr ribtm Thursday, February 21, 1974
I hr wibu -


.. .


Pi T i '
Aquinas Aces' forward Grathon Robbins wrestles a rebound from St. John' torl.iA
Phillip Turner during yesterday's championship finals


ACES TAKE ONE


By GLADSTONE THL R S I O
SIX-FOOT FOR R ',.rwrd
Great hon R ,bbi's- .1,1
playmaker guard Pniirc
Hepburn took chr.'Ce
offence in the last tw, quarTe-i
leading the wa for t \
College Aces' o.W-.44 \!..'
over St J tohn's Cillec-e 11
one game lead in the h, ..
three inter-scholastc ba k (ill
championship
The second ga'} :,i ,ii; h
played on Inrtda'. attj:i A 4
o'lock at the A. \d-:.
(;ny. The third .eidic
necessary wil be I
Monday.
H a v i n g J
governmentnt thgh 2! :0 -ih
semi-finals wch 'i ld
Monday St. JIhn's d -
guard Charles \ih.;
forward Vinc-ent Mlilkle' ',-'
deadly threat t,l thr \.
undefeated reign takiL: 'ht
first quarter 13-7 hib; .
the lead tor the s., J .i;i
final timi e carl iN h 'i
quarter.
Six-s o t-thrve vT.' : .
Forbes o i
Aqu tina .,:I :i i
"Mossld SnO iitt ;. 1; !;
an assist ti R:bb;ii, .,. ;
then on St IJothn' .i i'J l
rear.
coachh Cieve Ro;dglr, .: C4 44
to'k a tiniic t-at t I i' f ,!
rcu titi th i-gs buLt i! :;iCe '
n 'i use R.I -bbins r,, m :hi.' r il l,
post opened the gap b, d-.Ltbki


GAME LEAD


period ahead 4s-5






h :: I. -





'I !
p tiont :
*c ph ; .h .1 ,









e- ': I ;A k .
S > : -





"ii' n 'l ;n ; 1h" 1" "


Amiss rescues

England
tel Ni l,' i N I luncl oni
M uh5 -t i iN e IWin

st. ;-iid : i is'. Ii Ie.ii 'msi iii
a- jtl "I i ,! i i ,lt]. !)n
hI~i, U i appeared



55I .i ind i;., r the dt;e. at
21! -< t ; h d Io scoti re
at -e. 2 m" -, m.ake the West
Iend!, b:h .1 he.,idi thime dthe
Indh i Th
,tei |;it.r ii i n uigs total
was :e m.-.-ci ih hotr oine
dee1 le.i .- tmid lared Cwith
LErng iii.e isi innlinn gs 353.
I AP


Events

to find

top

golfers
I !1 NEW Providence
i., ,iOf the Bahamas Golf
\.,,liation will be staging the
,t o, five medal 36 hole
S'i'namients at the South
S-)ean Golf Course this
Me kend
Beginning Saturday at 9
ok,. the results of these
events will determine the
S best golfers in New
I'`o\ iderce These golfers will
;.rt compete against the 12
fr- t ironi Freeport to
i. orTmlne the team to
i'ese: 't the Bahamas in the
i rmat n ('up tournament in
i.i.iads, and at the World
ev\ ie I eami Championship
\ala Csia
I lhre will be no post entries
Si penaltiess wil! be levied for
,.' .irvas. Any golfer not
S!".ed by 5 p.m. Friday will
'.- iCeligible' to play
t should be noted that as
S c rivals are to determine
it ionll team members,

I stored. 'eh Ie e s are also
mindedd to arrange cart
Sies' bietweeni t heir foursome
i partl it. pents '. t; be
m .ki i bo lh t da
P'ainmg and starting Ilies foi
ic ia' entered are:- '1:00
I ,un.,ibe.e I (,ibson. lM .
i:, I. ) .los. l 0 1
Hl e B Smith. I Masson. R.
;i .' r. 2t i /. Stubbs. (
1 iw s.' R 1 Iumoni t. I)
'.;. \ X lHorton. P.
I W tlion V. Lockhart:
Si .1 \1 tve. R. Velton. R
S P-' : X-: \ I ockhart

BLTA

matches
!I, I l it I it \\l'' aire the
:- i :- ,i .' m ltclies t ilthe
I \ I \ I a h p io n shi ps
!i l ". Inlo ten tl tiei.,w at the
S :i,;!! Blcit lb iHotel Courts.
S ( ,iiarner v 1. Bethel
Si\l.irL'ii B l)Dcniritt e
I : .,, 'si . gh es tB.
XW I iiteleot
I !mi. I) lMorec v R.
k.." 's Q. Rihmiond v K.
S ; I. I v N. lParl L.
r .i ch Lt 1I Heini/
i r m I llicks v F Miller
i-iowslesv II. Schoepper I).

R. 'qis P Biddinger
i 1. 1 Powcll v ). I )Davies
\ Kno,,'les v K Seller
\I I RIAY'S Matches.
I p tin. Bruce 1 arnn tonN v L.
: '. N, -. J. I arringtot i v J.
S h > ,!!-!s..n, F (ancin, v G .
K '. h J I:,eeed v S liall
P e. I a ale v S. I stw.l k,
I R..t ii i M1. I lalc, G. (arc, v
i R'1;.,k i F -aord, M tI e i 1 .
B ll ii i
4- pot'i A. Dol), ert' v J.
HI": hir;s W, Iletp urn v J.
A\;l:'! Jr,.in Farrington v A.
It ,i. S M miller v 1. Overend.
S i.. B. Richmond v G.
( . B. Farrington & (.
B' "!;.I I I licks & B. Alburv'
V> \i .'! & J. lord v J. S,
t e.il:i: I) Roberlt ts.


-Who's who in the soccer sauad


I Ie


EIGHTEEN players make up the 1BFA's national soccer side which will represent the Bahamas at the
Caribbean and Central Americani (;ates in Santo D)omingo beginning Wednesday, Feb. 27. Standing.
left-right ... D. \\ il-,n (Icoachl, R. Rodgers icapt.). N. Keeling. I). Maples, P. Johnson, F. Crozier. B. Servilie.
P. Cole. P. W\liiik J, D). J. enitr. Kneeling, left-right. P.Louison. M. lialkitis. C. Knight, R. Stewart. R.
Davis. P. Nunez. Not pictured. S. Nicholls. I Renoso. INSI I. K. Lo\c.


Frank Croztr
AT 225 lbs. and 38 years of age. thls ilpowerfull built
lull back is the haviSest and eldest member ot the national
squad. Played for Southampton 'United Amateurs and
Cambridge University second team in Etngland and also
gained a blue at Cambridge I university for athletics
Presently teaches geography at i(overninimelit li.-i School
and plays for McAlpine in the BI-A Sunda! I league
Peter Cole
AGE. 23. joined Tropigas I.. alter leaving school in
1969. Formerly a member of the Bahamian Schoolboy side.
Plays left back for Tropigas and national side. Works as anl
insurance clerk in his fathers insurance company

Roscow Davis
A\ II I'.I I r member oti tlhe Bahamian team at the
Caribbean GIames in Panama I and the Pan Americaa
Games 71 in C ali., Colium ia. 1 )J is, wi ll be representing the
B.ihanias for the third ti n.t ab.roi!d Sa,.n Dm ing. Aed
34. he is a versatile players who is happy play ing ani where.
although he usually plays inidltield for St. (eorges in tihe
local league Ile is the BFA I Ve-preside int .iad so kt s ias anl
engineer with BATFLo(,(

Mike Halkitis
AGI(D 1 years. ialkitis is the second youngest member
ot the squad. Onll 5'7 inches It.ilkiti s is uI nustaillx , i
for a goalkeeper but cat like atilit .and lightening rei Vess
make up for his lack of reach. Plays for Paradise -F.C(. i:i te
Sunday League and is presently in his last ear at Queeitl
College.


Paul Johnson
This 6'2 inches tall goalkeeper has ; istled
t ';,,i I as the Islandi s number one keeper In fisc ga nc- tI r
the national squad lie has y et to let in a goal BF\ lcag.'c
leaders. Red Lion owe much to Johnson tor thirt poe:iion
at the top of the table this season Is einplo\edl ai an
insurance agent with a local firm.

Dave Jenner
PLA[Yt I) : ,.,i.rl. in the Lancashire Amteii I ague in
Ingiand and o tr Idinburgh university. \ tin create
midfield player who always gives one hundred per cent
Captain McAlpine in the BFA Sunday League. Aged 32
Sears and teaches nlathetatica vs ;I St Andre'- ( .'


Nick Kneeling
Captains Paradise F.C in the BFA Sundal I league \t
35 years old is as fliti Any other full back in tihe leage ii'
former member o' Itanstead Athletic and Surre\ \AB( i'
t|ngland. I playedd as a croupier at Paradis! Island
Casino-


SWIM FUNDS
TH- BAHAIMAS Fede:ration
ot Amateur Aquatics will kick
off its fund-raising camd paign
for the season with a bake sale
on Saturday 1 1.00 a.i. in
Palmdale Shopping Centre in
front oft United Book Shop
Funds are needelr d or the
national s w i m m i n
championship set toi May 10.
11 and 12 to be held at St
Andrews School

Be the man

you want to be!
and be
the man
they want
to see!


Keep fit with

DeWitt's Pills


--^ --- --

with the strong action
against BACKACHE
and MUSCLE PAINS


Colin Knight
BIFA league leaders Red Lions leading goalscorer this
season Scores goals with both feet and head and is always
dangerous in and around opponents penalty area. Played
for Kingston F.C. and Bagshot F C. in fI-Ll i I1 Age 24 A
teacher at Queen's College.

Kenneth Love
REPRIESNTFD the Bahamas at the Pan Americani
Games in 19'71. Love is a bustling industrious midfield
pla cer
Plays for Tropigas in the BFA Sunday I league. Played lto
Bahaimais schoolboys '68-'69. Is 21 e ars old and w works as
la engineering draftsman

Pat Loulson
ORIGINALLY a native of the island of tGrenada in the
West Indies. Pat Louison has been resident in the Bahamas
since 1465s5 This exciting 30 year old midfield player is
both .. .I ;i and powerful. Plays for St Georres im the HFA
Smnda Lcague and works at the Prison. Fox Hill
Don Maples
CAPTAINS Red Lion ill the BlA :Sunida\ L ague .ad .ii
3 inches tall is the tallest member of the squad Among
the top three leading goalscorers in the Sunday League
Played for his University side in -ngland and tariouii
amateur sides. Age 301 Teaches at Queen's collegee
Steve Nicholls
NICHOLLS. 22. is one of the island', most exciting
strikers A former Bahamian Schoolboy star and member of
the Bahamas side in the Pan American (Gaes in Columbia
Nicholls. although he now resides in Freeport pla'-
regularlh for St. Georges in the Sunday League. Works in
the Purchasing Department ait Freeport's King's Inn tlitel.

Paco Nunez
Ils HIGH1LY talented full back hails from Digee a
town in the north of Spain Played for various almateur
sides in Spain Is 28 years old and has worked as an
electrical engineer with the Mlinistry of Works for the past 5
cars. Pla s for St. Georges in the local league

Randy Rodgers
AS CAPTAIN of the squad Rodgers is credited cith a
tremendously impressive all round sports record Aged 25
years old he has represented the Bahamas in softball and
baseball in addition to soccer. Has captained I ropigas for
the past five years, leading them to the Ileague
championship last seas.on. Noted for his cooliness and tint
distribution in the midfield and highly revspectcd tor his
skills by his I yellow players. Works at. Purchasing
department at Bahamian l umIber Ltd

Louis Renoso
l!!S BI SI LING, tough tull back hails from Digo,. Spa.';
the same town as teammate Paco Nunle/ Reinoso is in fact.
Nune/' u/' ncle Hal s psla ed amateur soccer in Spain and in
Berimuda Is 3I(, ears old and has been living iin assau for
the past ) years. Plays tor St (;eorges in the local league
and is the resident manager at the King's Inn. Freeport

Rob Stewart
IItIS IHARI) tackling, skilful ull i back is as versaitl .t
player as all im the ieBFA- League. Sonetimtles plays nmidtield
and ir nii scored the winning goal for the national side
against tFll in Miain. while playing in the attack! Pla' s fs r
Red Lion in the Sunday League. Formerly from Ireland hie
played for Cliftonville F.C. in the Irish League. Presently
teaches at R.M. Bailey High School

Brian Serville
R i t1 l; Il/I I as one of the Islands best midfield
players. Ser ille is originally from Trinidad. where he learrnt
his soccer. His powerful running, hard tackling and
dangerous shot anywhere from 35 yards makes him one of
the squad's key players Is 26 years old and teaches at St
John's College. Plays for Red Lion in the BFA Sunday
League.

Paul Whitfleld
AT 17 YEARS OLD) Paul Whitfield is the youngest
member of the squad. This season he has blossomed into
the Island's most promising player. lie has so far played an
invaluable role at outside left for League leaders, Red Lion
and is now regarded as the league's most dangerous winger.
Is presently a student at Queen's College where he is taking
Advanced Levels in his last year.

Dick Wilson
TRAGEDY struck tor coach Wilson in 1972 when his leg
was broken in two places during a league game. Told by
doctors that he would never be able to play again Wilson
has since reappeared for McAlpine in short spells Last year
he became a fully qualified FIFA national coach and was
appointed Bahamian national soccer coach. Played formerly
for Southampton reserves and Cambridge United in
England. Is 35 years old and works with the ('avalihe
Construction companyy Is player/coach for McAlpine in
the local league


FOR SALE
Oonortul t o
ETAIL PUS NESS v'
LOCATION West ., : -
pase B:sinE iId at .. ..
Enquiries: Servac Irn national Ltd.
P. O. Rox N 88
Nassau.






*BOXING


BIRDLAND
MT. ROYAL & CAREW STREETS

FRIDAY 22nd. FEB.1974
DOORS OPEN 7:30 P.M. ACTION STARTS 8:30 P.M

**ALL-STAR BOXING **

RETURN OF

BOBBY LLOYD

MAIN EVENT

BOBBY LLOYD
Light heavyweight
your favourite boxing specitaist
-- VS

GEORGE HOLDEN
Heavyweight Fla contender

RANDY SCOTT -vs OTIS CLAY
Fought Sugar Ray ::; Pi.
last time out.

RANDY ARMSTRONG vs ROSCOE BELL
Fla. popular speedster Ready for this one.

JOE HLL -vs MOHAMMED ROLLE
Ft. Lauderdale. Tough Rough.


"White Label" AND





WILL BE THERE!.. WILL YOU?


~ ~~_ __~_


BUY NOWr~~




nd $averr


UP TO 121/2





VOLKSWAGEN