<%BANNER%>








IheU ,ritbuti


Tuesday, February 19, 1974.


Dazzling Duncombe hits tc
VEIL- %.w- I 1 -41A -W A


John G ibhson (lett i and y l I n l ii hl i c ., l : J im !, ii11.1l iin ,in A\.dl Iro
Jimt Malone oe the W illiharn tti t\c (oinlpan.t *in l (.ilt ll. pI < '' i .iio.il n o h' \ I 1) XI t1
B G.A .


Top defence killed




High, says Rodgers


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
YISTIRDAY chmaxed the
end of a long training ses1 io
for St. John's (College scent
boys basketball squad "D'l)u i1'
the regular season n the'- hll.
been learning, and todaL I hadl
to do hardly anlth in s.ilh
them just remind them -1 the
lob thc shad to d,,."
That's the va hcw d Cleve Rodgers summiiiiar I.ed lSt
John's 72-54 ictlor o)\ier
governmentt High C-tertIdf\
giving them a 2-1 edgi m1 liC
best of three lntet l- h. a'lsti
fill -I!li Ials.
Since thc were strlpptd cI
their Western Dimsion title. St
Jiht,'s seek to rcpe.il l,il[
s i.'Isiii's perfornianLc \% hliei
these take on the iindclealtd
\luina ((I C liege .\cA es in I lilt'
Sirst ga iTe "C i hi
Inter-schoilastlit seni- i h) L .
championship Wednesda\s
A year ago last week. both
teams tied for first place in the
Western division and clashed i
a sudden death pla \ft shii h
ended in St. John's taking Ith.
pennant and St \tggustline
College the chamnpi(onsthip
S.A.(' this sear t ilecd to )lrlak
the top five.
'Tvervbhod) knew whlci tl
go when they git the ball ,and
where to go when the other
teain had the ball,.'" praitstd
coach Ro dgers "And tIh,
played a perfect 1-2-2 detertL




flIr~l~


I tL' Iiat j I.'
I ie t I n lt i l;I I
I I lh I t h11 1h '' n I


l I t! iII'.' I I\ ti
( LIh ic- 'irn t iih I \\, ;i
I'hllh, i I ; I l .I


thI l a'1' t' .us' i t h t r I

t . 'k k ill I. : !.

SteLin I i te'l s Ri ., I l .
didn't ht ive L nL L ,t kI 'K
the poop,' ilT h.id

I\ i l l: 1 ecdc.I \I i ,i t :.

C l ie st L t' f i t ar1 it .J'I I 'i t 1 1
r fi'd and .ci l 1i !L i ft ,
"\I f I r 'i I ';i t l IIl I I We I I
*\ i t l | ,p Is \ i c "j l hc \ 1 r .! d \ !1


1.1i l '' si.i f.ii sit .' i h' \ it L .'. t1i
tihe i r nl irt i" l 1Ci e h I
L i I \t til | I L i L k f 1,, t .IS i l
J" .i-' W liiht we\'l 1i working
o nS. I lhi k w e' 'l ,in th ,
( )in (hi 1C' *Cn fli A( KIIt! (
I iLon ti lLoppcil ( li.S. w li lii
1 points l vid I'sifrot added
I I sind Jell I ,t i I t c lit)I

te nrday S It Joiti,, l\\ ji
cail, 8 0-(! h'le d oi, (,, c inmc ti !
1lt'hf t'rrt d L 14 .ill d a. atit
.) 5 -.

OId h li i lst ,I ih s 12 point
Ji iln l > pl.i inr St Johlli 's
Sllc i ld Id ti \\.is f lie cloIL I

. ii t l wil c \ ho ;dldll d
Lt l t t'id l l i t lh e tt ii
i1 t 'h o' 'co 1, the ;. ,,' \\thilt
St John's Ik l h\ ,bii] -ht poinl .


I tles opened lite gap bI .1i 1rom
Ilnily is 1 3 n11 that pel icid. \e
'y nl oiitl t' \/h,, p~ t^'J tight
.( L t' l llll'I ll l tll h ,, .t
IC.i ed if p f l. h t llow i i t.i.' J
I)a\id ()'ci it clip!,l% Si
IJ lir.' c aitl I , ei p l. l \.t,
S in sA A i. ..
It t<'.I k the f \ int c'i s tl ,1 Miller
I urritir
t ll' 'L t cel t fl itck >n the |< | I l
tight I t.ick. idk L tiurncid -,tl \ .ru
ibaskc iJInd ( har!'c Iive 'Loin't t '. 'li
slin St Johnls a f oi dina lLL arsh
5 14IU third quaIlei lead
\11 lwi\ in ihc tlinal pcnit ,.
Sl John )': opened ,1 ( 6741, lciI
',, hc al. to i l d t h 'r t t ,i i l
n ] I t' i pli i thi ii bl itnch .\1t
1)i. tpitL hcinrt t IccL- I l Stl 1iti l
i nli. l\ L li f t tl\ u i l ( I .S t itt | ) l ls
,r I \ I (tI i IIk ,. It urrro
ProuI tis stuad. i. came Miller


)p form with Gibson
THE TWOSOME of Jim Duncombe and John Gibson fired a
sizzling net bestball score of 30-32 (62) for a total of 46 points
t'- making top honours in the Becks Golf Tournament Sunday at the
Sonesta Beach Golf Course.
During the round, Duncombe scored an amazing eagle three on
* the monster par five 15th hole. He hit a four wood second shot
about eight feet from the pin. He holed the put for a three net
two giving his team five points.
r Following the Duncombe and Gibson duo, were Lou Parker
e and Rick Turnquest tied with Eric Gibson Sr. and Eric Gibson Jr.
at 45 points each.
In the sudden death playoff which ended on the first hole
Turnquest hit his approach shot onto the fringe, chipped to
within two feet of the cup and dropped the put for a par four and
victory.
S Young Rickey Gibson hit his approach shot over the green,
chipped to within three feet of the cup, but had to settle for a
bogie five when his putt rimmed the cup. His father was out of
the action when he bunkered his third shot.
In the ladies division, Margerete Seingfield of New York
teamed up with Irene Bethel for a net bestball score of 77 and 31
points winning that division. The Beryl Higgs/Geri Smith duo
carded a net 80 for second place.
in Brothers Dwayne and Therone Hepburn took the junior
i division with a net 79 and 49 points. The second place team of
Rory Higgs and Michael Rolle scored an 85.


a long 'way andt
were right
m." he said.


SI J ItN'S (c I 1


itirs
ro

righl
t ur\
;ill


t t
I0
,i i 3


I on-
o 1 3
1 0}
0 0-0


,()VF RNMI N I I1(,
3 1 4 5
iu 2 3-4 5
niette 9 3-4 1
3 2-2 3
t 5 2-3 5
%s I 0-0 3
0 004)


The lather and son team of
Fred and Rory Higgs shot a
net 29 over nine holes
winning the New Providence
Division of the Bahamas Golf
Association's junior
tournament Saturday.
The programme started
with a clinic at 9:30. A
number of low handicap
golfers and professionals
including Audnel Clarke,
Donald "Nine" Rolle and
in the end Charles Saunders took the
in there youngsters through a session
of 'how it should be done.'
Half an hour later, the
juniors teamed up with their
1>1 i big brothers and took part in
tf a nine hole best
4 ball tournament.


"It was especially
gratifying to see the number
of low handicap senior golfers
who turned out to help the
programme and the
youngsters," commented
tournament director Fred
Higgs.
Results of the tournament:
Rory Higgs & Fred Higgs
2g9 Therone Hepburn &
Wilfred Horton 31: Keith
Robinson & Coins Poitier -
33; Dwayne Hepburn & lan
Masson 34; Jeff Halliday &
Jack Moree 34; Mike Rolle
& Basil Smith 35; Will
Butler & Mike Taylor 36;
Eric Gibson Jr. & Pepi Terilli
37; Shane Gibson & Reg
Dumont 38.

SQUASH GAMES

HI'HF NASSAUt squash
c h a p i o n s h i p o t In lies
tonight with the quarter final
round and plate events at the
Blue Hill squash courts
Tonight's match schedules-
Men 8.00 pi.. R
Montgonmery v Bates or Garner:
K. Parker v F. Wilkinson ( ,45
p.m.) 9 30 p m. A Winner v A
Davis. 10 00 p.m. I)
Lightbourne v N. Morris; 10.00
p.m. U. Sahai v C. Tyers. 10 30
p.m. R. Nicholls v L. Poitier,
10.30 p.m. N 't young v NG
Wilde.


~i2


-"
Baillou Rugb Club inside 1
centre Broc Barrett makes a 50 yard ,,
run against ,isitini Mianmi University R.C. at the Blue Hill
(Golf Club Saturdayv Miami University won the game 25-0.


The secret to baseball success


SOL ND knowledge of the
basic tundaientals and good
ph sical condition is essential
to success to baseball, said
veleratn oultielder Tony
Currn
"It the rest of the teams in
the league are %working on
these then the 1974 season
would noI only be a great
year for baseball but a year
lthat should produce some
good talent that could
eventually be big league
talent. lie said
Alter spending 12 years in
pro baseball, sharing lIis
major league time with tihe
Cleveland Indians and the
Philadelphia Phillies, Curry
returned to Nassau where he
was president of the Bahamas
Baseball Association. That
post lie resigned lasl year.
In his return to
competitive baseball after
sidelining himself per se,
Curry joins head coach Fred
"Papa" Smith in the Jet Set
Baseball Club. The season
begins on lFebruary 25
"Once you get the basic


with good training and
development of the right
attitude towards the game has
a future in baseball." Curry
explained. "I'll be only too
happy to help."
Jet Set has open workouts
each Sunday at the Southern
Recreation Grounds.
Baseball in the Bahamas
Curry said has improved
tremendously over the years.
"Last year we witnessed some
very good competition and I
think it came about because


fundamentalss down and your
body in good physical
condition, the rest will come.
This." he said. "is what Papa
has been stressing and this is
baseball."
Smith formerly of the
pennant whining San Antonio
Brewers will not be returning
to pro ball this year but will
spend his time sharing his
baseball experience with the
juniors.
'You lose or win games on
fundamentals," stressed
Curry. "'The less mistakes you
make the better your chances
of winning Take advantage
of the other team's
mistakes "
Having made a
contribution as chief
executive, Curry's primary
aim now is to help the
younger ball players in the
league. "Playing then
becomes secondary," he said.
That is probably why he
chose Jet Set "Jet Set to me
has a tremendous amount of
yo';th 'There are a number of
kids on this ball club who


Six


cup--


*fl7'


4

37'*


V


Vivian Thompson, owner/trainer of King Fire, the
winning horse in Saturday's Fashion Boutique Cup race
presents King Fire's jockey Anthony Saunders with a
cheque for his share of win money.


BRISTOL BABES


SHATTER


LEEDS RECORD


stars in


Brazil


lineup
RIO DE JANEIRO Six
members of the 1970 World
Cup soccer championship team
were named to the 22-man
Brazilian selection that will
defend the title in West
Germany this year.
Two players from the 1970
team who were missing from
the list released by the
Brazilian Sports Confederation
were Pele, who has retired
from international competition
and Gerson Nunes, who has
been sidelined with injuries for
nine months.
The six returning players
were Felix, Carlos Alberto.
'lodoaldo, Pia/za, Jairzinho
and Rivellino.
A member of the technical
committee that chose the
players said it tried to "renew'"
the team as much as possible
"but wve obviously had to call
some experienced players.

rostac. who was often
heralded as Pele's successor to
superstardom. was not named
because lie was forced to retire
from soccer last year due to an
eye ailment.

(;oalie Felix, 37, and veteran
right-back Carlos Alberto, who
were not included in the
delegation that went on a
preparation tour of North
Africa and Furope last year,
were called this tune.

Coach Mario Zagallo said
that "if he proves to be fit,
'Carlos Alberto will be the
team',s captain."

i-ullback Brito and
left-halfback I-veraldo, who
were inmebers iof the main
lineup in 1970. were left out.

Zagallo explained that the
technical committee once more
decided to call versatile
players, who can be used on
several positions at crucial
situations.

These are the cases ot
left-halfback Marinho, of Rio's
Botafogo, niJidfielders ('arbone
and Rivellino, forwards
Jairzinho,. Paulo Cesar and
Dirceu, and fullback Wilson
Piazza.
The players were scheduled
to report for training March 4.
The Bra/iliats will play 11
exhibition matches between
March 4 and June 13. the day
they will open the World Cup
in Frank furt against
Y ugoslas a
Light of the players who
took part in last year's
preparation tour were left out
this time. (AP)



- by Tony

of the advanced knowledge of
the game and the opportunity
to play more regular."
He recalled times when a
ten game series was
considered good.
Curry would like to see
baseball introduced into high
school. "If they can be
introduced to baseball at that
early age they will advance in
the game that much quicker.
The long range effects will be
most beneficial."


off the line by Brian Drysdale.
Then goalkeeper Ray Cashley
stopped another header from
Allan Clarke.
A crowd watched Bristol
hold out under mounting
pressure.
Bookies had made Leeds 5
to 2 favorites to win the Cu'tip,
with Bristol City long-odds
outsider at 500 to 1. Now
Bristol will meet Liverpool,
another of England's top
teams, at honie in the
quarter-finals.
Bristol fought bravely for
every hall and outran their
famous opponents. All Leeds'
clearly superior skill could not
subdue the gallant Second
Division team.
Bristol City reached the final
of the cup in 1909. But since
World War One they have spent
most of their time in the lower
divisions of the league.
Leeds were last se,lson's cup
runners up and were hot
t fvoturites to cotr plete tIhe
league and cup double tis
time. (AP)
ROWE HITS 120
KING;STON The West
Indies lost their opening
batsmen, Lawrence Rowe
( 120) and Roy I'redericksI 94),
before lunch on tIhe second da
of the second test match
against F ngland here today .
But before their departure.
the pair set a new first wicket
record for tile West Indies of
206.
At lunch the West Indies
were 238 tor 2, Lloyd 8 not
out. Kallicharan 7 not out.


Bahamas

Telecommunications

Corporation



NOTICE




T he Bahamas Telecommunications
Corporation wishes to announce that
telephone service is now available in Palmetto
Village.
Residents living in this area, who are
interested in obtaining service should contact
the Corporation's Commercial Office on
Thompson Boulevard, Oakes Field, Telephone
Number 34911,. at their earliest convenience.
Information regarding lot or nearest Pole
Number, should readily be available when
applying for service.





NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that BERNARD PAUL of Boyd
Subdivision, Nassau, Bahamas is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalisation as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N7147, Nassau.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ALLAN ALVIN TRENTON
YOUNG of Norfolk Street Shirled, Nassau is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHUNG CHOI DAVID
KWAN of Coffee House, East Street is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration should not
be granted should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N7147, Nassau.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CERAMENT BELIZAIRE of
Dwen's Town, Andros Bahamas is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written ans signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 12th day of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship P. 0. Box N7147, Nassau




__INK-S


*BOXING*



BIRDLAND
MT. ROYAL & CAREW STREETS

FRIDAY 22nd. FEB.1974
DOORS OPEN 7:30 P.M. ACTION STARTS 8:30 P.M

**ALL-STAR BOXING **

RETURN OF

BOBBY LLOYD

MAIN EVENT

BOBBY LLOYD
Light heavy/w ight
yOur favoLr)te bIo q P .
VS
GEORGE HOLDEN
Heavyweight la 'e lr,

RANDY SCOTT -vs OTIS CLAY
Fought Sugar RYa ( .w P
last time out

RANDY ARMSTRONG vs ROSCOE BELL
Fla. popular speedster Ready for thi, one.

JOE HILL vs MOHAMMED ROLLE
Ft. Lauderdale. Touqh Rouqh.



"White Label" A ND





WILL BE THERE!.. WILL YOU?


NOTICE

ANNOUNCING THE RE-OPENING
OF

DONALD'S FOOD STORE

OUT ISLAND TRADERS BLDG.

ON 20th. FEB. 1974

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT

TELEPHONE 3-2102, BRAYNEN MORE

P. O. BOX 5679 ES. NASSAU.


I I


-- i


LFEDS Bristol City, front
the Second Division, shattered
Leeds United's unbeaten
record this afternoon and
moved into the quarter-finals
of the I nglisih FA ('ip with a
1-0 win.
The upset one ol the
biggest sensations 1 english
soccer in recent years came
in a fifth round replay.
Don Gillies scored in the
73rd nLinute.
Leeds had gone 29 league
games and three cup matches
without defeat since the start
of the season and broken all
F english soccer records.
Bristol City average age
23 had caused a surprise by
holding Leeds to a 1-1 draw at
Bristol last Saturday. In the
replay at hoe, I needs were
expected to massacre their
unsophisticated opponents.
Bristol withstood tremend-
ous pressure from Leeds and at
halftime held on at 0-0.
In the second half Bristol
began hitting back.
In the 73rd Iminute Keith
Fear, moving forward from
midticld, sent a beautifully
placed ball into the Leeds
penalty area. Gillies eluded a
tackle by Norman lHunter.
F ngland's World ('Cup sta. and
s(iee/Led a nIiht foot shot
between goalkeeper David i
liarsve and the post.
The crowd ot 47.182 was
stunned and witllh 15 minutes
left Lteds sent o11 Joe Jordan
as substitute in a desperate
effort to save tOheir reputation.
Jordan had ai header kicked






I


tFribunt


Bank with




E Barclays


(Regit ered with PotW of Bhama for poW concron within th, Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


VOL. LXXI, No. 75 Wednesday, February 20, 1974 Price: 20 Cents


Radio sick- out


Watching sponge clipping by Miss Ella Brown, a veteran of the sponge industry and an
employee of Mr. Joseph Armaly, the only Bahamian sponge merchant are (left to right) Mr.
Livingstone Coakley, Minister of Education and Culture; Prime Minister, Mr. Lynden Pindling;
Mrs. Gail Saunders, Bahamas Archivist and Mrs. Pindling.



Soaking up some history-


\\N I \llItII lION ,of historical docuimnts-i
on I tie Sptngintg Industry at the Public
Rclicutmds O lcc. Macke) Street was officially
opiend Mondi,i alterntitn b Prine Ministel,
Mr I \ ndin Pindhing
In his tpiniing ivinit.,ks. Ile Ptme i M minister
recipped the history otl the sponging industry,
.'Id pit)nictd oult that sonic 27 pcicenl of the
i t, al t ,oitld (utpul l nt at.ilu al sp linge wasS
produced iroin tthe island.
lic said there was a.i i ssibility there would
h'- a re i \ il if thie spiti in geintIulstrs.
"Thcie C Are sinis. th.ii 0k d iseJse t hat struck
tlihe beds ind killed .ill the s piiie night have
outlasted itself, and thcii s'emlls to be a
Ik!COVCl, I iin ) I ,) lie "h l,,Id
"-W h th, 1 t1 lha l to (I tl ,it t III Iofhl reahivcd
wc do nol knotiw, but twi' tiopt thai in the nol
too distant futuitt ,e i isl.ids woutild see the
icV\i\al >i l t id tsl i\ l11 l1 i 'l/ C t', if ollit indeed
Ir- in tl ie s t -te, C 11 iil li. tish i the sea
which would in lturn nit mIl\ protidet luo
tt lt, lit wou it .1it l ]i 1 p:u1 tidc fior great
wealthh" he added.
M r. Pindlint g said lie \\ s isli,i pp thc Mrinistrys
if I .luicaltion lid tiikcn tills lisk to c collect the
relevant liiio rnil iin pri tll.iitilip!' ih I ithe spoting
induisti\ .
Young and old could now see the exhibit,
icadit o the great indiisit and leirn something


itt how their country came to hbe. wh i
sustained it in the past and what could sustain
it in the future.
Minister of I education. Mr. Livingsloiie
Coakley said the insis of the sponge industry
is relevant in these days since it serves as ,a
constant reminder that man as an economic
man can get by on what he needs, notl hat he
really wants.
He endorsed the appreciation that the
Ministry of I education has ioti Mis. (Gail
Saunders, Bahamas archivist and the archives'
staff, and said that he is happs to be associated
with the programnme.
"Displays siuch as this should emind itS ofi
our econont t ili.ere wt' c :iame ntroi .titil 'fihere
wve are going, lie added.
Permanent Secretars tu the Ministry of
I education, Mr. Baltron Bethel was master of
ccremonies.
A highlight i1I the I exhibition S\as a sponge
clipping demonstration by Miss I lli Brown. aIn
employee ot 1Mr. Joseph Armaln,il. the tnIh
Bahalman sponi'e merchant .t present. Miss
Brown has bn iit working in tlie sponge
industry I rom the early part ot Ithe century
The I xhibiitnn will be open through Feb.
22 from n :)30 a in. to 7:00 p.m. daill\


Hotels: weekend signing?


1it) 1"1 I 1NI()\ I'lcsidei nt
D)avid Knotwles said ttda\ fit'
expects that signing tt (hie net
two-year contract wl ith I tle
Ilotel I tiploiers Associationl
will take place either this
weekend or lon MondaS. "it nit
snags pop up"
Mr. Knowles ajid ihe knew ot
a couple of "'snag"s' that uinghtl
pop up, but li'e would not go
into details.
Asked how t he dialling of


t lhe formal docurinent was
progressing. Mr. Knowles said.
"so -so no hits, no runs. rio
errors We are trying to put it
together "
Referring to the possible
"snags", the unionist added:
"Our past experience has
been that matters we thought
were settled, the Association
has different ideas."
Remaining areas of possible
conflict include the extent ott


c tract vits appli tig toi agreed
:11,i increases .itd blManket
tipping.
I'he hotels contr.ict dispute.
more than nine weeks old,
swent from att complete
standstill to virtual settlement
in a matter of hours o\er the
weekend.
The two sides arc now
%wor king out tlhe detailed
wordhng ot a lorniial conllllt.


Grenada gets its power back


S I (, 1 () R(;I 'S
lectrncal power will be
turned on for thie first tinie in a
tllonth on thie eastern
Ca.ibbean island of (;renada
after memnlbership of the
technical and power workers
union notedd today' to return to
o tork
The vole came at S a i
S I'SU). but C(uiItIs St'e arl.
PI esident of lihe lion, \\,Ias
lo t l i n ed iatel .t a\ailalle it
outline thCe vote oIln1t 0
explain the reason ito a
back-to-work order.
I telephone employees were
among the first to return to
work. and Leslie Seon, a
stringer for the Associated


Press in Grenada, made one ot
the first telephone calls off the
island at 10:30 a.m (I DT) io
report on the vote.
Union workers. back on Jan
I1. agreed by a more than 100
to 21 to walk off the tob. and
electrical power to feed
telephones. cables. hoines ,and
plants had been off since Jan
'ui. and now all power service
\ais expected to be restored by
early Thursday, a union
spokesman said.
the Fechnical and Allied
Workers Union was one of four
unions on strike that virtually
shut down the island that
gained independence from


I ngland on Feb ", two weeks

liie others were Seament l and
\\ after ronl nit n on. t clerical,
, commercial and ind usil til
otrkcis. ind l-it IProgiessive
I tibour L'lion thai nt olved
iboutIt 1.500 workers
(i re'natda tist albtovu e
initdad lias a p putllation o lt
inst to\er 100.000
A.-\s a 'esutil ot the ut
strikes trade uith other islands
uas reduced sharil\ and
electricity \\as off rile U.' S
I embassy in Barbados earlier
had suggested that the several
\merican tourists on the island
Iave. (AP)


Two fined on firearms charges


AN 'lONY "Stick-a-lone-'"
('Conyers and Glenn Bowe were
hotlh convicted and fined this
morning by NMagistrate
: In i anuel Osadebay in
connection with charges of
unlawful possession of firearms
on December 22, last year.


Conyers, a 24-year-old
IHospital Lane labourer and
Bowe. 17, of Fast Street were
arrested by police last year
when found at a car park
with a .22 revolver and two
rounds of ammunition.
They were represented by


attorney Randol I .Fawkes
iand had pleaded not guilty to
the charges
The magistrate ordered they
pay S500 or 12 months each
for having the gun and S 100 or
six months for the
ammunition.


RADIO STATION ZNS
was operating on a
skeleton staff today after
announcers, engineers and
news staff on the first shift
called in sick.
The "sick-out" began
yesterday when four of the
station's seven anntoriuncers
called in prior to the start ot
their shifts.
Two other announcers, Peter
Key and Alex Curry are
temporarily off the air Mr
Key for refusing 'o read an
Ex-Lax conimernal and Mr
Curry, who was demoted
following the obsceitnl\
episode during the investiture
of two Catholic Monsignors at
St. Francis Xavier's Cathedral
The only announcer to show
up for duty yesterday, it is
understood, was Don
Pritchard.
This morning three of the
engineers an o o!ur of the news
reporters t ledi to show up for
thile 6 a :n. lc noon shift, and it
seeli.e, likely thie i sane
s'ii : ioni would contInI In
th:ioughout the remaining thiee
shifts, a source said
The absence of so mian. of
the staff has left management
to keep the iti' in go'.ng
tIA % ti A 'ii i *
The Tribune understands
that the only personnel on the
air today were, station manager
Calsey Johnson, news director
Eddie Bethel, news editor Mike
Smith, Carl Bethel and Charles
Carter, who came in fromn
I report for a special inecting
and was called in to help out
Staff at the station are
allowed 28 dass a icar sick
leave -\fter two days however,
they are expected to bring in a
doctor's note showing thie\t
have been ill
I lihe problems at tihe st ,ilon
are believed to hate started
with the appointmentL of iMr
Calsey Johnson as Nassau
stat tion nanagert'
Mr Johnson was reportedly
responsible i l the dismissal o 0


Rodney Bowe, the production
assistant, whose obscenities
were accidentally carried on
the air while the Catholic
investiture was in progress at
the Catholic Cathedral.
Announcer Alex Curry, who
was then in charge of the
microphone, was demoted for
three months to production
assistant for failing to switch
ott the curse words in time.
Announcer Peter Key has
been broadcasting the I'x-lax
commercials for some time. Hie
reportedly objected to reading
it continuously and refused to

lust over a week ago he was
told to bring a note of apology
the following Monday. Mr. Key
did not turn up for work the
next das and has not been
back since
UNION COMMENT'
lhe dismissal of Mr. Bowe
and ilhe demotion of Mr. Curry
hiis already sparked conmmnent
litm I engineering and (encral
Workers Union president
l)udlev Williams.
IMr Williams, who represents
the station's employees, said
the union wondered whether
if not somelit people at the top
wet e notl ultimately responsible
loi the unfortunate incidents.
(' onui'i ed MI \' Illim-s
"I he ,ew station rnanagi'r MNit
Johnson has been heard in
some circles boasting about the
firing of the individual, and the
suspension ot two others
"Mr. Johnson has threatened
in his words to 'clean up' and
this statement is nol being
taken lightly by the union"
Yesterday Mr. Johnson was
said to have been at the race
track k Ilhis morning The
tribune tried to contact
Corporation chairman Milo
Butler Jr. only to be told that
lie was not in.
Asked when the chairman
was expected the secretary said
she' did not know, then that he
was not expected at all today
and finally that she believed he
was ill


Absolute


discharge


POL 'I 1:1lying Squad
sergeant 503 Kenneth BonanN.
convicted yesterday afternoon
in tilhe lower court on a charge
of shooting a 'Chppinghanl
hotel worker in the leg on0
October 29. causing hnn to
have the linh aiin lptaei d, was
absolutely discharged and not
"conditionally discharged as
reported earlier.
Yesterday during the trial.
the defence led bi atlorne I
Keith Dl)unConhe had argued
that Bonanty's evidence that lie
did not intend shooting the
ni an, ( ril I an (Gibson all.is
Ivan Siht ician, w\a's to be
believed.
rThe court should believe the
policeman's evidence after
considering ihe time of the
incident, along w it l tile
credibilit of the persons
involved.
The officer lhad been
investigating the cause of a
ringing burglar alarini at tlhe
Nassau and Meadow Streets
Super Value store arounlld 30
a.m. He and thie other three
officers with hinm had seen a
man running away in a dark
trousers and whitish coloured
shirt. They pursued hliln but he
did not stop to give them an
opportunity ot properly


MOD
FLOOR
LAMPS

SNl II FIIfII
NASSAU FREEPORT




-SMEAREI


identifying themselves if thie
officer had fired thle gun
inlte ni tonally, anld caught
Strachain-(iibson with the full
blast. "l)r Bain would not
have had to ampulate lthe leg
"'It would have been left
right there in the track road,"
the defence argued. Bonaimy
was represented by attorney
Duncolmbe Miss Jeanne
ihompson also appeared in
court yesterday to keep a
watching brief for Gibson whho
was allowed to sit during his
testimony because of the
injury.
The magistrate felt it best to
have punishment left to tlhe
Police Department iHe
therefore said that hlie was
"'unconditionally discharging"
the policeniani
The Criminal P rocedure
code howev er lists such a
discharge as an absolute
discharge.

CHAPLIN BANQUET
A I:ARI"WFIL I banquet and
dinner-dance for John and Jean'
Chaplin has been arranged and
will take place at the Italcyoni
Balmoral Beach liotel oni
Saturday, March 2, beginning
with cocktails at 7.30 p.m.
Tickets for the banquet
which will honour the couple
fol their woik as St. Andrew's
School, where Mr. C('haplin was
headmnaster for the past 19
cars can be obtained from
the following: D)r. Sidney
Sweeting, Dr, Paul Albury.
Mrs. Anne Albury at R. tH.
Curry & Company, and Ted
Kallergis at The Parisian.


D


HUGHES

HAS


BOUGHT


XANADU

HOWARD HUGHES has
purchased Freeport's Xanadu
Princess Hotel at Freeport, a
spokesman for the billionaire
industrialist confirmed in Los
Angeles yesterday. The price
was not disclosed.
The Tribune reported the
news exclusively yesterday.
The announcement came
from Hughes' firm Summa
Corporation. A spokesman
said the purchase from
Princess Properties, a member
of a group of firms owned by
international shipping
magnate Daniel K. Ludwig,
was arranged through the
merchant banking firm of
N. M. Rothschild & Sons Ltd.
of London.
Mr. Hughes has been
reported living on the upper
two floors of the 174-room
Xandau since arriving from
London on December 20, last
year.
According to the Summa
representative, the purchase
of the 12-storey hotel has
been "under consideration
for an extended period."
He said the purchase "adds
to the business interests Mr.
Hughes has had in the
Bahamas since 1955."
The purchase also included
related real estate, it was
reported.
It is the second time Mr.
Hughes has bought the hotel
in which he has been staying.
He bought the elegant Desert
Inn in Las Vegas, Nevada for
a reported $ 13 million while
staying there in March 1967,
and subsequently bought four
more hotels and seven casinos
in Nevada.
The Xanadu, which has no
casino, was reportedly sold
for $ I 12 million but this could
not be confirmed.


-Swift arrests



after Royal



Bank hold-up

By MIKE LOTHIAN
TWO BAHAMIAN suspects were arrested only three and a half
hours after the Monday morning hold-up of the Royal Bank of
Canada in Lyford Cay, and are expected to be formally charged
with armed robbery in Magistrate's Court tomorrow.
Police said they delayed reporting the arrests until today
because investigations were incomplete.


"Every single cent" of the
money taken in th,: robbery,
more than $38,000, was
recovered." a police spokesman
said.

The two suspects, aged 22
and 23 years, were taken into
custody by police at about
1:30 pn.. Monday in the
Grove, in the Southern
District. They did not resist
arrest, police said.
Iwo men, armed with a rifle
and a cutlass, held up two bank
employees and three customers
at about ten o'clock Monday
morning. They emptied the
vault of the bank, located in
the Lyford Cay Shopping
Centre, and made their
getaway in a stolen Chevrolet.
Police found the car
abandoned on Cowpen Road
just minutes after the robbery.

The bandits, who wore
masks over the lower parts of
their faces, got away with
B$23.897.34, U.S. $11,861.75.
Can. $2,334.74, Jam. $50,127
pounds sterling, 450 Dutch
guilders and 600 French francs,
according to police. At current
rates of exchange the money
totalled approximately
$38,158.50 in Bahamian
currency.
The same bank was robbed
of over $34,000 by three
bandits on August 16 last year.
Three suspects are currently in
custody awaiting trial.


Consulate

site

selected
THE GOVERNMENT has
selected a site for its
consulate in Miami and
presently is considering
establishment of a Missiot: n
the Commonweal: i
Caribbean, Mr. Oris Russell,
permanent secretary of
Exterpal Affairs said
yesterday.
Addressing members of
Nassau Rotary, Mr. Russell
indicated that a number of
countries has asked for
ambassadorial accreditation
to the Bahamas.
These are: Swizi'riland,
whose Canadian ambassador
would also cover the
Bahamas; Argintinu, through
its United Nations
Ambassador; Australia
through the Australian High
Commission to Canada;
Belgitum, through its
Ambassador in Washington;
and the Netherlands through
its ambassador to
Kingston-Haiti.
It has been speculated for
some time that Mr. Milo
Buth'r .Ir., presently chairman
of the Bahamas Broadcasting
Corporation, was to be
Bahamian consul in Miami
and Mr. e;trail C(ash, High
Commissioner for the
Caribbean.


V.'


Seamstress fined $1,500


Cl \ I R Patricia Campbell.
a 2 5-\ ear-old Kingston,
J a nlli ., seamstress was
cornt Iled anid fined a total ot
Sl.500) in the lower court this
itorninug; when she pleaded
ginill\ to importing and
ptiosse'ssting lalrliu anra.
jhe w aonlan, who arrived
licre Jboadi an Air Jamaica
tfitlet iCstleiday was found
with .1 suitcase containing
se eien pounds ot marijuana,


Insp. Okell Cartwright told the
court.
She was apprehended
following a routine Customs
search of arriving visitors.
She was given an alternative
I 2 month prison sentence for
failure to pay the fine ct
SI 200 for importing the drug
and a six month sentence upon
failure to pay S300 for the
second count.


It's just not cricket!
I iV RPOOL The sport of in Karachi and were slightly
a drug-smuggling ring came to thicker than the laws of cricket
an end when Liverpool allow.
customers officials chopped up a Officials said each had a
crsigrnment of cricket stumps wooden plug rammed into the
bcing imiported from Pakistan base after cannabis resin had
today been pressed into a hollow
Inside the\ reported finding space.
mote than 200 pounds of Customs men linked the
ilari.uana worth an estimated discovery to the seizure of
132,000. $88,000 worth of cannabis
[he stumps, part of the earlier this week. That hal
cargo of a Pakistani freighter was concealed inside football
which docked here Tuesday, believed to have been made ia
were made at a sports factory the same Karachi factory.


4
I


President of Mexico Luis
Echeverria Alvarez, in Nassau
for two days on his way
home from state visits to
European nations, presented
a gift of a silver Aztec-design
decanter and serving tray to
Prime Minister Mr. Pindling
during a lucheon reception
held in the President's honour
at the Lyford Cay Club on
Saturday.



TOWN AND AROUND

THE WEEKLY feature
"Town and Around" does not
appear today because of
pressure on news space. The
feature will appear tomorrow.


O DUDLEY'S
COR. ROSETTA ST.& MT. ROYAL AVE.

NEW 1974 MODELS
"THE V .... ..
ARRIVING SOON!


SKELETON ZNS


CREW AS STAFF


STAY AWAY


I


I


(hI




The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03729
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03729

Full Text








( ODUDLEY'S
COR. ROSETTA ST. & MT. ROYAL AVE.
NEW 1974 MODELS
"THE V........"
ARRIVING SOON!
(R.istrtd with Postmaster of Baham for postage concesion within the Bham.) Nassau and Bahama Islands Leading Newspaper


Bank with



E Barclays


-Swift arrests


after Royal


Bank hold-up

By MIKE LOTHIAN
TWO BAHAMIAN suspects were arrested only three and a half
hours after the Monday morning hold-up of the Royal Bank of
Canada in Lyford Cay, and are expected to be formally charged
with armed robbery in Magistrate's Court tomorrow.
Police said they delayed reporting the arrests unti' today
because investigations were incomplete.


Radio sick-out


SKELETON ZNS


CREW AS STAFF

STAY AWAY

RADIO STATION ZNS Rodney Bowe, the production
was operating on a assistant, whose obscenities
skeleton staff today after were accidentally carried on
the air while the ('atholic
announcers, engineers and investiture was in progress at
news staff on the first shift the Catholic Cathedral.
called in sick. Announcer Alex Curry, who
The "sick-out" began was then in charge of the
yesterday when four of the microphone, was demoted for
station's seven announcers three tionthlis to production
called in prior to the start l assistant for tailing to switch
their shifts. offtt tie curse words in time.
Two other announcers. Peter Announcer Peter Key has
w n e been broadcasting the r.x-lax
Key and Alex Curry are commercials for some time. l11i
temporarily off the air \,1 reportedly objected to reading
Key for refusing ',) read anl
Key or refusing e o read \r it continuously and refused to
Ex-Lax conimmieruial and \1r ino
Curry, who was deminoted so
following the obscenity lust over a week ago he was
episode during the investiture ld to bring a note of apology
of two Catholic Monsignors atl tie fottwin Monday Mr. K e
St. Francis Xavier's Cathedral did not turn up for work the
The only announcer to show next dla anti has not been
up for duty yesterday, it is back since OM NT
understood, was Don .,\1 ,I, (' OMMI N'r
Pritchard. I he dismissal of Mr. Bowe
This morning: three of the ai tdenotion of M r. Curry
s ',,hi, of s ilreadr sparked comnient
engineers a r then it tmi I ne.ince'ring and (encral
reporters 1 iltl to show up ll 1 of r kI n ion president
the 6 a iin. e noon shift, and rk udle ion presidentlliams.
see.c lik te Dudley Williams.
seeni. l likclv lthe samil ,, w
Sl continue Mr \ ilIn r. who represents
S tht- ighout lthe remaining thic, the stit n's etmpl ees. ,aid
tinroite u t ,lit union wondered whether
S ditfis, a source said ,
The absence, of so mian\ o tir iot siome people at the tI)p
the staff has !tt ,l ta ,igete t wi r te unflt irtunately responsi let
oor tlic tniortunate iticidents
to keep the tili 'n '(t ng l
(' oni"t r ed Mt \. llihns
A, .-\., k(" "I, ,ii p "I he hew satlion mianlagt r ml
The Tribune understands Johnson has been heard in
that the only personnel on the some circles boasting about tilt
air today were, station manager firing of the individiul, and thl'
Calsey Johnson, news director suspension ol two others
Eddie Bethel, newss editor Mike "Mr Johnson has threatened
Smith, Carl Bethel and Charles in his words to 'clean up* and
Carter, who camtte in from this statement is riot being
I report for a special meeting taken lightly by the union "
and was called in to htel'p out Yesterda. Mr. Johnson was
Staff at the statIion arc said to have been at the race
allowed 2 X das a \ car sick track this morning The
leave .After two days hocvel. riburne tried tt tcontat
they are expected to bring in Ia Corporation chairman Milo
docttor's note shotwitg the Butler Jr only to be told tha
have Ibeen 1ll he was not inl
I tie problems at the stations
are believed lo have started Asked when the chairianr
with the appointimnt i o Mr was expected the secretary said
C'alse\ Johnson is Na.isauti she did not know, then that he
station imanarer was not expected at all today
Mr Johnson was reportedly and finally that she believed he
responsible foti tie dismissal o,' was ill


Absolute

discharge
POL.I( Fly I Ing Squad identifying theinselves It thll
sergeant 503 Kenneth Bonaimi., officer had fired the gun
convicted yesterday afternoon intentionally. and caught
in the lower court on a charge Strachan-(Gibson with the full
of shooting a ('hippinghaill blast. "Dl)r Bain would not
hotel worker in the leg otn have had to ainputate the leg
October 29. causing hiin to "'It would have been left
have tilhe lilb aiiputitel d, was right there in the track road."'
absolutely disthcharged and not def lnce argued. Bonainm
"conditionally discharged'" as was represented by attorney\
reported earlier D) untonibe. Miss Jealnne
Yesterday, during thle trial Iholmpson also appeared in
the defence leild n attorney court yesterday to keep a
Keith Duncoinbe hald atgtied watching brief lor Gibson whlio
S that Bionamsy 's e\i dence a tit he was allowed to si! during his
i did not inend slioolting the testimony because of the
j mian, C('Vrl Ivan (ibsont als inuitryV
Ivan Strachan, was to be The miagislralte fell il best to
believed, have punishment left to the
S The court should believe the Police Department lie
policeman's evidence after therefore said that lit he. was
considering lthe timen of the "unconditionally discharging"
incident, along with the the policeman. i
S credibility of the persons lThe ('rininal iProcedure
involved, code however lists such a
The officer had bt'een discharge as an absolute
investigating the cause of a discharge.
ringing burglar alarm at tihe
Nassau and Meadow Streets CHAPLIN BANQUET
Super Value store around I 30
a.m. Hle and the other three A I ARIWFIL L banqiiuet and
officers with hin had seen a dinner-dance for John and Jeant
man running away in a dark C('haplin has been arranged and
trousers and whitiish coloured will take place at the Ilale on


shirt. They pursued him but he Balhnoral Beach liotel on
did not stop to give them an Saturday, March 2, beginning
opportunity ot properly with cocktails at 7.30 p.m.
Tickets for the banquet
which will honiour the coutiple
M ODI tor their work as St. Andress's
School, where Mr. Chaplin was
FLOOR ,headmaster for the past 19
L A S years can be obtained from
the following: Dr. Sidney
..... Sweeting, Dr. Paul Albur .
i 1 1 FtIKInIIE Mrs. Anne Albury at R. Hi.
NASSAU FREEPOR ('tirry & Company, and Ted
Kallergis at The Parisian.


SMEARED '


Iril


Watching sponge clipping by Miss Ella Brown, a veteran of the sponge industry and an
employee of Mr. Joseph Armaly, the only Bahamian sponge merchant are (left to right) Mr.
Livingstone Coakley, Minister of Education and Culture; Prime Minister, Mr. Lynden Pindling;
Mrs. Gail Saunders, Bahamas Archivist and Mrs. Pindling.


Soaking up some history--


\ I \111lbit I\ .1t historical dotcuriiments
on 1he Spoiigiir Industry at the Pubihli
Recuils O) ite M.iLckcs Street was ofticialls
opin il Mwoni \e.i ttern',mit b\ Prime Ministci.
Mr. I \ ndl n I' dlid ng
in Ils op nin iiir, icinii, kks the Prime 11M nister
reI.upped tile hlstoi ol ithe sponging industry
.idl puitnid out that some 27 ptilcLent ot the
itlil \ortd ( iutplit 'I n t.iul.il spiuinge was
produced tiorn the islands.
lie said there \a,is I passibilihts there woutild
Ib a rc'i\sil oI lite s(poitt ili1 !il ustr .
"' here iCre sini s lII hil li' dliseise' lthait struck
the beds intd killed ill t he sponitei inught have
out lasted itselfIt. i id the ir srIIIs to be b a
"Wr thh i tlhal lNnd hot l w,,ld het, real/,ed
w'e do not know. biul \\e hop that i in the not
too distantI ltunir tl i1 itslnils wouttld see the
revi\,il ol llldil '\ linlin tI he sI',i. If t M O intdetd
troin the spine. li in lhe lish 01 the se.
which w uiild in ll i il i 't loodl but \oiilid iAlsn ipli itM i great
weaullh." he iddCd.
M r. l'indlin' said Ite \\,is hliippi tile Ministry
of I .lictionu haid liken Ilhis t.isk ito oillcct the
relevtantt ilto itnlr ,i oit ]pm I liIII!,' I lthe sponllge
industry .
Young and old could not ) see the exhibit.
read (o the !'retat iidtisri\ .itid leiurn something


ft how their country caim to be, whit
sustained it in the past and what ctuld sustain
it in the future.
Minister of I education. Mr. Livin stonet
Coakley said the unsis of thc sponge industs\
is relevant in these days since it serves as ,a
constant reminder that nman as an economic
man can get by n what he needs, not whalI he
really wants.
iHe endorsed the appreciation that the
Ministry of iFducation has tm Mrs. (Gail
Saunders, Bahamas archivist and the archives
staff, and said that he is happy to be associatedd
with the progiramme.
"Displays such as this should remindit us ol
our economni where we ca.lie from il andwther
we are going," he added.
Pernianenrt Siccretary to the Ministry of
Education, M. Baltron Bethel was master of
ceremonies.
A highlight Io the I xhibition w as a sponge
clipping demon'straition by Miss l-lla Brown. an
employee of Mi. Joseph Ainial the onl\
Bahamian spongie merchant it present. Miss
Brown hass 'tn working i t lhe sponge
industry tro i the early part ot the center' .
The I xhibit;,on will be open throtigh Feb.
22 from 130 ,t .m. to 7:00 p.m. dail\.


Hotels: weekend signing?


it) 1 L UNION I'resident
Dasid Knowles said Itodai hl
expects that signing ll o ht ll ir i'
two-ecar conItr act wilth the'
Iotel t I iplto ers Ass0oi0 ,1ioin
will take plact'e either this
wcckend or on .Mondai, "it noI
snags pop up."
Mr. Knoiwles siid e knew oi
a couple i l ii igs" ti.il imighl
pop tip, butit he would not 'o
into details.
Asked how the diilling ot


the formal document was
progressing, Mr. Knowles said.
so so no hits, no runs, nit
errors We are trying to put it
together "
Referring to the possible
"snags", the unionist added:
"Our past experience has
heen that matters we thought
were settled, the Association
has different ideas."
Remaining areas of possible
conflict include the extent ot


ctroactivity apple ing to agreed
*;'1, increases and blan ket
ippIng.
i'he hotels contract dispute .
more than nitic'ne we eks old,
% went from a complete
standstill to virtual settlemen t
in a matter of hours over the
weekend.


Ihe two sides.
wor king outi t hei
wording of ;i lorral


are nmow
detailed
con I ract.


Grenada gets its power back


S I (; OR(;I 'S
t lectiail power \will be
tiurri d oin toti he first tine in aI
iont ll1 oil the eastern
('iriihbeaan island of (Grenada
after membership ot the
technicAl and power workers
union otled todas ito return to

The l ote cti'Ime I it aS il1
II'S I 1. but ('lutlis Stew .irf
President of th' e 'iioni. \\s i
not i iniedi'dilels a .ijilale i to
outline th e iole coi' nt 01
explain the reason toi .1
back-to-work order
Telephone eI ployees' were
among the first to lettliil to
work. and Lesliue Seun, a
stringer for the Associated


Press in Grenada. made one ot
the first telephone calls off the
island at 10:30 a.m. (FIDT) to
report on the vote.
I'nion workers. back on Jan
1). agreed by a more than 100)
to 21) to walk off the io t. and
electrical power to feed
telephones. cables, homes amnd
plants had been off since Ja.m
_U. and no\w all power service
adsi, expected to be restored by
e. rls Thursdhy, a1 union
spokesman said.
[he Technical and Allied
Workers Union was one of four
unions on strike that virtually
shut down the island that
gained independence from


I ngland on Ftetb two \wceks

the others were Scallen and
atlertrornt I'nion. cericmia,
ut O tIntl' rci aI I an illt iisl Ilu t
s\orkc's. amt tile Pro'giess.e
l ,ibour nion that iniol ved
jbout 1.500 \\orkers,
( renlada. Juitst ibie\ '
I rlnidad. has population of
niist over 100.000
A\s a reIsult of thie oin
trikess, trade with other islands
%\ ,s reduced sharply. and
1iectricity \\as oft rile L S
Sinbassy in Barbados earlier
lud suggested that thie several
A\merican tourists on the island
l'ave. ( AP)


Two fined on firearms charges
ANTHONY "Stick-a-Tone" ('on ers, a 24-year-old attorney Randol F Fawkes
Conyers and Glenn Bowe were Hospital Lane labourer and and had pleaded not guilty to
tIotti convicted and tined this Bowe. 1" of Fast Street were the charges.
morning by Magis arre y police last agistra arrte e by p ordered thev
II Immanuel Osadebay in when found at a car park pay S500 or 12 months each
connection with charges of with a .22 revolver and two for having the gun and S 100 or
unlawful possession of firearms rounds of ammunition. six months for the
on December 22, last year. They were represented by ammunition.


HUGHES

HAS

BOUGHT

XANADU
HOWARD HUGHES has
purchased Freeport's Xanadu
Princess Hotel at Freeport, a
spokesman for the billionaire
industrialist confirmed in Los
Angeles yesterday. The price
was not disclosed.
The Tribune reported the
news exclusively yesterday.
The announcement came
from Hughes' firm Summa
Corporation. A spokesman
said the purchase from
Princess Properties, a member
of a group of firms owned by
international shipping
magnate Daniel K. Ludwig,
was arranged through the
merchant banking firm of
N. M. Rothschild & Sons Ltd.
of London.
Mr. Hughes has been
reported living on the upper
two floors of the 174-room
Xandau since arriving from
London on December 20, last
year.
According to the Summa
representative, the purchase
of the 12-storey hotel has
been "utinder consideration
for an extended period."
He said the purchase "adds
to the business interests Mr.
Hughes has had in the
Bahamas since 1955."
The purchase also included
related real estate, it was
reported.
It is the second time Mr.
Hughes has bought the hotel
in which he has been staying.
He bought the elegant Desert
Inn in Las Vegas, Nevada for
a reported $13 million while
staying there in March 1967,
and subsequently bought four
more hotels and seven casinos
in Nevada.
The Xanadu, which has no
casino, was reportedly sold
for $12 million but this could
not be confirmed.


"Fvery single cent" of the
money taken in the robbery,
more than $38,000, was
recovered," a police spokesman
said
The two suspects, aged 22
and 23 years, were taken into
custody by police at about
1 30 p.m. Monday in the
Grove, in the Southern
District. They did not resist
arrest, police said.
i'wo men, armed with a rifle
and a cutlass, held tip two bank
employees and three customers
at about ten o'clock Monday
morning. They emptied the
vault of the bank, located in
the Lyford Cay Shopping
Centre, and made their
getaway in a stolen Chevrolet.
Police found the car
abandoned on Cowpen Road
just minutes after the robbery.
The bandits, who wore
masks over the lower parts of
their faces, got away with
B$23,897.34, U.S. $11,861.75,
Can. $2,334.74, Jam. $50,127
pounds sterling, 450 Dutch
guilders and 600 French francs.
according to police. At current
rates of exchange the money
totalled approximately
$38,158.50 in Bahamian
currency.
The same bank was robbed
of over $34,000 by three
bandits on August 16 last year.
Three suspects are currently in
custody awaiting trial.


Seamstress fined $1,500


( \\ VI R Patricia Campbell.
a 25 year-old Kingston,
J a milu'.i seamstress was
comicted and fined a total of
1.500 in the lower court this
moringmt when she pleaded
gtiillt to importing and
poss ssing n iiiitiana
1 tihe woman, who arrived
here aboard an Air Jamaica
tli hil estleI iai was found
I il i si ilIC ase containing
se enCt pounds of m marijuana,


Insp. Okell Cartwright told the
court.
She was apprehended
following a routine Customs
search of arriving visitors.
She was given an alternative
12 month prison sentence for
failure to pay the fine ct
S 1.200 for importing the drug
and a six month sentence upon
failure to pay S300 for the
second count.


It's just not cricket!
LIVI RPOOL The sport of in Karachi and were slightly
a drug-smuggling ring came to thicker than the laws of cricket
,in end when Liverpool allow.
customs officials chopped up a Officials said each had a
ionsignmcnt of cricket stumps wooden plug rammed into the
being imported from Pakistan base after cannabis resin had
today, been pressed into a hollow
Inside the\ reported finding space.
more than 200 pounds of Customs men linked the
nuuriuana worth an estimated discovery to the seizure of
S132,000 $88.000 worth of cannabis
lhe stumps, part of the earlier this week. That haul
cargo of a Pakistani freighter was concealed inside footballs
which docked here Tuesday, believed to have been made at
were made at a sports factory the same Karachi factory.


Consulate

site
selected
THE GOVERNMENT has
selected a site for its
consulate in Miami and
presently is considering
establishment of a Missior: i
the Com monwea a
Caribbean, Mr. Oris Russell,
permanent secretary of
External Affairs said
yesterday.
Addressing members of
Nassau Rotary, Mr. Russell
indicated that a number of
countries has asked for
ambassadorial accreditation
to the Bahamas.
These are: Swilzerland,
whose Canadian ambassador
would also cover the
Bahamas; A.-rgenttn, through
its Un i ted Nations
Ambassador; Australia
through the Australian High
Commission to Canada;
Belgium, t through its
Ambassador in Washington;
and the Netherluands through
its ambassador to
Kingston-Haiti.
It has been speculated for
some time that Mr. Milo
Bul'r .Ir., presently chairman
of the Bahamas Broadcasting
Corporation, was to be
Bahamian consul in Miami
and Mr. Gerald ('ash, High
Commissioner for the
Caribbean.


A




President of Mexico Luis
Echeverria Alvarez, in Nassau
for two days on his way
home from state visits to
European nations, presented
a gift of a silver Aztec-design
decanter and serving tray to
Prime Minister Mr. Pindling
during a lucheon reception
held in the President's honiour
at the Lyford Cay Club on
Saturday.


TOWN AND AROUND
THE WEEKLY feature
"Town and Around" does not
appear today because of
pressure on news 'space. The
feature will appear tomorrow.


I.


1111 1 I I I I I I


VOL. LXXI, No. 75 Wednesday, February 20, 1974 Price: 20 Cents


--


~L


vio


I


hl




al
i *
? \ I
-i,- l +\i,
A ...-.-.. < ',.-...
; A^Ja













Uh fIribtune


Wednesday, February 20, 1974


t llS'i\AL income of
Americans declined in
January for the first time in
19 months. The drop was
partially attributed to job
layoffs stemming from the
energy shortage, said the
Commerce Department.

FIFTY FOUR persons
viewing a movie at the Riviera
theatre in Chicago were taken
to hospitals complaining of
sickness Police said carbon
monoxide had leaked into the
theatre from a coal-fired
boiler that had been
converted to gas

RIC K OWENS, a
sophomore at Brigham Yonni,
unisersitl in Provo, has won
S25 for a rocket that
launched an egg 200 feet
without shattering it.
M-
FORMER world chess
champion Tigran Petrosian
said lihe probably will not be
the man to face Bobby
I ischer for the world title
next year Petrosian said
Fischer's opponent will be
the winner of the April
,enlinal match between
Boris Spassky and Anatoly
K arpov

POLICI say 55 people
were inured, tour seriously,
when tornadic winds ripped a
I 2 square mile path of
Jestriictiorn through Tampa's
ubhurbs. The swirling wind
that hit lhis gulf coast area
late luesday left nearly 100
pcfople homeless and house
i,,!, 1s and cars in twisted
tiii. poIhce said.

THE I ,I Nt. H Navy has
asked its radio stations in
Papeete and Noumea to try
to contact the Pen Duick VI
achit which has not reported
is position for 10 days in the
round the world race

ITHE I .S. State
Department was ready to
i|pprove the sale to Cuba of
auiiinobiles and trucks made
Sby North American
automo 1 o tive firms in
-\re nit ina. Argentine
diplomatic sources reported
in Mexico ('itv


RICH HOI
oi the
( ionmmunist
P'rem iier Hor.
todai flew to
Prime Ministe
thle I ,isl
\ge-ncv repo
e 1 l tton


MIAMI BEACH A win by
Britain's Labour Party in next week's
general election would not necessarily
end the coalminers' strike, the head of
the country's trade union movement
said yesterday.
Len Murray, general secretary of the
Trade Union Congress, said the strike
would continue until "there is a
sensible settlement," but admitted a
win by Labour could speed such a
settlement.
He refused to predict the outcome of
the Feb. 28 election.


Curfew


in riot


city

NFW DELHI Authorities
today clamped a curfew on
much of Ahmedabad. capital
of the central India state of
GLujarat. where antigovernment
rioting has erupted again two
weeks after civil disorders
forced the state government to
resign.
Police fired on looting,
burning mobs in four areas.
and unofficial sources said one
rioter was killed and two
injured. A government
..k'."-sran said the number of
fat citiess was uncertain.
More than 50 people have
died in six weeks of
disturbances that began in
protest of high prices and food
scarcity but later turned
,, i!'' i- the ..'. rrrn'.i nt which
was !,i;itcd with Prime
Minister Indira Gandhi's
Congress Party.
Ihe latest trouble broke out
on Tuesday during a one-day
general strike in the textile
centre 480 miles southwest of
New Delhi.
The strike was called by
opposition parties demanding
the state assembly he dissolved.
which would torce new
elections.
When Chief Minister
Chimanbhai Patel resigned on
Feb. 9. Mrs. Gandhi's
government took over
administration of the state and
suspended the legislature, a
move that allowed the congress
to retain its heavy majority
without having to face new
elections.


British miners are demanding pay
raises of between 30 and 35 per cent
from their average weekly pay of
about S80.
Prime Minister Edward Heath's
government says any more than seven
per cent would wreck its inflation
controls.
Murray told a news conference that
as a result of the current crisis in
Britain the trade union movement
"had found a unity in adversity."
Earlier, Murray appeared before the
AFL-CIO Executive Council where he


I I


Jackpot!

Nellina


scoops

$1.5 million

pools win

LONDON A young
Scottish housewife,
mother of two children,
today collected Britain's
biggest soccer pool prize,
nearly $1.5 million.
Nellina Fletcher,
32-year-old wife of a truck
driver, scooped the
jackpot by selecting the
only seven games in last
Saturday's British league
and cup soccer programme
that ended in draws.
The previous record on
Britain's weekly
Litlewoods pools was
about $1.385 million
nearly a year ago.
Mrs. Fletcher's exact
prize money was 680,697
pounds or $1.497,522.40.
The win may be one of
the last of British pools'
"super prizes." Legislation
is under consideration to
restrict wins to a
maximum of about
$250,000.

Air fares up
MEXICO CITY Beginning
April 1 international air fares
for all major world airlines will
be increased seven per cent,
The International Air
Transport Association (IATA)
president has announced here.
Geoffrey Robert. the IATA
president from New Zealand.
announced the increase during
a news conference last night.


said he discussed mutual problems
like inflation and unemployment with
American Labour leaders.
Murray said he had not sought a
statement of support from the
AFL-CIO for the British miners
because he didn't want to embarrass
the American labour federation "by
trying to involve them in our internal
matters."
Asked about charges that the
miners' strike was prolonged by a few
extremists, Murray said that issue


Now


Patty,


says Hearst


HILLSBOROUGHl
Newspaper magnate Randolph
Hearst says he hopes the $2
million food distribution
programme prompted by
demands from his daughter's
kidnappers can begin Friday
and bring about her freedom.
Work on setting up the
programme was scheduled to
get underway today.
"I don't know what to
expect. I only hope at this
point," Hearst told reporters at
his home.
"With the $2 million we can
feed 100,000 people a month
for 12 months," Hearst said.
Charles Bates, special FBI
agent in charge of the Hearst
investigation, told reporters as
he left the Hearst home last
night: "I have a seat-of-the-
pants feeling that Patty Hearst
might come home tomorrow
(Wednesday)." He did not
elaborate, and the FBI later
said Bates was merely
speculating.
The terrorist Symbionese
Liberation Army claims
responsibility for abducting
Hearst's daughter Patricia from
her Berkeley apartment Feb. 4.
As a precondition for
negotiating her release, the


Kissinger goes West


Nt-CKE R. chuet WASHINGTON U.S.
East German Secretary of State Henry
Part'. .and Kissinger today put aside
st Sindermann \Middle East distractions to fly
Cuba to Sisit to a western hemisphere
r Fidel Castro, meeting in Mexico City with
German News Ins promised "new dialogue"
rted A large between the United States and
accompanied Latin America.
His southward venture, put
',, t r-,, i' otf by the October war and
then peace negotiations, is a


NOTICE
JOTi! f s herebyv gven tat MORALES OTHELLO,
ALIAb IvALLACE OTHELLO o< Deveaux Street, Nassau,
B iii'hm is applying to the Minister responsible for
N'ati'oiiiaty a-id Citizenship, for niaturalisation as a citizen
f The aohamani, and that any person who knows any
, v I -yo ; why natinalisatIour should not be granted should
%Seni a wittee and signed statement of the facts within
twe-ity-eight days from the 20th day of February 1974 to
The Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship P.
0 Bo-' N7147. Nassau.


long planned attempt to
convince the 23 other
governments that Washington
supports a new "spirit of
community and solidarity."
He will try to avert any
brawl over Cuba and will seek
conciliatory means of settling
disputes over expropriation of
properties owned by
U.S.-based firms.
K issinger, a normally
ebullient figure, faces the
tricky problem of making his
mark in this new forum while
trying to persuade the other
foreign ministers that old
"Yankee imperialism" and U.S.
domination are dead. A
declaration reflecting the
cooperative spirit is expected
at the end of the session.
Kissinger planned an early
afternoon takeoff accompanied
by a high-powered congres-
sional delegation, including
House Speaker Car Albert.


Senate Democratic leader Mi.ke
Mansfield and Senate
Republican leader Hugh Scott.
As often with Latin
American affairs, events in
another region of the world,
this time the Middle East, tend
to overshadow the Secretary's
mission
lHe is in the process of
setting up negotiations
between Syria and Israel and
will fly to the Middle East next
Sunday or Monday, shortly
alter his return from Mexico
City.
Officials here said Kissinger
will tell the ministers that the
United States recognizes the
right of all countries to take
over property of foreign firms
provided there is prompt and
equitable payment.
Seeking to diffuse what has
been an emotional issue, he
will support L ..r'[,i ti ..n
between the firms and the host
countries without the direct
participation of the U.S.
government.
In the past, expropriation
disputes have harmed U.S.
relations with such countries as
Chile and Peru
On Cuba, there is confidence
here that a majority of the
countries are not ready to
reverse the sanctions imposed a
decade ago U.S. officials
concede a decline in evidence
that the Castro government is
"exporting revolution." But
Washington apparently hopes
to get lost in the crowd in
Mexico City and sidestep any
furor over the isolation of
Cuba.
The 8-topic agenda prepared
at the minister's meeting in
Bogota, Colombia, in
November remains intact
although the United States is
likely to add a proposal calling
for cooperation in face of the
energy shortage. (AP)
Other reports Page 6.

Inflation blow
WASHING( li.i\ The U.S.
Commerce Department said
today inflation in the closing
three months of 1973 in the
United States was even worse
than earlier estimates, rising at
an annual rate of 8.8 per cent.
This was the worst rate of
inflation for the United States
in 22 years, since the 13 per
cent increase in the
first quarter of 1951.


group later demanded a food
giveaway by Tuesday for
California's needy. Miss Hearst
was 20 today.
Patricia's parents asked her
kidnappers to make the
ultimate "gesture of sincerity"
in return for their two million
pledge to feed the poor: free
their daughter today.
Hearst appeared in front of
his Hillsborough mansion to
say again that the two million
dollars, "is not ransom," but
an indication of his good faith
to the Symbionese Liberation
Army.
"I expect them to make a
gesture of sincerity themselves
and naturally in my position
and Mrs. Hearst's position, the
gesture they could make would
be the release of our
daughter," said the newspaper
executive.
"But this two million dollars
is not ransom."
Mrs. Hearst spoke after her
husband, referring to
comments in her daughter's
last taped message which was
received Saturday.
"I know she said I wore a
dark dress." said the tearful
mother. "I have a bright.
pretty dress I can wear when
Patty comes home. I just hope
it'll be tomorrow.'"
California Attorney General
Evelle J. Younger said he
would not prosecute anyone
who accepted the food. He also
suggested the Red Cross and
Salvation Army as possible
charitable organizations that
might handle the distribution.
Hearst had said over the
weekend there were legal
problems to be worked out in
connection with the food
distribution plan. lie said, for
example, that persons
accepting the food might be


violating
part in
(AP)


the laws by taking
extortion activities.


doesn't stand up "when you look at
the results of the vote in which 81 per
cent of the miners voted to walk out."
Murray said labour disputes could
not be settled "in the great councils of
state." The only place they can be
settled is "across the bargaining table,"
he added.
He said the TUC was not "intent on
trying to kid the government" when it
gave assurances that hikes for the
miners would not result in escalating
wage claims by other unions.
Asked what assurances the
government had for the
pledge, Murray said: "They
just need a little faith."


Murray return to Britain
tonight after spending four
days in Florida.
Meanwhile the National
Coal Board, which runs the
state-owned coal mines and
employs the 280,000 miners
now on strike, gave its full
support to their demand for
higher wages yesterday.
The board's backing came
in a report to the pay board,
the government's watchdog
which ensures that pay hikes
stay within the government's
anti-inflationary limit.
The pay board is
investigating whether the
miners should receive more
than the limit because of the
special nature of their job.
Coal Board chairman
Derek Ezra told the inquiry it
was essential to re-evaluate
the relative position of the
miner in British industrial
society to retain the
manpower necessary to step
up production.
Ezra's report said the steep
increase in the price of oil
had greatly enhanced the
economic importance of coal.
"Looking to the future
there is no evidence that
marginal improvements in the
relative position of miners
compared with other
occupations will have an
adequate effect on manning
levels," Ezra said.
"A major shift in the
relative position of miners
compared with other workers
appears essential."
In South Wales, a major
coal mining area of Britain,
mine leader Dai Francis said
the United Mineworkers of
America had sent a cash
donation to their British
colleagues, but didn't say
how much. (AP)


JERUSALEM Premier
Golda Meir was winding up
nearly two months of arduous
negotiations to form a new
coalition government today,
but Defence Minister Moshe
Dayan said he may not join the
new Cabinet in the face of
bitter criticism of his
leadership during the October
Middle East war.
Dayan, angry at the sharp
attacks from within his own
Labour Party over his conduct
of the war, told close associates
yesterday that "under the
present circumstances" he
could not resume his post.
The enigmatic leader, who
has threatened resignation
several times in the past to win
support for his views, was not
clear whether he had definitely
decided to stay out of the new
government, or what
concessions from his party
would keep him in.
Transport Minister Shimon
Peres, Dayan's chief supporter
in the outgoing Cabinet, told
newsmen after a midnight
meeting with Dayan that
Dayan's backers would try to
change the conditions within
the party, apparently
indicating that the Defence
Minister may continue in office
if he receives clear support
from his party.
Dayan did not answer
questions as he emerged from
the conference,.
Dayan's dramatic move
came as Mrs. Meir appeared to
be putting the final touches on
a compromise with her


LOS ANGELES Sonny
Bono has filed suit for legal
separation from his wife and
singing partner, Cher. a
spokesman said.
The spokesman for the
entertainer said the petition
cited irreconcilable Jiffercnmr r
Bono, 37, and Cher, 27,
were married Oct. 27, 1964;
and have a daughter. Chastity,
boin in 1969.
Rumours of a marital rift
between the two popular
entertainers had been
circulating for months in


Sweet news for housewives


LONDON The British
housewife will not have to pay
more for her sugar even if
Commonwealth sugar
producers are paid more, a
Ministry of Agriculture
spokesman said today.
The spokesman was


commenting on reports from
the West Indies that during
London talks with Caribbean
sugar-producing countries last
week, Britain agreed to raise
the price paid under the
Commonwealth sugar
agreement by 22 pounds to 83
pounds a ton.


traditional coalition partners,
the National Religious Party
NRP to form the
government following Dec. ;I
elections.
In Haifa, Cabinet \I;,, .
Josef Almogi interrupted a
banquet late Tuesday to say he
had been called to Jerusale.r to
take part in the last stages of
the negotiations. "A new
government should be formed
by tomorrow morning." he
said.
Almogi gave no clue as to
the composition of the
government, but NRP leaders
told Israel radio that remaining
differences with the Labour
Party could be ironed out
indicating their party will agair
join the government.
Mrs. Meir's deadline to torge
a coalition expired at
(IO00EST) today. but
informed sources said she :"a\
withhold the announcement
until the detailed wording ,
the coalition agreement 1a,'
been worked out.
Labour won a narrm-,
plurality of 51 seats inm e
I 20-man Knesset,
Parliament, and NRP's ;ec
seats would give t
v' er Ti iii- n i a on -s'n
majority.
Mrs. Meir also could ;,.
on support from several sr.i'
parties on crucial i
involving peace negotijiu,-,
with the Arabs. These Ir
declined to join the cohal!,
over irreconcilable different,,
with the NRP on re ,'r
issues .AP)


Hollywood and Las Veias
There was no inmiie'dfc'
word from the ( olurn'ib.
Broadcasting System i ,;..
how the separation suli
affect their high rated
television .series, hI sti e S i'n
and (her tomnedN Iour i;
has been speculated,. howsu-,:
that it would mean a"n i nd to
the run ,AP)




McAIIstei Hotel
DOWNTOWN MIAMI



haiilai latin

Single S 9
Double $11
Triple $13
Quadruple $16

Home of the
AMERICAN-BAHAMIAN
FEDERATION


Butler Sands Offer...


%" .- -1RM6 .-Vw
IF YOU SEE YOURSELF IN THIS HAPPY GROUP PICTURE, CLIP IT OUT AND BRING IT
TO - BUTLER & SANDS COMPANY, LTD. WAREHOUSE OFF SHIRLEY STREET JUST
BEHIND THE MOSKO BUILDING - PICK UP A FREE FIFTH OF YOUR FAVOURITE
LIQUOR:


Heath needs a little faith, says union chief


DAYAN ADDS



TO GOLDA'S


PROBLEMS


free


Sonny wants separation


START AN EXPORT IMPORT AGENCY
No investment, no risk. no interference to present employment
Work at home or office in spare time or full, through the post. Big
income possibilities. Details airmailed by return.
ANTHONY WADE (CONSULTANTS) LTD.,
Dpt/9, Holdershill Crescent, London, NW4 INB, England.


REWARD



$5,00000






A reward of $5000.00 is offered for information
leading to the conviction of any person or persons
in connection with the robbery of the Chase
Manhattan Bank at Freeport International Airport
on the 25th of January, 1974.

Any information should be made available to the
Police at C.I.D., Freeport, 352-9775, 352-5048, or,
to C.I.D., Nassau, at telephone 2-2561, 2-2562,
2-3049 or 2-2311.


APPLETON
RUM


* BALLANTINE TANQUERAY
SCOTCH GIN


DEWARS WHITE LABEL
SCOTCH


THIS OFFER IS i.IMII:D TO O'.t* ilt.I R PI:RS


py**---9^WI^^M ---------- -------liWM--- --W


--


----------- - - -- -- - -.-.-.-.-.-.. -. -.- .- .. ... .... ...-. ...


......... = ..........~


--u--------------------


_ ___ JI _


I











whr Trib unr


EDITORIAL

Up from slavery-to what?

By ETIENNE DUPUCli
GRAND CAYMAN, January 18th I was interested when I
saw the heading over an article by Anne Taylor Fleming in the
January 21, 1974 issue of Newsweek that read: "Up From
Slavery To What?"
I was also curious because a picture of Anne Fleming appeared
with the article ... and she was a white woman.
I wondered what approach a white woman would have to
"slavery ... and what?"
The term "Up From Slavery" was coined by Booker T.
Washington. I think one of his books on slavery ... and freedom ...
bore this title.
I feel that everyone in the world ... certainly everyone in this
hemisphere ... should know who "Booker T.". as he was
commonly known, was. I consider him one of the really great
men ... of any race or colour ... of all time.
But there are bound to be some of our readers ... even among
young coloured people in the Bahamas ... who are not aware of
the part this man played in helping to lay sound foundations for
the freed slave during the difficult period that followed
emancipation in the U.S.
The important ... and the remarkable ... fact is that "Booker
T. was himself born a slave.
In the years immediately following emancipation he acquired
an education and devoted his life to the training of his people.
With the support of liberal white men and women in the U.S.
he collected enough money to establish Tuskegee Institute in
Tuskegee. Alabama.
Some years ago ... I don't remember the year exactly ... I
visited Tuskegee for the first time. It was for the celebration of
the fiftieth anniversary of its founding. On that occasion I
represented the Bahamas Agricultural and Marine Products Board
and the late lion. T. A. Toote represented the Board of
Education.
I have travelled widely ... I have seen many things in many
places in my life time ... but I can lhone[l\i say I have not found
anywhere anything that was more inspiring than this monument
to the foresight and unselfish dedication of a man who came up
from slavery.
An interesting fact is that, on the day of the big celebration,
the Board of Management of the Institute sat on the stage with
the President and teaching staff of the institution.
Most of these men were white, many of them were members of
old Southern families who had owned slaves but ... in spite of the
harsh manner in which emancipation had been established in the
U.S. ... were giving their time and their money to helping to raise
the black man up from slavery.
One of my most vivid memories of Tuskegee is the statue of a
muscular young black man on the campus of the university. He is
in a kneeling position. "Booker T." is standing over him ... lifting
a cloth from over his head that had covered his eyes ... and, as
this young black man looked out on this strange new world of
knowledge that was being revealed to him ... there was wonder
and amazement in his eyes.
"Booker T." didn't have white men on his Board of Directors
because of any slavish feeling in his heart.
He just had the good sense to know that, if Tuskegee was to
succeed, he needed men with a background of training and
experience that members of his race were not in a position to
bring to the task of laying secure foundations for an enduring
educational institution. This policy was still being continued 50
'ears after this school, which had had very small ', .inningl. had
grown into a giant.
I haven't been back to Tuskegee since then but I wouldn't be
surprised to find that all the members of the Board today were
black men ... because today there are many black men of great
achievement in the U.S. who would be qualified to maintain the
standards set for his brain child by "Booker T.," and to further
its aims.
I mention this fact because it shows the wisdom of this man.
lie knew that no man could step from mediocrity to greatness hy
mercl\ wishing this sudden transition.
In one of my books back in Nassau is a quotation that lenunds
its readers that "slow growth is good growth". The writer ot this
thought points to trees as an example. An oak will take hundreds
of years to reach its full growth and it will withstand any storm.
while the gumalemi will grow almost with the speed of Jack s
bean stalk in one of the fairy tales ... it quickly becomes a
beautiful tree ... but it is torn, disfigured and uprooted by the
first storm that strikes it
Tuskegee is not the only place in which have seen ". ..1
common sense displayed.
~ In 1055 1 travelled across the entire length of Aust ali, and
New Zealand with the Commonwealth Press Union.
In a small town in Australia ... I think its name was Mildura I
found the finest w.'rkti., men's club I have seen anywhere ini the
world. This club had everything. It even boasted the longest bar
. in thIe world.
S The secret of its success was that, after the working men
Formed their club thev invited their bosses to run it for them.
Theysev wanted a good club and they had sense enough to realize
that their bosses, who headed successful business enterprises,
could do this for them.
Their bosses had their own separate club but they were made
honorary members of the working men's club and they were
elected to the top posts. In this way working men on the Board
learned from their experience and wisdom.
I think "Hooker T." was really the wisest man of his penrod


because. while other Negro leaders in the nation were string to
establish institutions of higher education. "Booker IT."
maintained that his people must first learn to work with their
hands. And so. in its early years, Tuskegee was primarily a trade
school. Today ... now that his people have grown to great stature
.. Tuskegee is a combination of technical and academic training.
The educators in this great school still have the wisdom to know
# that the large majority of people of any race need to know how
to use their hands if they are to fit into the niche tor which
nature has endowed them. Only a small percentage of the world's
= people are endowed with executive ability.
You know something ... I started to write about ani article in
.Newsweek by a white woman that bore the title "Up From
Slavery ... To What'?" ... and I have gone on writing without
saying a word about her views on the subject.
S "Booker T." and Tuskegee ... and the men who helped to make
this a great institution ... have always been one of mv favourite
subjects. And so, when I get on it, my thoughts are lkel> to runt
away, as they have done in this article.
: I have got so far into the subject that I won't write about the
Ne .V'wseek article today. I will do that tomorrow because I want
to tell young readers of this column about another great Negro
who came up from slavery.
Dr. George Washington Carver was also born a slave. But lie
was far worse off than "Booker T." although, in a highly
specialized field of enterprise, lie developed into a more brilliant
, tian.
m Dr. Carver was worse off than "Booker T." because when he
was bom he was so sickly and puny that he had no value for his
- owners and they traded him to a family for a broken down old
imftl-.


horse.
Limited space will not permit me to go into the t.!'-iIc details
of the early struggles of 'his sickly child.
The family who owned him was kind to him but he was stolen
by slave raiders on one occasion and endured such brutalities that
it is almost unbelievable that even a healthy child could have
survived the ordeal. But he did live ... and as a free youth he
attracted the attention of a white woman because he did any job
he undertook better than anyone else. Even the simple, menial
job of cleaning a room was so thoroughly done that she was
constantly amazed.
Needless to say, it was a great struggle for this poor boy to
acquire an education. But he did. And he became one of the
greatest scientists of the century in the world.
On more than one occasion, when the economy of the South
was approaching collapse, Dr. Carver discovered a product that
saved the section of the country where his black people were still
being tortured and burned at the stake by the Ku Klux Klan.
Dr. Carver could have been a fabulously wealthy man but he
refused to patent any of his discoveries.
When urged to patent a new discovery he said simply that,
whatever talents he might have were a gift to him from God, and
he held these talents in trust for service to his fellowman ... yes,
even service to members of the Ku Klux Kl:mi who reaped wealth
by capitalizing on his discoveries.
Many nations wanted this man. lie was made fabulous offers
by some of the great nations of Europe. Russia was most insistent
that he should come to them.
lie could have had any position he wanted in the U.S ... but
no. he wanted nothing for himself. Hlie felt that his place was
among his people in the South who needed the benefits to be
derived from whatever talents God had bestowed on him.
It was the example of Dr. Carver that helped me to make a
decision when my late friend the Rt. lion. Lord Beaverbrook ...
year after year for many years ... offered me all kinds of
inducements to join him in London because he said I should be
writing for an audience of millions and not wasting my time on a
handful of people in the Bahamas who did not understand or
appreciate the work I was trying to do for them.
I told him that it I was worth to him what he was offering me
to go to London I felt my place was in the Bahamas where I
could be most useful to a people who needed help at that time.
I never met "Booker T." Hle had been dead many years when I
went to Tuskegee for the celebration of a great anniversary. But I
did meet Dr. Carver.
He was really a handsome, quiet, unassuming old man when I
met him. We corresponded for a long time before he died ... and I
can kick myself today because I failed to preserve his letters.
Frankly, during that period I was struggling so hard to survive
in a hostile environment that I failed to preserve many interesting
and important documents.
I shall never forget the humility and simplicity of this man. lHe
never married. He lived frugally. Most of the money he earned
went into helping poor boys to get an education.
lie was known for an old "green" coat he wore. It had turned
green 'hirtu'h age. Those who knew him swore that they had
never seen him in any other coat. The urge to help young people
was so great that he felt he couldn't afford to buy ." hitie for
himself.
I never saw the "green" coat. I suppose that. for the
anniversary celebrations, when important people from many parts
of the world congregated on the campus. he felt ihe had to make
an effort to tidy himself up.
I don't know where he got the suit he wore on that occasion
but he must have dug it up front the bottom of an old trunk
because it looked like a museum piece. This made him look
different from the rest ... and it was appropriate for him because
he was different ... perhaps the most unselfish man I have known
in all my experience.
On one occasion he did save some money. Like millions of
other people all over the world, he got caught in the great
depression that followed the first world war. His savings were
wiped out when the bank in which he had deposited his mione,
failed. When he was mntfomed of his loss, lie shrugged his
shoulders.
"! wasn't using if." he commented quietly. I1 hope it was
some service to somleonle else."
lIe never spoke of it again.
Talking about "Booker t's' approach to training for his peop c
recalls the early struggles for better schools it Nassau.
/The Tribune was always associated with the fight Ito' th'
advancement of educatIol iin thlie Bahamas.
During the years when coloured children were shut out from
high schools in Nassau we carried on a crusade for thre
establishment of a Government High School.
While this crusade was on the 1 hion. Charles D)undas came to th
Bahamas as Colonial Sec'miary
Mr. D)undas did n tunlusual tling, le took on the chairmansh-'
of thIe Agricultural and Marine Products Board and asked me t,
serve with him on this Board. He declared that until Bahamiru.
farmers produced most of the food used on the tables in the
hotels the money expended on promoting tourism would not h"
justified.
At that time Nassau had a short winter tourist season and ts
lihotels were staffed with coloured waiters, bell bo\s. hout
keepers and maids from thie ['.S. Bahamians were employed .,
labourers in the : nl t ii' otf the hotels.
Mrs. Dundas felt that this should stop. And so she launched
drive to collect monme\ for a school to train Bahamiianii for sesi),
in the hotels.
I backed her in this drive but my coloured ftlends we
incensed ... some of them even stopped speaking to me. Fh\r
maintained that all Mrs. D)undas was trying to do was to li.
perm anent servants of thie colouried people.
I rniembered the philosophy of "Booker T." I told them h thi
until the coloured people had earning power Ihe\ could i i


atTord to pay tle Ices lor their children to attend a high school i'
they could ge t jobs in the hotels that would be a beginning.
lFhe Dundas Civic Centre almost didn't matemnalize. Finall I
managed to get a small annual grant through the louse ,
Assembly for this work. I still have a letter from Mrs. Dund .s
thanking me for' my help and saying that, had my effort to g
this failed, she would have been obhliged to abandon the idc.a
because, by that time. .:he had exhausted all her resources.
My coloured friends were still more furious when I gt thl:,
vote for the Dundas Civinc C(entre. They felt that thins might be
used as an excuse h\ the tHouse for not establishing a high school
But the ihigih school did come. Dr. C. C. Swcetmr .. ftlhe:
Mi. William Sweeting. former Chief Secretary ol t lie
Bahamas ... was an enlightened white member of the Hounse. o:
years he pressed for the establishment of a high school and I
finally had the privilege of serving under him on a committee r :
the House that reported a Bill "irivdie for the establishsmtei l
the Government High School!
Bolth the Dundas Civic lintre and tihe Government theul
School have played an impoitanti role in preparing colomrcd
people for places of :,esponI iihlit\ in lthe Bahamas.
I can tell von a story to tllustrate the importance of the
Dundas Civic Centre.
Queen's College refused to accept Thelma Worrell, daughter of
Dr. and Mrs. G. S. Worrell. as a student. When this happened I
went to Fr. Bernard (later the first Catholic Bishop in the
Bahamas) and insisted that he should remove all racial ba m ers
from Xavier's College. I told hiim 1 could not continue as a
member of any (Christian church that condoned racial
Page 10,Col. I


Whitley Council


appointments


MR. HAROLD Munnmings.
Permanent Sec-.-tars Ministry
of gtrlculttire and Fi:henr.,
has beiel app hinted d ChailnniIm
of Whitlet ( fe 'ni i .: l 74.
Oth0 : iltllhmbers 't he' 'ati
side .ot \k hites t1 .l' !
1974 a-e Mr\ Baitomi Bethel.
Pernuancnt Secretae; Msii'it
of Iduaitioni and culture : Mr
R.Vt IWood. ( ontroller of
Road Iattfi.. Mrs. M '.:D.
M c Do n ald PeC mani i n C t
Secretary, mins ti Of Hlcalth.
Mr. (t 'atson tTi':rurr. Mrs.
B. Picrre., ire tnl (Im
Imnmigration and Mr 11
LD iI Director ol Plbh i
Per: anme.
M I TIhadduf s h)amr lisi,.
President li the Bahams
Publh Services lnion, ;s
Vice-Chairman ,otf Wii1tine
Counicitl their members ol
Staff Side of the Co(iuntil are:
M r. Sam uel II ', 1 ...' 1st
Vice PI'rsident t the B .ah.ami
Public Services Uniton. Mr
Gartht V. (;re'n. (Gencial
Secretamv )tf the B:thiamas
Publi.C Sersice i (s nion: Mr..
Ldward (Gardiner, I rusted ot
the Bahamas Public Setites
Union; Mr. Ailnigton \tMill['r.
Mr. Richard Munime nrd Mr.
George Leileu Im )cpuatmc!nd'
Repiesentatites.
The Whitls ( ouni. h.isc.
on r British plt-it edcLt nt. 'ws.is
estauiishcd in the B.lhamais in
the early 1 Is to onslider
conditions ot sir t, -' ntl he
Public Service. It is comprisedd
of represcntairi\t. ,i romti the
government aIde .I 'ttoiln tl.he
staff side. in this C'as. the
PubNlic Sers ti L t. iLi.
Many i t the re.oirntic i.-
tions of the (' o run il are usually
implemented without rlerenec
to Cabinet. 1 h u .t i has
s t.'h.u c It. oreat.i C umt rec'.eunlt
ll'S with th. n rea h


The recent public srvice
InCrT'-menIt was the result of
rc1. menlll endations in.Idc bi tlthe
C('t.:tA.cl and the proposed
salan reI INew fo allows t ori
otiile res. iionti lten'ltlt's b\ the
( 'unal. I.


GRAND PRIZE





CUTLASS
Complete with 50 HP
Johnson or Evinrude Motor
(Valued at $4,220)
The luxuIo it" !Oi U, ;I
migniitlent ORL ANDO(.A ioP R I'to
o t' eI' O f 'l l'nt sttv 'q It
, i)..ii ',uod ,I et.ll !a e -.iin, le"';it!
,, ttel ploo' qias full 'e!i r' q i '
Theo ul ls t ne te .ted ,'d .vll
.Vou .utsta''dng prior [:,fti Thi. .
)o Oii't boat aflojat f,, i't p:." ..
,V..eld by a irnm with ove' 20 t,
e i o~"'c That s OR. ANDO
CLIPPE R! What a 'b at"


The Whitley Council was
named after ain tiglishman
swho established the h.isj to
deal w'it thhe problemic of
British illndusli It oI.rkcvd so
suc. c sfully I aUt I" '"kas
adopted t t tltC Il S .e .


COME!!

JOIN ME IN AN EXCITING CAREER.
ENLIST IN THE BAHAMAS POLICE FORCE!


POLICE


C LI


C GE


Be a BIG WINNER...Enter the







MMALM LTD
0UC


i
,-a- ,.p,- -


J,*.


~


--Johnson
The ri'.", me,'e ts ftPei tor tr)Le ti .Outboat d -.lotoss. Top
speed, t olling speed cionomyi, dependabi lt. all the things
Vou w.i't '! ain outboard imotoi. I' you want a motor of
riid ida,,e size with ski motor speed, you want the
JOiNSONu 50 with loop chargqig 'r moie Horse-Powet
wot !e, i 'ue' JJohnson. the one yo i,-alliy need ,n these
days O 'ue' c'liiS


MAURA LUMBER COMPANY LTD.
PHONE 24001 24101
P.O. Box N-81 77, NASSAU


NEWSPAPER I

COPIES

AVAILABLE AT

THE TRIBUNE

OFFICE

THIS WEEK!


THANK YOU CONTESTANTS!
"NAME THE BABY. STUDIO"
Thank ,u or ,cnilitig 385 names for our new
baby itudi o I i'ach entrant is now being
acknowledged through the mail and a selection
of happy" ideas w IIl be published in the press
shortly\ together wi th thechosen name.



on the waterfront at East Bay & William Sts.
PHO NE 5-4641


I I II


-


















IF YOU ARE A BAHAMIAN, BETWEEN THE AGES OF 17Y2
YEARS AND 28 YEARS, 5 FEET 8 INCHES OR TALLER, VISIT OR
CALL US AT THE POLICE COLLEGE, OAKES FIELD, PHONE -
58551 2 3


Wednesday, February 20, 1974


3


id


i __ _,.,.II -- ---- --- ---- - --- -- -- ----~


S








Wednesday, February 20, 1974


...............


I


Centreville Food Market
6th TERRACE EAST PHONE 58106 P. 0. Box 5714
S ORE HOURS Monda\ to Thursday S a.m s 0 p m. Friday and Saturda\ S a.m. 9 p.m.
SundaS Sa.m. 10 a.m.
SPECIALS FOR FEBRUARY 21st. TO 24th.
U.S. CHOICE COLD POWER GIANT SIZE 998 1
CHUCK ROAST lb. $1.29 CHAMPION
US CHOICE TOMATO PASTE (LARGE) 2 CANS FOR85C
CHUCK STEAK lb. $1.39 HELLMANS
US CHOICE MAYONNAISE (OTS) $1.39
SHOULDER ROAST lb. $1.39 RICELAND RICE (1 LB.BAG) $5.20
U.S. CHOICE MAXWELL HOUSE
SHOULDER STEAK lb. $1.49 INSTANT COFFEE 10oozJAR $2.19
FRESH CELLO CARROTS PKG 29t JEWEL
FRESH KRAFT SHORTENING (1 LB PKGE) 45C
GRAPE FRUIT JUICE GAL. $1.75 FRENCHS MUSTARD(12 OZ JAR) 2 FOR890
FRESH FLORIDA RED DELICIOUS
GRAPE PUNCH GALS $1.20 APPLES 3 LBBAG $1.35


U -


J1aeau portion

C control Centre
TELEPHONE 2-3237 5th TERRACE, CENTREVILLE
OPEN'TIL 4 P.M. SATURDAYS!
-


MEATS

FISH

POULTRY
IN 10 LB.
CONTAINERS


HOMEOWNERS... BUY WHOLESALE
SPECIALS FOR THIS WEEKEND


AMERICAN "FRESH CUT" MUTTON
NATIVE BREADED GROUPER FINGERS
FRESH NATIVE UNSKINNED CONCH


U.S.D.A. CHOICE FRESH CUT


BONELESS STRIP LOIN STEAKS
BONELESS STRIP LOIN STEAKS


10 LBS.
3 LBS.
10 LBS.


BINDER'S FOOD MARKET
SP.O. BOXN457 \ A s PHONE 2403
OPEN SUNDAY MORNING 8 a.m. 10 a.m.


lb.


99C A
P
lb. S1.10 L
A
S
lb. $1.89 s


5JAX DETERGENT KING Size
)RANGES per dozen
HOSPHERINE TONIC WINE Qts.
IBBYS FRUIT COCKTAIL 303
LIBBY WHOLE KERNEL CORN 303


21
21


& B SAUCE 31
MEDLEY'S NEW POTATOES 19 ozs'
3OBINSON'S ASST. DRINK Orange, Lemon, Lime
T. PAULI GIRL MALT TONIC


U.S. CHOICE
SIRLOIN TIP ROAST


U.S. CHOICE
BEEF STEW
U.S. CHOICE
HAMBURGER


CUT UP
FRYERS


$2.07
$1.00
S2.35
For $1.15
For .89c
For .59c
.43c
.80c
$1.70


Ib. $2.59

lb. $1.50


lb. $1.29

lb. 98C


o e
". '4H't R IN C


COMET


CLEANSER


LARGE


MAXWELLHOUSE
INSTANT COFFEE


CANA
CORN ON COB
BLUEBIRD
ORANGE JIICE


CUT RITE
WAX PAPER


BUT WE TRY TO GIVE MORE FOR YOUR FOOD DOUAR!


MADEIRA FOOD STORE
PHONE 24524 P. O. BOX 6143
KELLOGS


-15C


o oz. 2.90


4 EARS TIN


46 OZ.


85e

79e


POP TARTS


MUELLERS READY CUT
MACARONI
SAWYERS
PIGEON PEAS
LIBBYS
PINEAPPLE JUICE


FRANCO AM.
50e SPAGHETTI


125FT.


PKG.

(1 LB)


SMALL 25t


12 OZ.


& TOMATO SAUCE
15ozs.


253

33


HELLMANNS
MAYONNAISE PT 820
B DR. PEPPER LIBBY'S
'.^ D f l SOFT DRINK 10 TINS FOR $1.00 PEAl
LIBBY'S LESUEUR VF
M TilT BrT nrrt unrAtAa


PORK LOIN ROAST lb. $1.35


NEW ZEALAND
LAMB SHOULDER


FRESH
BROILING CHICKENS Ib.89C


TULIP MINI
SPARE RIBS


I'1


$9.90
s6AO0


SLICED
MAPLE LEAF
BOLOGNA

PICNIC HAM
U.S. CHOICE
LAMB LEGS


7- 9 (8-10ozs.)
9 11 (6-8 ozs.)


$11.25


- -~r-T*-----


I


hrhp Iribuni


- --


- --


SW-


; - - -. . . . . .


. . . . .


- - - - -


I


__


... --


i ii i IIII I


I - -- - Is. ---- ,


I


;e _~-- ------- -~ ~--=-, ~e


::~~~~~~ ~~~~ ... .............~i~~~~ii~~ii~iii~~~~~iiiii~i~iiiiiiiiiiii~i!i~iiiiiiii~iii i~iii~i~ ii~~~~







Wednesday, February 20, 1974


Sfihe ribtmu


ON THESE STOCK-UP BUYS!

SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK FEBRUARY 21st. THROUGH FEBRUARY 24th. 1974.


SUPERMARKETS
If it's value you really want,
you really want SuperValuel


U.S. CHOICE
DELMONICO STEAK
U.S. CHOICE
SHOULDER ROAST
U.S. CHOICE
GROUND CHUCK
U.S. CHOICE
ROUND ROAST
U.S. CHOICE


U.S. CHOICE
PER LB 2.69 T. BONE STEAK
U.S. CHOICE
PER LB s1.89 TOP ROUND STEAK
U.S. CHOICE
PER LB $1.39 SIRLOIN TIP ROAST


PER LB $2.29


PORTERHOUSE STEAK PER LB 2.79


SLAB BACON
DAISY CHEESE
PIG TAILS


PER LB 12.79
PER LB $2.29
PER LB 12.59
PER LB $1.09
PER LB 990
PER LB 49C


DOWNYFLAKE HOT
SLICED BREAD
GORTONS
SOLE FILLETS
JENO
CHEESE PIZZA
MCKENZIE WHOLE
KERNEL CORN
BIRDSEYE
ORANGE JUICE


152-OZ


WITH LEMON
BUTTER 9-OZ


121/2-OZ


18-OZ
6-OZ


95C


OSCAR MAYER
s Ii~nL RACiN REGULAR THICK
SHM RUR IsKIC


$1.99 OSCAR MAYER
$1.29 SALAMI FOR BEER


69C


SCAH MAYER
BOLOGNA ALLMEAT


OSCAR MAYER
2/890 BOLOGNA PURE BEEF


I-LB


S I

( V rt ie s) [ -o z.










LIB Y'


$1.69


8-OZ $1.09


8-OZ

8-OZ


79C


/GA-RED
PAS fI 2Iz










PACLOT29OZ 69I
WOOL ITE
LIQUID 8Foz 95M
WIZARD BOUQUET 9-oz 79


WIZARD LILAC 9-oz
WIZARD LEMON MIST 9-oz
WIZARD BATHROOM 9-oz


790
790
79C


MULTIPLE
VITAMINS
t100oo


I-
1 l r> n\/ r


NECTAR Peach Pear Apricot 5/2-oz.
LIBBYS
SPAGHETTI & CHEESE 14 OZ


HOUR AFTER HOUR
DEODORANT
CRISCO
SHORTENING
SARATOGA
SPRING WATER


WIZARD AMERICAN BEAUTY 9-oz 79 DISH LIQUID
WIZARD LILY OF VALLEY 9-oz 79C CREST
TOOTH PASTE
E-Z ON SPRAY STARCH 20-OZ 79C DELMONTE
FOLGERS INSTANT COFFEE 6OZ$1.69 GREEN PEAS


NORTHERN
TOWELS ASSORTED


2 ROLL


7-OZ
3-LB


28-OZ
32 OZ


3-OZ


16-OZ


PLASTIC
75C DISH PANS RECTANGULAR


KRAFT SHARP
CHUNK CHEDDAR
KRAFT MILD
CHUNK CHEDDAR
BALLARD SWEETMILK
BISCUITS


8-oz $1.09


8-OZ


ANJOU
PEARS


PEPSI-


990


s oz 3/69C


tEC fa RD
LONGMACARONI
ess^ ^f ^


,' II


~reS'~
-3


6/99C
3/99C
$1.59
$1.79
2/89C


69C
69C


2/79%


990


69C


CARROTS
RED DELICIOUS
APPLES


1-LB


3-LB BAG


2/490

$1.45


U.S. Choice
CHUCK ROAST Per lb. $lm29


Bahamia'n Grown Fresh
WHOLE FRYERS Per lb. 690


K llmH=-l:,l ral ] IBT'dl 'l ; fflr[l
HWIIANCIRU


$ANDEECZT2S3


DAI EL IGH TS


I GARDEN FRESH PRODUCE71


ORCHID BRAND $
LONG GRAIN RICE 5-lbs. 1059


11,


Ir~


as








Wednesday, February 20,:197
-- - I


Ohb Tribunp


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LINDA HUBER of West Bay
Street, Nassau, Bahamas is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahdmas, and that any
person who knows any reason wiy naturalisation should
not be granted should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13th day of
February 1974 to The Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N7147, Nassau.






PINEAPPLE APRICOT SALAD

-Place a slice of Libby's
Hawaiian Pineapple on
crisp lettuce. Top with
Libby's Apricot Halves
which have been
well-drained and put
together with a mixture
chopped almonds. To
soften cream cheese
mix with apricot syrup
until smooth and
drained from fruits for
gelatin deserts, fru it
punch, salad dressings.


DISTRIBUTORS THROUGHOUT THE BAHAMAS
THE GENERAL AGENCY LTI
PATTON STREET-PALMOALE PHONE 2 1561
AVAILABLE AT YOUR FAVOURITE FOOD STORE
m- mm mmimm mmn mm mmm m mm nJ


Nations bid for united front


MEXICO CITY Foreign ministers of
24 Latin American nations made final
arrangements yesterday for their
three-day meeting with U.S. Secretary of
State Henry Kissinger.
Kissinger was scheduled to arrive today
for the conference.
The ministers met Monday and
Tuesday in an effort to present Kissinger
a united front on eight agenda items they
had set last November at a meeting in
Bogota.
But there was some disagreement at
Tuesday's meeting on how to proceed.
"It is very difficult to speak with one
voice when there are 24 countries talking


at once," one delegate said.
"We have to decide who speaks for
what point and what things do we
mention in the presentation." said
a.tother.
The eight points range from the role of
multinational corporations in Latin
America to L'.S. economic reprisals for
nationalization and expropriation of
North American investments. Mexico is
proposing that Kissinger pledge the
United States will not use economic
coercion in its relations Nwith Latinl
American governments.
There was also disagreement onil
whether Kissinger should speak during


HAITI 'A PART OF

LATIN AMERICA'


MEXICO CITY
Haitian Foreign Minister
Adrien Ra rmond said
. esterdar his country
considers itself pait of
Latin America and hopes
the conference ot Latin
American foreign m ministers
with 1..S Secietary of
State Henir Kissmgei will
bring about more
cooperation wislh the
L'nited States.
In a ne\, conference
Ra\ mond said Haiti
identified wi th Latin
America because it w\ as the
first black independent
republic ot the area and
thus had contributed to its


freedom.
U.S. economic mtet-
vention in the hemisphere
has "been stronger in
other countries thin
Haiti", Raymond said.
Intervention of L S
owned multinational
companies in the intiial
affairs of Latin Amne:,ni
countries is among tlie
points to be discussed it
the meeting.
He made no compliiits,
about U.S. treatment ,-
Haiti and said iclan:on,
h a d I m p i
economically I ,.
politically since Jobh I
Kennedy was I S
president.
Haiti would discu,,ss ,'
other countries
reincorporation of (.i.
into the Latin Amei-.r.
community but will iol
propose such a mileei!.:.
Raymond said.
He said he sees
possibility" that ',i
conference this ics.
would pass a resoluri,;l
affecting Haitian polite.+,
prisoners. It is not on thli
agenda and does in
conform to the Hat;.itil
reality." he said
He said there are n,,
plans for economic and
political integration vWii
the Dominican Republic .!
present.
Watergate switch
WASII\ I', )\ The
Senate Watergate (tioiittee
has voted tn cancel jll further
public hearings
Chairman Sami J I-i vin
announced the o-1 decision
and said "'The passage ot ti Ie
and the development of nesw
events ha\e persuaded t lihe
co in mi Ittee that futlt hei
hearings it tits time ire n til
necessary tor the coninittee tc
successtulls complete its work,
"The committee believes
that it should be caet ul not to
interfere unduly s ith Ithe
ongoing lipeachiliiln; proCe,,
o thie Ilous oL udiciar\
comn ittee or the h 'rcriliinlal
cases which will sI-on he
prosecuted b.i the special
prosecutor, on \ titch tihe
attention of the counttr.
appears not 'o be focused"

Toica

Extriatr


the public opening session ot the
conference tomorrow.
Some delegates felt a Kissinger speech
could be a manoeuver "to steal the
show."
Nevertheless, many delegates were
optimistic that, while few drastic changes
in I.S. policy toward Latin-American
could be expected in three days. it would
he a start.
"I think what we can expect from this
meeting," said Foreign minister George C.
R Mloe ot Barbados, "is'a new tone in
U.S. Latin-American relations and a
working together to solve the problems of
the region." (AP)


NOTICE

ANNOUNCING THE RE-OPENING
OF

DONALD'S FOOD STORE
OUT ISLAND TRADERS BLDG.
ON 20th. FEB. 1974

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
TELEPHONE 3-2102, BRAYNEN MORE
P. 0. BOX 5679 ES. NASSAU.


HARDING'S FOOD MARKET
P.O. Box 5290 ES Phone 2-3067


SPARE RIBS lb.


890 I


PORK CHOPS lb. $1.290


FRESH MUTTON lb. $1.10


LAMB SHOULDER lb. 99C


PIG FEET


SHEEP TONGUE


DANISH BACON Ib.


Ib. 35C


lb. 70C


$1.50


SLICED

MAPLE LEAF BOLOGNA 99C


BULK WIENERS Ib. $1.00 MAXWELLHO
IAArPrr


V


CO
P






'. .,


ILD
OWER
GIANT

990


IRISH
SPRING

SOAP


3 BARS
99C


TCOLGATE
TOOTH PASTE LARGE 73i


AJAX CLEANSER17 OZ.

2 TINS FOR 79C


VEL

LIQUID
S 220Z.

790

LANTIC

S SUGAR 5LBs. $1.0!


COKE 6 TINS 99C


WATERMAID
RICE
CARNATION
CREAM


CAMBELLS

VEGETABLE SOUP


JEWEL
SHORTENING
HATUEY
MALT TONIC
ARMOUR
CORN BEEF


ROBINHOOD
FLOUR


iooz. $2.49


10 LBS $3.95


LARGE 4 TINS


4 TINS 8!


3 LB. TIN 11.3


6 BOTTLES $1.4


12 0Z. 1.21


,, 1.2


,,-__ __nI .. .


DISTRIBUTORS THROUGHOUT
THE BAHAMAS

THE GENERAL AGENCY LTD.

PATTON STREET PALMDALE. PHONE 2-1551


grills

that are




























available at

The GENERAL HARDWARE

CO., LTD.
CENTREVILLE PHONE 2-1960/2-8844


1 I I


mwwmmlw MMMMU


m


. Eu I tttM







Wednesday. February 20. 974 UAtt' ~rihnnr


You know me. I wouldn't tell you to shop City Market stores
unless I really believed that they're the best in the Bahamas.
And I know they are. First, they're the oldest, most
established food stores on the islands.
What's that mean to you, honey? It means they're the
leaders. .they set the standards.. .and they've earned their
reputation for quality and low prices.
And City Markets are Bahamian stores through and
through. From the cashiers in green to the bagboys in
green pants, white shirts and ties, they're all Bahamian just
like me and you.
You'll be seeing and hearing a lot of me and City
Markets on your favorite radio station or at your favorite
movie theatre. Love to sing for City Markets. Love to
sing for you, child.
7-f-


-V


.4


do


I Il I I


the


he ritbunne


Wednesday. February 20, 1974


I - -





SEhr rih bune we'


I&


I FAB DETERGENT


BRILLO SOAP PADS RED

5-CT. 3z
PKGS


HATCHeT BAY
A BAHAMIAN UALUE


JUST FOR YOU


EX LARGC
CGGS


WHITC
mILK


CHOCOLATE


DOZ89t


'I


TREETOP ORANGE SQUASH,
LEMON, ORANGE APRICOT SQUASH OR
LEMON LIME DRINKS

26-OZ.6A
6omE 6 yy j


FIVE
ROSES
S FL OUR
IIW^rt -


GAL


FIVE ROSES FLOUR


5-
LB.
BAG


1~N


HALP
GfL. W


~


- -- --- ---


A


I v'^'






YFary 20, 1974 _h_ _ttt


9


R E


4


GROUND BEEF



L.3 '


THURSDAY FEBRUARY 21, THRU SUNDAY FEBRUARY 24, 1974
W.D. 5 to 9-LB. AVG.
TURKEYS


AW,
I 9t^
L jc rI "z

"t ^ . d


W.D.


PICNIC HAMS


LB.


WO. ALL MEAT
BOLOGNA
DAISY
CHEESE


.......... 1.29


.LB .89


SGLADESTONE
FARM
WHOLE FRYERS


VENT VUE
POTATOES


B0
LB.
BAG


GLADESTONE CUT UP
FRYERS
GLADE[STONE


.LB .76
TERS .LB .86


APPLES




+ M LB.eG
BAG

LEMONS
...A
.


NATIVE PORK .....................LB.99
FRYING FISH .......................LB .89
W.O. ALL MEAT OR 1
DINNER FRANKS ........... LB 1.29


WINDSOR BACON


LB. 0
PKG.


49


BAG ORANGES


FOR


FOR


SUPERBRAND PROCESS


SOuF
cRt


SUPERBRAND
AMERICAN
SLICED
CHEESE 8 oz.
fWSmSIlo-ngM
I w


AMERICAN SLICED CHEESE L


K8-Z.
PKG. 1 0M


1-LB. KRAFT
PARKAY SQUEEZE
MARGARINE



L. 69'


BREAKSTONE
SOUR CREAM


HALF


C TROPICAL
-^ ORANGE DRINK


HALF
GALLON
hh '


MORTONS ICKEN AND TURKEY
DINNERS


MORTONS
CREAM PIES


K _^--'. ^
^H .^^'- '*>> ^ A ^^<
w^-^^^. ..
fT Aa-'-INP "A1 "*^<"krf
'W '\'fa^^^
*^Bl^ ^' <, ii^r^ '*^^
^^Mitsiliw ^^


CRINKLE CUT
POTATOES



2-LB. PKG. 7


GREEN GIANT
MIXED VEGETABLES


10-Z.
PK"t


11-OZ.
PKG.


14-0Z.
PKG.


,, FROZEN
, SLICED STRAWBERRIES


PKG5


111


aI


II


*I'


U


LB.


or REAL
BUY


t X"


LETTUCE


HEAD


CH^


,,


, .


I

HAL


.- ,,,t


'c.


'I


. --Ag
i, q Tc I









Wednesday, February 20, 1974


* From Page 3
discrimination.
Bishop Bernard accepted the W,'i i child at Xavier's and
iniriediatelx several parents removed their children from the
school and sent them to Q.C.
B-..'p Bernard then promised me that the day he felt that
:ol'oued parents could support Xavier's he would throw it wide
,pen to everyone. And if white parents removed their children
thie school could continue to carry on.
The rnew jobs that Bahamians were getting in the hotels as a
.ui ot training at the Dundas Civic Centre helped to la ain
co ltioundatnon that made it possible for parents to support
.i high hl..ol.
Bshop Bernard fiiall learned out his promise to me. He didn't
w.5 i tor ,oloured people to be financially strong enough to
,pp' the ch-,,ool IHI made a special collection drive in the .S.
arid X, l. 'll, monee he gave scholarships to coloured children ir
all the Catholic parishes in New Providence.
Most ,' thes c hildieni came t'iom vers poor homes.
B:" th.1 was a big ,Istep towsads breaking doswn racial barriers
i h wia-s .. ,i .. achieved with a solution I pressed through the
use o *\ssemhhl in JaLnuarr i 'ai0
\nd ,ihe (Governmernt hllih School. The islands could not have
elohpcd a- the, hasve done sweie it not for the children who
Sere trained aI this school andjat St Augustine's College which
as, l:er fioundcd hb Bishop Bc'e rd
1i Duinda- was the'i moved to Ahtica as Chief Secretary of
,-. t ithe colonies there e lie later returned to Nassau as
( n t and was knighted and so they became Sir Charles and
I Id ', undau,
Il 5\5 \ela upset when lhe came to see me at my house at
..c'Idv.,.n one afternoon, during the second world war. He
Il -I H,_ XiT wa'- hcig moved to Alrica as the governor of a colony
l.l .. l l ant to go tte was particularly annoyed by the
.ha It led to his removal .. hut he said he could not
i.,l of his successor until it was officially
\ c t : was revealed that he was being moved to
\':- t l)he Duke ot Windsor who had escaped
r r ao !. advance, across Spain. and
-. lhc w ,1 P 1r-ugal It was imrpoitant that the British
.. :".. :t hm ,ti t l 1urope i inediatel\ because of a
S. :! I e pl ain-'e to :'ake him King of Britain in exile.
I as wi h i durinllg their early days in


Nassau.
Coloured leaders hated them for the reasons I have already
stated. And some of the wih:ne leaders in the House hated them
because they were laying sound foundations for the coloured
people of the islands.
Soon after he was first removed to Africa as Chief Secretuar
The Guardian published an editorial urging that the name ot
the Dundas Civic Centre lie changed. Miss Mary Moselev. last otf
the Moseley editors of this old newspaper, declared that the
Dundas name should be expunged from ever\ public place in tihe
colony.
The Tribune attacked this vicious editorial and .'li, more
was heard of the proposal
But as time passed, both white and coloured people lear ed to
appreciate the inti-portance of the Dundas civicc Centie. anmoing
them Mrs. Leslie Higgs. chairman of the committee that headed
the school. Mrs. Higgs is a remarkable woman.
By this time Sir Charles had died. He died while heing shared
in a barber's chair in England. When the news was announced in
Nassau one of the old line white political leaders commented that
he should have been dead long ago. Coloured people would be
surprised if I named this man. iThey seem to like him.
Lady Dundas finally went to an old folks nursing home.l Mrs
higgs, a liberal white woman who appreciated the worth of lthe
Dundases, arranged for the committee to bring her to Nassau so
that the people could thank her for the great contribution she
had made towards rhei develop-ment.
Everything was completed. The party was laid on and it was
to be a great occasion.
But too late. Iad\ l)uRdas died.
Boy. how mix i, h. i haec run away today. I read a heading
in a magazine that I picked ip in the airport in Miami last night
and I have sat down and wiinten columns of Bahamian hIistorv
that should be placed on record

When von look out oi. the mature and greedy black men
who are running the Bahama' 1oday one wsondeis hpow these meit
could stray so far fron tiie example of leadership given tie vorld
by men like Booker 1 2 -r and D,. (e gc iashlirgroi
Carver.
Even Prime \lmrici Pmidling recencrt admitCed Ithat peihap,
they had "nmiussed tmie boat somewhice on the ioad ,id


-'.ieng cdjiKi : ,ion p ii luni' P i iC 1 Bahamian people.
\I', b.e he is hC,, ii be ic ,I I' I ,.h c li.- i i i.[, i sll alter tihe fact
that ( d.sl' i p!a.n pi;o ide, iaI t h t.ir e sia lt ,f t the world's
pe,,le iC ill c amI a 'i h. b tire .'i.l .' t o the lli hands.
r' FIromi Slal ers TIo h'Al Ann.a: '' r.c Ifilor Fleming in
iS uiccnkA.
You \\ill be surprised whI en I sll \tis 1is moiroH w what she
X ro but
S1110 OGHT IOR lt) A\\Y
\o ace carn prosper until it le.urns thli there is as much dignity
in rli]j.; a field as in I Irw ing a poti.!. It is at the bottomti of life
thiit we mtIust begin. and not at the top.


BEAT


INFLATION!
Real estate investment is about the only way to
..beat inflation. It's good even in the sticks of
Alsaka. And, it's that much better in the towering
pines of ail A adry~, Andros.
Besides, San Andros is just 15 air-minutes from
home. You can enjoy San Andros recreational
lowfacilities while you wait for your property to
,- .increase in value. You won't have to wait long!
Z'You don't have to rob your bank account
S --.either. Just $45 down and $45 a month makes you
a San Andros investor with more than a quarter
... acre of the future. Let Eric Davis explain how you
can visit San Andros and decide.
VISIT

DAVSON REAL ESTATE
C'OM(PANY LIMITEDD
l"y & East Streets (upstairs). Phone 2-1178
San Andros (Bahamas) Limited


.. .:.5: .... ... ..... ..........
.... ... .......... ...........


.


ioi

* 000o


FORD LTD Brougnam 4-door hardtop


MUSTANG 3-door hatchback, 2-door hardtop,
luxurious new Ghia and the sporty Mach 1.


(Some Torinos


the


and Montegos have Brougham interiors)


F - -------


MORRISON


*INK- 2


I


0


For instance:


a


MERCURY MONTEGO MX
4-door pillared hardtop


I I I e


---~---------


-i-


r --


Q,1hr tributtrp






Wednesday, February 20, 1974


Quality... AsYou Like It Best
Quality Market. That's our name. And we take pride in our quality, in the products we sell you,
the way we serve you, the prices we charge. And when you've got quality like that going for you, you've just got to SAVE.
QUALITY MARKET. We sell Quality with a Capital Q.


0 LMBBREASTS49LB
d -'n nn u nt aln. .


THIS WEEK And The NEXT... ALL FOR YOU FROM LADY "Q".
WIN A FREE Quality PATIO SET First Prize
(On Display in Store)
Or Take Home Our Sfcond Prize
A GIFT CERTIFICATE Worth $70.00
All You Spend is $35.00 - Check With Your FRIENDLY
CASHIER COLLECT YOUR FREE TICKETS. Lucky Winners
will be Announced and Contacted on Saturday, March 2nd, at
8:00 P.M.
Offer Good Thursday, February 21st Thru Saturday, March 2nd., l
1974.


EARED


Xht Mribmw





,


r


S.ricultural ar It, S.i Andro.





i N..o%


Wh;e rittbun


HHH denies $50,000


12


EFFICIENT Nit
RIBBER L WRECI
& STAMP
SER VICE --RON[
&STAM,P^
PADS


WONG'S RUBBER SIAMP
BRADLEY & MADEiRA


FOR SALE
O p^ 'F o ; J,P established
SR[ T :',IL s"' ; -,% .*." i',, U y Strh o t


Enq!uiries: Seraic International Ltd.,
P. 0 Rox N 88.
"M : u



KENTUCKY
{ SPRINGS

HOTEL
Fowler Street South
ASK ABOUT OUR SPECIAL
DAILY ROOM RATE:
P '-'" $8.50, $10.50, $12.50

visit our intimate Dining & Cocktail Lounge
MEALS ARE HOME COOKED.
SER'V CE TO MAKE YOU WANT TO STAY
I.-T S i f S .'iPVAT YOU GIT
HOURS: 11 a.m. to 4 a.m.
iWWR1 i NN Mii- -- -


SEE THE TROJAN YAC'A T DISPLAY AT
THE '0'A,% INTERNATION"-AL BOAT SHO
FE BPUAPY 22ND 27iTH


Hughes' c
WASHINGTON -AP) Sen.
Ih r he t i t u r umphre.'
! -\luin.i has denied undei
,,.it that he persnamll
re cvd a S50.0U00 cash
,iI. I, friomll the Hosward


1i. ITROI A\ F-24 FISIIERNiA\ CR(IISFH
}{ I.- ;i hu r..i 1 [ 'i'tI liik sl W i' :i
-, Stil ii ,, .' ;1'.it r .tll ks i .i k
lii A ), F -wi 'i'i 't, ,('l m uiist
S t ih zfl l andi i fillH

Iir iim i:: woh tn, a s li' h i wei
( )U RI ) n- liopn uet!up avrat e
1-d, i" ih i I .,i ,rd i'10 a t1a!- nB, ltz n




YFAD-RD o FQIm _" 'IWs :

Exterior t, n: 'J'-;1 h IIlh


-iii ,l,
. . IiN I i :1


!A tt \ 1.\1 A \< I I S AI :I


I O.IAN A "A( Il t
A DIVISION OF "'.' '


Eat and Grow Younger


Longer, youthful life


is reward of planned diet

By LELORD KORDEL
Number Fourteen of a Series Commandmen
Your great desire is to live a long, useful life, all the
while looking and feeling far younger than your years. "PROrTv/N I/
Certainly this is a goal worth aiming at. But are you ,48,DANC
prepared to abide by the Commandments? Because ,
everything worth attaining has a price. And the price
of a long, youthf-l life is planned diet.


i


contribution
Hughes organization during the
19o8 presidential campaign.
lluniphrey made the denial
in a court-ordered deposition
Aken in his office T1uesda mn
which he replied to a series of
wrriten qulestions prepared h\
Stlorneys for IItIghCes dJll
Co'ss-qiluestions submtItted b\
la ecrs tor a former ilughe'
aide, Robert A. Maheu.
I le deposition will be
retired .'i, evidence i a d i!
irial scheduled to begin next
iweek in I-o's Anele .
Mahcu -said in sworn
testimony last summer that he
delivered S50.000 in cash troim
lfuglihCs to Humphrey while the
isMo men sat in a liTImousine in
troni t Oa los Angeles Hotel iI
the fall ot 19t%8. lHumphreC
was Vice President it the time.
Maheu has charged that
Iluehes libeled him diurmni a
07 t telephone ne, k on .
ference bs intLrrInI thai
Maheu had stolen 1n1,1c w\hilc
supern-ising tulihes hoCtel and
eaibling opcrat ins i I ias
Vegas. Nes.
In i a cotintcer-stsill. t utihe
e'nOlte tls Maheti ic iIapI'rOPri
ated some funds entrusted to
htii possibly including the
S50.000 he said he passed to
lumphrev.
FOR 3 in 1
LAWN SERVICE
FERTILIZE FUNGICIDE
PEST CONTROL
TROPICAL 2-2157


foods highest in iron content.
MINERAL SUPPLEMENT
As a safety measure, your doc-
tor will probably also prescribe
a mineral supplement contain-
ing organic iron to rebuild your
blood as quickly as possible.
As an added iron tonic which
you can prepare for yourself at
home, buy some unbleached ap-
ricots (usually found in health
food stores). If apricots can't
be had, the next best fruits are
dried peaches or raisins.
Put a handful of the fruit in a
glass, cover with lukewarm wa-
ter. stir, let stand overnight.
Next morning stir the mixture
again, drain off the water into
another glass, adding to it one
tablespoon of black molasses.
Prepare and drink this iron ton-
ic several times a week (the
fruit should also be eaten).
I have, of cour',e, been speak-
ing exclusively of simple, iron-
deficiency anemia which corn-
prises about 95 percent of all
anemia cases.
Next: More of the "command-
ments": Why vitamins are es-
sential elements to good health;
how they back-up proteins.


AMANDA BLAKE learns how to use an electric blender in
preparing many "eat and grow younger" recipes as advocated
by Lelord Kordel, with whom she is shown. Amanda is
"Kitty" in the TV production "GUNSMOKE."


Wednesday, February 20, 1974






*
BOXING-


BIRDLAND
MT. ROYAL & CAREW STREETS
FRIDAY 22nd. FEB.1974
DOORS OPEN 7:30 P.M.ACTION STARTS 8:30 P.M

**ALL-STAR BOXING **

RETURN OF

BOBBY LLOYD

MAIN EVENT

BOBBY LLOYD
Light heavyweight
your favourite boxing specialist
-- VS -
GEORGE HOLDEN
Heavvweight Fla. contender.

RANDY SCOTT -vs OTIS CLAY
Fought Sugar Ray Crowd Pleaser
last time out.

RANDY ARMSTRONG vs ROSCOE BELL
Fla popular speedster. Ready for this one.

JOE HILL vs MOHAMMED ROLLE
Ft. Lauderdale. Touqh -Rough.


"White Label A ND




WILL BE THERE!.. WILL YOU?


San Andros is a multi-million dollar development located on the largest island in tha Bahamas.


ANDROS.
Available for your enjoyment in our development, is a 24-Room Hotel, tennis courts, marina, deep sea fishing and beautiful Beach Club.
Ear marked for future development is a 18 hole golf course, club house, fully stocked quarter horse corral and lovely villas.

FOR A PRIME HOMESITE 10,000 SQUARE FEET (80 feet by 125 feet) S2995.*00


$50 down


$41 per month


(This offer good only for 10 days) ends Feb. 23rd.
FOR A COMPLIMENTARY TOUR, COME IN OR CALL US NOW 21238 or 24913.
WE'RE OPEN UNTIL 7:00 p.m. MON. FRI. UNTIL 2:00 p.m. SATURDAY


BERKLEY FERGUSON REAL ESTATE
BERWIN HOUSE FREDERICK STREET
PHONE: 24913 21238
NASSAU


At first, the careful and judi-
cious selection of youth-protect-
ing foods will be a novelty you'll
enjoy. But after that may come
the danger period when the nov-
elty provided by a new regimen
begins to wear off, and you are
tempted to lapse into the "oh,
it's too much trouble" kind of
defeatist thinking.
Yet I promise you that once
you have successfully weather-
ed this period of temptation to
return to the old haphazard way
of eating, you'll subconsciously
begin accepting, or rejecting,
each food on the basis of its
contribution to your youthful-
ness and long life, with the
same skill as that exercised by
a trained nutritionist. Instinc-
tively, you will avoid the old
"gooey" meals with which you
formerly insulted your body.
FOOD COMMANDMENTS
The food commandments I
shall lay down are those that
will afford you taste pleasures
and adventures in good eating
the like of which you have sel-
dom enjoyed before.
Let's take these six general
rules commandments I have
called them--one by one, in de-
tail, as they pertain to your goal
of attaining a long, youthful, en-
joyable life.
My first commandment is
high-y'Eade proteins in abun-
dance.
The protein story has been de-
,eloped rather fully for you in
the preceding chapters, so there
is no need to repeat at length
the fact that protein is essential
for feeding, repairing and re-
building your muscles, nerves,
tissues, glands and vital organs.
In case of illness or convales-
cence, protein is the rebuilder
of your health.
Life insurance companies have
an unsentimental, dollars-and-
cents interest in keeping you
well and alive for a long time.
For that reason they issue ser-
ies of pamphlets and booklets
loaded with sane advice on how
to avoid illness and early death.
I quote from one of the pam-
phlets directed at the 40-and-
over group:
"An ample, nutritious diet is


iNome


- A SAN ANDROS IS FOR L

-,--.... : and dowe love smart investors.


- WROUIOrCII*IWU~

.#


VERS,


III


I -.-i


i nnsat )i#II-I-


r I I r


A- l m.
.t,7.* , e~iA
li i "


I


"'I ( IICAF:IO S:


r _


) I


II


as important to adults as to
growing children. Learn to like
and to choose foods that are
good for you. Well-balanced
meals of vegetables, meats and
fresh fruits are health-building
meals. Ihe impression that peo-
ple in the older ages should
avoid eating meat is entirely er-
roneous. In fact, some diseases
are due to lack of protein which
is contained in such foods as
meat, fish, poultry, eggs and
cheese."
Let's see what nutritional sci-
ence has been doing to fight
these diseasee enemies of your
youth."
BLOOD DISORDERS
First, we'll take blood disor-
ders. One of the most common
of these in persons past 40 is
anemia. The paleness which has
come to be associated with
growing older is often nothing
except a visible symptom of nu-
tritional anemia. There's no rea-
son why a person shouldn't pos-
sess a healthy, glowing com-
plexion in later years, provided
his blood is rich with red color-
ing matter. But healthy blood
cannot be formed without pro-
tein any more than it can be
maintained without the minerals
iron and copper. You can't build
good red blood on tea and toast.
Anemia at any age cannot be
shrugged off as "not serious."
But in middle life anemia is an
ailment that can shorten your
years of useful, vigorous living.
If you suspect you may be
anemic, go at once to your doc-
tor or to a reliable laboratory
and have a blood count taken.
If a blood count reveals too
few red cells and a low per-
centage of hemoglobin (that is,
it is not red enough), then you
should act at once to restore
your blood to normal. How?
By immediately converting to
high-protein meals (those con-
taining lean meat, liver, kidney,
heart, dark meat of poultry,
eggs, cheese and low-fat milk
products. Eat generously of iron-
rich apricots, molasses, prunes,
raisins, whole grains, beets, par-
sley, radishes, citrus fruits and
pineapple, to mention but a few


ice.,

Nib-










Wednesday, February 20, 1974


Be first on your block with the
luxurious kitchen ease you didn't ex-
pect till 1999. Push-button cooking
that bakes a potato in 4 minutes. Does
a hamburger in 60 seconds. A well-
done 5-!b. roast in 371,/2 minutes. And
what's more, the food tastes better . .
is better... when it's cooked in the
Amana Radarange Microwave Oven.
Amana microwave cooking
means no more hot kitchen. No more


impatience over thawing frozen foods.
Easy after-dinner clean-ups. And no
grease film on your kitchen walls. The
oven is compact enough (223/4' wide,
15" high, and 17'/4" deep) to fit any-
place. Plugs into any 115-volt electri-
cal outlet. And cleans with a damp
cloth.
Cooking in the Amana Radarange
Microwave Oven is truly the cooking
of the future. Yours today. Why wait?


^Tlalltlm~ by a
SO MICROWAVE EOVEN


Taylor Industries Ltd.
P. 0. BOX N4806 TEL. 28941-5


13


26 dum-dums


gcidtare nhas 'oaindustries in poor
-I lhc corporation is part of a

*Matinee 3:00 & 5:00, Evening 8:30-Phone 2-1004, 2-10051


I
ENTER



HE CLOBBERS THE MOB AS

BLACK BELT
VO O \8 (I.\ Dh/:?13IVii L BE A PIl /TEI i
Reservatiofs not claimed by 8:15 will be sold
on first cone. first served basis.


Now thru Friday Now thru Friday
Matinee starts at 2:15 Continuous Showings
Evening 8:30 from 3:00
"NIGHT OF THE LEPUS"GEORGIA"PG
Stuart Whitman. PG GEORGIA,
Janet Leigh niana Sands, Dirk Benedict
PI US PLUS
"THEY ONLY KILL "KILL OR BE KILLED" PG.
THEIR MASTERS PG. Robert Marks,
'Phone 2-2534 Gordon Mitchell


NOVW SHOWING
Matinee Continuous from 1:45, Evening 8:30-
'Pnone 3-4666
BLACK GODFATHER IS BACK!
...and he s takin'r
over the town!


FRED WILUAMSON COLOR ..,,.... ] g I
Plus! "THE HUNTING PARTY" R n
l \o ()f. OXF \I)R 18 It'?LL BI. A Il/TTF'n


STARTS TONITE! *
AT 7 & 10:20

THUNDER KICK
(P.G.)
AND AT 8:44

iDEEtP ITHRUIST
(P.G.)
Parental Guidance
Suggested



BAHAMAS

DRAMA CIRCLE
Presents

'THE PROCE'
At


DUNDAS CIVIC CENTRE

Fri. 21 Thru.24
TIME: 8:30RM.
Tickets: $3.50 Reserved
$3.00 Unreserved
Call:22067
GOLD & SILVERSMITH
FOR RESERVATION


were


ignorant of R.S.V.P.!


By Abigail Van Buren
e 1974 by CicOWA TrInt-N. Y. News Synd., Inc.
DEAR ABBY: Every year my husband and I give a
large gala party. This year we mailed out 82 invitations.
They were marked, "R. S. V. P." with our phone number.
Our return address was on every envelope.
The day before the party we had only 48 responses!
I asked two of my friends to please help me phone those
from whom we had not heard to find out whether they were
coming.
Would you believe that 26 said, "Yes, we're coming, but
we didn't think we had to let you know unless we
COULDN'T make it." [Three in that group asked if they
could bring their houseguests-which totaled nine extra.]
Three couples declined, saying they had meant to let us
know, but just never got around to it. Five couldn't be
reached, so we assumed that they were out of town.
My husband was furious, and said: "Next year we're
not calling up anybody. If they don't respond but come
anyway, when they come to the door we'll just say, 'Sorry,
we weren't expecting you.'"
Abby, please print this, and tell people that R. S. V. P.
means, "Please let us know whether OR NOT you are
coming?" HAD IT IN PALM SPRINGS
DEAR HAD IT: Here's your letter. And If It's any
comfort to you, you have lots of company. People who
ignore R. S. V. P. invitations are either Ignorant or negli-
gent. And it's a toss-up as to which Is worse.
DEAR ABBY: My husband and I haven't lived together
for 14 years. He sleeps upstairs and I sleep downstairs. We
hardly speak.
Here's my question: If two people who aren't married
but have lived together as man and wife for seven years
are considered legally married, why wouldn't my husband
and I, who have NOT lived together as man and wife for 14
years, be considered legally divorced? STUMPED
DEAR STUMPED: Altho there are "common law mar-
riages," there are no common law divorces.
DEAR ABBY: I am writing about a relative of mine.
She has built a chapel in her home, and I mean, it's as big
as some churches have. She must have spent a fortune on
it. I want to know is this proper to do-religionwise? This
woman has a church to go to. She doesn't have to have a
church right in her own home.
Her chapel is like a cathedral. She even has a cross on
the roof! It looks to me like it is an insult to her own
church. I would appreciate your opinion, and I'd also like


to know how ministers feel about this.


WONDERING


DEAR WONDERING: A chapel is a place to pray,
right? So what's improper about building a place to pray in
one's home?
CONFIDENTIAL TO PORTLAND VIEWPOINT: I'm
with you. Anything that breeds jealousy, misunderstanding
and hostility between husband and wife should be done
away with. And the Company Christmas Party which ex-
cludes spouses heads the list!
CONFIDENTIAL FOR "YELLOW RIBBON": There is
no situation as hopeless as a single girl who has got it bad
for a married man who never had it so good.
Problems? You'll feel better if you get it off your chest.
For a personal reply, write to ABBY: Box No. 69700, L. A.,
Calif. 90069. Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope,
please.
Hate to write letters? Send $1 to Abigail Van Buren.
132 Lasky Dr., Beverly Hills, Cal. 90212, for Abby's booklet,
"How to Write Letters for All Occasions."

Over half of City Market

staff are now shareholders
133 FULL-TIME employees Providence and Abaco and the
of the 10 City Markets on New Winn-Dixie store at Freeport
have subscribed to an
additional issue of 45,000
shares of Bahamas
Supermarkets Limited, the
stores' operating company.
Announcement was made by
Gerald J. Fryers, executive
W vice-president and managing
director.
W Over 50c of the company's
S288 full-time employees are
OWE/ \ now shareholders, among 481
"/ fBahamian shareholders in all.
All employees subscribing to
the new issue-as shareholders
of record February 14, 1Q74
dividend payable February 28.
jW Employees subscribed at
$3.10 per share, substantially
W below the present open market
bid of $3.65. Purchase is by
payroll-deduction, financed
interest-free over a 2-year
period and sold at a discount
by W-D (Bahamas) Limited,
Bahamas Supermarkets
Limited's parent company.

W( "The purpose of this offer,
the second in three years," Mr.
Fryers said, "is to reward loyal
employees and to offer them a
S further opportunity to have a
'( financial interest in the
EO BR E business which employs them.
11 We also feel that maximum
ISTAlUSUMS 8 5 employee participation in the
ownership leads to better
service for our customers, and
P'PHONE 2-8421/2-3-4-5-6 that, after all, is our primary
aim."


ARRIVED TOdAY:
Olympia from Boston
ARRIVING TOMORROW:
Tropic Haven from West Palm
Beach
WEATHER ,
Wind: South-south-west to
westerly 10 to 25 m.p. h.
Weather: Partly cloudy to
cloudy with a chance of few
showers or isolated
thundershowers -
Temp: Min. tonight 65
Max. tomorrow 78 O.,
TIDES KL in F.r. Syn iat..


High 7:15 a.m. and 7:32
p.m.
Low 12:53 a.m. a",' 1:22
p.min.


"He'd never get started for the office if I didn't fix him
a vitamin-packed, quick-energy breakfast."


FANTASTIC SAVINGS

AT


FASHIONETTE LTD.

MON. FEB. 18 THRU SAT. FEB.23


Reg. Price SALE Price!

Polyester KNIT SLACKS $18.00 $21. 00 $10.00 $12.00

TIES $5.50 $3.50

Palm Beach SPORTS COATS 25% 50% off Reg. Price

SPORT SHIRTS '/ off Reg. Price

Palm Beach SUITS 25% 50% off Reg. Price


You Be The First To Get In On These

Fabulous Savings

AT


FASHIONETTE LTD.

NASSAU'S FINEST STORE FOR MEN
BAY STREET


Cook like

the 21st Century.Today.




In an 4mana Microwave Oven.


__ __ ._


SOpA


.. - -- -~~- -~~- --~ ---- ~~ --


Uhe rtbuni












hbe ri rirtb


Wednesday, February 20, 1974


SEAL ESTATE


Ii


WES T/ ,. > VLLAS
0 N D 0 M I N U L
APARTMENTS ton PARADISr-
SLAND
IAST BAY STREET
-EST BAY STREET
OTELS and HOTEL SITES.
EACH LOTS, COf'-I1ERC-
1AL LOTS, RESIDENTIAL
LOTS
AC R EAGE FOR
DEVELOPMENT IN THE
NASSAU AND FAMILY
ISLANDS SUCH AS GRAND
BAHAMA LONG ISLAND,
ELEUTHERA, ABACO.
45" ACRE CAY IN THE
EXUMAS WITH DEEP
WATER HARBOUR AND
MORE
CALL
DAVSON'S REAL
ESTATE AGENCY
Phoie 21178 or 80932 21178
P. O. Box N-4648
Nassau, Bahamas.


REAL ESTATE


C 13321
BUY A LOT
in EASTWOOD
or
WINTON MEADOWS
Call Frank Carey
at 27667 or 24815
Frank Carey
Real Estate
Box N4764
Bay & DPvP-wx Sts

C13559
4 BEDROOM, 2 bathroom
unfurnished house with carport
and sewing room. FOR SALE.
Call 31671 -- 31672 (9:00 a.m.
12:00; 2:00 p.m. 5:00
o.m. Weekdays).

C13561
HOUSE FOR SALE
Executive home with full
Central Air Conditioning and
large swimming pool. Located
on the hill top in Sans Souci.
and within 5 minutes drive of
St. Andrews School.

The house was constructed
four years ago on a large lot
and finished to the highest
standards and is now offered
for sale, fully furnished and in
immaculate condition
throughout. Tthe
accommodatror- comprises the
following:-
Four Bedrooms
Two and a half bathrooms,
Study
Living Room
Dining Room,
Family Room.
Fully equipped kitchen,
Laundry & Garage,


des large Mediterranean i om.n
extensive patio arid barbecue,
custom-built bar. surrounding
the kidney-shaped swimming
pool. All grounds completely
landscaped and fully enclosed.

Asking price $115,000 00
WoOld be i, '-. q to take
cheaper house in part exchange
if required. Telephone ow-ners
at 42194, any time

C 13609
CENTREVILLE 4 lots
(60,000 sq.ft ) inc i,
quality built bunding with
three units rentable. Ideal vor a
Church, Professional Building,
Offices, Apartments etc.
Valued $179,000 00. Owner
will sell for $150,000 00.
MARLBOROUGH STREET
WEST --opp. British Colonial.
three properties. One as low as
$100,000.00 other two
relatively cheap. Good location
for tourist trade, or
INVESTMENT. Invest in high
class properties to beat
inflation.
ARCADE BUILDING
OPPOSITE Malcolms on Bay
Street lowest price available
on main street. See anytime.
THREE LUrjT APARTMENT
BLDG. adjacent Racquet Club
Grounds 55 by 150. Income
$5000.00 yearly asking orniv
$27,500.00 With or without
terms.
DIAL NICK DAMIANOS, THE
ACTION REALTOR 22033,
22305, evenings 41197

C13376
DAVSON'S REAL ESTATE
CO LTD)
Certified R-al Estate Broker-
Phones 21178 55408
P. 0 Box N-4648
Nassau, Bahdamas
Proudly present
SMA _r-A -i'.. REAL

THROUGHOUT E-It
C l '." ." '.t A L T H
S3 and 4 BE- 0rcO i.
s1OUSES in the folcv."-l
areas
EASTERN ROAL
orn the water as wei .
o, the h6l-s
SAN SOUJ'C
BLAIR ESTATESF
GLENISTON GACE' .
WANTON
THE GROVE (w.5. na. )
SKYLINE Hr GHoS
NASSAU EAST
;SEA BREEZE
VILLAGE ROAD
GOLDEN GATES
'HIGHLAND PARK
PROSPECT RI' iDGE


C 13598
19' Philips T .V
A lot in Litttl
1968 BuIck S
airconditioned,
power steer imn
and tape deck
I Wooden desk
1964 Morris
2-2386 8
night.

C13611
14 Lots 50 x 1
lot. Situate Sot
vicinity of
residence. Co
Enterprises, 2-4

C 13603
ONE 18 lb.
Washing Mac
Condition. $
5-8512.


C 13604
LOT 118' x 1
HEIGHTS,
enclosed with
trees, $18,0
548512.
C 13470
2 BEDROOM
furnished housi
Retirement Ro
p.m. 74155.

C13579
DELIGHTFUL
residence with
of town, harb
Three bed
bathrooms.
separate 'i .1. .j
room, kitchen
two-car gara
swimming pool
Fully aircon
ceiling fans. Hc
of walled-i
grounds. $160

Attractive W,
four-bedroom.
residence with
rand patio area
sepa rate br
laundry, garage
130', landsca
furnished.

Three exceptic
commercial lot
150 feet each
Collins Avenue,
East rind
I rr ently
piotessional o
a pa r t mrents.
residence, heavy
with patios
adjacent lot
studio-type al
suitable for off
application.

H. G. CHRI
Phone 2:

FOR
C13580
FLP )N
apartment.
airconditioned
phone, water
Call 22698.

C13497
2 one bedroom
apartments
District Ring
Pritchard.

C13538
COTTAGES a
monthly -
ful;y furnished
available. Love
swimming po
31297, 31093.

C13555
EASTERN ROC
One bedroom
iong living roc
pool and oci

'd-ni antennaa
4 2387

C 1300
BASIC CALL Y
bedro ,i -
,v.,q ,ri d
%' K;rlt Ose Ave'
S7- ad 2

B lALI V

S. .ed) 1
I. '.: & din,ir
Mk Mo


1. P'.-
2 j


-. BED BE--
dpa+ t;"io .t Su





2 CLI TTAe


da.,'1"2+ or 441;

-1)58 7
2 BED ..... ,
ia.t St eet c








)a
G adrt
MO)f RNIS1
& PE T'


868


Set
Blal
.ylar k,

power

anid ch.
1100.
to five



lO at $3
uth Beac
A. D
ntact
1068.


AUTi
hine ii
100.00,


r


55' MO
Corr
h bear i
)00.00


MS,
e, closer
oad Cali



hilto
spectaci
)our anr
rooms,
living
'-,orn, b
n, laund
age.
and pa
ditionec
)use on
n lan
,000 fL

estwar d
two -ba
swim ni
L ,
eakfast
e. Lut
ped.


anal!y (
As 100
(C. 'y ..
Fourth
East
suitable
f f ice
Spl
ilv cons
un ac
i clue ii
pahtmc"



STIE, L
1041

RENT

one I
WW
$240
anrd ei


full fi
Ce
5-867


u-4 apa
aircond
maid
ly gaid
ol. Te




apartme
-m over
:e ri. ta
airond
Cali md



furrn sh


lue Te
3865.

f r rtisi
bedrock
bath,
] afred,

722 -



ROOM
table t
FPoyai
rs Ca


c all


238 mgh


apart
South
Avenue



iALE


.r garden
Aic Bul
n I a

'IC GA
SUPPt \


MARINE SUPPLIES


h ~- --- .


February 27, 1974.


WANTED
C13619
PIANO in good condition
Telephone 2 3252 Mrs.
Johnson.

C13616
GOOD used daybed that can
be folded into davenport for
daybed use Call Telephone
36925,

HELP INTED
C13558
WANTED, Male Bahamian
labourer/combination yardman
and janitor, to keep four or
five acres of grounds and serve
as janitor of large building, 5
days per week.
Please write Box N8154, listing
previous experience and
references.


HELP WANTED


CARS FOR SALE
C13585
iNTAGU 1973 L;'i r.l IN, like new,
ipletely very low mileage (all 5-4641.
ng fruit
Phone C13379
BLACK CHEVROLEI
CAPRICF in excellent
condition. L. J. Knowles. Tel:
1 bath 58134.
d yard in
I after 7 C 13606
1968 M.G.B.T good
1- 0-i,,-. Price $950. Tel.
36534 ask for Tonyv
)p city
.lar view C13569
d ocean. 1971 MUSTANG Fastback,
three mustard exterior, ginger
room, interior. V8 302 V2 engine,
breakfast 24,000 miles. Black rally
dry and stripes, rally mirrors. F Air
Secluded Auto trans. AM radio, se.tI
tio area. belts, new tyres. $41,300 Pho. e
I; also
half acre
rdscaped C13624
finished. 1970 FORD 4 door like
new. Nassau Florist
Villas telephone 2-4223.
athroour' c
n p 73 VOLKSWAGFN 1300
S-dan Excellent cordifio n.
9 radio, white wall tyv.s lo
$68,000 mileage, licensed for '74 o '75
Call 3 66s 11 4

desirabli C 13591
feet by New Providence Leasing
on Limited have the following
T e on *ised cars for sale. Our deposits
Ti'lae have been slashed right back
e -I and you will note that all our
u sales prices re very keen ...
it level On the spot financing and
itr lted. insurance while you wait Lot
t cted located opposite Super Wash.
OCitiona Gibbs Corner, Nassau You are
tsg two invited to come and check our
iP-c Ai selection:

1971 PONTIAC VENTURA -
Green Licence No. N985 Price
TD $2,500.00 down-payment
4 $650.00
1973 HILLMAN HUNTER
Automatic Blue Licence No.
2 NP.W. 453 Price $2,850.00
down-payment $700.00
edroor 1970 CHEV. MALIBU -
carpet, Green Licence No. NP.C. 967
includes Price $2,450.00 down-payment
ectricity. $600.00

1970 CHEV. TRUCK
White Licence No. T. 6468
Uirn'shed Price $2,600.00 down-payment
nltrvdli $600.00
79 Don
1972 FORD CAPRI Red &
Black Licence No. NP.W 574
Priee $2,650.00 down-payment
irtment $600.00
itioned, 1969 FORD TORINO --
se vice Green, Licencp No. 6252 Price
len and $1,350.00 down-payment
lephone $yo.oo

1970 CHEV. MALIBU -
Green Licence No. NP.S. 918
Price $2,600.00 down-payment
rnt, 21' $600.00
looking
stefully 1969 BUICK SKYLARK -
itioned, Red & Black Licence No. N
iornings 7758 Price
down-payment $600.00
1970 Pt MOUTH
BARRACUDA Green &
hed 1 Black Licence No. NP.R. 774
kitchcl. Price $2,700.00 down-payment
ar.,'. $650.00
lephonr 1972 PLYMOUTH DUSTER -
Green & Black Licence No.
NP.N 535 Price $4,500.00
hed 2 down-payment $900.00
om air 1970 RAMELER HORNET
kitchen,, Yellow & Black Licence No.
washing NP.F. 938 Price $1,850.00
Avriuie doeen-payment $500.00
15 9a- 0 1970 OLDSMOBILE
CUTLASS White Licence
No. N 2716 Price $2,700.00
upstairs down-payment $700.00
or large 1970 PLYMOUTH VALIANT
Avenul, Yellow Licence No. NP.Z.
II Mi. 475 Price $2,800.00
down-payment $700.00
1970 PLYMOUTH DUSTER -
Dfea" White & Black Licence No.
ed For NP.A. 726 Price $2,600.00
2-4656 down-payment $600.00
its. 1972 TOYOTA CORONA-
Red Licence No. NP. T. 806
Price $2,550.00 down-payment
ment $600.00
Phonst 1969 TOYOTA CORONA-
Tan Licence No. 7630 Price
$1,750.00 down-payment
$600.00
S 1969 BUICK SKYLARK
Tan Price $2,450.00
down-payment $600.00
rs 1971 AUSTIN GT Automatic


head our Health Insurance
Department. The applicant
must have knowledge of
individual and group health
schemes and be of managerial
material.
Apply in own handwriting to:
P 0. Box E. S. 6236, Nassau.

TRADE SERVICES
C13607
LANDSCAPING and for all
your gardening needs,
trimming, hedging, pruning,
tree felling and beach cleaning
call 57810. LAWNS AND
HEDGES. Prompt -
reasonable and efficient
service.
C13498 1
FOR your building needs and
CRANE hire see:
ISLAND BUILDERS
LIMITED P. 0. dcx
N-4559 Phone 31671 31672


CLASSIFIED ADVS. BRING RESL
TO PLACE YOUR ADV. TELEPHONE


I TRADE SERVICES


C13391

finder Cr; uomV

?rolfk,, c Ltid.
Mackey Street
& Roosevelt Avenue
NASSAU. BAHAMAS
P. 0. BOX N3714
IATA CARGO AGENTS
CUSTOMS CLEARANCE
& DELIVERY
MOVING, STORAGE
& PACKING
STEEL BANDING
& SHIPPING
HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING
FORK LIFT RENTAL
MECHANICAL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
SPECIAL QUOTATIONS
EXCELLENT SERVICE-
REASONABLE RATES
CONTACT LYMAN PINDER
OR JACK CASH


MARINE SUPPLIES I


C13443
SEWING MACHINE
PARTS AND REPAIRS
Island Furniture Co.
P. 0. Box N-4818,
NassauDowdeswell and
Christie Streets
Telephone 21197, 23152




GRAND B







HELP WANTED
C6704
Executive Tailor Shop requires
3 PANTS MAKERS, 1
DRESSMAKER and 1 COAT
MAKER. Must be able to do


CLASSIFIED


C13381
PACEMAKER 44 ft.
Luxurious Cruising yacht
Phone 3-2371.

C 11894
1969 31 ft. CHRIS CRAFT
Commander. Sleeps six, private-
shower, two 230 h.p. engines
with less than 200 hours.
kitchenette, good condition
Call 24267, 54011.


PETS FOR SALE
C13610
DACHSHUND Puppy male,
10 weeks old, both parents
A.K.C. registered. Phone
4-1485.

DINING GUIDE

C13613
ORDER YOUR TURTLE PIES
AND NATIVE DESSERTS
FLO MAJOR
TELEPHONE 3- 1119
C13629















Manager
Friendly Big "Al Collie"
Hostess Ms Penny Kemp
THE BRIDGE INN
NOW SERVING LUNCH
Open 11:00 a.m. 5.00 p.m.
FREE PARKING
C 13620
SETTLERS PUB & INN
Beaumont Arcade, Bay Street
Tomorrow's Special
SPLIT PEA SOUP
WITH SALT BEEF
STEAM TURTLE


SNMEMORIAM
C13628















IN loving memory of Bro. Isiah
Minns who departed this life
19th February 1973.
Twilight and evening bell
And after that the dark;
And may there be no sadness
of farewell,
Where I embark.
Foi though from out our
bound of time and place
The flood may bear me far
I hope to see my pilot face to
face
When I have crossed the bar.
Sadly missed by: Wife, Mrs.
Gertrude Minns; seven
daughters; two sons;
thirty four grandchildren; one
great granddaughter a host of
relatives and friends.

SCHOOLS
C13386
LEWIS AUTO SCHOOL
Learn to drive with confidence.
Phone 59805 between 7 andi
8:30 a.m. or after 6 p.m. or
35084 anytime.

C 13626
Aquinas College has scheduled
Saturday. March 2, 1974, at
8:30 a m. in Garfunkel
Audtor um, for the entrance
examirrtron for students
desiring to attend Aquinas in
September 19/4
Thec d,n limited places for
new studerts
20i' Grade 8
60 in Grade 10
25 rn Grade 11
Applications nray be obtained
at Aquinas on Monday through
Friday from 9:00 a m. to 5:00
p.m The DEADLINE for
completed application forms is


_ I I~__


I


I


_ C _t~


SECTION


21986 EXT. 5









SUshed aIlY
SotiY to SatU






AHAMA



IFIED



HELP WANTED
C6702
AUTOMOBILE BODY
REPAIRMAN at least 5
years experience, own tools.
tbbhhs Auto RBox F-792


C13597
GOLDSMITH Mold Caster and
Jewellery designer. 10 years
experience required. Phone
55441 Ext. 7015 Bahamian
only apply.
C13586
Experienced sales persons to
sell home appliances, working
full or part-time. Good
commission paid. Call 3-4351
or write P. 0. Box N-9012.
C13446
SPORTSFISHERMAN boat
captain. Must have 5 years
experience with diesel engines.
Permanent position. Give full
information: Worldoil, P. 0.
Box N7776, Nassau.
C13560
ASSISTANT CORPORATE
SECRETARY required to
assist the Secretary in
coordination of all corporate
secretarial functions of an
important multinational group
of banking and trust companies
under a Luxembourg holding
company with subsidiaries in
the Caribbean and Europe.
Successful applicant can expect
position to lead to that of
Group Secretary in due course,
when a considerable amount of
travel will be required to
attend meetings of various
Boards held in different
locations around the world.
Duties will include
coordination of planning of all
meet ings, recording of
corporate decisions,
maintenance of all corporate
records, filing necessary returns
with authorities in various
jurisdictions, and other usual
and similar Secretarial duties.
Position requires a thorough
working knowledge of
company law applying to
Banks, trust corporations and
financial service companies in
both British Common Law and
civil code jurisdictions.
Previous experience of
international banking and trust
company operations essential.
A legal qualification, A.C.I.S.
or equivalent required, and a
good knowledge of French
would be desirable. Age: 28 -
35. Salary negotiable,
depending upon age,
qualifications and experience.
B e n e f i t s include
non-contributory group life
and travel accident insurance,
medical insurance and pension
plan. Qualified candidates
invited to submit written
resumes of educational
background, qualifications and
experience to World Banking
Corporation Limited, P. 0.
Box N-100, Nassau.
C13595
REQUIRED urgently, full time
real estate salesman. Applicant
should have at least five years
experience in land and
constructed property sales and
should be fully experienced in
closing and contract
preparation. Successful
candidate will be considered
for promotion to the post of
senior salesman and knowledge
of land registration and staff
training will be an advantage.
Please write P. 0. Box N-3229,
Nassau, with full resume.
Many thanks for your kind and
prompt attention.
C13618
SALESMAN required in
nursery. Must ha., full
knowledge of all tropical
plants. Apply in person
Modernistic Garden & Pet
Supply, Madeira Shopping
Centre.
C13612
1FARMER. Contact Atchruel
Simmons, Malcolm Allotment
near Claridge Enterprises.
1 FARMER. Contact Milton
Martin, Winder's Terrace near
Soldier Road.
C13625
WELL Established Firm invites
applications for the services of
an Assistant Accountant.
Applicant must have
experience in all aspects of
Book-keeping and Accounting
to at least Trial Balance. Salary
in accordance with experience
and qualifications. Apply in
writing only, stating full
particulars of experience and
qualifications and giving two
references to:
"Assistant Accountant" P. 0.
Box N-8170 Nassau, Bahamas.
C13615
THE HOME INSURANCE
COMPANY seeks applicants to


-- --- -- -r


_~ _ __


P H O N E : 2 3 7 9 5 2 -3 7 9 6/ . .. .. . ., . .
2-379 7, 2-3798 neat jobs. Freeport.
Airport 7-7434 For interview inquire in

FREE ESTIMATES person, 2 doors West of Deluxe C6t89
Laundry in Eight Mile Rock.
C13390 See Gibson. GARDENER: Previous
TV. ANTENNAS C13601experience necessary. All
Boosters for hoes1360 duties related to Nursery work
Boosters for homes THE ROYAL BANK OF and outside maintenance. Must
SaparESnts ad hotel CANADA, FREEPORT, Grand be willing to do heavy manu.a
SALES AND SERVICES Bahanma requires an labour, grave digging, etc.,
WORCall 5OR MUS940IC Officer-in-Charge of Current Work outdoors in all kinds of
WORLD OR MUSIC, Accounts Department. weather. Also must possess
Mackey Street Applicants must be familiar valid driver's licence.
next to Frank's Place. with the operation of a Current Apply: Lucaya Nursery &
Account Department and Landscaping, Forest Ave., &
C13503 should be able to work under a Yellow Pine St., P. O. Box
DECALS, Bumper Stickers, computerized system, as the F-252, Freeport. Grand
posters, quantity signs, officer will be responsible for Bahama.
quantity printing on plastic the preparation of rnon
work, metal paper, fabrics etc. h i o
ARAWAK ART. Phon financial input under the Royal
2-309, Monose Avenue. Banks' computer operation 6706
2-3 709, Montrose Avrue. Responsible for the accuracy A
C13573 and completeness of records as CCOUNTANT with
WINDOW & DOOR well as inter-department work managerial office experience
SPECIALISTS flow. Bahamians only. Apply required. Must be able to
We repair all types of in writing to Mr. N. G. Miller, operate bookkeeping machine
aluminum windows, sliding Assistant/Administration, P.O. and calculator. Type own
glass doors, all types of screens Box F61, Freeport, Grand business letters prepare
awning windows, Jalousie Bahama, or call for an monthly analyzed statements
windows, anci doors, Phone appointment a telephone closinedof books, alshave

procedures. Experience with
U S and Canadian
manufacturing and banking
procedures.
C, o Contact: Anglo-American
SElectrical Co., Ltd., P. 0. Box
SF-2504, Freeport, G.B.I.
BUSINESS 6 PROFESSIONAL ---o

STOREKEEPER
DIRECTORY Bahama Cement Company
requires a Storekeeper. The
successful applicant must have
Save Time a good education, supervisory
experience and be 30-35 years
Sof age. Experience in industrial
storekeeping preferred, but we
S .''. *will train successful applicant

with good educational
background.
SInterested persons apply in
Writing to: Personnel
ti l D1 IX 5 Department, Bahama Cement
b Is h it 3hit i C 21#0 [Al. 5 Company P. 0. Box F-100.
LIN rM tn 2 LIN PI LI Freeport, Grand Bahama. or in
1ElIOIE inuuuperson,

> SAVE IME SAVE MONEY THE ROYAL BANK OF
CANADA, FREEPORT, Grand
ANTENNFAS HOUSE PLANS Bahama requires the services of
Island Tv 2-2618 EvangelosG. Zervos 2-2633 an experienced stemographer.
Applicants should have at least
AUTOMOTIVE LAUNDRY G.C.E. in English language and
Lucas Batteries DRY CLEANING be a high school graduate.
BaySreet Grg 2.2434 Shorthand speed of 100 w.p.m.
Bay Street Garage 2-2434 New Oriental Laundry and typing speed of 80 w.p.m.
BODY BUILDING 2-4406 Bahamians only. Apply in
Wong's Barbell Club LOCKSMITH writing to N.G. Millar,
5-456Assistant Manager/Adminis
5-4506 .. Bahamas Lock & Key tration, P. 0. Box F61,
BOOKSTORE 2-4591 ext.C147 Freeport, Girand Bahama or
The Christian Book Shnp call for an appointment at
5-8744 MEN'S & BOY'S WEAR telephone 352 6631.
BUILDERS The Wardobe 5-5599 C6703
Richard's Construction 5-7080 MEN'S WEAR "BUSINESS IS TERRIFIC"
BUSINESS FORMS Fashionette Ltd. 2-2376/7 iWf are In easf Gr
xecuPrinters 24267/5-4011musicOpportunity for permanent
Printers 24267/5401 MUSIC resident of the Bahamas

CAMERAS Cody's Records 2-8500 Excellent benefits all the year
round.
John R-ll 2-a252/3 OPTICIANS POSITIONS AVAILABLE:

CARPETS Optical Service Ltd. 2-3910/1 Sou veChef
Lee's Caroet Craft 3-1993 PRINTING Cook's Helpers
DRAPERIES Room Service Captain
S DRAPER IES Wong's Printinq 5.4506 Storeroom Supervisor
Lee's Carpet Crift 3-1993 Coffee Shop Manager (Nights)
_________________ Executive Lounge Manager
DRUGS & Printers 2-4267/5-4011 For all of the above please
PRESCRIPTIONS RADIO TVSALE report in person to Holiday
PRESCRIPTION RADIO & T.V. SALES Inn. Freeport, Food &
McCartney's 5-6068/5-2127 Inn,-Fre-port--Food &
McENTERTAINMENT5-2127 Carter's Records 2-4711 Beverage Office between 9 a.m.
ENTERTANMENT C and 11 a.m., and 2 p.m. and 4
Movies RUBBER STAMPS p.m. daily except Sundayv
Film & Equip. Service 2-2157 Wong's Rubber Stamp -
GARDEN & PET Co. 5-4506
SUPPLIES SPORTS GOODS
Modernistic Garden Champion Sport Land 2.1862
& Pet____ 68 TRAVEL nhe-ribunr!
Nassau Garden & Pet Playtours 2-2931/7 ,, ,1 4
Montrose Avenue ?-4259 R.H.Curry & Co.. ..
HARDWARE _2-8681/7 \' k .
JohnS. George 2-8421/6 TRUCKING SERVICE "
WRECKER SERVICE -GonaI Truc7ng
s Wrecker WATER CONDITIONING 1

2-8896 Bah. Water Refining ,4 5i- '
3-4351 'r '"
Miracle Water nQ
WINDOW/DOOR REPAIRS 3-4351 a
Window & Door Specialists 5-4460 Na&ssaU ,l

FOR TiE ACTIOIIN VO WIT Bahama


S .J Islands
mmmmmm imaimm iim
Shop Nassau Merchants j Leading

For Business And Services Newspaper


L-


~


|_ li I


go


rA- I ,


III


_j


I


I


I


Price $1,650.00 down-payment
$500.00
RDEN PLEASE COME AND LOOK
MANY MORE OF THESE

I LOST

C13617
LARGE Black Gray Dog
2 door, answers to the name of
Smokey. Red Collar Tag No
Brakes 2068. Reward Telephone
3.1432
sir
Phone
3h202 MARINE SUPPLIES
SC13507
ATTRACTIVI, custom built
.500 per houseboat, protect condition
ch in the luxuriously fu rnished and
Hanna equipped. Washer, dryet,
Whylly's dishwasher, deep freeze, fr idge.
television, air conditioned, and
many e electrical extras.
Completely screened lounge
with 18ft. ceiling. Cocktail bar
OMATIC with ice machine. Immediate
n Good possession. $24,000. Wrte
Phone "Houseboat", P. 0. Box
N1648, Nassau


~


(













Wednesday, February 20, 1974


[ King Featura 3yndieate, Inc.. 1974. World ria, n rt s 2-2
"I don't want it to appear that I'm going in there
looking for a fight. Keep this until I'm ready to use it."


'1ID Y HEAR THAT, GEORE? DENNIS GEiS MY
60WANA CAK9 ff STARS*


"Slip me a frozen snowball, Martha."


CROSSWORD

PUZZLE
ACROSS


1. Bursa
4. Theater sign
7. Mischief
11. Grape
12. Large cask
13. Curved
molding
14. Order
16. Straight
17. Delve
18. American
Beauties
19. Aplomb
21. Melody
22. Herring
23. Tract


27. Determine
29. Foster
30. Meadow barley
31. Blockade
32 Coarse
35 Slime
36 Turkey buzzard
37 Moscow citadel
41. Placard SO
42. Distress
43. Miss
LeGallienne
44. Dill
45. Sun
46. Unbranched
antler


OA AP DA S
ADD LAX E EE
SIN ICELS



1. E ~ITICBHUNDp
D ilopBE 14 o




LUTION OF YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE
DOWN


1. Count
2. Topaz
hummingbird
3. Bonbons
4. Theater


5. Wheel track
6. Sole
7. Reward
8. Long time
9. Female
defendants
10. New York
baseball team
15. Harsh
18. Fictional
sleeper
19. Normal
20. Bravo
21. Hatchet
23. Dusk
24. Heckled
25. Settle
26. Prior to
28. Fib
31. Scent
32. Spanish house
33. Spoil
34. Impel
37. Dutch
cupboard
38. Kind of coffee
39. Herb eve
40. Shrew


CARROLL RIGHTER'S

'HOROSCOPE
from the Carroll Righter Institute
^.GENERAL TENDENCIES: Unexpected
developments could occur today. It would be
wise to adopt a conservative attitude and try not to force any
issues. Make sure you have everything in perfect operative
condition. Use special care with electricity.
ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr. 19) Don't expect friends to be
concerned about your affairs, since they are too busy with
their own right now. Work at favorite hobby.
TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) It is wise to keep at regular
routines today since it's not a good day for seeking success in
the outside world Relax tonight
GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Not a good day to engage in
new outlets so don't be tempted. Showing more devotion to
kin at this time can bring fine results. Be wise.
MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Make sure you
meet your obligations instead of running away from them. Do
your utmost to improve relationship with loved one.
LEO (July 22 to Aug 21) Although tempted to make
changes, it is best to carry through with arrangements you
have already made with others. Show you have poise.
VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept 22) Be sure you study all facets
of a new plan you have in mind before putting it in operation.
You've been under a strain lately, so relax,
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) You want to have a good time,
but the aspects are better for working now. Evening is fine for
inexpensive pleasure. Use care in motion.
SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov. 21) You have to maintain poise
at home if you want to avoid an argument. Sidestep any
controversial subjects. Show devotion to mate
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec 21) Being careful in
motion could stave off an accident that would be costly now.
Avoid creating problems by being overly hasty
CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan. 20) Don't think you can buy
your way into or out of anything now or you could get into
trouble Caution must be exercised today
AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Take care you don't lose
your temper with anyone today or you could regret it later.
Take steps to improve your appearance
PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar 20) You have much work ahead so
schedule your activities wisely and accomplish a great deal
Later you can be of assistance to others.
IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY he or she will be a
natural-born problem solver. Courses in psychology and allied
subjects will pave the way for a successful life, which is
destined to be long and interesting Give ethical training early
in life. Sports are a must here.
"The Stars impel, they do not compel." What you make of
your life is largely up to YOU!


Winning

Bridge
by VICTOR MOLLO
Four nesses waro out of
four exclaimed 7e ro'etso
"lncni"' agreed te Senior
Kibitzer, "-but as 3nu didn't
need any of tiem, why ? "
Dea .er Souti: Bth Vu, .
North
4 K J 4
SJ 10 9 8 2
0 A J
Q94
West East
S108332 2975
99872 OQ1054
A 8 2 A K 10 7 6




nothing to try hte 4J, ,ut 0
A 8
SA Q 7 5 4

South I North
West led tie 4+2. Itst t

of #tie four finest failed.
Ironing to the K, We Pro-
lessor tuok 'the trunip finese.
bult that. too. lost and a diafnond
came back. Seizing on a chance
to nothing t. 0.e Prafesur in-
serted the QJ. onay to see East
cover wi. the 0C
TIe one remnanig tpe of
avoiding thee olub uoeers was
to find West with tihe O and
fesor gavew up in dsguat
"Witnmat an oiluc- 3-to
p break said seveety
"tte corat l suireskable
and all your fAinesses are iTree-
van.
"You lay down the VA and
continue with t -e +K and a
spade iruf. then ohe OA, the
OK and a diamond ruff. Now
you exit with a tuman. Wlidh-
ever defender has the VK must
open rje lu3s or present
you with a ruff and darscd.'


SI



I 1 I



- - -



No. 7.35533 by TIM McKAY
Across
L. Continental cake? (5, 4)
7. For catching antnials. (4)
to. Simple (4. 2, .3)
13. Mature. (4)
14. (Go-getters. (9)
15. Rubbing mark. (4)
16. It provides ea erveie for
travellers. (5)
18. Requtiring things. (2. 4)


Chess
By LEONARD BARDW4


CERTAINLY YOU KNOW, I SHOULD CONFIRM THE SERGEANT WANTS TO TALK
SERGEANT! SHE WASN'T HERE WHEN THE TO YOU, EVELYN.---.ANP I THINK
I'M SORRY MR. LESTER I'LL GET HER' ACCIDENT HAPPENED, THINGS YOU SHOULD BE VERY DISCREET
--- UT IT ALMOST FORGOT! LIKE THAT! IN WHAT YOU TELL HIMu
I SHOULD ASK YOUR URE,H

QUESTIONS OR THE CALL DO YOU
CAPTAIN WILL ;EVELYN MA

MY REPORT'S
NOT THOROUGH...






I STEVE ROPER & MIKE NOMAD by saunders & overgard|


WH 7ON POICE 1 T ARGUE, VIC! I MUST D-B'B'ODY ON OUR HANDS/ NO/- )W

,KA/KTREN$ AND I COME IN!

24-0NOV
111 1111Lft 0mi I;1


Tal v. Hartdton, Hastings 1974.
As in yesterday's postalon. Tal
(White, to move) is 'ioed for
a deistive attack on the king.
Can you work out the winning
line he spotted in the diagram?
The first move is easy for experi-
enced solvers, but for full credit
you adso need the winning play
against Back's best defence.
Par times: 20 soondsM. chess
master: 1 minute., chess expert:
3 minutes, county player: 6
minutes. club standard: 10
minutes, average); 20 minutes.
nnwiee.

Chess Solution
I RxPI RxR fi ...KxR:
2 BxP ch. K-KtI: 3 Q-R7
mate): 2 BxP. Kt-B5I (if the
rook moves, then 3 Q-R7 ch
and 4 Q-R8 mates); 3 BxR ch.
KxB; 4 Q--R7 ch, K-K1 (if
4 . K-B1; 5 Q-R8 ch and
6 Q x Q wins on material, while
if 4 . Kt-Kt2: 5 R-B1 ch
wins); 5 QxP ch. K-BI; 6 Q-
R8 ch wins.


21. It often goes Iit the drinks
r2. ,em. (6)
3. looks at. (4)
24. American t (ivil War
general. 3)


DOWN
I. Sauternes. i,,r instance.
(5. 4)
SAnger. (4,
3. A matter of policy. (9)
4. Declare. 3a
5. It lights al) the liattle-
ground. E 1.l
6. lumber. (3. 6)
1. Hunter (A)
ii. P o e.'a
I. Jetty (4)


17. oauh
return.
(4)
19. Archale
n e so
tiv e.
to. F e nmjule
a rab bit. _I i .n
I ) y leserdal' ilitdon


Rupert and the Jolly Holly-17


The door is made fast from the outside and
Rupert is left alone in the dreary room. He
tries the windows, but they are heavily barred
and he realizes there is no cape. "Oh
dear, Mummy and Daddy will be so worried
If I'm not home soon." he sighs. "They
.won't know where to look for me. I shall
have to tay here all night Oo*oh, what's


th
w,
-l


0


c,










2U
w


Q
I-
U,
2

2


T A R E T- M ".- -

R G tour letters
R or more Can
fN I1 463e
letters lhown
here? In
making a
gword. each
eI I tter mna y
the used once
only. Each
wurd must contain the large
tether, and tlhe nmust be a -
letast oi atsileas oreid tIn Ibe
WO amj 2SA T'
ez m gcem i .
ele e e gil i fe 5f1Zi
Kim touw oan ,
011 ;;Nmp2sm to


ROFICE !H.URJ


I


that ?" He catches his breath as a slab of
the earthen floor rises like a trapdoor. While
he watches, a tiny man climbs from the hole,
carrying a sweep's brush. Why. you're
another Gomnie I cries Rupert. Have you
come to rescue me ? "
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


5/w Comi pae




REX MORGAN, M.D. By DAL CURTIS

FRANK COM5TACK /I I'VE GOT TO YLET ME CALL THE HOSPITAL THATS IGeT/ I WANTTO MAKE
HE WAS NOTIFIED O TO HIM //IN PARKERSVILLE / IF A PERSON-TO-PERSON CALL TO THE
LET'S GO IN HERE SY THE STATE HE'S IN CONDITION TO BE A NSTRATO OTHER iPARKERS-
WHERE WE CAN MAKE POLICE/ STAN MOVEP, WE'LL. HAVE HIM sVILLE COMMUNITYV-
SOME PHONE CALLS/ WAS DRIVINGHIS BROUGUT 4ERE FY HOSPI TAL/'
W14 CALLED YOU ;? AMBULANCE












JUDGE PARKER By PAUL NICHOLSjII
I IT'S WITH SORRY I ushED vYOU I'LL CONSIDER THAT WIE I WONDER
I HAVE TICKETS FOR YOU, YES, THROUGH LUNCH! WE'LL A COMMITMENT, WHY 6AM WANTS THIS PILE?
THE CONCERT TOMORROw MA'AM! HAVE A LEISURELY MR. DRNER! WAKEMAN 16 SERVING A
NIGHT! WANT TO 30? SUPPER TOMORROW! TEN-YEAR SENTENCE IN













APARTMENT 3-G By Alex Kotzky


'a





~1
I. a,
-t
..v.
I.






I.


*r
si


Whr artinm












February 20, 1974


.
















St. Augustine's College all-rounder
senior girls games.


SLaural Lightbourn closely guards St. John's


Winsome Davidson during yesterday's
Pi ttures I 'IYC9'.T A.4 t;H 4\


It's so easy for SAC


A WELL-COACHED St
Augustine's College senior
girls ripped through St.
John's 49-20 vesterdav and
stand ready for Government
High tomorrow in the final
game of regular play in the
inter-scholastic series.
A win for G.H.S. to-
morrow can force a sudden
death playoff between the
and S.A.C. for the senior girls


championship. S.A.C.'s sole
loss this season went to
G.H.S.
Top scorer Kave Bastian
scored six of her 10 in the
first quarter yesterday as St.
Augustine's took the lead
which they held throughout.
Denise Moss who added seven
scored four in the second
quarter which saw the


winners control the half
30-11.
Defensive guard Denise
Whylly turned on her offence
and scored eight in the third
with Deborah Rose and
Pamela Wilson topping the
fourth period with four each.
All-rounder Laural
Lightbourn contributed eight
points and strong rebotmunding.
Winsome Davidson topped
St. John's with 12.

C. Saunders scored six of
her nine points in the fourth
quarter when H. Moultrie
added four of her eight
leading L.W. Young senior
girls to a 30-20 upset over
Aquinas College Aces.


Taking the lead by one
point at the end of the first
quarter, L.W. Young
outscored the Aces 9-2 in the
second quarter as 1. Miller
scored four. Jan Mortimer
scored Aquinas' sole basket.
Paula Grant and Joyce
Thompson came into the
attack for the Aces in the
third period moving them
four behind.
However, unable to stifle
the offensive power of
Saunders and Moultrie, the
Aces settled for their fourth
loss of the season. Joyce
topped the Aces with even
points. Paula added four and
Shane Sweeting three.


We want gold


- volleyball coach

By GLADSTONE I HL RSTON


42


get


Games




tickets
FORTY-TWO athletes comprising six sports will
represent the Bahamas in the Central American and
Caribbean Games in Santo Domingo next week. The
contingent leaves Monday.
The six sports are: athletics, yachting, boxing,
swimming, volleyball and soccer.


"We feel that persons on this
particular team are fully aware L
of the past performances of
our athletes in the social area
and they will understand that
the Olympic Association will
not tolerate adverse reports
against individuals,"
commented Mr. Arlington
Butler president of the B.OA.
Mr Butler pointed out that
the Association has taken very
strict stands at these games and
has not chosen anybody who
would not qualify to become
competitors or who would not
be L.'inpcitii.e in their events.
"To this extent, we are
particularly happy with the
team that we are sending." Mr.
Butler said. "We are fully
aware of our position and we
are fully aware of the country's
position in anticipating good
performances."
Mr. Gerald Cash, senior vice
president of the B.O.A. will be
Chef de Mission, Mr. Simeon
Bowe, president of the
Bahamas Football Association
will be general manager, Dr.
Norman Gay, president of the
Bahamas Volleyball Federation
will be team doctor, and Miss
Elaine Thompson the
chaperon. Mr. Tom Grant,.
public relations officer of the
B.V.F. will also accompany the
contingent as an official.
Explaining the financial
position of the B.O.A. Mr.
Butler said that a total of
$42,000 was raised from their


By GLADSTONE THURSTON
house raffle held last year.
However, $30,000 had to be
paid for the house itself leaving
a net profit of $12,000.
This sum, Mr. Butler said,
would have ordinarily been
available to them for the games
situation "but we were
confronted with a number of
outstanding bills since the last
games in Munich ... the money
for those bills have been
reserved.'"
However, the B.O.A. has
been fortunate in putting
together approximately
$20,000 towards the cost of
travel next week though the
cost wi'l be $30,000. Thus, it is
nece.,:ry for the B.O.A. to
appeal to the public, Mr. Butler
said.
Two cheques of $1,000 each
have been donated to the
B.O.A. by Paradise Island
Limited/Resorts International
and an anonymous donor who
was described as a keen
advocate of sports. Mr.
Frederick Gooson also
contributes $25. All
contributions are welcome.


Agony for England
KINGSTON The West ,of 353.
Indies were 583 for nine
wickets at lunch today, the This was despite some
third day of the second fighting bowling and keen
cricket test, in reply to fielding by the England team
England's first innings total yesterday
teA~teA^ _A_^~k^..Jfe4fe-4te-f d fe


.arnarnarwaram k


Denise Moss moves in for a layup despite
Eulamae Archer's defensive attack.


w

St. John's


THI R4tt.\HAMAS- men and
ladie,, national ollCevball
squads will face competition of
a standard expected in the
Central American and
SCaribbean Games wlien these
pla\ a three match series with
the New York State
Champions beginning on
F:rida'
Coming off Region Six
championship v victories last
week during the Semrninoli'
Invitational Tournament the
national teams under the
direction of international
co:ich Gene Sel/nick lease
Monday for Sn to )oningo
the home of the (lames.
Fhe ladies squad tackle the
New Yorkers in the first match
7:30 On Saturday the men
squad take the test with a
double header on Sunday All
games will be played at the
Donald lav is (G in.
I lhese matches Selinick
pointed out will give him an
opportunity to find out lust
how good the players are since
the% started practising. how
muhJi they came along and
what the' learned. "When I see
this then I could find out how
to improve what the\ haven't
learned." he said.
lhe New Yorkers who are
ranked in the top ten in the
,outintr., use a six /ero fast
attack like Sel/nick has been
teaching the Bahamas' teams.
"lhiey are about ten times as
strong as the Miami teams,"'
said Set/nick "This is the right
team for both the guys and the
dmm W


Also Sel/nick said that this
weekend's games is a good test
to see what players lie can use
under situations.
Victory it] the recent
tournament Selnick said.
proved for the men's team that
they can win. "Ihis was
siti .iliii, they didn't know
that the, could have done."
Selznick has his eyes pinned
on a gold medal. "We're
working for a gold medal. I
don't work for anything less. If
the guys co-operate and really
put a lot of effort into it
which they are they may be
ready for this." he said.
The only team he is
worrying about is Cuba.
Ranked first in the Caribbean,
Cuba has shown their strength
by beating many good teams.
Dr. Norman (;a\. president
of the Bahamas Volleyball
Federation and former coach
of the ladies squad has high
hopes in their coming out on
top.

MRS. THELMA
LOCKHART
The picture on this page last
night showing jockey Anthony
Saunders receiving a cheque for
his winning ride on King Fire
in Saturday's Fashion Boutique
C'up race was incorrectly
captioned. The cheque was
presented by Mrs. Thelma
Lockhart and not Vivian
Thompson as reported. We
apologise for the error.


WI


Saturday Only February 23rd.


SIZE


Lichine Beaujolais
B & G Nuits-Saint-George, Vintage
B & G Nuits-Saint-George,
Calvet Beaune Clos de la Feguine
Drouhin Pommard, 1969
Drouhin Pommard, 1969
Engel Clos Vougeot, 1969
Engel Vosne-Romanee, 1969
Hallgarten Nuits-Saint-Georges, 1970
Latour Chateau Corton Grancey, 1969
Lichine Gevrey-Chambertin
Lichine Gevrey-Chambertin

Sichel Nuits-Saint-Georges, 1966
Sichel Nuits-Saint-Georges, 1966
Lichine Chateauneuf-du-Pape
Cruse St. Julien, Non-vintage
Eschenauer St. Julien
Chateau Pontet-Canet, 1968
Chateau Ripeau, 1969
Chateau Ransan Segla, 1968
Cruse Barsac, Non-vintage
Cruse Sauternes, Non-vintage


Calvet Rose
Calvet Rose
Chateau Chet de Selle

Bollinqer Brut, 1966


Charles Heidsieck, 1966
Charles Heidsieck Rose, 1966
Krug Brut, Non-vintage
Montvillers Brut, Non-vintage
Tacttinger Brut, 1966

Veuve Clicquot, 1964-66
Veuve Clicquot, Non-vintage
Veuve Clicquot, 1962, 1966
Veuve Clicquot Grande Dame
Bosca Asti Spumante
Torres Gran Sangre de Toro
Riscal


pts
5ths
pts
5ths
5ths
pts
5ths
5ths
pts
5ths
5ths
pts

5ths
pts
ots
pts
pts
pts
pts
Sths
5ths
pts


REG. SALE
PRICE PRICE


$ 4.10
$ 9.00
$ 4.70
$10.30
$.9.00
$.5.00
$15.00
$ 9.30
$ 3.45
$12.00
$ 8.50
$ 4.45

$10.00
$ 5.20
$ 3.45

$ 4.20
$ 4.20
$ 3.70
$12.00
$ 6.75
$ 3.85


5ths $ 2.80
pts $ 1.60
pts $ 3.00

pts $ 7.55


pts
5ths
5ths
pts
5ths

pts
pts
pts
Sths
5ths
5ths
pts


$ 6.65
$13.00
$12.30
$ 4.80
$11.30

$26.00
$ 5.65
$ 6.65
$16.50
$ 2.75
$ 3.70
$ 1.95


1.50
5.00
3.00
6.00
6.00
3.50
9.00
6.00
2.50
7.00
5.00
3.00


$ 5.00
$ 2.50
$ 2.00
$1.50
$ 1.50
$ 3.50
$ 2.50
$ 7.00
$2.50
$ 2.50

$ 2.00
$ 1.50
$ 2.00

$ 5.00


$ 5.00
$10.00
$ 9.00
$ 3.00
$ 8.00

$15.00
$ 3.50
$ 4.00
$12.00
$ 1.50
$ 2.00
$ 1.50


SHOP EARLY-BEAT THE RUSHI



BAHAMAS BLENDERS

Warehouse J.F.K. Drive

^ysyy^ww ffvw-yy ripm


IE SALE

9 a.m. 4 p.m.


rT






n i









us7Mans


IN THEI SiPR-ME (COURT 1-F 1973
FTHE COMMONWEALTH
O Fli1 :BAHIIAMAS No 40
EQL ITY SIDE
NOTICE
THE QUIETING TITLES ACT.

Fhe Petituon of JI-\\NI BRNIT I (\lASH of the
Island of New Providence in the Commonwealth of
Fhc Bahaimas. tHousewife in respect o:-
ALL that piece parcel or lot of1 ind situate on
(Cllum Road in the Settlement of Hope lTown
on' the Island of Elbow Cay Abaco in the
( ommonwealth of The Bahamas which said
piece parcel or lot of land is bounded as follows
NORTHW)R ARDLY by land now or formerly the
property of W ii on Roberts I ASIWARDLY by
the Sea at High Water Mark SOL'IITHWARDLY
SO.ean ILane AND WFSI WARI)IY b'y G(illunm
R -! andl running thereon For -t\ two and Forty
undr'dths (42 40) feet 'which said piece parcel
,r ;oi of land is coloured Pink on the plan
threof filed in this matter in the Registry of the
Supreme Court in the City of Nassaui
it \\lt H RNI T-If CASH, the Petitioner in this
.,ater claims to be the owner in fee simple in
pos-,'siOn t of the piece parcel or lot of land and tias
n.id c application to the Supreme Court of the said
Ba ni a Islands under Section 3 of The Quicting
cities Act -\ to haec her title to the said piece parcel
or it 1of land investigated and the nature and
:xtent thereof determined anid declared in a
C ertficate oft Iitle to be granted by thle Court in
iccordanctice with the provisions of tile said Act.
COPII S of the said plan may be inspected during
normal office hours at the following places:-
1u The Registry of The Supreme Court. Public
Square. in the City of Nassau aforesaid:
Ih1 The Chambers of Messrs. Hliggs & Kelly. 324
Bay Street. in the City of Nassau iaforesaid
Attorney for the Petitioner.
.,i Ihc Office of the Conunmissioner at Marsh
Harbour. Abaco.
d i hI lie Office of the Justice of the Peace at I lope
ftlow ) i1. Abaco.
NOTII i, hereby given that any person having
dower or a right to dower or an adverse claim or a
claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or
before the 15th day of April 1974 file in the
Supreme Court in the City of Nissau .if ir-esaid and
serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a
statement of his claim in the prescribed form.
verified by an affidavit to be filed therewith.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a
statement of his claim on or before the 15th day of
April. 1974 will operate as a bar to such claim.

HIGGS & KELLY
324 Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner.


-- -I -I c-i- -I I : II-I= I- I 1 -2 ---------- I~-- -


.~.1


W, W l -- W, AJ ", "


- -um o ma


...~ .~-.. -- I -- ---


(The Crilnnlre


Wednesday.


p


J


V,


Results and payoffs at
Hobby Horse:
FIRST RACE 5 Furlongs
1. Sweetness (41 A Saunders
$3.10. $2.65, $2.55.
2. Al's Twist (7) G. Bain
$2.90, $2.60
3. Lady Fly (2) M. Lewis
$3.65
SECOND RACE 2 Furlongs
1. Lucky Girl (9) A. Saunders
$6.40, $4.00, $2.40
2. Lil Jess (7) S. McNeil $4.50,
$3
3. Royal Prince (5) Ant.
Saunders $4.30
Daily Double (4-9) $9.85
First Quinella (6-7) $8.05
THIRD RACE 6 Furlongs
1. Sea Fury (6) D. Patel
$11.35, $6.10, $3,45
2. Liberty Bell (7) J. Bain
$3.25, $2.60
3. Tamette Dial (3) --P.
Newbold $4.40
Second Quinella (6-7) $16.70
FOURTH RACE 6 Furlongs
1. The Stranger (2) J. Bain
$13.05, $8.55, $5.25
2. Casper's Child (7) K. Johnson
$4.60, $5.60
3. Gunsmoke (5) G. Serchwell
$4.90
Third Quinella (2-7) $35.05
FIFTH RACE 10 Furlongs
1. Miss Glo (1) A. Saunders
$4.75, $3.25, $4.35
2. Tamico (2) J. Bain $3,45,
$4.80
3. Miss Millie (4) M. Brown
$22.85
Fourth Quinella (1-2) $9.40
SIXTH RACE 5 Furlongs
1. Cigarillo (9) Ant. Saunders
$11.55. $5.40, $5.05
2. Scare Um (5) S. McNeil
$4.90. $5.25
3. Miss Pumpkin (4) A.
Saunders $3.90
Fifth Quinella (5-9) $39.20
SEVENTH RACE 5 Furlongs
1. Lady Chester (4) Ant.
Saunders $3.50. $3.3S. $2.75.
2. Mighty Joe Young (8) K.
Johnson $8.75, $4.75
3. Time & Tide (1) J. Horton
$4.75
Sixth Quinella (4 8) $16.95
EIGHT RACE 5 Furlongs 1. My
Account (9) -- A. Saunders $7.20,
$4.05, $2.95
2. Rango's Image (8) R
Ferguson $6.25, $4.30
3. Knightly Manor (3) G. Bain
$3.00
Seventh Quinella (8-9) $26 25